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Result of search for "sally ann":

BIG SWEET TATERS IN SANDY LAND. AKA and see "Great Big Taters in Sandy Land," "Sally Ann." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Ozark Mountains. A traditional tune usually known as "Great Big Taters in Sandy Land," collected in the Ozarks and recorded under this title by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's. A version of the well-known "Sally Ann."

BRIAR PATCH. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Texas. One of the "Sally Ann" variants, though at least one tune by this title is a variant of "Sally Johnson."

DINEO. AKA and see "Di-nee-o, Ladies," "Darneo," "Sally Ann." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, southwestern Va. A Major. Standard. The name "Dineo" is particular to the Franklin/Floyd County area of western Virginia; it is more widely known under the title "Sally Ann." Di-nee-o = a variant of 'Dinah'? Recorded by Herbert Halpern for the Library of Congress (2739-A-3), 1939, from the playing of Taylor Houston and the Houston Bald Knob String Band (Franklin County, Va.) during a dance. Rounder 0057, Ted Boyd & Charlie Woods - "Old Originals, Vol. 1" (1978).

GREASE THAT WOODEN LEG, SALLY ANN. Old-Time, Fiddle Tune. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. It is perhaps a version of "Sally Ann."

GREAT BIG TATER(S) IN SANDY LAND. AKA - "Great Big Taters." AKA and see "Sandyland," "Better Quit Kickin My Dog Around," "Sail Away Ladies." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi. A Major: G Major (W.E. Claunch, Kuntz, Sweet). AEAE or Standard. ABB (Rankin): ABB' (Phillips/Wills): AABB' (Sweet): AABBCC (Phillips/Eck Robertson). The melody is directly related to "Sail Away Ladies" (and thus to "Sally Ann") and some indicate it is merely a variant of that tune, though the title "Great Big Taters" and its variations is considerably disseminated in the South and Old Southwest. Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner knew a tune by this title in the very odd key of C Major (for this kind of tune), which he learned from Frank Pruitt, about 1900. The title was one of those in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954, and it was mentioned in an article entitled "Fiddler's Jubilee" in the Fayette Banner (Fayette County, Alabama) of January 2, 1908 (Cauthen, 1990).
***
Another of Ira Ford's (1940) improbable tales goes: "From a fiddler who played 'Great Big Taters in Sandy Land' as his favorite tume, comes the following tradition obtained by the writer thirty years ago. The fiddler was then a man more than seventy years old, who had 'larned' the 'chune' when a you fellow of twenty, from the 'feller' who composed it (c. 1860?). It appears that Steve, the composer homesteaded 160 acres of land in the rough sandstone hills in a remote section of the country, it being the only land left open for homesteading. Steve was engaged to be married to a beautiful young girl of the community and the wedding was to take place as soon as he developed his farm and got his place built. He broke the new ground, which was all in patches on the tops of the hills, the remainder of the farm consisting of steep rocky hillsides and gullies. As his first crop he planted oats and corn. The oats only came up a few inches and the corn did not even make 'nubbins'. So the wedding had to be postponed. The boys teased Steve considerably about trying to make a living on the sandy land, but he took it all good-naturedly, as did the girl. That same year there was a shortage in the potato crop, and, as the land around there was not suitable for potato growing, the farmers had to pay exorbitant prices for the potatoes they had to ship in. Betty, Steve's girl, suggested that he plant potatoes for his next crop. The following spring he planted all his ground accordingly, to the great amusement of his friends. But their amusement was changed to astonishment when that fall Steve harvested 300 bushels to the acre of high grade potatoes and sold them to the farmers as a good price. The wedding was elaborately celebrated with a big supper, followed by a dance that lasted until morning. This tune, composed by Steve and afterwards played at all the dances, was commonly known as 'Steve's Tune', but it was Betty who originated the verses. To get even with those who had 'poked fun' at Steve and his sand farm, she invented the verses, singing them at the dance that night much to the amusement of the guests."
***
Thede says the Henry Hilderbrand referred to in the lyrics which she collected with the Oklahoma version given in her book was a farmer who lived near West Plains, Missouri, and that Eli was a mule.
***
Great big tater in the sandy land,
Plow it up Henry Hilderbrand;
Great big tater in the sandy land,
Git there Eli of you can. (Thede)
***
Great big taters in sandy land,
We-all dig 'em out as fast as we can.
The folds all buy 'em from a foolish man,
Raisin' great big taters in sandy land.
***
Sow them oats, but you can't get a stand,
Corn won't grow in that sandy land.
Folks won't think you're much of a man,
If you can't make a livin' on sandy land. (Ford)
***
Sift the meal and save the bran,
Goodby gals I'm goin' in
Raise big taters in sandy land,
Raise big taters in sandy land. (W.E. Claunch)
***
Sources for notated versions: Eck Robertson (Texas) and Earl Collins (Oklahoma/Texas) [Brody, Phillips]; Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]; Jubal Anderson (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 125. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 39. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Music), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 103 (two versions). Rankin, 1985; Notes to "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo American Fiddle Music from Mississippi." Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 43, pg. 16. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 75. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 80-81. Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." County 517, Eck Robertson and J.B. Cranfill- "Texas Farewell." Folkways 31062, Ship in the Clouds- "Old Time Instrumental Music" (1978. Learned from Bruce Molsky). Gennet 3255 (78 RPM_, Sam Long (1926. Appears as "Sandy Land"). Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH-002, W.E. Claunch - "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo-American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1985). Rebel 1515, Curly Ray Cline- "My Little Home in West Virginia." Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson- "Master Fiddler." Victor 40205 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1929. 2nd fiddle by Dr. J.B. Cranfill).
T:Great Big Taters in Sandy Land
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz
K:G
e/f/|g/f/g/e/ e/(A/d)|(e/ e) (e/ e)(e|e/)f/e/(A/ d/)A/B/(B/|d>)B dd|
g/a/g/e/ e/(A/d)| )|(e/ e) (e/ e)(e|e/)f/e/(A/ d/)A/B|A>B (A A/):|
|:(A/|B/)A/B/B/ A/D/G|(G/ B) (G/ B)B/c/|d/B/d/A/ B/D/E|(A/ B) (A/ B>)(A|
B/)A/B/B/ A/D/G|(G/ B) (G/ B)(D|D/)D/B A/B/A/(D/|A/ B) (G/ B)z/:|
|:(D|D/)D/B A/(D/G)|(G/ B) (G/ B/)A/B|1 D/D/B/(B/ A/)B/A/D/|
(G/ B) (G/ B):|2 d/A/B/B/ A/B/A/D/|G/ [GB] G/ [GB]||

MISSISSIPPI SQUARE DANCE - PART 2. AKA and see "Sally Ann." Old-Time, Breakdown. OKeh 45533 (78 RPM), 1930, Freeny's Barn Dance Band (twin fiddle band from Leake County, Mississippi).

PORK FAT MAKES MY CHICKEN TAN. See "Sally Ann" [1] (Recorded sources).

RAGTIME ANNIE [1]. AKA and see "Raggedy Ann (Rag)," "Bugs in the 'Taters." Old-Time, Canadian; Breakdown. USA, very widely known. D Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & G Major ('C' part). Standard. AAB (Phillips/1989): AA'B (Sweet): AABB (Ford, Welling): AA'BB (Ruth): AA'BB' (Krassen): ABCC (Christeson): AABCC (Jarman, Johnson): AA'BCC' (Reiner & Anick): AA'BBC (Messer): AA'BB'CC (Miskoe & Paul): AA'BB'CC' (Phillips/1995). A popular tune and a staple of the North American fiddling repertoire. "Ragtime Annie is almost certainly a native American dance tune, possibly less than 100 years old" (Krassen, 1973), in fact, rumors persist that it first was heard played by Texas fiddlers around 1900-1910. Guthrie Meade has a similar point of view regarding the tune's antiquity, noting that this very popular piece appears in many relatively modern collections, but not in early ones. Reiner & Anick (1989) suggest the tune is derived from a piano piece called "Raggedy Ann Rag," and catagorize it as a 'Midwest' and 'Southwest' tune. One "Raggedy Ann Rag" was written by Joe "Fingers" Carr and published in 1952, far too late to have been the original for "Ragtime Annie," which was first recorded by Texas fiddler Eck Robertson (along with Henry C. Gilliland) in June, 1922, (backed with "Sally Goodin'" it was the best-selling country music record for that year), and a few years later by the Texas duo Solomon and Hughes. It was later recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's.
***
There is often some confusion among fiddlers whether to play the tune in two or three parts, and both are correct depending on regional taste. Eck Robertson's version was in three parts (the third part changes key to G major) as are many older south-west versions, and some insist this form was once more common that the two-part version often heard in more recent times. Other Texas fiddlers only learned the two-part version. Glen Godsey writes: "Of the fiddlers I knew in Amarillo in the 1940's-1950's, Eck was the only
one who played the third part. I learned only two parts as a kid, and we always played just two parts for the square dances. I only learned the third part many years later from Eck's recording." Little Dixie, Missouri, fiddler Howard Marshall says the third part has been a vital part of the tune in Missouri for many many years, offering that the renowned regional fiddler Taylor McBaine remembered playing it that way as a child in the very early 1920s. Marshall reports that local speculation is that the third part was inserted to relieve a square dance fiddler from the stress of keeping the main part of the tune going through a long set. Some feel the third part is reminiscent of "Little Brown Jug," although there can be considerable variation from fiddler to fiddler in the way third parts are rendered.
***
"Ragtime Annie" was the first tune learned by itinerant West Virginia fiddler John Johnson (1916-1996), originally from Clay County, from fiddler Dorvel Hill who lived in a coal-mining town called Pigtown, not far from Clay, W.Va.
***
I was bashful back then and wouldn't go in anybody's house hardly. I'd
sit on the railroad and listen to Dorvel play the fiddle at night. And I
learned most all of Dorvel's tunes. I just set down there and listened
to all his tunes and then go home and play them. (Michael Kline, Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed. 1999).
***
See the related "Going Uptown." Sources for notated versions: African-American fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Hector Phillips [Reiner & Anick]; Alexander Robertson [Phillips/1995]; transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.) who "played (the tune) way back in Canada" [Miskoe & Paul]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 171-172. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 44. Frets Magazine, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle," July 1980; pg. 64 (includes variations). Jarman, 1944; pgs. 2-3. Johnson, Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 12. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 48-49. Messer, 1980; No. 10, pg. 1 (appears as "Raggedy Ann"). Miskoe & Paul, 1994; pg. 35. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 107. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 131. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 123, pg. 43. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 75. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 5 (with variations). Caney Mountain CEP 212 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.). Columbia 15127-D (78 RPM), 1926, Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers (Posey Rorer, fiddler). County 507, The Kessinger Brothers (Clark Kessinger, fiddler) - "Old Time Fiddle Classics." County 509, "Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers, Vol. 2." County 725, "The Riendeau Family: Old-Time Fiddling from Old New England." County 733, "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways 8826, Pers Four--"Jigs and Reels." Fretless 200a, Yankee Ingenuity--"Kitchen Junket" (1977). Front Hall 01, Bill Spence and Fennigs All-Stars--"The Hammered Dulcimer." Heritage 048, Gordon Tanner - "Georgia Fiddle Bands" (Brandywine 1982). Marimac 9110, Floyd County Ramblers - "It'll Never Happen Again" (orig. rec. 1930). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers Association 002, Taylor McBaine - "Boone County Fiddler" (played in three parts). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling." Rounder 0100, Byron Berline - "Dad's Favorites." Vanguard VSD 79170, "Doc Watson and Son." Victor LPV 552, Eck Robertson - "Early Rural String Bands" (a reissue of the original 1922 recording). Victor 19149 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1922). Victor Vi V-40244 (78 RPM), {Ervin} Solomon & {Joe} Hughes (1929. A twin fiddler version). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999). Voyager, Benny Thomasson - "Say Old Man Can You Play the Fiddle?"
T:Ragtime Annie
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
FE|DFBF AFBF|DFBF A2FE|DEFG ABAF|A2c2c2cB|
ABcA B2cB|ABcA BAcB|ABcd egfe|d2dc d2:|]
fg|a2ab afd2|A6 fg|a2ab agf2|g6 ef|
gfef gfef|gagf e2ef|gagf edcB|A6 fg|
a2ab afdB|A2AB A2 AA|d4 =c4|B6 A2|B2 b2 b2ag|
f2a2 a2gf|A2ef gfec|d2=c2 B2A2||
K:G
:G6 AB|c6 cB|A2f2 f2ef|gfga gedc|D2B2 B2AB|E2 c2 c2cB|
A2f2 f2ef|gfga g2:|
Variant of 'C' part from Dave Barton:
|: "G" B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| "G" gage dBAG
| B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| gfga g4:|

ROCK THE CRADLE JOE [1]. See also related part 'B' of "Sally Ann" (B version). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Patrick & Franklin Counties, Virginia; North Carolina, West Virginia. D Major. Standard. AABB. Most modern "revival" versions of the tune come from the playing of J.W. "Babe" Spangler of Meadows of Dan, Virginia, who recorded it in the late 1940's. The following ditty is sometimes sung to the tune in old-time tradition:
***
('B') Rock the cradle Lucy, rock the cradle low,
Rock the cradle Lucy, Rock the Cradle Joe.
***
Rock the cradle Lucy, rock the cradle high,
Rock the cradle Lucy, don't let that baby cry. (Kuntz)
***
('A') Can't get up, can't get up,
Can't get up in the morning;
What we gonna do if the baby cries?
Rock the cradle Joe.
***
('B') Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock the cradle Joe;
Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock it nice and slow. (Johnson)
***
What'll we do when the baby cries
I don't know;
What'll we do when the baby cries
Rock that cradle Joe.
***
Variations of the words, however, were in tradition as "Uncle Joe Cut Off His Toe," a nursery rhyme which has variants with verses which also resemble some of the "Old Joe Clark" verses:
***
Uncle Joe cut off his toe
And hung it up to dry;
The ladies began to laugh
And Joe began to cry.
***
Chorus:
Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock the cradle, Joe.
'I will not rock, I shall not rock,
For the baby is not mine.' (Version 'C', Number 97, The Frank C. Brown Collection Of North Carolina Folklore, Volume 3)
***
Lani Herrmann finds a similar verse in the biography of Jennie Devlin (1865-1952) by her granddaughter Katharine D. Newman (Urbana, IL: Univ of Illinois Press, 1995; "an Illini Book"). Allan Lomax recorded this version as a recitation by "Grandma Deb," one of the names by which Jennie Devlin was known. It seems to echo the North Carolina version:
***
O, rock the cradle, John,
O, rock the cradle, John,
There's many a man
Rocks another man's child
When he thinks he's rocking his own.
***
Apparently a "Rocke the Cradle, John" "was licensed by Laurence Price in 1631 in England, and there is an Irish song called "The Old Man Rocking the Cradle." Sources for notated versions: Alan Block (N.H.) [Spandaro]; Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Kuntz]; Babe Sengler (Va.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 232. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician: Occasional Collection of Old-Timey Fiddle Tunes for Hammer Dulcimer, Fiddle, etc), No. 2, 1982/1988; pg. 10. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 333-334. Sing Out, Vol. 36, No. 2, August 1991; pg. 77. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 169. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 16. Tennvale 004, James Leva and Bruce Molsky- "An Anthology." County 201, The Old Virginia Fiddlers- "Rare Recordings 1948-49." June Appal 015, Plank Road String Band- "Vocal and Instrumental Blend." Kicking Mule 213, David Winston- "Southern Clawhammer Banjo."
T:Rock the Cradle Joe [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:D
f/g/|aa/g/ f/e/f/g/|aa/g/ f/e/f/g/|aa/b/ a/g/e|[Af]>[Ag] [Af][Ae]|[Af]f/e/ d/e/g/e/|
ff/e/ de/f/|g/f/e/d/ c/A/B/c/|d>e d:|
|:c/B/|A[A/e/][A/e/] c[c/e/][c/e/]|d/c/d/e/ [d/f/]d/e/f/|g/f/g/f/ g<a|f>g f/e/d/B/|
A[A/e/][A/e/] c[c/e/][c/e/]|d/c/d/e/ [d/f/]d/e/f/|g/f/e/d/ c/A/B/c/|d>e d:|

SAIL AWAY LADIES [1A]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Kentucky, Tennessee. G Major. Standard. ABB (Brody, Ford): AABB (Spandaro): AABBCC (Phillips). The tune is related to the numerous versions of "Sally Ann" played in the keys of A and G Major. According to Guthrie Meade (1980), the tune is identified with the south central Kentucky and middle Tennessee locals. The title also appears in a list of the standard tunes in the square dance fiddler's repertoire, according to A.B. Moore in his 1934 book "History of Alabama." Southern Kentucky fiddler Henry L. Bandy recorded the tune for Gennett in 1928, though it was unissued, however, the earlest recordings were Uncle Bunt Stevens (1926-without words) and Uncle Dave Macon (1927-with words). Paul Wells (Middle Tennessee State University) states that the song was collected around the turn of the 20th century and seems to have been common to both black and white traditions. Tom Paley (former New Lost City Ramblers member) believes the verses of "Sail Away Ladies" to be typical floating verses, and go:
***
If ever I get my new house done,
(I'll) give my old one to my son.
***
Children, don't you grieve and cry.
You'll be angels, bye and bye.
***
Come along, girls, and go with me.
We'll go back to Tennessee.
***
(I) got the news from Shallow (or "Charlotte") Town.
Big St. Louis is a-burning down.
***
I chew my tobacco and I spit my juice.
I love my own daughter but it ain't no use.
(Paul Mitchell and others believe the words in Macon's last line sometimes heard as own daughter is really Dona, pronounced Dough-nee in the American South, a Spanish/Italian word for a mature love object, a woman.).
***
Another version of this last couplet goes:
***
I chew my tobacker and I swaller my juice
Sail away, ladies, sail away.
I'd like to go to Heaven, but it ain't no use.
Sail away, ladies, sail away.
***
African-American collector Thomas Talley, writing in his book Negro Folk Rhymes (reprinted in 1991, edited by Charles Wolfe), printed a similar but different text:
***
Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Nev' min' what dem white folks say,
May de Mighty bless you. Sail away!
***
Nev' min' what you daddy say,
Shake yo liddle foot an' fly away,
Nev' min' if yo' mammy say:
"De Devil'll git you." Sail away!
***
Kentucky fiddler H.L. Bandy sang the following lyric to "Sail Away Ladies", usually associated with the tune "Old Miss Sally":
***
I asked that girl to be my beau
She hacked at me with a garden hoe
***
I asked that girl to be my wife,
She took at me with a butcher knife
***
Uncle Dave Macon also included a chorus which went, "Don't she rock, Die-Dee-Oh?" but Paley notes that other old recordings have variants like "Don't she rock, Darneo?" and even "Don't she rock 'em, Daddy-O?" (which seems to harken to the beatnik era). Some unknown "revival" wag re-interpreted Macon's lines as:
***
Don't sheetrock the patio (x3)
Sail away, ladies, sail away
***
Wolfe (1991) finds the song in several older collections: Brown (1:153), Brewer (165) and a 1903 collection by William W. Newell, Games and Songs of American Children (170). It also appears in a modern collection of African-American songs and games, Jones and Hawes's Step It Down (174, as "Horse and Buggy"). Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (N.Y.) [Brody]: Uncle Bunt Stevens (Tenn.) [Phillips, Spandaro]. See Journal of the Society for Ethnomusicology, #1, 1968; Linda Burman - "The Technique of Variation in an American Fiddle Tune (Sail Away Lady)." Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 241. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 35. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 207. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 32. Columbia 15071-D (78 RPM), "Uncle Bunt Stevens" (Tenn.) {1926}. County 521, "Uncle Dave Macon: Original Recordings 1925-1935." Folkways FA 2395, New Lost City Ramblers- "Vol. 5." Folkways FA-2951, Uncle Bunt Stevens - "Anthology of American Folk Music, Vol. 2, Social Music" (1952). Gennet Records, Master #14361, Henry L. Bandy (1928. Not released). Kicking Mule 213, Susan Cahill- "Southern Clawhammer Banjo." Morning Star 45004, H.L. Bandy (southern Ky.) - "Wish I Had My Time Again." Rounder 0074, Highwoods String Band- "No. 3 Special" (1976. Learned from Uncle Dave Macon's recording). Rounder 0193, Rodney Miller - "Airplang" (1985). Vocalation 5155 (78 RPM), Uncle Dave Macon (1927).
T:Sail Away Ladies
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:G
g2ga g2d2 | e3d e4 | g2g2 edB2 | d6 d2 | e2ed B2G2 | A3G G4 | B2BE D2E2 | G3G G4 :|
|: B2BG A2G2 | B3A G4 | B2GE D2E2 | G3G G4 :|

SAIL AWAY LADIES [1B]. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA. G Major. Standard. AAB (Phillips): AABB (Brody). See also the related tune "Sally Ann." Source for notated version: Kenny Baker [Brody, Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 242. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 207. County 730, Kenny Baker- "Baker's Dozen." County 705, Otis Burris- "Virginia Breakdown" (Brody's version '1C').

SAIL AWAY LADIES [3]. AKA and see "Chinquapin." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Round Peak, North Carolina. E Minor/G Major. Standard. AA'B. This melody, almost entirely played over an E minor chord (with a G major cadence in the 'B' part) is unrelated to the "Sally Ann" tune family, unlike so many other tunes with the title "Sail Away Ladies." The source for the tune, Mt. Airy, North Carolina, fiddler Tommy Jarrell, learned this single tune from Round Peak fiddler Preston 'Pet'/'Pat' McKinney, whom he chanced to meet in the road when Jarrell was age sixteen and on his way to a dance with his fiddle. McKinney, on his way to get some whiskey, hailed him and noting the instrument said "They say you fiddle, son." Jarrell handed him the fiddle which was in ADAE tuning (the 'normal' tuning for Jarrell) and McKinney re-tuned it to standard tuning and played "Sail Away Ladies." Jarrell asked him the title and to play it again, and by the end had it fixed in his mind (see Peter Anick, "An Afternoon with Tommy Jarrell, 1982," Fiddler Magazine, Spring 1995, and notes on the tune appearing with Jarrell's recording on County 756). Source for notated version: Tommy Jarrell (Mt. Airy, N.C.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 207. County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1976). Heritage V, Roscoe Parish (Galax, Va., under the title "Chinquapin"). In the repertoire of Luther Davis, Galax, Va.

SALLOW OLD WOMAN, THE. See "Cailleach Odhar."

SALLY ANN [1]. AKA and see "Dineo." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina. D Major. Standard. AABB. One version of the tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. See also related tunes "Big Sweet 'Taters in Sandy Land," "Great Big Tatters in Sandy Land/Lot," "Sandy Land," "Sail Away Ladies" (Kentucky/Tennessee), "Wished I Had My Time Again" (Ky.). One version of the tune goes by the name "Dineo" in the Franklin/Floyd County area of southwestern Virginia. Among the many early recordings of the tune was a version by the Ashe County, North Carolina, string band Frank Blevins and His Tar Hell Rattlers, a name made up on the spot at the 1927 Columbia recording session in Atlanta for 16 year old fiddler Frank Blevins, his older brother and guitarist Ed Blevins and banjo player Fred Miller. The band's playing was inspired by a few shots of corn liquor from a convenient jug. Source for notated version: John Ashby (Virginia) [Brody, Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 244. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 209. County 405, "The Hillbillies." County 727, John Ashby- "Old Virginia Fiddling." Folkways FA2434, Norman Edmonds and the Old Timers - "The 37th Old-Time Fiddlers' Convention at Union Grove, North Carolina" (1961). Library of Congress (2741-B-1), 1939, J.W. 'Peg' Thatcher (Franklin County, Virginia). OKeh 40336 (78 RPM), The Hillbillies (1925). Old Hat Enterprises CD, "Music from the Lost Provinces" (1997). Revonah RS-932, The West Orrtanna String Band - "An Orrtanna Home Companion" (1978. Learned from Henry Reed via the Hollow Rock String Band). Rounder 0058, Clell Caudill- "Old Originals, Vol. II" (1978). Rounder CD0262, Mike Seegar - "Fresh Old-Time String Band Music" (1988. Appears as "Pork Fat Makes My Chicken Tan," an unusual variation by the Horseflies and the Agents of Terra, Ithaca, N.Y., string bands in which the fiddle is tuned EDAD). Yodel-Ay-Hee 020, Rafe Stefanini & Bob Herring - "Old Paint."

SALLY ANN [2]. See related tune "Rock the Cradle Joe." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, western North Carolina. D Major. ADAE. AABBCC. A very common Galax (Va.) area tune, though Bill Hicks (1972) notes that there are many versions of it played in the Galax/Mt. Airy area. In fact, there appears to be two distinct versions or strains of the tune, one characterized as the "Round Peak" version (named after the Round Peak, North Carolina, area south of Galax), and one typefied by the "Great Big Taters" versions. Musician and folklorist Alice Gerrard tells this story: "Back when I first got to Galax it seemed like everybody in the country could play an instrument. I remember going to one auction sale and this fellow was standing there--he had just walked over from across the street and was watching the sale going on, and Wade Ward handed him his fiddle and said, 'Here, play us a tune.' And the guy said, 'I don't know how to play.' Uncle Wade told him, 'Well, play Sally Ann--there's not a man alive that can't play Sally Ann.' So the fellow played 'Sally Ann', and it wasn't bad! To this day I don't know who the fellow was." (O.T.H., Vol. 3, No. 2, pg. 30). Tommy Jarrell recalled the tune he learned from his father, fiddler Ben Jarrell, along with Tony Lowe and Charlie Lowe, an adaptatin of the version he named "old-timey 'Sally Ann'. The newer version was rooted in the interplay between the ensamble playing of banjo and fiddle, rather than the more archaic solo fiddle style. Tommy learned the third part of the tune when he was about fourteen over the Virginia line, just north of where he lived in North Carolina, and brought it back to teach local musicians. Source for notated version: Tommy Jarrell (Mt. Airy, North Carolina) [Brody].
***
Sue's in the garden siftin' sand,
Sal's in bed with a hog-eyed man,
And I'm going home with Sally Ann,
Stay all night with Sally Ann.
***
Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 244. County 723, Cockerham, Jarrell, and Jenkins- "Back Home in the Blue Ridge." County 748, Tommy Jarrell- "Come and Go With Me." Marimac AHS #3, Glen Smith - "Say Old Man" (1990. Learned from Creed Smith). Rounder 0010, "Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972. Learned from Tommy Jarrell, Mt. Airy, N.C.).

SALLY ANN [3]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major (Brody): A Major (Kuntz): D Major (Johnson). Standard. ABB (Johnson): AABB (Brody, Kuntz, Phillips). Related to "Sail Away Ladies" and "Great/Raise Big Taters in Sandy Land". John McCutcheon notes it could easily be called "Scott County's Anthem" and was Beachard Smith's (1911-1981) signature tune. Sources for notated versions: Doc Roberts (east Kentucky) [Brody]; John McCutcheon, Fred Price, Dave Brody (Kuntz); James Chancellor [Phillips].
***
Sally's in the garden sifting sand,
Susie's upstairs with the hog-eyed man;
I'm a-goin home with Sally Anne,
I'm a-goin home with Sally Anne.
***
Goin' to a weddin'-up Sally Anne,
Great big weddin'-up Sally Anne;
I'm a-goin' home with Sally Anne,
I'm a-goin' home with Sally Anne.
***
Did you ever see a muskrat Sally Anne?
Draggin' his slick tail through the sand;
Pick it on the banjo Sally Anne,
I'm a-goin' home with Sally Anne. (Kuntz)
***
Sift that meal and save the bran,
I'm going to the wedding with Sally Anne.
Shake that little foot, Sally Anne,
You're a mighty good dancer, Sally Anne. {x2} (Johnson)
***
Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 245. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 344-345. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 208. Conqueror 7766 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts. Davis Unlimited 33015, Doc Roberts- "Classic Fiddle Tunes." Folk Legacy Records FSA-17, Hobart Smith - "America's Greatest Folk Instrumentalist" (appears as 2nd tune of "Banjo Group 1"). Folkways 2355, "Old Time Music at Clarence Ashley's, Vol. 1." Greenhays GR 710, John McCutcheon- "Fine Times at Our House" (1982). Kicking Mule 202, John Burke- "Fancy Pickin' and Plain Singing." Kicking Mule 205, Delaware Water Gap- "From the Rivers of Babylon to the Land of Jazz" (1978).

SALLY ANN [4]. AKA and see "Liza Jane." American, March (2/4 time). USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard. AB. The title floated to a fife march version of "Liza Jane" in southwestern Pennsylvania. Source for notated version: Lloyd Grimm (fifer from Westmoreland and Greene Counties, Pa., 1960) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 393C-D, pg. 377.

SALLY ANN JOHNSON. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Virginia, West Virginia. G Major. Standard. AABB (Brody): AABB' (Phillips). The title is often confused with "Sally Johnson," a different tune altogether. According to Guthrie Meade, this piece was a favorite competion number for St. Albans, West Virginia, fiddler Clark Kessinger at fiddlers' contests. Sources for notated versions: Ray Bierl (California) [Phillips]; Sally & John White (Scio, Oregon) [Songer]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 245. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 209. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 173. County 733, "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Folkways 31062, Ship in the Clouds- "Old Time Instrumental Music" (1978. Learned from the late Henry Reed, Glen Lyn, Virginia). Jabbour, Thompson, and Bradley- "Sandy's Fancy."

SALLY JOHNSON [1]. AKA and see "Katy Hill." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Virginia, Kentucky, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Georgia. G Major. Standard. AABB. The title is often confused with "Sally Ann Johnson," a different tune altogether in the same key. Thede says: "One of the fiddlers learned the strains of Sally Johnson in 1884 from a man of seventy who first learned it as a child of ten. It was a well-known tune during his childhood, and today nearly all fiddlers still play this tune." Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner identified it as an "old Texas tune. Buddy Durham, Ft. Worth (Texas) plays it best of all" (Shumway, 1990). The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by folklorist/musicologist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. The Kentucky/Tennessee duo of fiddler Leonard Rutherford and guitarist John Foster recorded the tune for Gennett in 1929, and though the record was issued a copy has never been found. Sources for notated versions: Eck Robertson (Texas) [Brody]; Orville Burns (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Herman Johnson [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 248. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 211. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 92. Columbia 15620 (78 RPM), 1930, Lowe Stokes (north Ga.). County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 517, The Lewis Brothers- "Texas Farewell." County 517, Solomon, Solomon, and Hughes- "Texas Farewell." County 544, Lowe Stokes- "Georgia Fiddle Bands." County 733, Clark Kessinger- "The Legend of Clark Kessinger" (appears as "Sally Ann Johnson"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" Front Hall FHR-017, Michael & McCreesh - "Dance, Like a Wave of the Sea" (1978). Gennett 6913 (78 RPM), Burnett and Rutherford (1929). Global Village C-302, Lazy Aces - "New York City's 1st Annual String Band Contest - November 1984". Marimac 9008, The Lazy Aces - "Still Lazy after all These Years" (1986). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Pete McMahon - "Kansas City Rag." Rounder 0046, Mark O'Connor- "National Junior Fiddle Champion." Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson- "Master Fiddler." Victor 19372 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (Texas) {1922} [appears as "Sallie Johnson"]. Victor Vi V-40244 (78 RPM), {Ervin} Solomon & {Joe} Hughes (1929. A twin fiddle version). Voyager 309, Benny & Jerry Thomasson - "The Weiser Reunion" (1993).

SUSANNA GAL [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Patrick County, Virginia, variation of version #1, which "has a different high part, closer to "Sally Ann," than versions collected in Grayson and Surry Counties" (Tom Carter and Barry Poss). An exception is Emmett Lundy, who even though a Grayson County, Virginia, fiddler, has a version similar to this. County 201, The Old Virginia Fiddlers - "Rare Recordings 1948-49". String 802, Emmett Lundy (1941 Library of Congress recordings). Marimac 9110, Dad Blackard's Moonshiners - "It'll Never Happen Again: Old Time String Bands, Vol. 1" (orig. rec. 1927).

TRIM THE VELVET ("Deasaid/Daesuig an Srol" or "Bearr an Veilbhit"). AKA and see "Geehan's Reel," "The Grazier," "Green Garters," "The Humours of Flip," "The Potlick," "The Railroad" [4], "Sally Kelly" [2]. Irish, Reel. G Major (Breathnach, Flaherty, Mallinson, Mulvihill): G Major/Mixolydian (O'Neill): D Major (Carlin). Standard. ABCD (Breathnach, Flaherty, Mallinson): AABCD (O'Neill/Krassen): AABBCCD (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABBCDD (Carlin, Mulvihill). The tune is called "Humours of Flip" in Goodman's collection. Breathnach finds the tune by the title "Kiss the Maid behind the Barrel" in a manuscript from Castleisland, County Kerry, although he says that name usually refers to a different, related tune. Whistle player Micho Russell, from Doolin, County Clare, knew it as "The Potlick." "Sally Kelly" is a Leitrim name Breathnach finds for "Trim the Velvet." Sligo/New York fiddler Michael Coleman played the 'D' part of the tune first. East Clare fiddler Paddy Caney's (a member of the famous Tulla Céilí Band) recorded version was used as the prestigious signature tune for Ciarán Mac Mathúna's Job of Journeywork program on Radio Éireann for several years. Sources for notated versions: Chicago police patrolman, piper and flute player John Ennis, originally from County Kildare [O'Neill]; piper Paddy Moloney (Ireland) [Breathnach]; fiddler Peter Horan (b. 1926, Kilavil, County Sligo) [Flaherty]; Ann Sheehy (Castleisland, County Kerry) [Mulvihill]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 85, pgs. 42-43. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 193, pg. 115. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 68. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 12, pg. 5. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 118. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1320, pg. 247. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 581, pg. 107. Claddagh Records CC2, "Paddy Moloney, The Chieftains" (1969). Green Linnet SIF-1110, Seamus Connolly & Brendan Mulvihill - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991).
T:Trim the Velvet
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (581)
K:G
G2 BG AGFD|G2 BG cAFA|G2 BG AGFD|defd cAFA:|
||dcde dBGB|dedB cAFA|dcde dBGB|defd cAFA|d>e dBGB|
dedB cAFA|d2 df e2 ef|gefd cAFA||
|:g2 gb a2 af|g2 ab c'baf|gfgb abaf|defd cAFA:|
||(3BAG dG BGGA|(3BAG dB cAFA|(3BAG dG BGGB|defd cAFA|
(3BAG dG BGGA|(3BAG dB cAFA|BG (3GFG cA (3AFA|defd cAFA||

WISH(ED) I HAD MY TIME AGAIN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. A Major. Standard. One part. Another variant of the "Sally Ann"-"Great Big Taters"-"Sandy Land"-"Sail Away Ladies" tune family. One of only two tunes (along with "Hook and Line") recorded for Gennett Records in 1933 by the Bath County, northeastern Kentucky duo of the Hatton Brothers. Soon after the session the brothers gave up music, and Jess, the younger brother (b. 1895), became a full-time minister in the Mormon Church. Source for notated version: Vertner Hatton [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 260. Kicking Mule 213, Susan Cahill, Bob Carlin & Bill Schmidt - "Southern Clawhammer Banjo." Morning Star 45004, Hatton Brothers - "Wish I Had My Time Again."


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