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The Fiddler's Companion

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ABBEY REEL, THE. AKA and see "The Moher Reel." Irish, Reel. A Major. Galway flute and concertina players Jack and (Fr.) Charlie Coen call this tune "Drag Her Around the Road." Green Linnet SIF 1011, "Playing with Fire: the Celtic Fiddle Collection" (1989). Green Linnet SIF 1092, "Liz Carroll" (1988. Liz plays the tune in the key of G Minor). Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Learned from Bronx flute player Jack Coen). Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

ALENA MACASKILL. Scottish, Pipe Tune. Green Linnet GLCD SIF 1176, The Tannahill Weavers - "Leaving St. Kilda" (appears as third tune of "Islay Charms Set").

ALEX DAN MACISSAC'S. Canadian, Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. A Dorian. Standard. AB (Dunlay & Greenberg): AABB (Dunaly & Reich). Dunlay and Greenberg state the tune is similar to "Tibby Fowler o' the Glen" (Gow's version) and McGlashan's (1780) "The Fouller's Rant." Source for notated version: Fiddler Jerry Holland learned this tune from David MacIssac, whose father played it [Dunlay & Greenberg, Dunlay & Reich]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 35. Dunlay and Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 33. Boot (BOS) 7231, Jerry Holland- "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Green Linnet GLCD 1156, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection."

ALLAN MACDONALD'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 1108, The Tannahill Weavers - "Cullen Bay" (1990).

ALY'S WALTZ. American, Waltz. F Major. Standard. Composed by Colorado musician Terry Rasmussen for visiting teacher Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, while attending the Valley of the Moon Fiddle School in California. Green Linnet, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Green Linnet GLCD 1151, Seamus McGuire - "The Wishing Tree" (1995).

ANDY BROWN'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. A modern composition by Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, composed for the christening of a friend's son. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

ANGUS G. MACLEOD. Scottish, Pipe March or Slow Air. Composed by Pipe Major Donald MacLeod. Pipe Major Donald MacLeod's Collection. Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

ASHMOLEAN HOUSE (Teach Ashmolean). AKA - "Ash Maley House." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Belfast. D Major. Standard. AABB. Breathnach (1996) attributes the composition to Belfast/Derrylin, County Fermanagh, fiddler Tommy Gunn. The Ashmolean is the university museum of Oxford, University, England. A cousin to the tune "Mullingar Races." Sources for notated version: Martin Mulvihill (Bronx, NY), Joe & Willie Kelly, Jerry O'Sullivan (Yonkers, NY) [Black]; County Fermanagh & Belfast fiddler Tommy Gunn via the mid-20th century Liam Donnolly (County Tyrone & Belfast) collection [Breathnach]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 87, pg. 45. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 200, pg. 92. Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 25, pg. 19. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet SIF-1074, Jerry O'Sullivan - "The Invasion" (1987). Green Linnet SIF-104, Jerry O'Sullivan - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Appears as "Ashmaleen House"). Shaskeen - "My Love is in America."
X:1
T: Ashmolean House
C: Tommy Gunn
S: J. O'Sullivan / Kelly Bros.
Z: transcribed by B.Black
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
AF F2 EDB,A, | D2 FD FA A2 | defd efdB | AFDE FE E2 |
AF F2 EDB,A, | D2 FD FAAB | ABde dBAF | A,CEG FD D2 :|
defg a3 b | afdf eB (3BAB | defg a3 b | afdf e3 f |
fd (3ddd ad (3ddd | edBd egfe | dBAF A3 F | A,CEG FD D2 :|
X:2
T:Ashmolean, the
C:Tommy Sands
R:reel
S:Mike Rafferty
H:The Ashmolean is a museum in York (UK),
H:named after its founder, a fellow named Ashmole.
N:Ashmolean House title courtesy of Andrew Kuntz.
D:Jerry O'Sullivan
Z:Lesl Harker [lmh@rcons.com]
M:C
L:1/8
K:Dmix
d3B|:AF~F2 EDBA|D2ED FA A2|defd efdB|AFDE FEE2|
AF~F2 EDBA|D2EDFA A2|ABde dBA2|BDEG FDD2:|
|:defg a~a2b|afdf edBA|defg a2ab|afdf e2eg|
fdd2 Addf|edAd e2fe|dBAF A~A3|BDEG FDD2:|
X:3
T:Ashmolean House
R:reel
C:Tommy Gunn (fiddle), Derrylin, Co. Fermanagh
B:Ceol Rince na hÉireann 4, no. 200
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
AF (3FFF EDB,A,|D2 (3FED FAAB|defd efdB|AFDE FEEE|
AF (3FFF EDB,A,|D2 (3FED FAAB|ABde dBAF|A,B,DF ED D2:|:
defg a2 ab|afdf eB{c}BA|defg a2 ab|afdf {g}feef|
fd (3ddd ad (3ddd|edBd egfe|dBAF ABAF|A,B,DF ED D2:|
X:4
T:Ashmolean House
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Reeder
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
"D"AF~F2 EDBA|"D"D2 (3FED FAA2|"D"d2 fd efdB|"D"AFDE "A"FEE2|!
"D"AF~F2 EDBA|"D"D2 (3FED FAAB|"D"ABde dBAF|"A"AFEG "D"FDD2:||!
"D"defg a2ab|"D"afdf "Em"eBB2|"D"defg a2ab|"D"afdf "A"e4|!
"D"fd~d2 Ad~d2|"A"ed^cd egfe|"D"dBAF A2AB|"A"AFEG "D"FDD2:||

ATHOLL HIGHLANDERS, THE. AKA - "Athol Highlanders Jig." AKA and see "Lord Athlone's March," "The Three Sisters" (Shetland). Scottish (originally), Irish; Pipe March (6/8 time) or Jig. Scotland, Perthshire. Ireland, Donegal. A Major/Mixolydian (Brody, Hinds, Martin, Neil, Songer, Sweet): G Major (Kerr). Standard. AABB (Kerr): AABB' (Neil): AABBCC (Brody): ABCD (Sweet): AABBCCDD (Hinds, Martin, Songer). The name Athole (or Atholl) derives from the Gaelic ath Fodla, generally translated as New Ireland, and stems from the first invasion of the northern land by the Irish tribe the Scots in the 7th century (Matthews, 1972). The tune, described sometimes as a Scottish warpipes melody, is dedicated to the private army of the Duke of Atholl, the last private army still legally existing {albeit on a token level} in the British Isles (Boys of the Lough). Musically, the tune contains a characteristic melodic cliché in Scottish music in which a figure is followed by the same or a related figure on the triad one tone below or above (Emmerson, 1971). The original Athole Highlanders (and the ones associated with the tune) were the old 77th Highland Regiment, raised in 1778 and commanded by Colonel James Murray. The 77th served in Ireland and was not engaged in active service, though its garrison services were apparently useful in freeing other units for the conflicts with America and France. They were disbanded in 1783 after those conflicts ended (though the disbanding may have come about because of a mutiny). The tune was later taken up as a march past by the 2nd Battalion of the Cameronians, the 90th Light Infantry, who over the years had shed their Scottish origins. However, when pipers were introduced in 1881 they recollected their Perthshire origins and chose to play "The Atholl Highlanders" (also known in pipe literature as "The Gathering of the Grahams"). Susan Songer notes that when played for contra dances once through the tune is twice through a dance. Source for notated version: the tune was first brought to the Portland, Oregon, area by Seattle accordion player Laurie Andres and Olympia fiddler John Culhane in 1989 when playing at the first Spring Festival, and subsequently entered contra dance repertoire in that region [Songer]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 27. Hinds/Hebert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 20 (appears as "Athol Highlanders Jig"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 265, pg. 29. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 23. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 117, pg. 155. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997, pg. 21. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 37. Banff SBS5406, "Graham Townsend, Champion Folk Fiddler." Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ní Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994). Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Tourish et al. - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991). Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough- "Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Tradition 2118, "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Better Than an Orchesta" (1977).

BANSHEE'S WAIL OVER THE MANGLE PIT, THE. Irish, Jig. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

BARROWBURN. AKA - "Barrow Burn Reel." Scottish, Irish; Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by Addie Harper of Wick, Scotland. 'Burn' is a Scots word for stream. The tune is identified as a traditional Shetland reel on Sharon Shannon's album, who was apparently unaware that it is a modern composition. Taylor (Where's the Crack?), 1989; pg. 14. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "Bag of Cats" medley).
T:The Barrowburn reel
C:Addie Harper
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=150
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:D
A2|:D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA BddB|A2 AB d2 de|fedB AFEF|
D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA Bdde|f2 af egfe|1dBAB d2 D2 :|
2 dBAB d2|:cd |
e2 ef ecBA|f2 fg fdBA|g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|
g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|g2 ag f2 ed|BAAB d2 :|

BATTEUX, LE (The Grain Mill). French-Canadian, Jig (3/2 time). A Major. AEAE. AA'BB'. Source for notated version: Louis 'pitou' Boudrealut (Saguenay region, Québec) [Remon & Bouchard]. Remon & Bouchard (25 Crooked Tunes, Vol. 1: Québec Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1996; No. 5. Green Linnett GLCD 3042, La Bottine Souriante - "Chic & Swell" (1988. Learned from Louis "Pitou" Boudreault). Voyager 322, Louis Boudreault - "Old Time Fiddler of Chicoutimi, Québec" (1977, 1993).

BEAUTY OF THE NORTH, THE (Mais' An Taobh Tuath). Scottish, Slow Strathepey. E Flat Major. Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (Athole, Fraser, Hunter, Skye). The melody, composed by Captain Simon Fraser, first appeared in his collection published about 1816, also known as the "Fraser Knockie" collection. It was a great favorite of Scottish violinist James F. Dickie (1886-1983) of New Deer, Buchan, reknowned for his skill at slow strathspey playing. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 181, pg. 74. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 45. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 179. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 195. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 267. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Olympic 6151, Angus Cameron - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).
T:Beauty of the North, The
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:E_
E|G,<E E>F G>A B<c|C<C F>E D<B, ~B,2|G,<E E>F G>A B<g|
f>d e/d/c/B/ e2e:|
g|e>g B<g e<g b>g|a>gf>e d<BB<g|e<g B>g e/f/g/a/ b<g|a>f e/d/c/B/ e2 e>f|
g<eB<G e<BG<E|A>GF>E D<B, ~B,2|G,<EE<A G<eB<g|f>d e/d/c/B/ e2e||

BERNADETTE'S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Minor. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton). Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 42, pg. 12. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Green Linnet GLCD 1156, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection."

BIDDY MARTIN (Bidí Mháirtín). AKA and see "(Hi) Betty Martin," "Tip Toe Fine." Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard. AB (Breathnach): AABB (Mallinson). Breathnach (1985) said his source, Leahy, told him this tune was much referred to in dancing schools as the steps of the reel set to it were easy for youngsters.
**
Hie, Biddy Martin, tip toe, tip toe,
Hie, Biddy Martin, tip toe, tie.
**
Source for notated version: accordion player Tim Leahy, 1968 (Listowel, Co. Kerry, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 111, pg. 62. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 39, pg. 15. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from accordion player Jackie Daly).

BIG JOHN'S REEL. Irish, Reel. The tune is named after County Fermanagh fiddler 'Big' John McManus. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from the playing of Gary Hastings).

BILL MALLEY'S BARNDANCE. Irish, Barndance. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Bill Malley was a fiddler from Glandree, County Clare. The name is sometimes given as Bill O'Malley. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).
T:Bill Malley's Barndance
D:Calua: bo/thar gan briseadh/down the line
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=170
K:G
G3 A B2 GB|dedB G3 A|B2 G2 d2 G2|BAGB A3 F|
G3 A B2 GB|dedB G2 Ac|B2 AG E2 (3DEF|1GBAF GDEF:|
2GBAF G2 g2|:
e2 d2 g3 e|dedB G3 g|e2 d2 g3 d|BAGB A2 g2|
e2 d2 gfge|dedB G2 Ac|B2 AG E2 (3DEF|1GBAF G2 g2:|
2GBAF G3||

BILL SULLIVAN'S. AKA and see "Denis Murphy's," "Micky chewing bubblegum." Irish, Polka. A Major (Mallinson, Taylor): G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Terry "Cuz" Teahan as a youngster prior to leaving Ireland for America. Philippe Varlet says tha Teahan composed the tune while still taking lessons with the great Sliabh Luachra fiddler Padraig O'Keeffe. O'Keeffe liked the composition and continued to teach it after Teahan's departure, and it eventually circulated among local musicians; hence the name "Bill Sullivan's." Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 61, pg. 47. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 7. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 66, pg. 25. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from County Cork accordion player Jackie Daly). Shaskeen - "My Love is in America." CEF 057, Jackie Daly & Seamus Creagh.

BILLY MALLEY'S SCHOTTISCHE. Irish, Schottische. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).

BIRD'S NEST. AKA - "Put Out the Fire." Scottish, Canadian; Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Dorian. Standard. AB (Dunlay): AA'B (Perlman). Dunlay and Greenberg (1996) find that the second part of "Ratha Fair" bears some resemblance to the first part of "Birds Nest;" similarly, the first part to "Feargan" (in Kerr's) is also close to the first of "Bird's Nest." Angus Chisholm and Winston Fitzgerald paired the tune with "The Bonnie Lass of Fisherrow" in recordings which have become classic. Gaelic words for the tune were obtained from Lorrie MacKinnon from Archie Neil Chisholm:
**
Tha nead na h-eoin anns a'choille (x3)
Far an d'fhuair an smeorach.
(The bird's nest is in the woods (x3)
Where the thrush is gotten.)
**
Sources for notated versions: fiddler Angus Chisholm, learned this tune from the Gaelic singing of his mother (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) [Dunlay & Reich]; Peter Chaisson, Sr. (b. 1929, Bear River, North-East King's County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 75, pg. 22. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 66. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music of Cape Breton), 1986; No. 65, pg. 66. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 99. Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection), 1986. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 40). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). CX 009, CX 1, SCX 57, and Shanachie 14001, Angus Chisholm - "The Early Recordings of Angus Chisholm." CX 40, Winston Fitzgerald. Decca 14006, The Inverness Serenaders (appears as "Put Out the Fire"). Green Linnet GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. Learned from accordion player Paddy O'Brian from Co. Offaly, now living in Minneapolis). PKMMCD-17, Peter Chaisson (P.E.I.) - "Road to Rollo Bay." Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974).

BLACK HAT, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. D Major. Standard. AAB. A traditional tune from the Tingwall area of the Shetlands, and named for the fiddler who played it who always donned a black hat when he played the instument. Source for notated version: W. Manson and A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 23. Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Tom Anderson). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

BLACK PAT'S. Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Tommy Peoples - "The Quiet Glen."
T:Black Pat's
C:Tommy Peoples
S:Tommy Peoples
D:The Quiet Glen
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/8
R:Reel
M:C
K:F
D3E|:F3A d2cA|G2AG FDDE|F3A dccA|Acfa g2fg|\
af~f2 gfdc|(3ccA cA GFDE|FEFA dccA|1GcAG F4:|2GcAG F3 D|]\
CF~F2 FDCD|~F3G Ad ~d2|c2AF ~c2AF|G2AG FDDE|\
F3G FDCD|FEFA d2fg|af~f2 gfdf|cfag f4|c3A AGFD|\
CDFG Ad~d2|~c2AF cFAF|~G2AG FDDE|F3G FDCD|\
FEFA d2fg|af~f2 gfdf|cfag f4|:~a3f cdcd|\
fdcA F4|a2fc acfc|dggf g2fg|~a3f dfcd|\
fdcA (3Bcd fg|a2gf dccA|GFFD F4:|

BLACKBIRD, THE [5]. Scottish, Pipe Tune. Composed by Dr. Charles Banntyne. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994).

BLACKBIRD AND THE THRUSH, THE [1] (An londubh agus an ciarseach). Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Minor. Standard. AB. The tune, reputedly by the legendary bard and Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738), is contained in Edward Bunting's General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1796). Bunting himself recorded the source of this air to "Charles Byrne's singing," but also states it was obtained "at Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, 1792." Words to the air are printed in O'Sullivan/Bunting, collected in 1864 in County Derry, though sung to a different tune. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 3, pg. 5. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1994). Topic 12TS381, The Battlefield Band - "At the Front" (1978).

BLACKLEY OF HILLSDALE. Scottish, Pipe Tune. Composed by M. Gray. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

BONNIE MULLIGAN. Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999).

BOYS FROM BALLAVANICH, THE. Scottish. Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog."

BOYS OF BALLYSADARE, THE [2]. AKA and see "The Dublin Lasses," "Douse the Monkey," "(A) Galway Reel," "Miss Roden's Reel," "Miss Roddy's," "Last Night's Work," "The Eve." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. ABC (O'Neill, Taylor, Tubridy): ABCDEF (Mitchell). Older publications list the tune generally as "The Dublin Lasses." David Taylor (1992) says the tune has "distinct connotations" with the melody "Last Night's Fun" (as opposed to the alternate title above, "Last Night's Work"). It was recorded by Irish fiddle master Michael Coleman (Co. Sligo and New York) in 1922 as "Miss Roddy's." Sources for notated versions: piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; sessions at the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 13 (appears as "Boys of Ballisodare"). Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 46, pg. 20. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 53, pg. 60. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 119. Taylor (Through the Half-Door), 1992; No. 22, pg. 17. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 1. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 21. Flying Fish FF 266, Malcolm Dalglish & Grey Larsen - "Thunderhead" (1982). Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Nimbus NI 5320, Tommy Peoples - "Irish Traditinal Music from Donegal" (1991). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady" (learned from Tim Fitzpatrick). Shaskeen - "Shaskeen Live." Shanachie 97011, Duck Baker - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990. Learned from the Topic records anthology "The Breeze of Erin" {where it appears as "The Eve"}).
T:Boys of Ballysadare, The [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
B|dG G2 dGeG|dGGA BAAB|dG G2 dedB|AcBA GEDB|
dG G2 dGeG|dGGA BA A2|Gddg eBdB|AcBA GE D2||
g3a bgaf|g3 a bgef|g2 ga bgaf|gfed Bdef|g3 a bgaf|gfga bgeg|
bgaf gedB|AcBA GE D2||
Bddd Bdgd|Bdgd BA A2|Bddd eBdB|AcBA GE D2|
Bddd Bdgd|Bdgd BAAB|dBBA B2 BG|AcBA GE D||

BOYS OF PORTAFERRY, THE (Buacailli Puirt An Calad). AKA and see "The Sporting Boys," "The Pullet." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. David Taylor (1992) traces the tune and its relatives to the appearant root melody, a Scottish tune called "Pigeon on the Gale" (not to be confused with the similarly titled modern tune "Pigeon on the Gate"). The word 'gale' not only means a strong wind but is the name for a bog-plant, also called 'sweet-gale', and either meaning may have been the one intended. Related tunes include "The Red-Haired Lass" and "Shearing the Sheep," while the 'B' part is interchangable with the same part in both "The Primrose Lass" and "The Brown-Eyed Girl" (although the 'A' parts are quite different). Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), pg. 105 (appears as "Unknown"). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 105. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1249, pg. 235. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 521, pg. 98. Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 8, pg. 8. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T:Boys of Portaferry, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (521)
K:G
BA|G2 BG AcBA|G2 BG GEDE|G2 BG ABce|dBgB c2 BA|G2 BG AcBA|
G2 BG GEDE|G2 BG ABce|dBAB G2||GA|Bdgd edgd|Bdgd e2 dc|Bdgd edef|
GedB c2 BA|Bdgd edgd|Bdgd e2 dc|Bdgd egfa|gedB c2||

BOYS OF THE TOWN, THE [1] (Buacailli An Baile Moir). AKA and see "Miltown Jig." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AAB (O'Neill/1915, Tubridy): AABB (Joyce, Mallinson, Miller & Perron, Mulvihill, Roche ): AABB' (O'Neill/Krassen, 1001 & 1850). Source for notated version: fiddler John McKeown [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1978; pg. 229. Joyce (Ancient Irish Music), 1890; No. 91, pg. 93. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 49, pg. 21. Miller & Perron (Traditional Irish Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 8. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 23, pg. 69. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 130, pg. 75. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 29. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 825, pg. 154. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 89, pg. 30. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. I, pg. 49, #118. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 39. Green Linnet SIF-3041, Matt Molloy - "Stony Steps" (1989). Green Linnet SIF-104, Matt Molloy - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Rounder 7011, "The Beatons of Mabou: Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton" (1978).
T:Boys of the Town, The [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
D|G3 GBd|edB dBA|G3 GBd|edB AFD|G3 GBd|edB gfg|edB AGA|BGF G2:|
|:B|def gfg|afd edB|def gfg|afd e2B|def gfg|afd efg|edB AGA|BGF G2B|
def gfg|afd edB|def gfg|afd e2B|def gbb|faa efg|edB AGA|BGF G2||

BOBBY CASEY'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Chuir me Feisteas ar mo Theachsa," "Humours of Tullycreen/Tullycrine." Irish, Hornpipe. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from Co. Clare musician Bobby Casey).

BOG AN LOCHA(I)N (The Water-ouzel). AKA and see "Athole Cummers." Scottish (orginally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. E Minor. Standard. AABB'CD (Skye): AA'BCD (Gow). The melody is popular on Cape Breton Island. The Gaelic title translates as 'water-ouzel', a bird. Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster plays the tune as "Bog on a Small Lake" on a recent video instructor. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 16. Lowe's Collection, 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 90. Green Linnet GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. "Inspired" by the playing of Bill Lamey). Topic 12TS354, Mike MacDougall - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle"(1978).
T:Bog an Lochan
T:Athole Cummers
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:E Minor
F|:E/E/E ~E2 E>FB>F|E/E/E ~E2 F<D A>F|E/E/E ~E2 E>FB>A|1 B<d A>d F<DA>F:|2
B<dA<d F<D D>d||
|:B<E (B>A) B<E E>e|B<E (B>A) (F<D) D>d|B<E B>A d>e(f>e)|1
(d/^c/)B/A/ d>A (F<D) D>d:|2 (d/^c/)B/A/ d>A F<D D>f||e/e/e e2 (e>f)(b>f)|
e/e/e e2 f>da>f|e/e/e e2 (e>f)b>f|(g<e) b>e (df/g/) a>f|(g>e)(b>e) (g<e) (b>e)|
(g<e) (b>e) (df/g/) a<f|(g<e)(b<e) d>e(f>e)|(d/^c/)B/A/ d>A F<D D>d||
B<E (B>A) (B<E) E>e|B<E (B>A) (F<D) D>d|B<E (B>A) d>e(f>e)|
(d/^c/)B/A/ d>A F<D D>d|B<E (B>A) (B<E) E>e|B<E (B>A) (F<D) D>d|
B<E (B>A) d>e(f>e)|(d/^c/)B/A/ (dA) F>DD||

BOGMAN, THE. Irish, Slide (12/8 time). Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).

BONAPARTE CROSSING THE ALPS. AKA and see AKA and see "Battle of Waterloo," "Bonaparte Crossing the Rhine" (Irish) [2], "Bonaparte Crossing the Rockies," "Bonaparte's March," "Bonaparte's Retreat" (Pa.), "Napoleon Crossing the Alps," "Oro, Welcome Home," "The Diamond," "Peter Gray" (Pa.). Irish (originally), Candain, American; March. Canada, Prince Edward Island. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. "The wide diffusion, extensive ramification and probable great age of this Irish air have been discussed already in the notes to other versions in this collection (see notes for 'Bonaparte's Retreat'). The present version must also represent a fairly antique development of the tune; it has a strongly impressed character of its own, and may readily be traced in Irish tradition. Though some of its variants serve for songs or dances, most of them have the same strong, martial swing as the one given here. Petrie unhesitatingly calls it 'an ancient clan march' (see Petrie, pp. 251, 356), although he does not assign it to any particular Irish sept. Joyce, on the other hand, declares it to ba a wedding march, or 'hauling-home' song-tune, since it was used in his boyhood in County Limerick to accompany the progress of a newly-married couple home from church (see Joyce 1909, pp. 130, 131). Its frequently occurring Irish name, "Oro, 'Se do bheatha a'bhaile!' (Oro, Welcome Home), and two or three lines of verse quoted by Joyce, would be convincing were we not aware by this time of its protean variety of form and multiplicity of functions in the tradition. As a matter of fact, this version, like the ones already cited, goes under other names in Ireland beside 'Welcome Home'; while these words also befin the refrain to a Gaelic Jacobite song sometimes sung to it. We can only conclude that the statements of Petrie and Joyce were both partially correct: the tune, like other old and well known ones in our tradition, has been used for a number of purposes. In southwestern Pennsylvania this version is definitely a marching tune. Another local set is Bayard Coll. No. 352, from Greene County. When the volunteers from the communities of Pine Bank and Jollytown, in that county, went to camp at the time of the Civil War, they marched to the stately music of this tune as played by a 'martial band' (drums and fifes) made up of local folk musicians. Although this 'Welcome Home' form of the air is strongly individualized, it cannot be separated from the other sets, discussed under our Nos. 44-48, to which its variants continually show resemblance and relation. Intermediate or transitional forms have been recorded, some of which were listed under Nos. 44-48; others are referred below...A still more specialized march form of the 'Welcome Home' version goes in Irish tradition by the name of '(Fare Thee Well) Sweet Killaloe'. Variants are found in Joyce 1909, No. 824 and O'Neill's Irish Music, No. 100. A greatly simplified dance-tune form of this 'Killaloe' version is also current in western Pennsylvania under ('floating') titles of 'Jennie Put the Kettle On' and 'Nigger in the Woodpile'. Sets are in Bayard Coll., Nos. 21, 64. 'The American Veteran Fifer' also has a variant, No. 122" (Bayard, 1944)."/ Bayard (1981) cites it as a member of the "Lazarus" tune family (identified in part by a subtonic cadence in the 1st and 3rd tune lines, with a tonic cadence in the 2nd and 4th tune lines; which is a feature of medieval music, he says).
**
Perlman (1996) remarks that the tune was played by the regionally famous PEI fiddler Lem Jay on New Years' Eve over Charlottetown (PEI) radio during the 1930's. Source for notated version: Johnny Morrissey (1913-1994, Newtown Cross and Vernon River, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman].
**
PRINTED SOURCES: Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 89. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 63 (appears as 'The Diamond'). The Feis Ceoil Collection, No. 67 (equals JIFSS, No. 15, pg. 18). Hannagan and Clandillon, 'Londubh and Chairn, No. 57 (Welcome Home Jacobite Song; and note mention ibid., p. 28, of a Tyrone version of the tune to the same piece). Hardings All-Round Collection, No. 32. Henebry (Handbook), p. 148 (two sets); Hogg (Jacobite Relics), I, 3, II, 138. JIFSS, No. 2, p. 35; No. 12, p. 17; No. 15, pp. 18 (see above). Johnson (The Scots Musical Museum, edition of 1853) II, No. 298. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909, Nos. 275, 281, 729. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2; pg. 7. Kennedy-Fraser, 'From the Hebrides, pp. 96-98. Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 69. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 11. O'Neill's Irish Music, Nos. 178, 205. O'Neill (Music of Ireland), Nos. 58, 1809 (same set as in O'Neill's Irish Music), and 1824. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 99. Petrie, Nos. 926, 983, 1056 (to Welcome Home Jacobite Song), 1425. Roche Collection, Vol. 2; No. 231. Scanlon, p. 63, 'Battle Call of the Fianna' (close to Petrie 983, 1425). C.J. Sharp (English Folk-Chanteys), No. 7. Smith (The Scottish Minstrel), I, 106, 107, IV 58, 59. Stokoe & Bruce, 1886, Northumbian Minstrelsy, p. 183 (appears as "Cuckold Come Out o' the Amrey"). Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).
T:Bonaparte Crossing the Alps
T:Napoleon Crossing the Alps
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
cB|A2 AB AGEG|cd (3edc d2 (3e^fg|aged cAGE|G2 (3GGG G2 cB|
A2 AB AGEG|cd (3edc d2 (3e^fg|aged cAGE|A2 (3AAA A2:|
|:e2|aged cde^f|gega g3e|aged cAGE|G^FGA G2 cB|A2 AB AGEG|
cd (3edc d2 (3e^fg|aged cAGE|A2 (3AAA A2:|

BRAES OF BALQUHITHER/BLAQYHEDER/BALQUHIDDER/BALQUIDDER, THE. Scottish; Air, Strathspey and Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). G Major (Kerr): F Major (Athole). Standard. AABCC (Gow, Kerr): ABCD (McGlashan): AABCCD (Athole). No matter which spelling is used the name 'Balquhither' is pronounced 'Balwhither'. The tune appears in both air and dance versions. Glen (1891) finds the piece frist published in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 37), however, the tune (and dance instructions) appear in The Bodleian Manuscript (1740), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740" (the MS is named for the Bodleian Library, Oxford, where it is housed). Robert Tannahill (1774-1810), bard and weaver of Paisley, wrote a song by this name which appeared twice in R.A. Smith's Scottish Minstrel (1821-1824), Vol. 1, pg. 49 and Vol. IV, pg. 89 (the latter air is a modification of the first and is called "The Three Carles o' Buchanan"). The song text appears in Henry W. Shoemaker's Mountain Minstrelsy of Pennsylvania (1931), with the following note:
***
Potter County: This very ancient ballad was furnished by Mr.
Myron Hill, 70 years old. It was sung to my grandfather when a
child, soon after the War of Revolution, by veterans of that war,
and he sang it to me in 1876, in memory of our family soldiers
of 100 years before.- John C. French, 1919.
***
Mr. French's account predates the Tannahill publication by some forty years, and perhaps he was a victim of the human penchant for subscribing increased antiquity to already old items, though it is possible that an older song text to the country dance tune predated the Tannahill publication. Tannahill's words begin:
***
Will ye go, lassie, go,
To the braes o' Balquhidder?
Where the blaeberries grow,
'Mang the bonnie bloomin' heather;
Where the deer and the roe,
Lightly bounding together,
Sport the lang summer day
'Mang the braes o' Balquhidder.
***
Chorus:
Will ye go, lassie, go,
To the braes o' Balquhidder?
Where the blaeberries grow,
'Mang the bonnie bloomin' heather.
***
The song "Wild Mountain Thyme" is derived from "Braes of Balquidder," as is "Will You Go, Lassie, Go" reworked by Frank McPeake of Belfast. Gow notes the tune "may be play'd very Slow." Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 27. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 16, No. 1, pg. 11. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 37. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 212. Folk Lyric FL-116, Betsy Miller (Ewan MacColl's mother). Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994. Tannahill's song).
T:Braes of Balquhidder
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
c|A/B/c Fc A2 AB|A/B/c Fc AGGB|A/B/c Fc A2 Ac|defd cAA:|
c|defd cAag|fdcA AGGc|defd cAfg|agfd cAAc|defd caga|~fdcA AGGA|
FCA,C FGAc|defd cAA||
|:c|dFcF A2Ac|dFcF AGGc|dFcF A2Ac|defd cAA:|
c|defd cAag|fdcA AGGc|defd cAfg|agfc A2Ac|defd caga|fdcA AGGA|
FCA,C FGAc|defd cAA||
T:The Braes o' Balquhidder
B:G.F. Graham, The Popular Songs and Melodies of Scotland (1900)
C:Words written by Robert Tannahill 1774-1810.
N:it's vaguely like The Duke of Bucclugh's Tune in Playford, 1687
M:2/4
L:1/8
R:Air
Q:1/4=96
K:D
% hexatonic, G missing
F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B2 A>F|F<E F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B>c d>B |A<F||
F>A|B>c d>B|A<F f>e|d<B A>F|F<E F>A|B>c d>B|A<F f>e|dB AF |F<E||
F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B2 A>F|F<E F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B>c e/d/c/B/|A<F|]

BRIAN MAGUIRE. Irish, Planxty. F Major. Standard. AB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 95, pg. 74. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

BRING BACK THE CHILD. Irish, Jig. Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).

BROKEN PLEDGE, THE (An Geall Briste). Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. D Dorian (Flaherty): D Mixolydian (O'Neill/Krassen, Willaimson): D Mixolydian/Dorian (Cranitch): D Major (O'Neill/1850 & 1001). Standard. AABB. There are several thoughts as to the origin of the title. One is that the pledge refers to a love pledge, in which a young couple, soon to be parted due to sea or military service, pledge their affection for one another and promise to remain faithful during the interim. It is also said the title refers to a failed temperance pledge, from the days of the temperance movement. A related Irish tradition says that at the Church asks children at the age of 11 or 12 to promise not to drink before they reach the age of twenty. Needless to say, few achieved the age not having broken the pledge. Occasionally the tune is played in the key of E Minor. Source for notated version: fiddler Philip Duffy (b. 1966, London, now residing in Dublin, Ireland) [Flaherty]. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 70, pg. 152. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 30. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 91. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1178, pg. 222. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 458, pg. 89. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 88. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997). Piping Pig Records PPPCD 001, Jimmy O'Brien- Moran - "Seán Reid's Favourite" (1996. Learned from Séamus Ennis). Shaskeen Records OS-360, Andy McGann, Joe Burke, Felix Dolan - "A Tribute to Michael Coleman."
T:Broken Pledge, The
M:C
L:1/8
Q:250
K:D
dc AG A2 dB | cA GF ED C2 | DE FG Ad ~d2 | Ac Gc Ad fe |
dc AG A2 dB | cA GF ED C2 | DE FG Ad ~d2 | Ac Gc AD D2 :|
|: dc AG A2 de | fe df ed AB | cA GE GA cd | ec ~c2 ea ge |
dc AG A2 de | fe df ed cA | F3 E FG AB | cA GE {F}ED D2 :|

BROWN COFFIN, THE (An Cófra Donn). AKA and see "The Brown Casket/Chest," "(An) Comhra Donn," "Factory Smoke." Irish, Hornpipe. G Minor. Standard. AABB. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).
T:The Brown Coffin
T:The Factory Smoke
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:Gm
G>A|B>AG>^F G>AB>c|d2G2G2a>g|f>ed>c B>cd>B|(3cdc (3BAG F2d>c|!
B>AG>^F G>AB>c|d>g (3fga g3d|e>dc>B c>ed>c|B2G2G2:|!
g>a|b>gd>B g>dB>G|D>GB>d d>gb>g|a>fc>A f>cA>F|C>FA>c f>cA>c|!
B>AG>^F G>AB>c|d>g (3fga g3d|e>dc>B c>ed>c|B2G2G2:|

BROWN-SAILED BOAT, THE. Irish; Reel, Highland or Strathspey. Ireland, County Donegal. The tune is a County Donegal adaptation of the Scottish strathspey "Peter Baillie." According to Caoimhin Mac Aoidh, the title comes from the Kilcar area and references the story of a young woman, daughter of a wealthy local man, whom her father had betrothed to a rich man she did not want to marry. Instead, she gave her heart to a young fisherman from the area, and when her disapproving father found out he forbade her ever to see her lover. She and the young man contrived to meet in secret, and arranged that should he be able to meet her he would use a brown sail on his return from fishing in Donegal Bay, and if he could not he would show his white one. The lovers continued to meet for some time, planned their independence, and when they had enough saved they eloped. The first tune played at the hauling home dance was this strathspey, which as it was untitled was given the name "The Brown-Sailed Boat" by the fiddlers in honor of the couple. Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994).

BUCKS OF ORANMORE, THE ("Boic Óráin Mhóir" or "Og-Fir Uaran-Mor"). AKA and see "The Bucks of Cranmore," "The Bucks of Carranmore," "The Hearty Bucks." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Kerr, Roche): ABCD (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): ABCD (Breathnach): ABCDE (Mallinson): AA'BCD (Taylor): AA'BB'CCDD'EE' (O'Neill/Krassen): AA'BB'CC'DD'EE' (Alewine): ABCDEFGH (Mitchell). According to Alun Owen (1973) the tune is a celebrated testing piece for uilleann pipers. O'Neill (1913) relates that the accomplished piper Patrick Flannery (renowned especially for his jigs), a native of Ballinasloe, County Galway, who emigrated to New York about 1845, was playing this tune to a "fascinated audience" on the streets of Brooklyn when he died in the year 1855. Source Kelly told Brendan Breathnach that the old musicians used to play what is now the first part of the reel last, and that was how he played it. Sources for notated versions: piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; fiddler Patrick Kelly (Cree, County Clare) [Breathnach]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]; sessions at the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 11. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 248, pg. 128. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 20. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 167, pg. 19 (appears as "Bucks of Cranmore"). Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 23, pg. 10. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 32, pgs. 46-47. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 95. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1199, pg. 226. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 476, pg. 91. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. I, pg. 59, #149. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 32. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997). Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969). Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972/1983). Paddy Glackin & Paddy Keenan - "Doublin'" (1978).
T:Bucks of Oranmore
M:4/4
L:1/8
S:Oisin MacDiarmada
R:Reel
O:Ireland
K:D
"D"A2FA (3AAA dB|A2FA "Em"BE (3EEE|"D"A2FA (3AAA Bd|egfd "G"ed{e}dB|
"D"A2FA (3AAA dB|A2FA "Em"BE (3EEE|"D"DEFG AFAB|"Bm"defd
"G"efdB|]"D"AD(3DDD ADBD|ADFA "Em"BE (3EEE|
"D"ADFA (3AAA Bd|egfd "G"efdB|"D"AD (3DDD ADBD|ADFA "Em"BE (3EEE|
"D"DEFG AFAB|"Bm"defd "Em"efge|]!
"D"a2fd efdf|a2fd "Bm"edBd|"D"a2 fd edef|"Em"gefd "G"edBd|"D"a2fd
efdf|adfd "Bm"edBd|"D"faaa agfe|"Bm"defd "Em"eaag|]"D"f2df efde|fedf
"G"edBd|"D"fddd edef|"Em"gafg "G"edBd|"D"f2df efde|fedf
"Bm"edBd|"D"faaa agfe|"Bm"defd "G"efdB|]
"D"Adfd edfd|Adfd "G"edBd|"D"Adfd edef|"Em"gefd "G"edBd|"D"Adfd
edfd|Adfd "Bm"edBd|"D"faaa "Em"agfe|"Bm"defd "G"AddB|]

BUNDLE AND GO [4]. AKA and see "This is My Love, Do You Like Her?" Irish, Jig. E Minor. Standard. AABB. This tune, a variant of "Bundle and Go" [3], is closely related to the jig "I Lost My Love." Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 43. Philo 1153, "Sharon Shannon." Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "Tickle Her Leg," learned from banjo player Charlie Piggott).

CAPTAIN CAMPBELL('S STRATHSPEY). AKA - "Captain Campbell." Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Minor or Dorian. Standard. AAB (Hunter, Kerr, Perlman): AABB' (Athole, Carlin, Lerwick): AA'BB' (Little). Sources for notated versions: Cape Breton style fiddler Harvey Tolman (Nelson, N.H.) [Little]; Eddy Arsenault (b. 1921, St. Chrysostom, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 72, No. 108. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 70. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 12, No. 6, pg. 9. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 29. Little, 1984; pg. 34. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 194. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 51. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Amy Geddes - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).
T:Captain Campbell
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:Aminor
A|E<A A>B c>A B<G|E<G G>A Bd c/B/A/G/|E<A A>B c>Bc>e|
d<B g>B A2A:|B|A<a a>g e>d c<e|d>eg>e d/=c/B/A/ GB|1
A>a a<g e>d c<e|d<B g>B A2A:|2 c<A d>B e>d =c<e|d<B g>B A2A||

CAPTAIN O'KANE/O'KAIN. AKA and see "Cailin tighe moir," "Captain Henry O'Kain," "Giolla an Bimhoir," "The Wounded Hussar," "The Small Birds Rejoice." Irish, Air or Planxty (6/8 time). E Aeolian (Matthiesen, O'Neill): G Aeolian (Gow). Standard. AB (Complete Collection, Matthiesen, O'Neill): AABB (Gow). "Captain O'Kane" is thought to have been composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) for his friend Captain O'Kane (or O'Cahan), a sporting Irishman of a distinguished County Antrim family well-known in his day as "Slasher O'Kane"(Donal O'Sullivan, Carolan, The Life and Times). O'Sullivan's attribution is based on a comment by Hardimann (who said O'Carolan wrote it) and because of stylistic similarities with other O'Carolan works. O'Neill (1913) quotes Patrick O'Leary, an Austrailian correspondent, who wrote that the Captain of the title was "the hero of a hundred fights, from Landon to Oudenarde, who, when old an war-worn, tottered back from the Low Countries to his birthplace to die, and found himself not only a stranger, but an outlawed, disinherited, homeless wanderer in the ancient territroy that his fathers ruled as Lords of Limavady." The earliest printing of the tune Captain Francis O'Neill could located was in Aird's 1788 Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, though he also found it (under the title "Captain Oakhain: A Favourite Irish Tune") in McGoun's Repository of Scots and Irish Airs, Strathspeys, Reels, etc.(Glasgow, 1803)-the same title and presumably the same tune was printed in McGlashan's 1786 collection. The song "The Wounded Hussar" was written to the melody by Alexander Campbell (O'Sullivan gives his name as Thomas) and appears in Smith's Irish Minstrel (Edinburgh, 1825). It was also included in Surenne's Songs of Ireland without Words (Edinburgh, 1854). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 325. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 133, pg. 95. Hardiman, Irish Minstrelsy, 1831. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 10. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 36 (appears as "Captain Oakhain"). O'Farrell (Collection of National Irish Music for the Union Pipes), c.1799-1800. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 627, pg. 111. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 245. O'Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody), 1922. Green Linnet GLCD 1151, Seamus McGuire - "The Wishing Tree" (1995). Maggie's Music MM107, "Music in the Great Hall" (1992).
T:Captain O'Kain, or The Wounded Hussar
B:O'Neill's Waifs & Strays of Gaelic Melody, 1922
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
R:air
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:Em
E/D/|B,EF G2 F/E/|F/G/A/G/F/E/ DEF|GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/|
B,EE E2 E/D/|B,EF G2 F/E/|F/G/A/G/F/E/ DEF|
GBB B/A/G/F/E/D/|B,EE E2 E/F/|
GBB B2 A/G/|FAA A2 d/c/|Be^d e>fg|Be^d e2 e/f/|
g>fe d>cB|AFd DEF|GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/|B,EE E2||
T:Captain Oakhain
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"A favourite Irish Tune"
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:G Minor
G/F/|DBA B2 A/G/|A/B/c/B/A/G/ FGA|BdB cB/A/G/F/|DGG G2:|
|:G/A/|Bdd d2 c/B/|Acc c2f|d>g^f g>ab|dg^f g2 g/a/|bag f>ed|
d/c/B/A/f FGA|BdB d/c/B/A/G/F/|DGG G2:|

CARADALE BAY. Scottish. Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

CAROLAN'S WELCOME. AKA - "O'Carolan's Welcome." Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Minor. Standard. ABB. Donal O'Sullivan, the primary source for information on Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) and his music, identified this as one of the O'Carolan tunes which has come down to us without a title and was one of his melodies "probably composed for patrons whose names have been lost; they have come down to us either with wrong titles or with no titles at all." O'Sullivan finds the tune in the Forde manuscript in the Royal Irish Academy, [Dublin, p. 62] which was reprinted with slight alterations by P.W. Joyce in his Old Irish Folk Music and Songs [London,1909], p. 293. Source for notated version: "The present tune was given to (the collector William) Forde (1795-1850) by Patrick McDowell and is marked 'said to be Carolan's'" [O'Sullivan]; Kit Nelson and Kathrine Gardner (San Francisco, CA) of the band ContraBandits (who knew the tune as "Carolan's Circle Waltz") [Mattiesen]. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 171, pg. 119 (appears untitled). Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 11. Folkways FTS 31098, Ken Perlman - "Clawhammer Banjo and Fingerstyle Guitar Solos." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Rounder 0216, John McCutcheon - "Step by Step" (1986). CBS 36401, Chieftains - "Boil the Breakfast Early." Lunasa - "Otherworld."
X:1
T:O'Carolan's Welcome
M:3/4
L:1/8
Z:Transcribed by Tomas Embréus
K:BMin
|:"part A"dc|B2d>ef2|B2d>ef2|e>fedcB|d2A2A2|d3cB2|e3dc2|dfF2A2|B4:|
|:"part B"dc|B2d>ef2|B2d>ef2|e>fedcB|c2A2A2|a3gf2|b3afe|dfedcd|B4z2:|
|:"part C"f2b>c'd'2|f2b>c'd'2|d'<d'c'babc'|d'2f2f2|g2b/b/gfe|e2g/g/fed|e
2f2a2|b6|b/b/agab2|a/a/fefa2|f/f/edefd|e2c2A2|d3cB2|e3dc2|
1dfF2A2|B6:|2dfedcd|(B6|B2)z2z2|
X:2
T: O'Carolan's Welcome
R: waltz
Z: John Chambers <jc@ ecf-guest.mit.edu > http://eddie.mit.edu/~jc/music/
B: Ossian p.119 #171 (unnamed)
N: The chords are highly variable.
N: The G# in bar 24 is often played natural.
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Am
cB \
| "Am"A2 cd e2 | A2 cd e2 | "Dm"de dc BA | "Em"G/A/B G2 E2 \
| "Am"c3 B A2 | "Dm"d3 c B2 | "Em"ce E2 G2 | "Am"A4 cB ||
| "Am"A2 cd e2 | A2 cd e2 | "Dm"de dc BA | "Em"G/A/B G2 E2 \
| "C"g3 f e2 | "F"a3 g ed | "Em"ce dc Bc | "Am"A4 ||
|| e2 \
| "Am"e2 ab c'2 | e2 ab c'2 | "G7"c'b ag ab | "C"c'2 e2 e2 \
| "Dm"f2 af ed | "C"e2 ge dc | "E7"d2 e2 ^g2 | "Am"Ha6 ||
|| "F"ag eg a2 | "C"ge de g2 | ed cd ec | "G"d2 B2 G2 \
| "Am"c3 B A2 | "Dm"d3 c B2 | "Em"ce E2 G2 | "Am"A4 |]

CAT IN THE CORNER, THE [1] (An Cat Annsa Cuine). AKA and see "Lady Charlotte Murray" [1], "O'Mahoney's Frolicks," "Puss in the Corner." Irish, Double Jig. D Major (O'Neill): D Mixolydian (Mulvihill). Standard. AABB (O'Neill): AABB' (Mulvihill). Mulvihill turns it into a double-tonic melody. The tune was claimed by Niel Gow as "Lady Charlotte Murry" or "Lady Charlotte Murray's Favorite" and first appears in print in his collection. Source for notated version: "From my mother" [Mulvihill]. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 49, pg. 75. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 36. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 871, pg. 162. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 129, pg. 36. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).
T:Cat in the Corner, The [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (129)
K:D
A/G/|F2D DFA|dAF AFD|EGE CEC|EGE CEG|F2 D DFA|dAF AFD|GBG EFG|AFD D2:|
|:a/g/|f2d dfa|afd dfa|e2c ceg|gec efg|faf edc|dcB AFA|B/c/dB ABG|FDD D2:|

CAT RAMBLES TO THE CHILD'S SAUCEPAN. AKA and see "Mary Willie's." Irish, Slide. D Major. Standard. The title, apparently made up in lieu of the correct name, appears on a recording by Kerry fiddler Johnny Cronin and Joe Burke. Green Linnet GLCD 1134, Cherish the Ladies - "Out and About." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T:The Cat's Rambles to the Childs Saucepan
L:1/8
M:12/8
K:D
A3|d2e f2e dcd ~B3|{a}g2e cBA {f}e2A cBA|d2e f2e dcd ~B3|g2e cBA d3 dBA| d2e f2e dcd ~B3|{a}g2e cBA {f}e2A cBA| d2e {fg}f2e dcd ~B3|g2e cBA d3 d2A| d2e f2a baf a2f|{f}e2A cBA {f}e2A cBA| d2e f2a baf a2f|{f}e2A cBA d3 dBA|d2e {g}f2a baf a2f|{f}e2A cBA {f}e2A cBA| d2e f2a baf a2f|{f}e2A cBA d3 d3|

CATHAL McCONNELL'S. AKA and see "Cock and the Hen," "Denis Ryan's." Irish, Slip Jig. The Boys of the Lough recorded this tune as "Denis Ryan's," obtained from the County Offaly fiddler, although flute player Cathal McConnel altered it somewhat. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

CATHERINE KELLY'S. Irish, Slip Jig. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

CAVAN'S OWN. Irish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by County Cavan/Philadelphia fiddler and composer Ed Reavy (1898-1988). Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 102, pg. 115. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Conolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1994).

CAISLEÁN AN ÓIR/CAISLEÁN NA nOR. AKA and see "The Golden Castle." Irish, Hornpipe. G Dorian. Standard. AABB. Composed by West Clare fiddler Martin "Junior" Crehan (b. 1908). Peter Woods (in his book The Living Note: the Heartbeat of Irish Music, 1996) relates Crehan's story about how they got the tune. It seems that at one time a crowd of men were digging a grave for a fiddler at a location that overlooked a place called Caislean Oir. An old man happened by on the road and asked whether the group had made the sign of the cross before they dug, and was assured they had. The old man then proceeded to tell them, in Gaelic, the story of a priest who had taken a wife and was banished to live above the Cliffs of Moher (County Clare), and then he sang them a song in Irish known as "The Priest's Lament." The air of the song stayed with then and formed the basis of the hornpipe "Caisleán an Óir," named for the prominent feature where they heard the melody. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Junior Crehan (West Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Martin Hayes [Fiddler Magazine]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 223, pg. 102. Ceol, (II, (1) pg. 50. Fiddler Magazine, Spring 1994; pg. 11. ACM Records, Mick O'Brien - "May Morning Dew." Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann CL17, Junior Crehan - "Ceol an Chlair, Vol. 1." Green Linnet SIF 1058, Matt Molloy & Sean Keane - "Contentment is Wealth" (1985). Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from Martin Rochford of Bodyke, Co. Clare). Green Linnet SIF1127, "Martin Hayes" (appears as "The Golden Castle").

CALIBACHAN. Scottish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

CALUM FHIONNLAITH (Malcolm Finlay). AKA - "Calum Findlay." AKA and see "Malcolm Finlay," "Larry Down's." Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Topic 12TS354, Mike MacDougal - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (c. 1976). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as "Calum Fhionnlaid," the last tune of the "Bag of Cats" medley). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Clare Mann & Aiden O'Rourke - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).

CAMERONIAN REEL, THE [1] (Cor Cameronac). AKA and see "Aisling Ui Chiardha," "Carey's Reel," "Carey's Dream," "Roger's Fancy." Irish (Scottish?), Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Cole, O'Neill/1915 & 1001): AAB (O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Taylor): ABC (Mitchell). David Taylor (1992) points out that the second part has changed since O'Neill (1001 Gems) was first published and that there are several settings of this tune in common currency. Sources for notated versions: piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann in the 1980's [Taylor]. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 4. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 140, pg. 111. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 274, pg. 139. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 154. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 731, pg. 128. Taylor (Through the Half-Door), 1992; No. 35, pg. 25. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 6. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 20. Shaskeen - "Atlantic Breeze". Green Linnet SIF 1134, Cherish the Ladies - "Out and About." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T:Cameronian Reel, The [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
B|A2 FA DAFA|GFEF GBdB|A2 FA DAFA|GBAG FDDB|
AF F2 DF F2|GFEF GBdB|A2 AB A2 FA|B/c/d AG FD D:|
|:B|Addc d2 dA|B/c/d ef gfed|c/B/A eA fAeA|B/c/d ef gfeg|
faeg faeg|fdec defg|afge fdec|dBAG FA d:|

CANNONGATE TWITCH, THE. Scottish. Cannongate is in the city of Edinburgh. Green Linnet GLCD 1108, The Tannahill Weavers - "Cullen Bay" (1990).

CAOILTE MOUNTAINS, THE. Irish. Green Linnett GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).

CEILEABRAD CAOINE, AN. Irish, Air. From the Roche Collection Airs and Fantasies. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

CHARLES SUTHERLAND. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Murdoch Henderson. Sutherland was a Fraserburgh violinist and "disciple" of J. Scott Skinner, according to Alastair Hardie (1992), who owned the famous and fine "Goddard" Stradivarius violin. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 39. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).
T:Charles Sutherland
C:J Murdoch Henderson
D:Hardie/Marwick
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:E
B|E2- eg fdec|B2 BG cBGB|c2 Ac B2 ge|fgfe dBcd|
E2- eg fdec|B2 BG cBGB|c2 Ac Bgbg|afdf e2:|]
a|g2 eg bge=d|c2 ac B2 gB|A2 fA G2 ge|fgfe dBBa|
g2 eg bge=d|ceac Bege|c2 Ac Bgbg|afdf e2:|]

CHUIR MÉ FEISTEAS AR MO THEACHSA (I Furnished Up My House). AKA and see "Bobby Casey's Hornpipe," "The Humours of Tullycreen/Tullycrine." Irish, Hornpipe. A Dorian. Standard. AAB (Moyland): AABB (Breathnach). Breathnach prints these words, from source John Kelly, with the air:
***
I furnished up my house as well as I was able,
With a three-legged stool and a fine old table.
That wouldn't do I had to get the cradle
And look for the bottle in the morning.
***
Sources for notated versions: fiddler John Kelly/Seán O'Kelly (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) {Moylan quotes O'Leary saying:
***
And do you know where we got it? I was along with Denis
Murphy behind playing in the Jug of Punch bar where Lil's
sister is married in Killarney. And myself and Denis Murphy
that opened the bar, I suppose about twenty-six years ago and
Mike Sullivan, a man from Kilcummin, a fairly old heavy lad,
a great set dancer, he walked up and came out with that hornpipe,
we never had it heard. Denis held at it till he got it and I got it
from Denis then and 'Mike Sullivan's' we called it. He usen't
to play at all but he had every tune under the rising sun in his head. [Moylan].
***
Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 205, pg. 83. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 77, pg. 44. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Appears as "Bobby Casey's Hornpipe," learned from Co. Clare musician Bobby Casey). Topic 12T357, Johnny O'Leary - "Music for the Sets" (1977. Appears as the first of two hornpipes called "Mike Sullivan's").

CIARAN'S CEOLTA TIRE. Irish, Polka. The title Seamus Connolly gave to a polka played by Paddy Neill of Newport, County Tipperary, heard on Ciaran MacMathuna's weekly program of Irish music on Radio Eireann. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988).

CLAR BOG DEIL, AN. AKA and see "Cois na Brighde," "The Soft Deal Board," "The Bog-deal Board"(?) Irish, Air. Ireland, Munster. F# Minor. Standard. AB. The air and song have been identified as a love song coming from Munster (where it is better known as "An Caiseal Mumhan"), though variants can be found throughout Ireland. The tune, according to Cowdery (1990), is the same as that of the Connemara version of "Roisin Dubh," the title coming from a different text. The music appears in Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849), and Stanford/Petrie gives no less than six settings, according to Joyce. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1903; No. 127. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. III, pg. 10. Claddagh CC9, Sean MacDonagh - "An Aill Bhain" (1971). Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Nhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994. A Donegal version of the tune). Olympic OL-6129, Seamus Ennis - "Irish Pipe and Tin Whistle Songs" (1976). Spin CD1001, Eoghan O'Sullivan, Gerry Harrington, Paul De Grae - "The Smoky Chimney" (1996. Learned from the singing of Gweedore fiddler and singer Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh).
T:An Clar Bog Deil
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:70
S:Treoir Vol.2 1996
R:Air
K:DMix
B,>C|D>C B, C D>D|F2 D GA/2G/2 F|D C>B, CD>D|!
D2-D z C B,/2A,/2|G,2 A, B,2 A,|G, G,/2 G,-G, Z/2 G>A|B2 A/2G/2 c2 B|!
A3-A z/2 A G/2|F2 D D2 D|E>D C D G>A|!
BA/2B/2 c d2 e|d2-d z c B/2 G/2|B3 c/2B/2 A2|!
A F G F G{AG}F|D2 C/2 B,/2 C D>D|D3-D||!

CLIFFS OF MOHER, THE (Aillte Motair Ua Ruadain). Irish, Double Jig. A Dorian (Carlin, Cranitch, Moylan, O'Neill/Krassen): G Major (O'Neill/1850). Standard. AAB (Carlin, Moylan, O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB' (Cranitch, Mallinson, O'Neill). The Cliffs of Moher are situated on the Atlantic coast northwest of Lahinch, in County Clare. They stretch some eight kilometers from Hag's Head to O'Brien's Tower and reach 200 meters in height. Although the tune is noted in G Major in O'Neill's/1850, it is usually heard played in the A Dorian mode, and indeed, O'Neill's version is quite distanced from modern ones. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; Francis O'Neill learned the tune from an accomplished West Clare flute player (and Chicago police patrolman) named Patrick "Big Pat" O'Mahony, a man of prodigious physique of whom he said: "1/4the 'swing' of his execution was perfect, but instead of 'beating time' with his foot on the floor like most musicians he was never so much at ease as when seated in a chair tilted back against a wall, while both feet swung rhythmically like a double pendulum" [O'Neill, Irish Folk Music]. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 148, No. 258. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 117. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 100, pg. 43. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 276, pg. 158. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 35. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 861, pg. 160. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 121, pg. 35. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Green Linnet SIF 3037, Silly Wizard - "Golden, Golden" (1985). Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969).
T:Cliffs of Moher, The
M:6/8
L:1/8
K: Ador
eaa bag|eaf ged|c2A BAG|EFG ABd|eaa bag|\
eaf ged|c2A BAG|EFG A3::efe dBA|efe dBA|\
GAB dBA|GAB dBd|1efe dBA|efe dBA|GAB dBG|\
EFG A3:|2efe dee|cee Bee|EFG BAG|EDB, A,3|]

CLOCH NA CEITHRE MHILE (The Four Mile Stone). AKA and see "The Four Mile Stone." Irish, Reel. The melody is attributed to Arthur Darley, a Dublin musician who loved for some time in Bruckless, Co. Donegal. Green Linnet GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1982/1994. Learned from the playing of the late New York musician Larry Redigan).

CLOONAGROE REEL. Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

COALMINER'S REEL, THE (Fir an Ghuail). AKA and see "More Power to Your Elbow." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune was recorded in the 1930's in America by the Flanagan Brothers. Source for notated version: flute player Harry McGowan (b. 1937, Carrowmore, County Sligo) [Flaherty]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 157. CIC CD, Marcas a Murchu - "Ó Bhéag go Béal." Gael Linn CEF 115, Frankie Gavin & Paul Brock - "A Tribute to Joe Cooley." Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).
T:Coalminers, The
T:Fir an Ghuail
M:4/4
L:1/8
S:Dan Cummins
Z:transcribed by Liam Hart
R:reel
K:D
|D2DED2DF|A2FD EDB,D|D2DED2FA|dBAFE2FE|
D2DED2DF|A2FD EDB,D|D2DED2FA|dBAFD4:|
|d3 B ABdB|A2 FD EDB,D|d3 B ABde|fedf e2 de|fddd edBd|
A2 FD EDB,D|D2DED2FA|dBAF D4||

COFFEY'S REEL. Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).
T:Coffey's Reel
M:C|
R:reel
Z:Bud Burroughs
K:ADor
A3B AGED|G2Bd edBd|eaaf gedB|AcBG AGEG|
A3B AGED|G2Bd edBd|eaaf gedB|1 AcBG A2cB:|2 AcBG A2eg|
a3b ageg|gedB GABd|(3efg fa gedB|AcBG AGED|
a3b ageg|gedB GABd|(3efg fa gedg|gedB A2eg|
a3b ageg|gedB GABd|(3efg fa gedB|AcBG AGED|
A3B AGED|G2Bd edBd|eaaf gedB| AcBG A2cB|

COLLEGE GROVE(S, THE) {"Doire An Colaiste" or "Garrán an Choláiste"}. AKA and see "An Cailín Fionn" (The Fairhaired Girl), "The Connacht Reel," "The Green Jacket," "The Millstone," "The Milestone," "The New Demense," "The New Domain," "The Old Locks and Quays of Galway," "Whiskey in the Jar," "Whiskey in the Jug." Irish, Reel. D Major (Brody, O'Neill/1001): D Mixolydian (Miller & O'Neill/Krassen). Standard. ABCD (O'Neill/1001): AABBCCDD (Brody): AABB'CC'D (Miller). Sources for notated versions: Kevin Burke (Portland, Oregon) [Brody]; Chicago police Patrolman, flute player and piper James Ennis, father of Tom Ennis (Chicago) [O'Neill); fiddler Patrick Kelly (Cree, County Clare) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 265, pg. 137. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 71. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 9. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 97. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 485, pg. 93. Folkways FW 8876, Kevin Burke- "Sweeney's Dream." Green Linnet 1009, Eileen Ivers and Mick Moloney- "Irish Music: The Living Tradition." Green Linnet GLCD 3009/Mulligan LUN 021, Kevin Burke- "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Andy McGann and Paul Brady- "Its a Hard Road to Travel" (appears as "The Millstone"). Outlet SOLP 1010, "Farewell to Connacht."
T:College Grove, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (485)
K:D
D2 (3FED AD (3FED|Ec (3cBc edcA|D2 (3FED Eddc|ABGF EDCE|
D2 (3FED AD (3FED|Ec (3cBc edcA|DEFG Addc ABGE ED D2||
fedc Acdf|edcd efge|fedc dcdf|eaag ed d2|(3fgf df (3fgf df|(3efe ce (3efe ce|
dfeg fagb|afge fd d2||faag fddf|efgf eccg|faag fddB|cAGE ED D2|
faag fddf|efgf ecce|dfeg fagb|afge fd d2||(3fgf df (3fgf df|(3efe ce (3efe ce|
(3fgf df (3fgf dB|cAGE ED D2|(3fgf df dfdf|(3efe ce cece|dfeg fagb|afge fd d2||

COLLIER'S (REEL), THE ("Seisd An Gualeoir" or "Cor an Gualadoir"). Irish, Reel. Ireland; Counties Sligo, Clare. D Mixolydian/Major. Standard. AB (Flaherty, Mitchell, O'Neill): AABB (Sullivan, Taylor). As with many Irish tunes, various versions have more or less naturalized 'c' notes. The melody was also recorded by the great County Clare piper Leo Rowsome. O'Neill (1913) tells the story of 19th century piper John Morris (also known as Morris Sarsfield) of Clida, Headford, County Galway. It seems that Morris, who spent much time in England, chanced to travel to Wales to ply his art, "and got along swimmingly with the miners until asked to play 'Collier's Reel.'" Unfortunately, poor Morris could not call the tune to mind, if he knew it, and the miners, incensed that a musician would have the temerity to play before them and not know the melody called after their trade, chased him out of town for the deficiency in his repertoire. The tune is similar to "Farewell to Connacht." Sources for notated versions: flute player Sonny McDonagh (b. 1926, Rinnarogue, Bunninadden, County Sligo) [Flaherty]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Martin Byrne [Sullivan]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann in the 1980's [Taylor]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 122. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 37, pg. 50. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 246, pg. 129. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 132. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1404, pg. 261. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 646, pg. 116. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 57, pg. 23. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 9. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988). Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993). Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969).
T:Collier's Reel, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (646)
K:D Mix
G|(3FED FG A2 AB|cAdB cAGc|Addc d2 de|fdec dcAG|FEFG A2 AB|
cAdB cAGc|Addc A2 AG|EFGE FDD||g|fdeg fdec|Addc Addg|fdeg fdec|
ABcd e2 fg|agfa gfeg|fded cAGc|Addc A2 AG|EFGE FDD||

COLONEL O'HARA. Irish, Planxty. F Major. Standard. AB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 129, pg. 92-93. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

COME WEST ALONG THE ROAD (Bog Siar A Botar). AKA and see "Arboe," "The Monasteraden Fancy," "Over the Moor to Peggy." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. G Major. Standard. AB. Philippe Varlet reports that the tune was recorded in 1925 by John McKenna and in the 1940's by the Aughrim Slopes and Moat ceili bands (who called it "The Monasteraden Fancy," Monasteraden being a town on the Roscommon/Sligo border). Sources for notated versions: flute player and piper Frankie Lavin (b. 1940, Cloonshanville, near Frenchpark, Co. Roscommon) [Flaherty]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 150. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 6. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 793, pg. 137. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 31. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Lochshore CDLDL 1215, Craob Rua - "The More That's Said the Less the Better" (1992).
T:Come West Along the Road
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:240
K:G
d2 BG dGBG | GABd efge | d2 BG dGBG |1 ABcd edBc :|2 ABcd ed (3Bcd ||
g2 bg egdg | egdg ed (3Bcd | g2 bg egdB | ABcd ed (3Bcd |
g2 bg egdg | egdg ed (3Bcd | gabg efge | dega bage ||

COMHRA DONN, AN ("The Brown Casket" or "The Brown Chest"). AKA and see "An Cófra Donn," "The Brown Casket," "O'Connor Donn's," "The Star of Bethlehem." Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. The alternate title "O'Connor Donn's" appears to be a corruption of the Gaelic title. Sources for notated versions: accordion player Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Chieftains [Sullivan]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 210, pg. 85. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 29, pg. 11. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 22. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993. Appears as "The Brown Coffin").
T:An Comhra Donn
T:The Brown Coffin
T:An Cofra Donn
T:The Brown Chest
C:Traditional
R:Hornpipe
B:Music for the Sets - The Blue Book, David J Taylor
Z:Gordon Turnbull
M:C
K:D
A>BA>G F>Ad>e | f>gf>e d>cd>A | B>Gd>B A>FD>E | F>EE>D E2 F>G |
A>BA>G F>Ad>e | f>gf>e d>cd>A | B>cd>B A>FE>G | [1 F2 D2 D2 F>G:|[2 F2 D2
D2 f>g ||
a>fe>d g>fe>c | d>cd>e f>dA>F | G>AB>G F>Ad>e | (3fed g>f e2 f>g |
a>g (3fed g>fe>c | d>cd>e f>dA>F | G>AB>G F>AE>G | [1 F2 D2 D2 f>g:|[2 F2
D2 D2 F>G |]

CON CASSIDY'S (JIG) [2]. AKA and see "Sit-In Jig." Irish, Jig. An untitled jig from Teelin, County Donnegal, fiddler and storyteller Con Cassidy, named after him by the group Altan in place of the lack of a title. Green Linnet SIF-1109, Altan - "The Red Crow" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 3090, Maiaread Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994).
T:Con Cassidy's (Jig) [2]
T:Sit-In Jig
M:6/8
L:1/8
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:G
B3 BAB|d2 c A2 F|GAG GFG|B2 A A2 B|
c3 cBc|e2 d B2 c|ded cBA|1G3 G2 A:|2 G3 deg|:
f2 d def|gfg a2 g|f2 d ded|c2 A A2 g|
f2 d def|gfg a2 g|fed ed^c|1d3 deg:|2 ded cBA|

CONNOR DUNN'S. AKA and see "O'Connor Donn's." Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).

CRANN TARA [2]. Scottish, Strathspey. The crann tara, or 'fiery cross', was the signal to clansman to gather, or it signified the gathering itself. Allan MacDonald, Moidart Collection. Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

CROCK OF GOLD, THE. Irish, Reel. Composed by flute player Vincent Broderick, a member of the Kincora Ceili Band from 1952-1957. Often played in a medley with two other Broderick compositions, "The Tinker's Daughter" and "Midsummer Night." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977).

CROOKED ROAD, THE. Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Tara Records 2002, Christy Moore - "The Iron Behind the Velvet" (1978. Learned from the playing of John Kelly on concertina, John Regan on accordian and Paddy Glackin on fiddle).
T:Crooked Road
R:reel
M:4/4
K:G
~G2 AG FGAF|~G2 FG AdcA|~G2 AG FGAd|fdcA ~d2 cA|\
~G2 AG FGAF|~G2 FG AdcA|~G2 AG FGAd|fdcA ~d2 Bc||\
d~g3 fgaf|d~g3 agfe|d~g3 fgag|fdcA ~d2 Bc|\
d~g3 fgaf|d~g3 ~a2 ga|bgaf g ~a3|fdcA ~d2 cA||\

CROSSING THE MINCH. AKA and see "McNab's," "McNabb's Hornpipe." Scottish, "Pipe Hornpipe." D Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. "Traditional," states Aly Bain in his collection, though Christine Martin credits it to Pipe Major Donald Shaw Ramsey. The melody is known as "McNab's" or "McNabb's Hornpipe" in Cape Breton. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 4. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 52. Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog."

CROWLEY'S [1] (Ríl Uí Chruaidhlaoich). Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Breathnach, Moylan): AAB (Miller & Perron): AABB (Mulvihill, Taylor). The reel is commonly played along with the second Crowley reel and together are known as "Crowley's Reels." The Irish fiddling master Michael Coleman (b. 1891, Co. Sligo - d. 1945, New York) is the source for most versions of this tune, although accordion player Joe Cooley (Peterswell, County Galway) also helped popularize it. David Taylor (1992) thinks the tune was probably originally called "Crowley's" by Coleman, who, like other Irish musicians, frequently named tunes after his associates. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Tommy Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Michael Coleman (Co. Sligo/New York) [Williamson]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; John Clancy (Bronx, NY) [Mulvihill]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 137, pg. 55. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 3, No. 41. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 309, pg. 178. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 226, pg. 61. Taylor (Through the Half-Door), 1992' No. 34, pg. 25. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 18. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 18. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 84. Ace of Hearts AH56, Michael Coleman (reproduction of an old 78 RPM recording). Columbia, Michael Coleman, mid-1930's. Compass 7 4287 2, Cathal McConnell - "Long Expectant Comes at Last" (2000. Learned from the Coleman 78's). Decca Records, Michael Coleman. Gael-linn CEFCD 114, Tony MacMahon & Noel Hill - " "I gCnoc na Graí" ('In Knocknagree'). Green Linnet SIF-1051, Jackie Daly, Seamus and Manus McGuire - "Buttons and Bows" (1984). Green Linnet SIF1122, Kevin Burke - "Open House" (1992). Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998). Philo 2001, "Jean Carrignan" (learned from Coleman's recordings). RCA 5798-2-RC, "James Galway and the Chieftains" (1986).
T:Crowley's [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
B|A3dB2dB|ADFD ADFD|A3A BABc|dfeg fddB|ADFA B2 dB|ADFD ADFD|
A3A BABc|d2 eg fdde||f3a g2fg|eA c/B/A eA c/B/A|f3a g2 fg|afge fdde|f3a g2fg|
eA c/B/A eA c/B/A|f3a g2 fg|afge fd d||

CROWLEY'S [2]. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Moylan): ABB (Miller & Perron). Sources for notated versions: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]; New York/Sligo fiddler Michael Coleman [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 3, No. 19. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 3, No. 42. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 310, pg. 178. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; No. 18. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 84. Decca Records, Michael Coleman. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).

CUTTING FERNS. AKA - "Cutting Bracken." AKA and see "DulamaOn na Buinne Bui." Scottish, (Slow) Strathspey or Slow Air (6/8 time). A Minor (Athole, Kerr, Martin): A Dorian (Perlman). Standard. AAB (Kerr): AABB (Athole, Perlman): AABBCCDD (Martin). "Very old," notes James Stewart-Robertson in his Athole Collection. Under the title "DulamaOn na Buinne Bui" it was a highland in Donegal fiddler Mickey Doherty's repertoire, recorded by the Irish Folklore Commission in January, 1949. Source for notated version: Eddy Arsenault (b. 1921, St. Chrysostom, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 29, No. 3, pg. 18. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 26 (appears as "Cutting Bracken"). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 196. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 58. Green Linnet GLCD 1156, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection."
T:Cutting Ferns
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Slow Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:Aminor
B|A>A a2 g<e g2|e>dB>A G>AB>G|A<A a2 g<e g2|e>dB>g B<A A:|
|:g|e>dB>A G>AB>G|e>dB>A B2 B>g|e>dB>A G>AB>d|e>dg>B A2A:|

CUTTY'S WEDDING. Scottish, Jig. E Dorian. Standard. AABB'. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 8. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994).

DANCING FEET. Scottish, Reel. The tune was composed by G. S. Maclennan. Flying Fish FF-250, Battlefield Band - "Home is Where the Van Is" (1981. Heard by Battlefield Band bagpiper Duncan MacGillvray as a boy from the playing of his father). Green Linnet GLCD 1081, The Tannahill Weavers - "Dancing Feet."

DANSE DES FOINS, LA (The Hay Making Dance). French-Canadian, Jig (3/2 time). Canada, Québec, Gaspé Peninsula. D Major. ADAE. AA'BB'. This 'crooked' melody belongs to the family of "grondeuse" (grumbling) tunes, in which the fiddle is cross-tuned ADAE, which produces a resonent "grumbling" effect when the two lower strings are played. Source for notated version: Lisa Ornstein (Maine) [Remon & Bouchard]. Remon & Bouchard (25 Crooked Tunes, Vol. 1: Québec Fiddle Tunes), 1996; No. 23. Green Linnett GLCD 3042, La Bottine Souriante - "Chic and Swell" (1988. Learned from Lisa Ornstein).

DESSIE O'CONNOR'S. Irish, Slide (12/8). D Major. Standard. AABB. The 'B' part is similar to "Frieze Breeches." O'Connor was an excellent flute player in the north Connacht flute style and a Capel Street, Dublin, neighbor of fiddler John Kelly. Source for notated version: flute player Dessie O'Connor (Dublin) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 74, pg. 41 (appears as "Gan anim/Untitled"). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Shanachie 79093, Paddy Glackin and Robbie Hannon - "Whirlwind" (1995. A three-part setting earned from fiddler Dermot and piper Joe McLaughlin of Derry. It is considered by Dublin flute player Mick O'Connor to be of Leitrim origin, according to Caoimhin Mac Aoidh).

DEVILS IN DUBLIN. AKA- "The Devils o' Dublin." AKA and see "Merry Blacksmith," "Mist on the Loch," "Paddy on the Railroad." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. D Major. Standard. AABB. A variant of the well-known "Merry Blacksmith." The second tune in Michael Coleman's 1921 pair of tunes recorded under the single title "Boys of the Lough." Irish flute player Seamus Tansey has also recorded the tune under the "Devils" title. In Cape Breton the tune is known as "Mist on the Loch." Source for notated version: fiddler Peter Horan (b. 1926, Kilavil, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 67. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 3, No. 9. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999. Appears as "Devils of Dublin"). IRC Records, Michael Coleman - "The Musical Glory of Old Sligo" (1967).

DROCHAID LUIDEACH. Scottish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

DROWSY/DROUSY/DROWSIE MAGGIE [1] (Mairgreadin Taimeac/Suantac). AKA and see "Sleepy Maggie," "Sleeping Maggie," "Sleepy Moggie," "Pegg in the Settle." Irish, Reel. Ireland; Counties Donegal, Sligo. E Dorian or E Minor ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AB (Cranitch, Feldman & O'Doherty/Byrne, Flaherty, Mulvihill, O'Neill/1850 & 1001, Spandaro, Tubridy): AAB (Kennedy, Roche & Raven): ABB' (Feldman & O'Doherty/Doherty, O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Brody, Phillips): AABB' (Sweet): AA'BB' (Reiner): AA'BC (Songer): ABCE (Breathnach). A very common reel, the basic form of which is known to most Irish traditional musicians. There is a version of "Drowsy Maggie" particular to County Donegal, where, again, it is a popular reel. A third part to the tune is sometimes played that was first recorded in 1938 by Frank O'Higgins (see abc's below). Liz Carroll, in the notes to her album "A Friend Indeed," says the same third part was composed by the famous accordion player Joe Cooley, but in view of the fact that he would have been 14 at the time of O'Higgins' recording, this seems unlikely. Breathnach's source, Michael "The Master" McDermott (d. 1947), a schoolteacher and fiddler from Pomeroy and Carrigmore, County Tyrone, had two additional parts than the usual two-part setting; the first was similar to O'Higgins, while the fourth is a variation on the third. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Peter Horan (b. 1926, Kilavil, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]; "from my mother" [Mulvihill]; fiddler John Doherty (1895-1980, County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]; fiddler Peter Turbit [Feldman & O'Doherty]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]; from the mid-20th century collection of Michael 'Master' McDermott, who got his tunes from local musicians [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 143, pg. 70. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 91. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 86. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 68. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pgs. 162 & 235. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 70. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 15. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 48, pg. 13. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 136. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1425, pg. 264. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 662, pg. 118. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 16. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 178. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles) 1977; pg. 51. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 1, pg. 64, No. 163. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 66 (third part from the Massachusetts contradance band The Fourgone Conclusions). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1969; pg. 18. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg.43. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 23. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 62 (appears as "Sleepy Maggie"). Claddagh CC14, Cheiftains- "Cheiftains 4" (1973). Columbia C33397, Dave Bromberg - "Midnight on the Water" (part of "Yankee's Revenge" medley). Front Hall Records FHR029, Fourgone Conclusions - "Contra Dance Music from Western Massachusetts." Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. A Donegal version learned from the playing of Con Cassidy, James Byrne and John Doherty). June Appal JA 028, Wry Staw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978). Maggie's Music MM107, "Music in the Great Hall" (1992). Shanachie 29008, Frankie Gavin- "Traditional Music of Ireland." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1983). Transatlantic 337, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick." Dave Bromberg- "Midnight on the Water" (fifth tune in 'Yankee's Revenge Medley).
X:1
T:Drowsy Maggie
R:Reel
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:E Dorian
"Em"E2BE dEBE|"Em"E2BE "D"AFDF|"Em"E2BE dEBE|1 "Em"BABc "D"dAFD:|2 "Em"BABc "D"dAFA||"D"d2fd "A"c2ec|"D"defg afge|1 "D"d2fd "A"c2ec|
"G"BABc "D"dAFA:|"D"afge fdec|"G"BABc "D"dAFD||
X:2
T:Drowsy Maggie
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:County Clare setting.
K:D
~E2BE ~E2BE |~E2BE AFDF | ~E2BE GBdB | AFDE FE{G}ED ::\
fedB A4 | fedB AFD2 | e3f gfec | dBAG FDD2 :|
X:3
T:Drowsy Maggie, 3rd part
S:Liz Carroll, A Friend Indeed B 4b
L:1/8
M:C|
Z:Transcribed by Jerome Colburn
K:EDor
dBfB dBfB | A2 eA fAeA | dBfB dBfB | def^g aecf |\
dBfB dBfB | A2 eA fAeA | EGBe aece | d2 ce dAFD |]
X:4
T:Drowsy Maggie, 3rd part
S:Frank O'Higgins
L:1/8
M:C|
Z:Transcribed by Philippe Varlet
K:A
dBfB dBfB | cAeA cAeA | dBfB dBfB | defg aecA |
dBfB dBfB | cAeA cAeA | (3Bcd (3efg aecA | ~B3 c dAFD ||
X:5
T:Drowsy Maggie
S:Michael (Master) McDermott, Tyrone
B:Ceol Rince na hE/ireann 4, Breathnach/Small
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
R:reel
K:EDor
~E2 BE dEBE|~E2 Bc dAFD|~E2 BE dEBB|BABc dAFD|
~E2 BE dEBE|~E2 Bc dAFD|~E2 BE dEBB|BABc dAFA||
d2 fd c2 ec|d2 fd fa{b}af|d2 fd c2 ec|BABc dAFA|
d2 fd c2 ec|d2 fd fa {b}a2|(3bag af {a}gfed|BABc dAFA||
dBfB dBfB|cAeA cAeA|dBfB ~B2 fB|defg aecA|
dBfB ~B2 fB|cAeA cAeA|(3Bcd (3efg aecA|~B2 Bc dAFA||
dff{gf}e dfBf|ce e2 {fe}ceAe|dff{gf}e defg|a{ba}gfg aece|
dff{gf}e dfBf|ce e2 {fe}ceAe|afge fded|B{cB}ABc dAFD||

DRUMNAGARRY. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AA'BB. The melody is similar to "The Fisher's Rant." MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 74. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from Tommy Peoples). GTD Heritage Trad. HCD 008, Tommy Peoples - "Traditional Irish Music Played on the Fiddle."
T:Drumnagarry
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
D|G>DB,>G, (B,/C/D) G2|E<A,F<A, G>A, E<A|G>G,B,>G, (B,/C/D) G2|1
(3FGA (3DEF (3GEC (3B,A,G,:|2 (3FGA (3DEF G2 G,||c|B<GB>d g>dBG|
(3cec (3BdB A>Bc>d|B<GB>d G>dBG|(3FGA (3DEF G2 G,>c|B<GB>d g>dBG|
(3cec (3BdB A>Bc>e|(3dcB (3ABc (3BAG (3FGA|(3GFE (3DEF (3GDC (3B,A,G,:|

DOBBIN'S FLOWERY VALE [2]. Irish, Air. Not the tune usually associated with the song. Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. Learned from the singing of the late Robert Cinnamond of Glenavy, Co. Antrim).

DOCTOR GILBERT (An Dochtúir Gilibeart). AKA - "Dr. Gilbert's Fancy Concert Reel." AKA and see "The Dispute at the Crossroads," "The Loughros Point Reel." Irish, Reel. Ireland; County Sligo, Donegal. E Minor. Standard. AABB. "A well known reel of (Sligo/New York fiddler) Michael Coleman's" (Daniel Michael Collins). Caoimhin Mac Aoidh gives that it is most likely that the Dr. Gilbert referred to in the title was a scholar who in 1717 became Vice-Provost and Professor of Divinity at Trinity College, Dublin. His bust is still displayed in the Long room of the Library of the college that houses the Book of Kells. Source for notated version: accordion player Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 180, pg. 71. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 118. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 52. Blarney Castle Records BC-509, "Best of Irish Dance Music." Claddagh CC17, Seane Keane - "Gusty's Frolics." CEF 153, Paddy Glackin - "In Full Spate." Comhaltas LP, John Doherty. FFS 002, Pete Cooper - "The Wounded Hussar." Folkways Records, Michael Gorman & Willie Clancy. Green Linnet SIF-104, Seamus Connolly - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet SIF1035, Brian Conway & Tony De Marco - "The Apple in Winter" (1981). Green Linnet SIF-1098, Seamus Connolly - "Here & There" (1989). Green Linnet SIF 1163, Joe Derrane - "Return to Inis Mor." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Green Linnet SIF 3077, John Doherty - "Bundle and Go." IRC Records, Michael Coleman - "The Musical Glory of Old Sligo" (1967). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady." Shanachie 79093, Paddy Glackin & Robbie Hannan - "The Whirlwind" (1995. Appears as "Dispute at the Crossroads").
T:Dr. Gilbert's
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:reel
Z:Barney
K:G
gf|:eB BA ~B3 ^c|dB Ac BA GF|ED B,D (3GGG FG|ED B,D DB, A,B,|
DE ED ED B,D|(3GFE (3FED EF GA|(3B^cd ed (3Bcd gb|ag ed e2 gf:||
e ~B3 g ~B3|de fg af df|~g3 e ~f3 d|eg fd ed Bd|
af df ed B^c|dB AG FA DF|(3B^cd ed (3Bcd gb|ag ed e2 gf:||

DONALD MACDONALD. Scottish, Pipe Tune. Green Linnet GLCD SIF 1176, The Tannahill Weavers - "Leaving St. Kilda" (appears as first tune of "Islay Charms Set").

DONALD STEWART THE PIPER. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. ABB'. Composed by Scottish virtuoso performer and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), though only first published in J. Murdoch Henderson's Scottish Music Maker (1957), some thirty years after Skinner's death. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 19. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier - "The Dances Down Home" (1977).
T:Donald Stewart the Piper
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:D
(3DDD FA d3 A |\ dcBA GFED|(3CCC A,C ECA,C|edcB AGFE|(3DDD FA d3 A|
defa gfed|BcdB Aagf|1 edcB AG FE:|2 edcB AG Ac||
|:(3ddd fd Adfa|^gaba =gfed|(3ccc Ac EDCB,|Acea ^ga=ge|(3ddd fd Adfa|
^gaba =gfed|BcdB AdcB|AGFE DAFE:|

DONEGAL HIGHLAND. Irish, Highland. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from the playing of fiddler Charlie O'Neill, originally from Ardara, Co. Donegal, lately of Moy Co. Tyrone).

DONEGAL TRAVELLER REEL. Irish, Reel. D Major (Carlin): C Major (Mulvihill). Standard. AB. Sometimes also played in A Major. The tune was recorded on a 78 RPM disc by Hugh Gillespie, a Donegal fiddler much influenced by Michael Coleman. The name Donegal is Gaelic for 'castle of the strangers.' Source for notated version: L. Donnelly [Mulvihill]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 60, pg. 31. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 127, No. 216. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 158, pg. 43. Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992. Learned from Joe Madden).
T: Donegal Traveller
S: Hugh Gillespie
Q: 350
Z: transcribed by B.Black
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
d2 FA DAFA | d2 fd Beec | d2 FA DAFA | gbag fddc |
d2 FA DAFA | d2 fd ce a2 | bgaf gefd | ceag fd d2 ||
a^gab afdf | abaf ge e2 | ad d2 Addf | gbag fdde |
a^gab afdf | abaf geef | gbag fagf | egfe fddc ||

DONNIE MACGREGOR. Scottish, Green Linnet GLCD SIF 1176, The Tannahill Weavers - "Leaving St. Kilda" (appears as last tune of "Islay Charms Set").

DOWD'S FAVORITE. AKA - "O'Dowd's Favorite." Irish, Cape Breton; Reel. G Aeolian (Gm) ('A' and 'C' parts) & B Flat Major ('B' part) [Brody]. Standard. AABBCC (Brody): ABC (Miller & Perron). The melody is a setting of the Scottish march/strathspey "The Braes of Bushbie," perhaps composed by John Bowie and appearing in his 1789 Collection. It was said to be a favorite of the great Scots fiddler Niel Gow's. Reworked as "O'Dowd's Favorite" (often called "Dowd's Favorite") it was famously recorded by County Sligo/New York fiddler Michael Coleman in 1921. Coleman himself probably obtained the melody from Sligo fiddler John O'Dowd, who also had emigrated to New York and where Coleman heard him play. See also the related tunes "The Rover" [4], "Dublin Lasses," "Murtough Mulloy" and "Tee Ree Reel;" they have a similar sequence in the first part. "The Curragh Races" and "The Maid in the Cherry Tree" are also related, and like "Dowd's Favorite," shift to the relative major in the second part. Sources for notated versions: Steeleye Span (England) [Brody] & Andy McGann (New York City) [Miller & Perron]; Hughie Gillespie [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 89. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 5. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 22. Columbia CAL504-1, Paddy O'Brien (195?). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Appears as "Dowd's Reel," learned from Sean Maguire). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Learned from Mirella Murrey, Clifden, Co. Galway). Pegasus Mooncrest 9, Steeleye Span- "Ten Man Mop." Philo 200l, "Jean Carignan" (appears as the third tune of 'Cape Breton Medley'. Carignan learned his version from the Andy McGann recording). Shanachie 29002, "Kathleen Collins." Shaskeen Records OS-360, Andy McGann - "A Tribute to Michael Coleman" (c. 1965).

DOWN THE BROOM. AKA and see "The Crosses of Annagh," "Old Peter's Reel," "Paddy Cronin's," "Sligo Maid." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABB (Brody, Carlin, Miller & Perron, Taylor): AA'BB (Mitchell). Sources for notated versions: piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Paddy Killoran [Bulmer & Sharpley]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 90. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 1. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 73, No. 113. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 28. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 77, pg. 73. Taylor (Music for the Sets, Blue Book), 1995; pg. 17. Green Linnet 1016, The Irish Tradition- "The Corner House." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977). Rounder 7006, Theresa and Marie MacLellan (Cape Breton) - "A Trip to Mabou Ridge."

DINNY DELANEY('S) [1]. AKA and see "Hag in the Kiln," "Old Hag in the Kiln." Irish, Single Jig or Slide (12/8 time). D Mixolydian. Standard. ABB. Dinny Delaney (1836-1919) was a piper and character from Ballinasloe, east Galway. Source for notated version: piper Pat Mitchell, 1972 (Dublin, Ireland), who had the setting from Delaney's cylinder recording [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 88, pg. 46 (appears as "Old Hag in the Kiln"). Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, Vol. 4, No. 81. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 39, pg. 16. Green Linnet SIF 3005, The Bothy Band - "Old Hag You Have Killed Me" (1981. A reissue of the 1976 Mulligan LP). Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Shanachie 34007, Tommy Peoples (with Paul Brady) - "The High Part of the Road."

DUBLIN LASSES [1] ("Na Cailinide Ua Baile-Ata-Cliat" or "Cailini Baile-Ata-Cliat"). AKA and see "Boys of Ballysadare," "Boys of Ballisodare," "Coppers of Brass," "Coppers and Brass," "Crossing the Fields," "Douse the Monkey," "The Green Fields of Erin," "The Heather Breeze/Bloom," "The Heathery Breeze," "The Heathery Braes," "The Heathery Braes of Ballyhealy," "The Humours of Appletown," "Last Night's Work," "McNamara's Reel," "Miss Roden's Reel," "Miss Roddy's." Irish, Reel. F Major/D Minor. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB (Cole, O'Neill/Krassen). See also "The Dublin Reel." The name Dublin is derived from the Gaelic dubh linne, or 'the black pool'. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 8. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 254, pg. 132. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1328, pg. 248. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 587, pg. 107. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

DUKE OF GORDON [1]. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Neil (1991) notes that the Gordon family was one of the most powerful in Scotland, probably descended from the Gourdons who came to Britain with William the Conqueror. Most of the Scottish Gordons descend from one Sir Adam de Gordon who was given the lordship of Strathbogie in Aberdeenshire by Robert the Bruce. Adam's descendent George (4th Marquis of Huntly) attained the title of Duke in 1684, which expired in 1836 upon the death of the childless 5th and last Duke of Gordon. Niel remarks the powerful Gordons often stood alone in disputes with the crown, and, under the Earl of Huntly, lieutenant of Scotland, obtained land forfeited by others. As a result the Gordons were frequently engaged in clan disputes with such as the Mackintoshes, Camerons, Murrays and Forbeses. Composed by Niel Gow. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 44. Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).

DUSKY MEADOW. AKA - "Dusty Miller." Canadian, Strathspey. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Dunlay and Greenberg state there are several theories as to the origin of this strathspey. It is said to have been published by Elias Howe of Boston, who printed several collections in the 19th century, but they were not able to find it; Cape Breton fiddler Bill Lamey, they report, was one who was convinced it came from a book (his accompanist, Lila Hashern, suggested it was from a pipe collection). Famous Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald thought it might have been connected with Simon Fraser's unpublished second collection, though Paul Cranford (Little River, Cape Breton) could not locate in his microfilm copy of the manuscript). Joan MacDonald Boes suggests in was 'Little' Jack MacDonald who brought the melody to the attention of Cape Breton fiddlers. Finally, the composed has been attributed to Donald MacLellan, who suggested there existed four parts to it. See also dissertation by Earl V. Spielman entitled "Traditional North American Fiddling" (1969). The alternate title, "Dusty Miller," is the name of several tunes and became attached to "Dusky Meadow" (at least with some Cape Breton musicians) due to its being called by the "Miller" title on a recording by Bill Lamey and Joe MacLean (Kate Dunlay). Source for notated version: Carl MacKenzie (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 31. Celtic 20, Five MacDonald Fiddlers. Celtic CX 043, CX 1, CX51, Bill Lamey & Joe MacLean (c. 1950. Appears as "Dusty Miller"). CLM 1006, Carl MacKenzie - "Celtic Ceilidh" (1986). Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988. Learned from fiddler Kate Dunlay {Wayland, Mass./Ontario). Marimac C-6501, Peter Chaisson - "The Old Time Fiddlers of P.E.I." (1993). Nimbus NI 5383, John Morris Rankin & Howie MacDonald - "Traditional Music from Cape Breton Island" (1993). E25Q 7243 8 82013 2 2, Jonh Morris Rankin & Howie MacDonald - "Grey Dusk of Eve" (1995). RDRC 850, Raymond Ellis - "Dedicated to Mom and Dad" (1994).
T:Dusky Meadow
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:Toby Rider
K:A Mixolydian
B,| A,>A E<C D<G,D>B,| A,>A E<C F>DE>C| D<EC>E D/2C/2B,/2A,/2 G,>B,| A,>
AE>D C<A,A,>B,|!
,>A E<C D<G,D>B,| A,>A E<C F>DE>C| D<EC>E D/2C/2B,/2A,/2 | D<EC>E D/2C/2
B,/2A,/2 G,>d| c>A e/2d/2c/2B/2 c<A>A|!
g| a>ec>A B
GG>g| a>e c<A e>Ac>A| d<Bc>A d/2c/2B/2A/2 G>g| f<ae>d c>AA>g|!
a>ec>A B<GG>g| a>e c<A e>Ac>A| d<Bc>A d/2c/2B/2A/2 G>g (3faf
>d c>AA||

EAGLE'S WHISTLE, THE [1]. AKA - "The Eagle's Tune," "Fead an Iolair," "Fead an Fhiolair." Irish, March (2/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. Joyce (1873) identifies this as the marching tune of the O'Donovans whose ancient lands consisted of the territory of Hy Fidhgheinte, a district lying west of the river Maigue in county Limerick. "I gave a setting of this in my 'Ancient Irish Music' {"Eagle's Whistle" [2]}: and there are two others in the Stanford-Petrie Collection. These three are in 3/4 time: whereas the setting I now give is in 2/4, which is no doubt the proper original form, inasmuch as this was the marching tune of the O'Donovans (see my Ancient Irish Music, p. 53). The Cork MS. has this remark:--'The legend tells that with this tune the eagle whistles his young to rest'" (Joyce)./ Bayard believes this tune to be the common ancestor to the "Bonaparte's Retreat" family of tunes (see Bayard's (1944) note for Bonaparte's Retreat," No. 87), even though most Irish versions seem to be in triple meter. Hannagan and Clandillon, "Londubh an Chairn," No. 22, (lullaby version). Henerbry, Handbook, p. 212. JFSS, VII, 171 (appears as "Frog Dance"). Joyce, 1872, No. 53. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 361, pg. 166. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 41, pg. 28 (appears as "The Eagle's Tune"). Petrie, No. 1424. Flying Fish FF-407, Robin Williamson - "Winter's Turning" (1986). Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991. Learned from Shetland fiddler Aly Bain). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as "Fead an Fhiolair/Cry of the Eagles," first tune of "Kids").
T:Eagle's Whistle, The [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
G/|BB d/B/A/G/|BB d/B/A/G/|BAA B/G/|BAA B/G/|BB d/B/A/G/|BB d/B/A/G/|
EG GG>A|EG/G/ (GG/):|
d/|e/d/e/f/ ed/B/|e/B/d/g/ dB/A/|dg d/B/A/G/|BAA B/G/|e/d/e/f/ ed/B/|
d/B/d/g/ dB/A/|Bg/e/ d/B/A/G/|EG/G/ (G G/)||

Portrait of the 2nd Earl Grey. By Samuel Cousins after Sir Thomas Lawrence, 1829.
University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor.
***
Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 122. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 1, pg. 3. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 5. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993). Angus Cameron - "Strings to the Bow" (1977). "James F. Dickie's Delights" (1976).
T:Earl Grey
L:1/8
M:C
S:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
E|A>BA>E F>AE>c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<BB>c|A>BA>E F>AE>c|(3def (3efg a<AA:|
||g|a>Ag>A f>Ae>c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<BB>g|a>Ag>A f>Ae>c|(3def (3efg a<AA>g|
(3afa (3geg (3fdf (3ece|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<BB>c|A>BA>E F>AE>c|
(3def (3efg (3aed (3cdB|]

EARL'S CHAIR, THE (Cathaoir an Iarla). Irish, Reel. D Major {Mallinson, Taylor}: B Minor ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part) {Songer}. AABB (Breathnach, Mallinson, Miller & Perron, Taylor): AA'BB' (Songer). The chordal backing to the tune is more complicated than most. The melody actually resolves to D Major in both parts, though the accompaniment in the 'A' part starts on either a G Major or B Minor chord and the 'B' part starts either on E Minor or A Major. Historian and concertina player Gearoid O'hAllmhurain relates that the tune's origins lie with an East Galway flute player by the name of Pakie Moloney (who was an uncle of Galway-born New Jersey flute player Mike Rafferty). Moloney is said to have composed "The Earls Chair" while sitting on a large rock in the Derrycrag Wood, East Galway. Since he was mid-way between the townlands of Derryoober East and Derryoober West at the time he originally entitled the piece "Down between the two Derryoobers," although he fortunately rethought this later and changed the name to the name of the rock, "The Earl's Chair." That formation is named after the Earl of Clanrickard who reportedly rested there during his hunts. Source for notated version: flute player Éamonn de Stabaltún (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 142, pg. 57. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 6, pg. 3. Miller & Perron (Irish Tradtional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 28. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 69. Taylor (Through the Half-door), 1992; No. 14, pg. 11. Green Linnett SIF1071, "Patrick Street." Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Harp 10, "All Ireland Champions - Violin." Shaskeen - "The Joys of Life". Shaskeen - "Shaskeen Live."
T:Earl's Chair
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:Transcribed by Frank Claudy
S:Jack Coen (Co. Galway/Bronx, NY)
R:reel
K:Bm
B3 B BAFA|B2dB BAFB|A2FA DAFA|AFdB ADFA|
~B3B BAFA|B2Bd BAFB|~A3B defd|1 edef d2 FA:||2 edef d2 Bd||
e3B d3B|e3B dBAB|~e3f d3e|(3gfe dB ADFA|e4{a}e4|{a}e2{a}e2 defg|
~a2 ba afeg|1 fedB ADFA:||2 fedB A3||c

EILEEN CURRAN [1]. AKA and see "Maura Connolly's," "Sailor Set On Shore," "Sailors On Shore," "The Sailor's Return." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. An American version of the tune was recorded in the 1920's by Ohio fiddler/violinist William Houchens, for the Starr Recording Company under the title "Hel'n Georgia." Sources for notated versions: accordion player Patrick O'Brien, 1970 (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; sessions at the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 239, pg. 124 (appears as untitled reel). Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 36. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).

EILEEN MACDONALD. Scottish. Green Linnet GLCD 1171, Simon Thoumire Three - "March, Strathspey, and Surreal."

FARMER'S DAUGHTER [1]. AKA and see "Aberarder's Rant." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Paul Cranford (1997) states the "Farmer's Daughter" title seems to be a 20th century appelation first used in The Seaforth Highlanders (1936). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 62, pg. 27. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 36. Temple TP021, Battlefield Band - "On the Rise" (1986) and Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997). Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Wintson "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 59).
T:The Farmer's Daughter
M:4/4
L:1/8
C:Scottish Traditional
R:Reel
K:D
B|d2 de f2 ef|dedB d/d/d AB|d2 de f2 ea|cAeA cAAB|
d2 de f2 ef|dedB d/d/d dg|fgag f2 ef|A/A/A eA cAA:|
c|d2 f2 B/B/B fB|cBfB cBBc|d2 eA A/A/A eA|cAeA cAAc|
d2 f2 B/B/B fB|cBfB cBBc|d2 ag f2 ef|A/A/A eA cAA:|

FASHION O DA DELTING LASSES, DA. AKA and see "The Duke of Perth." Shetland, Reel. Shetlands, Mainland district. D Major. Standard. AAB. Aly Bain states "it must have been composed in honour of some new fashion in the Delting area." Source for notated version: A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 22. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

FATHACH EIREANNACH, AN (The Irish Giant). Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. The tune was named in honor of Charles Byrne, a 7 ft., 7 in., Derryman who died in London in 1783. He had a mortal fear of being dissected by anatomists and directed his body be flung into the sea upon his death. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 17, pg. 131. Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994. Learned from Vincent McLaughlin from Magherafelt, Co. Derry, via his nephew Caoimhin MacAodha).

FERMANAGH HIGHLAND. Irish, Highland. A variant of "Moneymusk." Green Linnet GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned in County Fermanagh from the playing of Mick Hoy, Gabriel McArdle and Seamus Quinn).

FAHY FROM KILLYBEG HOUSE. Irish, Reel. The title is from Seamus Connolly in honor of the composer, fiddler Paddy Fahy of Killybeg House, near Aughrim, County Galway. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988).

FAIR HAIRED MOLLY. Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).


FAREWELL TO MILLTOWN. AKA - "Farewell to Milltown Malbay." Irish, Reel. G Dorian. Standard. AABB. Composed by West Clare fiddler Martin "Junior" Crehan. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Mick O'Brien - "May Morning Dew."
T:Farewell to Miltown Malbay
M:4/4
L:1/8
C:Junior Crehan
S:Mick O'Brien
D:May Morning Dew
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
K:EDor
ED|B,EE^D EDEF|GEED EDB,C|D2B,D A,DB,D|A,DDC DB,A,D|\
B,EE^D ~E3 F|GEED EDB,C|D2AD BDAD|FBAF E2::EA|\
Bee^d ~e3 f|gefe edBc|cddc dcBc|defd edBA|\
Bee^d ~e3 f|gefe edBc|c~d3 BAFE|DBAF E2:|

FINTAN McMANUS'S. Irish, Reel. A modern composition by Fintan McMaus, Co. Fermanagh. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993).

FIONA MACLEOD. Scottish, Pipe Reel. Composed by Donald MacLeod for his daughter. Pipe Major Donald MacLeod's Collection. Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

FISHERMAN'S LILT [3]. AKA and see "Fisher's Hornpipe." American, Hornpipe. Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "The Bungee Jumpers" medley).

FLAG(G)ON, THE. AKA and see "Floggin' (Reel), The" (Irish). Scottish, Irish, English; Reel. England, Northumberland. G Mixolydian. Standard. AABB (Vickers): AABBCD (Athole, Gow): AABBCC'D (Kerr). "This is still a very popular tune in Ireland, where it is known as the 'Flogging Reel'" (Seattle). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 254. Kerr (Merrie Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 131, pg. 16. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 482. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 3; No. 488. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 170. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).
T:Flagon, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
c|:BG G/G/G BGdG|BG G/G/G G2gd|BG G/G/G BGd_B|A/_B/c =Fc AfcA:|
|:g2 dB GBdB|g2 dB gbaf|g2 dB GBd_B|A=fcf AfcA:|
B/c/d gd B/c/d gd|B/c/d gd BGG_B|A/_B/c =fc A/B/c fc|A/_B/c =fc AFFc|
B/c/d g>d B/c/d gd|B/c/d gd BGGe|=fgag fgfd|cA=fc AFF||
c|B/c/d Gd BdGd|BdGd BGG_B|A/_B/c =Fc AcFc|Ac=Fc AFFc|
B/c/d Gd BdGd|BdGd BGGe|~=fgag ~fgfd|cA=fc AFF||

FLAX IN BLOOM ("An Líon Air Blatacd," "An Líjon Faoi Blat" or "An Líon Faoi Bhláth") AKA and see "The Lily White," "Marquis of Huntley's Highland Fling." Scottish, Strathspey; Irish, Reel or Fling. Ireland, County Clare, Sligo, Roscommon, the Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. D Mixolydian or D Major (Breathnach, Cranford, Flaherty, Moylan, Mulvihill, O'Neill/1850, Taylor). Standard. AB (Emmerson, Flaherty, O'Neill, Roche): AAB (Lerwick, Raven): AABB (Cranford, Moylan, Taylor): AABB (Mulvihill): AABBCC (Breathnach). Composed by George Jenkins, according to Lerwick (1985). The melody is "always associated with that part of Ireland around Connolly, County Clare," notes Christy Moore (1978). The tune was released on a 78 RPM record 1927 by Sligo fiddler James Morrison in New York, and recorded somewhat later by Cape Breton Irish-style fiddler Johnny Wilmot, also on a 78. The third part in Breathnach's setting, not usual for the tune, was a product of schoolteacher and fiddler Michael ("The Master") McDermott (d. 1947), Pomeroy and Carrigmore, County Tyrone. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Michael Lennihan (b. 1917, Kilnamanagh, Frenchpark area, Co. Roscommon) [Flaherty]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra) who associates the tune with box-player John Brosnan [Moylan]; fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) [Cranford]; "from my mother" [Mulvihill]; collected from local musicians in 1937 by Michael 'Master' McDermott (Carrickmore, southern County Tyrone) [Breathnach]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann in the 1980's [Taylor]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 114, og, 59. Cranford (Brenda Stubbert's), 1994; No. 57, pg. 20. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 55, pg. 143. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 89. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 28-29. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 20, pgs. 12-13. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 34, pg. 9. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 130. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1389, pg. 258. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 633, pg. 114. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 173 (appears as "The Lily White"). Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 2; No. 284, pg. 35 (listed as a Fling). Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 10. Green Linnett SIF-104, Seamus Connolly - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Brenda Stubbert - "House Sessions" (1992). Green Linnett GLCD 1020, Brendan Mulvihill - "The Flax in Bloom." Green Linnett SIF-1098, Seamus Connolly - "Here & There" (1989). Tara 2002, Christy Moore - "The Iron Behind the Velvet" (1978. Learned from concertina player Paddy Murphy, Connolly, County Clare).
T:Flax in Bloom, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (633)
K:D
D2 (3FED FAAf|(3gfe (3fed edBd|(3ABA FA dfaf|gafd edBd|D2 (3FED FAAf|
(3gfe (3fed edBd|ABAF ABde|faeg fd d2||(3fgf df (3efe ce|dcdB AGFG|
DFAd FAdf|(3gfe (3fed edBd|(3fgf df (3efe ce|dcdB AGFG|DFAc defg|afeg fd d2||

FLOATING CROWBAR, THE. AKA and see "The Rathcroghan Reel." Irish, Reel. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Cairan Carson (Last Night's Fun, 1996) says he has heard this tune attributed to fiddle player Brendan McGlinchey. The tune is closely related to "The Cameronian." Taylor (1992) speculates that "It is quite possible that the title is a tongue-in-cheek name given by some wag when no name was known by him or her." However, it seems that the term 'floating crowbar' has meaning in the building trades, where it refers to either a type of switch employed by electrical engineers, or to setting concrete (i.e. the concrete is ready when it can support, or 'float', the weight of a crowbar). Source for notated version: fiddler Paddy Ryan [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, Vol. 4, No. 24. Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 23, pg. 18. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Shaskeen - "My Love is in America." Artie McGlynn - "McGlynn's Fancy" (1994).

FORESTERS (HORNPIPE), THE. Canadian, New England; Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Rodney Miller (N.H.) [Phillips]. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 89. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 63. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 109, pg. 70. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 116. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 194. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1980; pg. 17. Alcazar Dance Series FR 204, "New England Chestnets 2" (1981). Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997. Learned from Dermot McLaughlin).
T:Forester's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
|:fg|a^g af df bg|a^g af d2cd|eA fA eA fA|ed cB A2 fg|
a^g af df bg|a^g af d2cd|BG FG Ad ce|f2d2d2:|
|:cd|ed cB AG EG|FA df a2 fa|ge Bg fd Af|ed cB A2cd|
ed cB AG EG|FA df af ba|gf ed cA Bc|d2f2d2:|

FOUR CROSS ROADS, THE. Irish, Polka. Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).

FOXHUNTER'S (REEL), THE [1] (Fiagaí an Mhada Rua). AKA and see "The Fiddler is Drunk," "Patrick Kelly's Reel." Irish, Reel. G Major (Mallinson, Sullivan, Taylor): A Major (Alewine, Breathnach, Moylan). Standard, GDGD or AEAE. AABBCCDD (Alewine): ABCDE (Breathnach): ABCCDD'E (Moylan): ABBCCDDEE (Mallinson, Sullivan, Taylor). One of the "big" reels at sessions in modern times. It is generally easier for fiddlers to play it in the key of 'A' Major. The GDGD or AEAE tuning for the tune was traditional in County Kerry, and was brought to southern County Clare by the late fiddler Patrick Kelly of Cree (Fiddler Magazine, Spring 1994). "Grieg's Pipes" is a related tune that, says Breathnach, "left its mark on "The Foxhunters," as did "Miss McLeod's." Goodman prints the tune under the title "Greig's Pipes." Sources for notated versions: Chieftain's fiddler Seán Keane (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, October, 1984 [Moylan]; sessions at the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 18. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 205, pg. 106. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 51. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 29, pg. 13. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 157, pgs. 90-91. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 1, pg. 1. Taylor (Through the Half-door), 1992; No. 16, pg. 13. Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Eireann, Patrick Kelly - "The Fiddle Music of Clare." Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Green Linnet SIF 3018, "Molloy/Peoples/Brady" (1978). Green Linnet SIF 3064, Dick Gaughen - "Coppers and Brass." Rounder 0215, James Bryan - "The First of May" (198-). Shaskeen - "The Joys of Life."

GALLAGHER'S FROLIC [3]. AKA and see "O'Gallagher's Frolics." Irish, Jig. E Dorian. Standard. AABB. A variant of version #1 and a favorite session tune. O'Neill thought the tune "closely resembled" his printings of "Frieze Breeches" and the air "I Buried My Wife and Danced on Top of Her." Source for notateed version: Martin Mulhare, recalled from his playing with the original Tulla Céili Band [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 350, pg. 186. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 53. Sing Out, Vol. 34, No. 3, Summer 1989; pgs. 94-95. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 38. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall" (appears as "Gallagher's"). Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).
X:1
T:Gallagher's Frolic [3]
M:6/8
L:1/8
R:Jig
K:Em
D|EDE GFE|BAB dBA|~B3 BAB|GBG AFD|
EDE GFE|BAB dBA|BAG FAF|GEE E2:|
|:d|e2f gfe|gga bge|ded fed|faf fed|
e2f gfe|dfe dBA|BAG FAF|GEE E2:|
X:2
T: Gallagher's Frolics
S: M. Mulhaire
Q: 325
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
K: Edor
D | EDE GFE | BAB dBA | BdB BAB | GFG AFD |
EDE GFE | BAB dBA | BAG FAF | GED E2 :|
B | e2 f gfe | g2 a bge | d^cd fed | f/g/ad fed |
e2 f gfe | d^ce dBA | BAG FAF | GED E2 :|

GALWAY BAY ("Camuis Gaillibe" or "Cuain Gaillim"). AKA and see "Democratic Hornpipe." Irish, Hornpipe. G Dorian. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 343, pg. 168. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 178. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1619, pg. 301. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 853, pg. 147. Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Éireann CL13, "Tommy Peoples" (1976). Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Lochshore CDLDL 1215, Craob Rua- "The More that's Said the Less the Better" (1992). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann and Paul Brady" (learned from accordion player Joe Burke).
T:Galway Bay
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (853)
K:G Minor
GA|BABc dcd^f|g^fga gabg|fdbg fdcd|BAG^F GFDF|
G2 GA BABG|F2 FG AGFD|GABc dcBA|B2G2G2:|
|:g2|gfd^f gabg|gfdf GFDF|BABc dcd=e|fcdB AGFD|
G^FGA BABc|BFdB Afec|d^fga bag=f|d2g2g2:|

GALWAY HORNPIPE [1]. AKA and see "The Baldheaded Bachelor," "Dan Lowry's Hornpipe," "McDermott's Hornpipe," "McDanaugh's Clog," "McDonaugh's Clog." Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB (Allan, Bain, Cranitch, Mallinson): AABB' (Mulvihill). The tune appears as the first two parts of a four-part hornpipe recorded under the title "McDermott's" in 1922 by New York/County Sligo fiddler Michael Coleman (see "McDermot's No. 2" for the second two parts). Source for notated version: Fennig's All Stars (New York) [Brody]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 107, pg. 27. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 29. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 116. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 87, pg. 160. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 82, pg. 34. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 36, pg. 99. Front Hall 01, Fennig's All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Philo I 2018, Jean Carignan- "Plays Coleman, Morrison, and Skinner" (appears as third tune of 'Hornpipe Set').

GARDEN OF BUTTERFLIES, THE. Irish. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).

GEESE IN THE BOG [1] ("Na Géabha sa bPortach" or "Na Geadna Annsa Mointe"). Irish, American; Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB (Cole, Kerr, O'Neill/Krassen): AABB' (O'Neill/1001): AA'BBCCDDEE (Breathnach). Several tunes have been named "Geese in the Bog." One tune by this name was popular as long ago as 1779; its playing is mentioned by Berringer in an account of a "cake" dance (a dance where a cake was given as a prize) he attended in Connacht. The great County Sligo/New York fiddler Michael Coleman recorded the tune on a 78 RPM disc in the key of G Major, although his version differs slightly. Breathnach states the tune is related to "Saddle the Pony" printed by Levey (No. 43) and to Joyce's "The Housemaid" (No. 841). He says that Petrie (edited by Stanford, 1905, No. 940) printed the first two parts.
***
The title "Geese in the Bog" reminds one of a story related to Charlie Piggott by flute player Roger Sherlock, who was born in County Mayo on the border with Sligo. The story appears in Vallely's and Piggott's Blooming Meadows (1998) and concerns Michael Coleman's brother Jim, also a fiddler and accounted by many to have been even more proficient at the instrument than his famously-recorded brother. Sherlock remembered house-dances that Coleman played for, performing all night, sometimes playing his instrument while simultaneously dancing on a half-door that had been taken from its hinges. At that point coins would be thrown onto the door at his feet, his only pay. Sherlock reminisced:
***
Well, then he'd put the fiddle in the case and outside he had a flock
of geese that would accompany him to and from the dances. The geese
used to follow him everywhere. He had fifteen or eighteen geese. And
he used to walk from our house to a place called Drumacoo, which
would be-he used to walk as the crow flies of course, across the
fields and the bogs-'twould be roughly about seven miles. And
the geese would be with him all the time.
***
Source for notated version: accordion player Sonny Brogan (d. 1966. Dublin, Ireland; originally from Prosperous, County Kildare. Brogan made records in the 1930's with The Lough Gill Quartet and was a member of Ceoltóirí Chualann under the direction of Seán Ó Riada) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 28, pg. 12. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 77. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 106. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 46, pg. 40. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 67. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1085, pg. 204. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 279, pg. 61. Green Linnet GLCD 1092, "Liz Carroll" (1988).
T:Geese in the Bog [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (279)
K:D
Add fdB|AFA AFA|Add fdB|AFA B2A|Add fdB|AFA DFA|gfe fdB|AFA BdB:|
|:AFE DFE|DFA BdB|AFD DFA|BGA BdB|AFE DFE|
DFA Bgf|gfe fdB|1 AFA BdB:|2 AFA B2d||

GILLAN'S REEL. AKA - 'Gillian's Reel." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Peter Milne (1824-1908), the Tarland Minstrel, a self-taught fiddler and one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers as well as his friend. Milne earned a living playing in theaters until his career deteriorated from opium addiction, reducing him to ekeing a livlihood from busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in 1908, destitiute, in an insane asylum. "Gillan's Reel" is sometimes nowadays called "Gillian's Reel." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 230. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

GIRL THAT/WHO BROKE MY HEART [2] (An Cailin a Bris Mo Croide). Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Flaherty, O'Neill/1001): AABB (O'Neill/-Krassen). A more major key variation than version #1. Source for notated version: flute player Sonny McDonagh (b. 1926, Rinnarogue, Bunninadden, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 123. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 91. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 456, pg. 89. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978).
T:The girl who broke my heart
N:usually played in G (with a hint of minor)
R:reel
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:Amix
ed|cA ~A2 FEDF|EAA^G ABcd|efge dcAG|EGGF G2 ed|
~c2 BA FD ~D2|EAA^G ABcd|efge dcAG|1EAA^G A:|
2 EAA^G AEGB||
A2 ce aecA|G2 Bd gdBG|A2 ce aece|dcde dB^GB|
A2 ce aecA|G2 BD gdBG|ABce dcAG|EAA^G A4:|

GIRLS OF OUR TOWN, THE [1] (Na Cailinide Ar Bailesa). Irish, Air (6/8 time, "with spirit"). D Major. Standard. AB. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 574, pg. 101. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill and Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993. Appears as "Girls of the Town." Mulvihill remarks the tune was favored by his first cousin, Jerry Mulvihill, for his classes in dance.)

GLADSTONE'S REEL. AKA - "A.A. Gladstone (Edingburgh)." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB (Skinner): AABCCD (Hunter). Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Played as part of the romantically entitled set "Warblings From the Hill's" during Skinner's 1921 concert tours. Source for notated version: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 121. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 232. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 22. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall" (appears as "The Gladstone"). Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (appears as the fourth tune of the "J. Scott Skinner Medley"). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King".

GLASS OF BEER, THE. AKA and see "John Stenson's," "Listowel Lasses," "McFadden's." Irish, Reel. B Minor. Standard. AB (Mulvihill): AABB (Mallinson). A well-known traditional session tune, perhaps composed by John McFadden, an Irish traditional musician in Chicago and a contemporary and source of Captain Francis O'Neill. O'Neill's "Pick Your Partner" is a similar tune supplied by McFadden. Sources for notated versions: flute player Cathal McConnell [Bulmer & Sharpley]; Bridge Céilí Band [Mulvihill]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 3. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 61, pg. 27. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 207, pg. 56 (appears as untitled reel). "Chieftains 9." Gael Linn CEF 103, Frankie Gavin - "Up and Away." Green Linnett SIF1040, Touchstone - "The New Land." Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Ossian 39, Oisin - "Over the Moor to Maggie."
X:1
T:Glass of Beer, The
M:C|
L:1/8
K:B Minor
|:fB~B2 fBaB|fB~B2 e2de|fB~B2 ~f3e|1 dfaf e2de:|2 dfaf ~e3c\
|:~d3e ~f3e|defd edBA|~d3e ~f3e|1 dfaf ~e3c:|2 dfaf edba||\
fB~B2 fBaB|fB~B2 e2de|fB~B2 ~f3e|dfaf e2de|\
fB~B2 bBaB|fBeB fede|fB~B2 ~f3e|dfaf e4||
X:2
T:Glass of Beer
L:1/8
M:C|
B:Mulvihill - 1st Collection (207)
S:Bridge Ceili Band
K:E Minor
de|f~B3 fBaB|f~B3 e2 de|f~B3 fgfe|dfaf e2 de|
f~B3 fBaB|f~B3 e2 de|f~B3 fgfe|dfafe2 dB||
d3e fgfe|d2 fd eA (3cBA|dcde|fgfe|dfaf e2 dB|
d3e fgfe|defd eA (3cBA|d3e fgfe|dfaf e2 de||

GOOD NATURED MAN, THE. AKA and see "The Steamboat Hornpipe," "Tim the Turncoat." Irish, Hornpipe. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).

GOODBYE MISS GOODAVICH. Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. ABB'. Composed by Lunasa guitarist Donogh Hennessy. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).
T:Goodbye Miss Goodavich
C:Donogh Hennessy
D:Lúnasa Otherworld
N:Played on Low F whistle on the recording
R:reel
M:C|
K:G
eBBB cBAG|AEGA DE A2|B/2c/2ded geag|
fffa gfed|eBBB cBAG|AEGA DEG2|GeBG FdAF|
FEBA GEGA|BzBB cBAG|AEGA DEG2|B/2c/2ded geag|
fffa gfed|eBBB cBAG|AEGA DEG2|GeBG FdAF|
FEBA GEGA|:BDG/2A/2B edcB|AFFF DFFF|B/2c/2dfd aaab|
geed efga|bz bg efg/2f/2e|adfa bagf|geBG FdAF
|1 G/2F/2EBA GEGA:|2 G/2F/2EBA GEB/2c/2d|

GRAF SPEE, THE. AKA - "The Grand Spey." AKA and see "The Grants of Strathspey," "Winnie Green's Reel," "The Western Lasses." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Sligo, Derry. C Major (Flaherty, O'Neill): D Major (Alewine, Black). Standard. AABBCC (Flaherty): AABCCD (Black): AABBCCD (Alewine): AABB'CCD (O'Neill): AABCCDDE (Mulvihill). Seattle (1987) believes the name to be a curious corruption of the title "Grants of Strathspey" transformed into the name of the famous World War I German battleship (itself named after a famous German admiral). Flaherty's version is somewhat distanced from O'Neill's. "The Western Lasses" as a variant is more noticeable in the second and third parts of the tune rather than the first. Philippe Varlet finds an early recording of the tune on a 78 RPM disc by an American Irish piper named Martin Beirne (who led the Blackbird Orchestra) on which it is called "The Grand Spy." Sources for notated versions: fiddler Fred Finn {1919-1986} (Kiltycreen, Kilavil, County Sligo) [Flaherty]; Jim McElhone (County Derry) [Mulvihill]; New York fiddlers Andy McGann and Brian Conway [Black]; Tony Smith [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 20. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 189, pg. 100 (appears as "The Grand Spey"). Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 3, No. 44. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 83. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 137, pg. 37. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 162. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). SIF 3002, Kevin Burke & Jackie Daly - "Eavesdropper" (1981). Green Linnet SIF 3018, "Molloy/Peoples/Brady" (1978).
X:1
T:The Graf Spee
S:Paul O'Shaughnessy
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
M:C|
L:1/8
K:C
EDCD EG (3GGG|AGcG AGcG|EDCD EG (3GGG|AGcG ED (3DDD:|\
efed cBcA|GE (3EEE GAcd|efed cBcA|GECE EDD2|\
efed cBcA|GE (3EEE GAcd|eaag eged|cAGE EDD2|]\
eg~g2 gedg|eaa^g ~a3=g|eged cBcd|eaag egdg:|\
eccB cAGE|GAcd cAGE|GAcd {e}dcdc|AGcG EDDg|\
ec~c2 cGAG|~c3d cAGE|GAcd {e}dcdc|AGcG EDDg|:\
egcg egcg|fada fada|egcg ec~c2|ABcd ed~d2|\
e~a3 gedg|eccB cAGE|GAcd {e}dcdc|1AGcG EDDg:|2AGcG EDDF|]
X:2
T: The Grand Spey (sic)
S: McGann - Conway
Q: 350
R: reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
FEDE FA A2 | BAdA BAdA | FEDE FA A2 | BAdF FE E2 |
FEDE FA A2 | BAdA BAdA | FEDE FA A2 | BAdF FE E2 ||
fedc dcAF | Adfe dBAB | dB B2 fB B2 | BAdF FE E2 |
fedc dcAF | Adfe dBAB | (3fga ba fded | BAdF FE E2 ||
faa^g a3 e | (3fga ba b3 a | fafe dcde | fbba feeg |
faa^g a3 e | (3fga ba b3 a | fafe dcde | fbba feeg ||
fcdg fcdg | gbef gbeg | fAde fedB | ABde feeg |
faa^g a3 e | egfe dcdB | AFAB defe | dBAd FE E2 ||

GRANDE GIGUE SIMPLE, LA (The Great Single Step Dance). AKA and see "Red River Jig." French-Canadian, Jig (3/4, or 6/4 and 3/2 time). D Major. Standard or ADAE. One part (Carlin): ABCD (Reiner & Anick): ABCCD (Remon & Bouchard). This melody is probably the most popular and famous solo step-dance tune for virtuostic stepping in French-Canadian tradition, though it is in actuality not a jig ('gigue') but a reel. It is performed at a variety of tempos, depending on the taste of the fiddler or the step-dancer for whom it is played. Made up of repetitive phrases, the melodic line is somewhat free-form, states Guy Bouchard, and each fiddler seems to have his or her own version. Métis fiddlers from Manitoba play it under the title "Red River Jig." Source for notated version: Louis Boudreault (Québec) via Lisa Ornstein [Reiner & Anick]. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 101, pg. 63. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pgs. 60-61. Remon & Bouchard (25 Crooked Tunes, Vol. 2: Québec Fiddle Tunes), 1997; No. 17. Green Linnett GLCD 3042, La Bottine Souriante - "Chic and Swell" (1988. Learned from Pierre Laporte, "who believes that his interpretation is fairly similar to that played by the late Jules Verret). Voyager VRLP-322, Louis Boudreault - "Old Time Fiddler of Chicoutimi, Québec" (1977, 1993).

GRAY BOB. Scottish. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994).

GREEN COTTAGE, THE. AKA and see "Denis Doody's," "From Billy to Jack," "Glen cottage no. 2," "Green cottage polka, no. 2," "The Glin cottage polka no. 1," "St. Patrick was a gentleman," "St. Patrick was your patron saint." Irish, Polka. E Minor. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 236, pg. 137. Gael-Linn CEF092, Julia and Billy Clifford - "Ceol as Sliabh Luachra." Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Learned by Mary Coogan from her father Jim). Topic 12T358, "Jackie Daly" (appears as the first tune of "Glin Cottage Polkas").
T:Green Cottage, The
R:polka
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:Edor
"Em"BA |:"Em"GE ED|"Em"B,E EF|"Em"GF ED|"G"GA BA|"Em"GE ED| "Em"B,E E2|"Em"BA GF|1 "Em"E2 BA:|2 "Em"E2 "Em"E2|| |:"Em"Be ef|"Em"eB BA|"Em"B/d/e df|"Em"e2 ef|"Em"ga/g/ "D"fg/f/| "Em"ed BA|"Em"BE E/F/G/A/|1"Em"B2 "Em"BA:|2"Em"B2|

GREEN-GOWNED LASS, THE (Cailín an Ghúna Uaine). Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: flute player Matt Molloy (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 195, pg. 87. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Martin Hayes - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993). Mulligan Records LUN 004, "Matt Molloy" (1976).

GREEN GROW THE RUSHES O. AKA - "Green Grow the Rashes." AKA and see "The East Neuk of Fife," "Grant's Rant," "Irish Whiskey," "Over the Hills and Far Away," "Paddy Caught/Got a Rat," "Paddy Killed the/a Rat," "Paddy Run the/a Rat." Scottish (originally), Irish, English, American; Strathspey, Hornpipe, Barndance, Highland, Highland Schottische, Fling, Slide (12/8 time), March or Reel. G Major. Standard. AB (Cole, Moylan, Tubridy): AAB (Athole, Ford, Gow): AABB (Ashman, Bayard, Hardings, Johnson, Kerr, Miller & Perron, Raven, Sullivan, Taylor): AABB' (Skye): AA'BB' (Flaherty). The air first appears in early lute manuscripts of the 17th century; a note in Graham (1908) claims the first strain of the tune occurs twice in the Straloch Manuscript of 1627. It appears in the Panmure Collection of c. 1705, a fiddler's MS repertory book. Johnson (1984) states the whole tune was recorded in fiddle manuscripts from the 1680's and was already ancient when printed in Stewart's Reels (1761-5, pg. 13) and the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). The present title is from Robert Burns's reworking of the poem sung to a tune called "Grant's Rant"--in the transition the rant form was dropped and a strathspey rhythm was substituted, a not uncommon fate of rants. Burns' version is somewhat more polite, states Robin Williamson, for the tune seems originally to have been linked to lyrics satirizing the proflicacy of priests. Johnson (1984) confirms the Scottish song (first mentioned in The Complaint of Scotland in 1549) originally was a rude or risque text.
***
The American collector Ford (1940) relates the following tale, a superficially plausible and thus repeated yarn, though unfortunately completely untrue: "'Green Grow the Rushes O' was a popular melody of American soldiers at the time of the Mexican war, to which they set many verses. The following verse is descriptive of their associations in the land of the senorita:
***
Green grow the rushes, O!
Red are the roses, O!
Kiss her quick and let her go,
Before you get the mitten, O!
***
The deviltry of the American soldier boys was very much resented by the Mexicans. Any American who attempted to kiss a senorita was certain to have his face slapped by her. They called this to 'get the mitten.' Whereever Americans were would also be heard verses of 'Green Grow the Rushes, O.' The Mexicans, in mockery, gave the name 'green grow' to their tormenters, their pronunciation being 'gingo.' After the war 'Gringo' became the sobriquet for all Americans." Another source gives the similar assertion that the song which gives rise to the word "gringo" is "Green Grow the Lilacs." Ford, at any rate, has a poor reputation for veracity.
***
Accordion player Johnny O'Leary, of the Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border, plays the tune as a 12/8 time slide. In other parts of Ireland the tune is played as a barndace, highland and/or hornpipe.
***
Bayard's thirteen Pennsylvania collected versions of the tune are divided into two groups, corresponding with two main British Isles variants. One is called in America the "Over the Hills and Far Away" (a floating title) group, corresponding to "The East Neuk of Fife" in the British Isles; the other retains the British "Green Grow the Rushes" title. One of Bayard's sources (1981, Appendix No. 11, pg. 576) was a Massachusetts Irish-American born near Cork, a Mrs. Anastasia Corkery, who knew in the 1930's the following quatrain to the first strain:
***
Green grow the rushes O,
Blackbirds and thrushes O,
The piper kissed the fiddler's wife
Behind the bunch of rushes O.
***
Sources for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Miller & Perron]; Johnny O'Leary (Slibah Luachra, Co. Kerry), recorded at Ballydesmond in February, 1973 [Moylan]; 13 southwestern Pa. fiddlers, fifers and manuscripts [Bayard]; Gillespie MS. [Johnson]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; flute player Noel Tansey (b. 1940, Cuilmore, County Sligo) [Flaherty]; Castle Ceili Band [Sullivan]. Aird (Selections), Vol. 6, 1903?; No. 37. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 74b, pg. 31. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 206A-M, pgs. 158-162. Breathnach, 1971; No. 4. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 21 (Reel). Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin String), 1971; Nos. 30 & 31, pgs. 130-131. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 72. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 95. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 12. Graham, 1908; pg. 37. Hardings All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 86, pg. 27. Jarman, 1951; pg. 76. JEFDSS, Vol. 9; pg. 147 (Shetland variant). Johnson, Vol. 1, 1787-1803; No. 77. D. Johnson, 1984; No. 70, pg. 223. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 17. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 5, pg. 19. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 117, pg. 14. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 80. McGibbon (A Collection of Scots Tunes), c. 1795; Vol. 1; pg. 12. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 15 (hornpipe version). Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 25, pg. 16. Oswald (The Caledonian Pocket Companion), Vol. 1, 1780?; pg. 18. Petrie-Stanford (Complete Collection), 1903-06; No. 1427. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 173. Saar, 1932; No. 18. Scottish Country Dance Book, Book 12, 1930; No. 2. Sharp (Sword Dance Tunes), Book 2, 1911-13; pg. 3. Smith (The Scottish Minstrel), Vol 4, 1820-24; pg. 91. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 157. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 30, pg. 12. Taylor (Where's the Crack), 1989; pg. 4. Thompson (A Select Collection...Scottish Airs), 1, Vol. 4, 1805; No. 155. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 12. Walsh (Caledonian Country Dances), Vol. 2, 1737; pg. 25. White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 72. Flying Fish, Robin Williamson - "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers, Vol. 2". Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music From Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Kathleen Collins). Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976).
T:Green Grow the Rashes O!
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
D|G2 BA BGGB|A/A/A ed eAAB|c2 ce dBGB|A/B/c BA GEE:|
A|G/G/G gf gddg|eaa^g aeef|gage dcBG|A/B/c BA GEEA|
Gggf gddg|eaa^g aeef|gbeg dgBG|A/B/c BA GEE||

GREIG'S PIPES (Píopaí Greig). AKA and see "Cobbler's Hornpipe," "Connolly's Reel," "Craig's Pipes," "The Fiddler is Drunk," "The Foxhunters," "Greg's Pipe Tune," "Gregg's Pipes," "Gun Do Dhuit Am Bodach Fodar Dhomh" (The Old Man Wouldn't Give Me Straw), "The Kerry Huntsman," "Kregg's Pipes," "The Manchester," "Píopaí Greig," "Willy Wink(ie)'s Testament," "Willy Wilky." Scottish, Shetland, Canadian, Irish; Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. G Major (Breathnach, Mulvihill, Taylor, Tubridy): A Major (Athole, Cranford, Hardie, Perlman). Standard, AEAE or AEAC#. AABB (Taylor): ABC (Feldman & O'Doherty, Tubridy): ABBC (Mulvihill): AABBCC' (Perlman): ABBCCDD (Cranford/Fitzgerald): AABBCCDD (Athole, Gow, Hardie): AABB'CDE (Breathnach). AEAC# tuning was preferred for "Greig's Pipes" in the 18th century (Johnson, 1983) as it is set, for example in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection, but it is also played in ADAE tuning. Played in AEAE tuning, the tune was employed on the island of Whalsay, Shetland, by fiddlers John Irvine and Andrew Polson as one of the tunes for the "bedding the bride" ritual (Cooke, 1986). AEAE is also a common tuning for the piece on Cape Breton Island, especially with the early-mid 20th century generations of fiddlers, such as Mary Hughie MacDonald and Donald MacLellan (Paul Cranford, 1997) {Winston Fitzgerald, however, played it in standard tuning}. "Greig's Pipes" is a double-tonic tune that is also in the pentatonic scale; a characteristic now-a-days recognized as Scottish, but the double-tonic was also common in English music prior to 1700 when it dropped out of favor in that part of the island. To avoid the need to tune up and retune after playing the piece, it was, according to Charles Milne of Dufftown, the last item of an evening's program (Collinson, 1966). The melody appears in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth, 1768, and Joshua Campbell's 1778 Collection of Newest and Best Reels (pg.11), though John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 44). A Cape Breton bagpipe setting was printed by Barry Shears in his Gathering of the Clans Collection (1991) under the title "Gun Do Dhuit Am Bodach Fodar Dhomh" (The Old Man Wouldn't Give Me Straw), and Perlman (1996) adds that another Cape Breton title is "Greg's Pipe Tune." A dorian setting of the tune also goes by the name "Gregg's Pipes" in Kerr's 4th. Several Irish versions are found as "Craig's Pipes."
***
In Ireland the tune appears in print in O'Farrell's Pocket Companion, a setting reprinted by O'Neill in Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (288, 1922). O'Neill printed the tune elsewhere under the title "Limber Elbow" (a poor version, says Breathnach), and the first part of the tune appears in his "Edenderry Reel." Other Irish names include "The Kerry Huntsman" and "Connolly's Reel."
***
Sources for notated versions: accordionist Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; John Clancy (Bronx, New York) [Mulvihill]; Hughie McPhee (b. 1924, Elmira, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Priest Pond) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 96, pg. 41. J. Campbell, Newest and Best Reels (c. 1778). Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 100, pg. 42. Dunlay & Greenberg (Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 136. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 169. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 24. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 122. Lowe, Collection of Reels and Strathspeys, 1844. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 6, pg. 2. O'Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody); No. 288. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 104. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 16. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 20. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 24. Celtic SCX 57, Dan R. MacDonald et al - "The Fiddlers of Cape Breton." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Rodeo RLP 107, Joe MacLean - "And His Old Time Scottish Fiddle" (c. 1967. Appears as "Athole Reel"). Rodeo RLP 59, Dan R. MacDonald - "Fiddling to Fortune with..." Rounder 7009, Doug MacPhee - "Cape Breton Piano" (1977).
X:1
T:Greig's Pipes
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
f|eAcA eAAf|eAcA BFFf|eAcA eAcA|B/B/B (cA BFF:|
|:B|cAcA cAAB|cAcA BFFB|cAcA EacA|B/B/B (cA BFF:|
|:A|EA,CA, EA,A,F|EA,CA, FB,B,F|EA,CA, EA,CA,|B,/B,/B, (CE FB,B,:|
|:G|A2 A>E CA,A,E|A2 (AE FB,B,G|A2 A>E CA,EC|B,/B,/B, (CE FB,B,:|
X:2
T:Greig's Pipes
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
B3 B BAGA|B2 GB AGEG|B3 B BAGB|A2BG AGEG|B3B BAGA|
B2 dB AGEG|B~d3 eBdB|AcBG AGEG||DG G2 DGBG|DGBG AGEG|
DG G2 DGBG|dBAc BGGE|DG G2 DGBG|DGBG AGEG|DG G2 DGBG|
DBAc BGGB||d2 Bd egge|d2 BG AGEG|d2 Bd eg g2|agbg ageg|
D2 Bd egge|d2 BG AGEG|d2 Bd eg g2|a2 bg aged||

HANKIE DANCE, THE. Scottish. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

HAPPY DAYS. AKA and see "Let's Dance." Irish, Jig. Composed by the late Irish-American musician Larry Redican (1908-1975). Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), Vol. 4; No. 54 (appears untitled). Green Linnet SIF 1063, Irish Tradition - "The Times We've Had." Green Linnet GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992. Learned from Brooklyn, New York, born accordion player Billy McComiskey).
T:Happy Days
T:Let's Dance
C:Larry Redican
R:jig
M:6/8
L:1/8
Z:Philippe Varlet
K:F
G|FDC FAc|agf dfc|Bdf Acf|~B3 GEC|
FAG FAc|agf dfc|BAG AGF|EFG F2:||
c|faf gec|dBf cAc|faf gec|deg fga|
bag afd|cdB AFG|ABc fcA|BGE F2:||

HAPPY ONE STEP. Cajun, One Step (4/4 time). USA, Louisiana. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: fiddler Dennis McGee (La.) [Francois]. Francois (Yé Yaille, Chère!), 1990; pg. 159. Morning Star 45002 - "The Early Recordings of Dennis McGee 1929-1930." Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as second tune of "Blackbird").
T:The Happy One-Step
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:Cajun One-Step
K:G
d>G B>d- d>G B>d|g>c e>g- g>a g>e|d>G B>d- d>B- B>A|A>G G>E D2 G>B|
d>G B>d- d>G B>d|g>c e>g- g>a g>e|d>G B>G A>G E>D
|1 E>G G>G- G2 A>G:|2 E>G G>G- G2 B>d||
b>d b>b- b>d b>d|a>d a>a- a>d a>d|b>d b>b- b>d b>d|c'>d c'>c'- c'>d c'>d|
b>d b>b- b>d b>d|a>d a>a- a>d a>d|b>d b>b- b>d b>d|c'>d b>d- a>d g>e|]

HARRY BRADSHAW'S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton). Harry Bradshaw is an excellent writer on Irish traditional music. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 16, pg. 5. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - "Fathers and Sons" (1992). Green Linnett, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection" (1995). Green Linnet GLCD 1134, Cherish the Ladies - "Out and About." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).

HARSH FEBRUARY, THE. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Scottish accordion player Phil Cunningham (brother of Black's source). Source for notated version: Scottish fiddler Johnny Cunningham [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 267, pg. 144. Green Linnet, Johnny Cunningham - "Squeeze." Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog."
T: Harsh February
S: ? Phil Cunningham
Q: 350
R: reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
D | FABd B2 AF | ABdf e2 de | f2 ed BddB | ABdA FE E2 |
FABd B2 AF | ABdf e2 de | b2 fb afef | afef d3 :|
f/a/ | b3 f a2 fe | defd edBA | FABd FABd | afde fe e2 |
b3 f a2 fe | defd edBA | FABd FABd | afef d3 :|

HEATHER BREEZE, THE [1] ("Leoithne an Fhraoigh" or "Feoitne Fraoc"). AKA and see "Coppers and Brass," "Coppers of Brass," "The Dublin Lasses," "The Green Fields of Erin," "Heather Bloom," "The Heathery Breeze," "The Heathery Braes of Ballyhealy," "The Humours of Appletown," "Lady's Pantaloons," "Limerick Lasses," "McNamara's Reel." Irish, Scottish; Reel. Ireland, Counties Donegal, Sligo, Clare. G Major (most versions): G Major/Mixolydian (Kerr). Standard. AB (Allan's, Flaherty, Feldman & O'Doherty, Tubridy): AABB (Russell): ABC (Breathnach, O'Neill): AA'BCC'DD' (Kerr). Apparently the title is a corruption of "Heathery Breas," which makes sense as the Gaelic word brae refers to the slopes of a hillside. Doolin, north County Clare, tin whistle player Micho Russell (1989) thought a 'heathery breeze' was some kind of fairy wind, an isolated but strong gust which "roots up the grasses out of the ground," and offered the folklore vegatables grew better in the soil where heather grows and that it is also a good place to find a shamrock. P.W. Joyce collected the tune (which appears indentified only as "an old reel" in his Old Irish Folk Music and Songs) in Kilkenny in the mid-19th century. In County Monaghan Breathnach found the melody as "Coppers of Brass," "The Heather Bloom" and "The Heathery Braes." "Coppers and Brass" was a Tipperary and Kerry title and "The Heathery Braes of Ballyhealy" was collected in Leitrim. Breathnach (1976) finds O'Neills "Crossing the Fields," in Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody, a related tune. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Tommy Peoples, 1968 (Co. Donegal & Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; fiddler Kathleen Morris (Corlisheen, Ballyrush, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]; Donegal fiddler John Doherty (1895-1980) [Feldman & O'Doherty, Jordan]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 61, pg. 15. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 149, pg. 79. Feldman & O'Doherty (Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 76 (appears as "Untitled Reel"). Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 60. Jordan (Whistle and Sing!), Vol. 2. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 122, pg. 15. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 285, pg. 144. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 779, pg. 135. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989; pg. 15. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 20. Flying Fish 266, Malcolm Dalglish & Grey Larsen - "Thunderhead" (1982). Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).
T:Heather Breeze [1]
R:reel
M:C
K:G
D>GBG dGBG|DFAF cFAF|DGBG dGBG|ABcA BG G2:|
g2 (3agf gbag|fede fgaf|g2 (3agf gbag|fdcA G2 Bd|
g2 (3agf gbag|fede fgac'|(3bag (3agf gbag|fdcA BG G2||

HEATHERY CRUACH (An Cruach fraoch). AKA and see "John Mhosey McGinley's Reel." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Glencolumbkille and Kilcar area, southwest Donegal. D Major. Standard. Cruach is the Gaelic word for mountain peak. Source for notated version: John Doherty (1895-1980, Co. Donegal) [Feldman]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned from a 1977 recording of the late fiddler John Doherty, obtained from Caoimhin Mac Aoidh).
T:Heathery Cruach
L:1/8
M:4/4
Z:Bill Reeder
K:D Major
(3ABc|d2 AG FDDE|FDAF E2 (3ABc|d2 AG FDAD|
FGAF D2 (3gfe|d2 AG FDDE|FDAF E2 FG|
ABAG FDDE|1 FGAF D2 :|2 FGAF D2 ed||
cA (3AAA cAGE|cBcd efed|cA (3AAA cAGE|FGAF D2 ed|
cA (3AAA cAGE |cBcd e2 de|fded cAAG|FGAF D2 ed :||

HECTOR [MACDONALD] THE HERO. Scottish, Lament ("with intense sadness," 6/8 time). A Major. Standard. AAB (Hunter): AA'BB (Perlman): ABC (Martin, Skinner). Composed by the great Scots fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) in honor of the famous Major-General Sir Hector MacDonald (1857 - 1903), one of the most famous Victorian-era British military figures. MacDonald was born in the Black Ilse and at the age of thirteen enlisted in the 92 Gordon Highlanders. He came up through the ranks, serving as a color-sergeant in the Afghan War, until he was promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant at the end of those hostilities. Transferred to South Africa, he was mentioned in dispatches in the 1st Boer War, and in 1885 he led a military expedition up the Nile to Sudanese territory. In 1888 he took part in the Battle of Sunkin and a year later won the Distinguished Service Order for his service in Sudan. He remained in the Sudan for the next decade, seeing action in the Battle of Tokar (1891), and leading the 2nd Infantry Brigade in the Dunglen Expeditionary Force, by which time he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General. During the next two years he took part in the battles of Khartoum and Omdurman, with which he ended his Sudan service. He subsequently served as the Aide de Camp to Queen Victoria and as a Major General with the Highland Bridgade in South Africa during the Boer War. In 1901 he was knighted and the next year was stationed as Major General with British forces in Ceylon, however, in 1903 he was accused of being a homosexual and, feeling disgraced, he committed suicide.
***
Though the charge of homosexuality was probably true it was popularly believed by all levels of society in Scotland at the time that MacDonald had been framed. Soon after the incident Edward VII made his first visit to Scotland, though the atmosphere was decidedly chilly.
***
This ballad was composed in the soldier's honor:
***
HECTOR THE HERO
***
Lament him, ye mountains of Ross-shire;
Your tears be the dew and the rain;
Ye forests and straths, let the sobbing winds
Unburden your grief and pain.
Lament him, ye warm-hearted clansmen,
And mourn for a kinsman so true
The pride of the Highlands, the valiant MacDonald
Will never come back to you.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
Lament him, ye sons of old Scotia,
Ye kinsmen on many a shore;
A patriot-warrior, fearless of foe,
Has fallen to rise no more.
O cherish his triumph and glory
On Omdurman's death-stricken plain,
His glance like the eagle's, his heart like the lion's
His laurels a nation's gain.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
O rest thee, brave heart, in thy slumber,
Forgotten shall ne'er be thy name;
The love and the mercy of Heaven be thine;
Our love thou must ever claim.
To us thou art Hector the Hero,
The chivalrous, dauntless, and true;
The hills and the glens, and the hearts of a nation,
Re-echo the wail for you.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
Perlman (1996) notes that the melody is currently played on Prince Edward Island as a lament at funeral services. Source for notated version: Sterling Baker (b. mid-1940's, Morell, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Montague) [Perlman]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 29. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 24. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 208. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 49. The Bothy Band (1st album). Dougie MacDonald - "A Minor." Green Linnet GLCD 1189, John Cunningham - "Celtic Fiddle Festival: Encore." Greentrax CDTRAX 096, "Tony McManus" (1995).
T:Hector the Hero
C:James Scott Skinner
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/4
M:3/4
K:A
A,|{B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|{D}E3|~E2A,|{A,B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|\
{A,}B,3|~B,2A,/<B,/|{B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|{D}E2A,|{A,}[A,2A2]{AB}A/F/|\
E<<A,{B,}C|{D}B,2=G,/<A,/|A,3|~A,2||A|{AB}c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|e3|e2A|\
{AB}c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|{A}B3|~B2A/<B/|c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|{c}e2A|\
{ABcdefg}a2{ab}af|e<<A{B}c|{Bd}[E2B2]{Bd}[E/B/][E/A/]|[E3A3]|\
[E2A2]c/<[c/e/]||[d2f2][~df]|[c2a2]g/<f/|[A3e3]|[A2e2]c/<[c/e/]|\
[d2f2]{fg}e/<c/|e<<AB/<c/|[E3B3]|[E2B2]c/<[c/e/]|[d2f2]f/{gfef}>g/|\
[c2a2]a/{bag}>f/|e<<AB|c<<a{ab}a/f/|e<<AB/<c/|\
{Bd}[E2B2]{Bd}[E/B/][D/A/]|[E3A3]|[E2A2]|]

HER MANTLE SO GREEN. AKA and see "George Reilly," "The Plains of Waterloo," "Young Willie of Famed Waterloo." Irish, Slow Air. This melody is published in Colm O'Lochlainn's Irish Street Ballads (No. 7), and was taken from early twentieth century broadsides. The ballad tells of a young woman visited in the meadows by a young man; he tests her to see if her love is true; she passes, having remained faithful to her William Reilly, whom she believed killed at the battle of Waterloo. He reveals himself and they are wed. A similar situation occurs in Homer's Oddessy, when Ulysses returns home after his voyages of twenty years. The melody also belongs to the 18th century song "George Reilly."
**
When I was a-roving one morning in spring,
To view the sweet flowers and the meadows so queen,
I met a young damsel, she appeared like a queen
With her costly fine robes and her mantle so green.
**
Green Linnet GLCD 1151, Seamus McGuire - "The Wishing Tree" (1995).

HERR ROLOFF'S FAREWELL. Scottish, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of a musical friend who helped him arrange his Harp and Claymore collection. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 19. Skinner (Harp and Claymore Collection). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

HIGHEST HILL IN SLIGO, THE. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by the late County Cavan/Philadelphia fiddler and composer Ed Reavy (1898-1988). Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 23, pg. 24. Green Linnet GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988. Learned from Reavy during his visit to Connolly's home in Limerick in the late 1960's).

HIGHWAY TO KILKENNY. Irish, Slip Jig. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 451, pg. 88. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Learned from Brooklyn fiddler Sheila McGuire).
T:Highway to Kilkenny
L:1/8
M:9/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (451)
K:G
G2g gfg dBG|A2B c2d ecA|G2g gfg dBG|1 e/f/ge f/g/af gdB:|2 A/B?cA BGE E2z||
|:e2f g2e fdB|e2f g2a bge|1 g/a/bg f/g/af e/f/ge|B/c/dB A/B/cA BGE:|2
faf gbe dBG|A/B/cA BGE E2||

HOLE IN THE HEDGE, THE. AKA and see "Seamus Cooley's Jig." Irish, Jig. G Major. The first part is similar to "The Angry Peeler." Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

I'M THE BOY FOR BEWITCHING THEM ("Is Misi An Buacaill Do Meallfad Iad" or "Is Misi an Buacaill Le na Meallad"). Irish, Slip Jig. G Major. Standard. AAB. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 84. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1151, pg. 217. O'Neill (1001), 1907/1986; No. 432, pg. 85. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988).
T:I'm the Boy for Bewitching Them
L:1/8
M:9/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (432)
K:G
B|G>AG G<ge dBG|A>BA ABd e2g|G>AG gfe dBG|A>Bc BAB E2:|
|:d|g>dg gag fed|efe efg a2b|gdg gag fed|gfe dcB A2d|g>dg gag fed|
efe efg a2 g/a/|bgb afa gfe|def gdB A2||

INGONISH JIG. Canadian, Double Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. E Minor. Standard. AABB. Composed perhaps by the late Cape Breton fisherman and fiddler Mike MacDougall (d. 1980), of Ingonish Beach, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Dunlay & Greenberg say MacDougall may have composed it, or it may be Irish in origin. Source for notated version: Mike MacDougall (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Reich]; Jerry Holland (learned from Mike MacDougall) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 114. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music from Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 75. Boot BOS 7231, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). PLP4-1012, Joe Cormier- "The Cheticamp Connection" (1983. Appears in "Jig Medley in D"). Cape Breton's Magazine Tape, Mike MacDougall- "Mike MacDougall's Tape For Fr. Hector." Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned by Ciaran Tourish from the playing of Cape Breton/Massachusetts fiddler Jerry Holland.) Wild Asparagus WA 003, Wild Asparagus - "Tone Roads" (1990).

I BURIED MY WIFE (AND DANCED ON HER GRAVE). AKA - "I Buried My Wife and Danced on Top of Her." AKA and see "(An) Bristin Mire," "Cunla," "Friar's Breeches," "Friar's Britches," "Frieze Britches/Breeches," "Gallagher's," "O'Gallagher's Frolics," "On St. Patrick's Day I was Gay," "The Trumlo." Irish, Air (6/8 time). The air is the vehicle for the song of the title. O'Neill (Irish Folk Music) thinks it "closely resembles" his "Frieze Breeches" and "O'Gallagher's Frolics." Gael-Linn CEFCD 153, Paddy Glackin - "In Full Spate" (1991). Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993). Kells Music 9501, Dervish - "Playing with Fire." Piping Pig Productions PPPCD001, Jimmy O'Brien-Moran - "Seán Reid's Favourite" (1996. Learned from Clare piper Willie Clancy).

I HAVE NO MONEY ("Níl Aen Airgiod Agam," "" or "Táim gan Airgead"). AKA and see "Miss Hamilton." Irish, Reel. C Major (O'Neill): D Major (Breathnach). Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): ABB' (O'Neill/Krassen). Sources for notated versions: whistle player Mick Crehan, 1971 (Co's. Clare and Kildare, Ireland) [Breathnach/CRE II]; from the playing of piper Séamus Ennis (Dublin), who learned them from his father, a piper taught by Nicholas Markey who in turn had been taught by the renowned piper and pipemaker Billy Taylor of Drogheda and later Philadelphia [Breathnach/Ceol]. Breathnach (Ceol V, No. 2), 1982. Breathnach (The Man and His Music), 1997; No. 6, pg. 73. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 137 [1], pg. 74. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 124. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1356, pg. 253. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 610, pg. 111. Globestyle Irish CDORBD 085, Jackie Daly - "The Rushy Mountain" (1994. Reissue of Topic recordings). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992. Learned from Chicago fiddler Liz Carroll). Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T: Níl Aon Airgead Agam
T:I Have No Money
L:1/8
M:C
S: Séamus Ennis
K:D
FAdB A3G|(3FGA dA FEEG|FAdB A2 Af|afeg fedB|
FAdB ABAG|FAdA FEEG|FAdB Af|afeg fedf||
Afef dcdf|afeg fb b2|afef dcdB|ABAG FADf|
Afef dcdf|afeg fb b2|af (3gfe fdBd|A2 AG (3FGA D2||
(3FGA dB A3G|(3FGA DA FEEG|(3FGA dB A2f|afeg fedA|
(3FGA dB A3G|(3FGA dB FEEG|FAdB A3f|afeg fedf||
afef dcdf|afeg fb b2|afef dcdB|ABAG FDDf|afef dcdf|afeg fb b2|
afge fdBd|A2 AG FA D2||

IF EVER YOU WERE MINE. Irish, Air. Composed by Leitrim fiddler Maurice Lennon, a member of the Irish group Stockton's Wing. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Green Linnet GLCD 1074, Jerry O'Sullivan - "The Invasion." NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993).
T:In Memory of You
C:Morris Lenahan
S:Cherish the Ladies CD
N:I think this appears as If Ever You Were Mine on J. O'Sullivan's 1st cd.
Z:Transcribed by Phil Sexton
M:3/4
K:G
DE|"G"G4 e2|"G"d4 (3BAG|"G"AB G4|"G"G4 DE|
"G"G4 e2|"G"d4 Bd|"D"d6|"D"d2 e2 f2|"G"g4 ed|
"G"g4 ed|"G"e2 d3B|"G"AB G2 (3GFE|"G"D4 e2|
"G"d4 (3BAG|"C"DE G2A2|"G"G6|"G"{A}G4 dc||
|:"G"B3d (3BAG|"G"d4 Bd|"C"c2 d2 e2|"G"d4 Bc|
"G"B3d (3BAG|"G"d4 Bd|"C"c2 d2 e2|"D"def def|"G"g4 ed|
"G"g4 ed|"G"e2 d3B|"G"AB G2(3GFE|"G"D4 e2|"G"d4 (3BAG|
"C"DE G2A2|"G"G6 |[1 "G"G4dc :|[2 "G"G4 DE ||

HUMOURS OF ANDYTOWN. Irish, Reel. A modern composition (1992) by flute player Frankie Kennedy in praise of his home in Belfast. Green Linnet GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993).

HUMORS OF WESTPORT, THE (Sugra Catair-Na-Mart). Irish, Reel. F Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB (O'Neill/Krassen). See also related "Pretty Peggy" [5]. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 91. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1177, pg. 222. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 457, pg. 89. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Seamus Connolly - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Shaskeen OS-360, Andy McGann, Felix Dolan, Joe Burke - "A Tribute to Michael Coleman" (c. 1965). Seamus Creagh & Aidan Coffey.
T:Humors of Westport, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (457)
K:F
f2 fe fcAc|f2 fe fage|fage fcAc|BAGA Bcd|f2 fe fcAc|f2 fe fcAc|
f2 fe fagb|afge fcAc|BAGA BdcB||AFcF dFcF|AFcF BdcB|AFcF dFcF|
BAGA BdcB|AFcF dFcF|AFcF BdcB|Acfa gefc|BAGA Bcde||

HUNTER'S PURSE, THE. AKA and see "The Old Bush," "The Five Leaved Clover," "The Hawthorne," "The Haymaker," "Heel of the Hunt," "Paddy Kelly's," "An Sceach." Irish, Reel. A Mixolydian (Am) or A Dorian (Mallinson). Standard. AABB. See also "The Haymaker," "The Heel of the Hunt," "The Five Leaved Clover," "An Sceach." John Glatt reports in his biography The Chieftains (1997) that band leader Paddy Moloney hired the services of a lilter, Pat Kilduff, especially for their recording of "The Hunter's Purse" on "Chieftains 3." The recording studio was in London, however, and Kilduff had never ventured from Athlone, County West Meath, where he was born. The first night the nervous man was put up in a hotel in Dublin, and Pat was told to stay put-which he did, only wandering to the hotel bar for a pint of stout...where he chanced to meet the famous fiddler Seán Maguire. The two ended up staying up all night lilting and playing music, and when he was collected by Moloney in the morning he was hardly in shape for his very first plane ride. Kilduff endured the flight but rushed for the bathroom as soon as the plane landed, having been too frightened to relieve himself on the plane. While in London 'the boys' (the more 'worldly' members of the band) showed the lilter 'the sights', including pornographic book shops in Soho: "It was a terrible shock and such madness. We knocked great fun out of it," said Moloney (Glatt, pg. 82). Source for notated versions: Pete Sutherland with the Arm and Hammer String Band (northern Vt.) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 138-139. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 75, pg. 32. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 45. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 8. Claddagh CC10, The Chieftains - "Chieftains 3" (1971). Copley DWL-9-617, Jack Wade- "Ceili Music Fron Ireland." Green Linnet GLCD 3009/Mulligan LUN 021, Kevin Burke- "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Island ILPS 9379, Chieftains- "Chieftains 3." Kicking Mule 216, Arm and Hammer String Band- "New England Contra Dance Music." Shanachie 79023, "Chieftains 3" (1982).
T:Hunter's Purse, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
K:A Dorian
(3Bcd|eAAB AGEF|GBAF {A}GE D2|cBcd eged|(3Bcd ef {a}gedg|
eAAB AGEF|GBAF GE D2|cBcd eged|1(3cBA BG A2gf:|2 (3cBA BG AB^cd||
|:ea{b}ag agef|gbaf gedB|cBcd eged|(3Bcd ef {a}ge d2|
ea{b}ag agef|gfaf gedB|cBcd (3efg ed|cABG A2cd:|

HUT ON STAFFIN ISLAND, THE. Scottish. Green Linnet GLCD 1059, "Relativity."

ISLAY CHARMS. Scottish, Pipe Tune. Green Linnet GLCD SIF 1176, The Tannahill Weavers - "Leaving St. Kilda" (appears as second tune of "Islay Charms Set").

JACK DANIEL'S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Nova Scotia. Composed by John Morris Rankin. Green Linnett GLCD 1146 - The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994. Learned from Scottish dancer Billy Forsyth, who had the tune while on a trip to Nova Scotia). Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

JAMES F. DICKIE'S DELIGHT. Scottish, Slow Strathspey or Air. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by John Murdoch Henderson (1902-72) in honor of James F. Dickie (b. 1886) of New Deer, Buchan, were he was a "weel-kent and respected player" for over fifty years, and whose forte, according to Hunter (1979) was playing his own 'florid' variations to many famous tunes. Alburger calls him "a player of great taste and polish," and notes the melody appears in Henderson's The Flowers of Scottish Melody. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Alburger, 1983; Ex. 114, pgs. 202-203. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 95, pg. 40. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 129. Henderson, The Flowers of Scottish Melody. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 40). Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988). Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Paul Anderson - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).

JANUARY SNOWS. Irish, Air. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

JENNY DANG(ED) THE WEAVER (Planc Sinead an Fiodoir). AKA and see "Jenny Bang the Weaver," "Jemmy Dang the Weaver," "Jenny Beguil'd the Webster." Scottish (origially), Shetland, Irish, Canadian, American; Air, Reel or "Solo Strathspey." USA, New England. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard. AB (Athole, Gow, Skye): AAB (Honeyman, Hunter): AA'B (Perlman): ABC (Breathnach): AABB (Cole): AA'BB' (Kerr). Composition of the tune has been credited to the Rev. Alexander Garden (1688-1778), minister of Birse, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Hunter (1988) relates that around 1746 "the minister's 'handy-man,' and ex-weaver from Mary well called Jock, hotly refused to clean the parson's boots when requested to do so by Mrs. Garden. The enraged minister's wife gave him such a beating with her 'tattie-beetle' that he soon performed the task." It was first published in the 2nd edition of William Thompson's Orpheus Caledonius (1733), where it appeared as "Jenny Beguil'd the Webster." John Glen (1891), though, finds it earliest in print in Robert Bremner's 1757 Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances (pg. 54), and it was also printed in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). It is reported to be in Rutherford's 200 Country Dances of c. 1756. It became a favorite early 19th century song (at least in Lowland centers, says Emmerson {1971}), with lyrics by Sir Alexander Boswell set to the tune. The song tells of a weaver who makes unwanted advances toward Jenny, who turns him down flatly, or 'dangs' him:
***
Jenny dang, and Jenny dang, and Jenny dang the weaver,
Soon the fool his folly kent and Jenny dang the weaver.
***
The popular melody was known in the American colonies where it appeared in the MS copybooks of violinist Whittier Perkins (Massachusetts, 1790) as "Jemmy dang the weaver" and Clement Weeks (Greenland, New Hampshire, 1783) as "Jenny Dangs." It has been observed that there is some similarity between this tune and the Irish "Longford Tinker." Sources for notated versions: fiddler Seán Keane (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Peter Chaisson (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 19, pgs. 39-40 (a reprint of the Skye version). Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 139, pg. 65 (appears as "Planc Sinéad an Fíodóir/Jennie Bang the Weaver". Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 5. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 34. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 13 (reel). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 216. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 10: Airs & Melodies of Scotland's Past), Vol. 10, 1992; pg. 7. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 6, No. 4, pg. 6. Lowe's Collection, 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 35 (appears as a "Solo Strathspey"). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 77. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 83. Surenne, Dance Music of Scotland, 1852, Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Claddagh Records CC17, Sean Keane - "Gusty's Frolics" (1975). Culburnie Records CUL102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Green Linnet GL1108, The Tannahil Weavers - "Cullen Bay." Green Linnet SIF 1077, Capercaillie - "Crosswinds" (1987). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Dun Creagan in Paradise."
T:Jenny Dang the Weaver
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
f/e/|d>A A/A/A AFAB|d>A A/A/A f2 ef|d>B B/B/B BABd|ABde faef|
d>A A/A/A AFAB|d>A A/A/A f2 ef|dB B/B/B BABd|ABde f2e||
f|d2fd efge|d2fd e2cA|d2fd efge|aA A/A/A f2ef|d2fd efge|defd e2cA|
defd efge|abag faef||

JER O'CONNELL'S. AKA and see "O'Sullivan's Fancy," "Lucy Farr's" [2]. Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard. AABB. A version of this tune appears under the title "O'Sullivan's Fancy." Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 215, pg. 124. Green Linnet SIF 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T:Jer O'Connell's
M:4/4
L:1/4
S:from Mary Rafferty
Z:David Marcus
R:polka
K:D
ADED | FAdc/d/ | cAAG | EFGF/G/ | ADED | FAdc/d/ | cAGE | {F} EDD2 :||:
Adde | fg/f/ed | cAAB | B/c/def | Adde | fd e/f/e/d/ | cAGE | {F}ED D2 :||

JER THE RIGGER (Jer an Rigéara). AKA - "Ger the Rigger." AKA and see "Thadelo's." Irish, Single Reel or Hornpipe. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. West Kerry musicians play this tune almost with a polka feeling, and indeed, some sources list it as a polka (i.e. Mallinson). Sources for notated versions: fiddler Denis Murphy, 1966 (Gneeveguilla, Co. Kerry, Ireland) [Breathnach]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), who associated the tune with accordion player Thadelo Sullivan [Moylan]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 128, pg. 67. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 16, pg. 7. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 113, pgs. 65-66. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 19, pg. 8 (appears as "Ger the Rigger"). Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 16. Gael-Linn CEF 132, Johnny O'Leary - "An Calmfhear/The Trooper" (1989). Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from accordion player Jackie Daly). Kicking Mule KN-327, "Scartaglen" (1984. Learned from Kevin Burke).

JESSICA'S POLKA. AKA and see "Mick Hanly's." Irish, Polka. Ireland, West Kerry. A Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by noted Irish guitarist and singer Mick Hanly, dedicated to his daughter. Source for notated version: set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor]. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stoir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 7, pg. 15. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 31. Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Green Linnet SIF 1052, Kevin Burke - "Up Close." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).
T:Jessica's Polka
R:polka
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:A
ef/e/ ce|fe Bc|A>B cA|ec B2|ef/e/ ce|fe Bc|A>B cA|FA E2:|
|:F>B AF|cB A2|ef/e/ ce|ag f2|ef/e/ ce|fe Bc|A>B cA|FA E2:|

JULIA DELANEY [1] ("Sigile Ni Delainaig" or "Siuban Ni Dublainge"). AKA and see "Glenloe," "La reel de la sorciere." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'B. Capatin Francis O'Neill named the tune in honor of his sister-in-law, wife of uilleann piper Bernard ("Barney") Delaney. Julia was the sister of O'Neill's wife Anna, both hailing from Feakle, County Clare. The Delaneys received much assistance over the years from O'Neill, who may even have introduced the couple to each other. Barney had a job on the Chicago police force, courtesy of the Captain, and was guided in profitable real estate investments by him. Barney and Julia retired to Ocean Springs, Maryland, however Julia died a few years later. Barney subsequently moved to Havana, Cuba, but eventually feel ill and returned to Chicago where he died in July, 1923. O'Neill apparently greatly admired Bernard Delaney's music, but considered him ungrateful for all the help he had given him; the piper would not, for example, teach students or record cylinders for O'Neill on demand. Delaney is buried alone in Mt. Olivet cemetary about 100 yards from the O'Neill mausoleum. Joyce (1909) prints a version of the tune as "Glenloe," in the dorian mode with a different turn. O'Neill himself printed another version in his Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody under the title "The Groves of Mount Talbot" (No. 324) collected from a John Kelly of San Francisco. A minor key version of the reel may be "Sporting Molly." Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, Vol. 4, No. 4. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 132. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1401, pg. 260. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 643, pg. 116. Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Green Linnet SIF 1139 - "Eileen Ivers" (1994). Wild Asparagus 003, Wild Asparagus - "Tone Roads" (1990).
T:Julia Delaney [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (643)
K:D
dcAG (3EFG DE|G2 {B}AG EG G2|dcAG (3EFG DG|1 Addc defe:|2 Addc d2d2||
cdef g2 fg|agef g2 ed|cdef g2 AG|Addc dfed|cdef g2 fg|(3agf ef g2 fg|
(3agf (3gfe fd ec|d2 dc defe||

JUNIOR'S WALTZ. American, Waltz. Composed by New Mexican Texas-style fiddler Junior Daugherty. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Learned from Junior Daugherty).

JOHN BRENNAN FROM SLIGO (Seán o Braonáin as Sligeach). Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. A similar tune is printed by Breathnach (CRE II, No. 173, pg. 90) as an untitled reel collected from the playing of Co. Galway musician Aggie White (Mrs. Sean Ryan). John Brennan was a fiddle player from County Sligo. Source for notated version: accordion player Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 160, pg. 63. Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).

JOHN DOHERTY'S REEL [1] (Ríl Sheáin Uí Dhochartaigh). AKA and see "All Around the World," "Cooley's," "The Connemara Rake," "Doherty's," "Grehan's," "John Doherty's," "Johnny Doherty's," "Jolly Beggar," "The Knotted Chord" [2], "Maids of Mullaghmore," "Matt Molloy's," "The Mistress," "Mot Malloy," "Tinker Doherty's," "The Wise Maid" [1]. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major. Standard. AB. John Doherty was a famous fiddler from County Donegal, born into a family of hereditary musicians and travelling tinsmiths in 1900. The family travelled extensively throughout Donegal plying their trade and sharing music with the community; they were said to have had a vast repertoire. Only three brothers, Simey, Mickey and John, were ever recorded, with John the best known. Source for notated version: fiddler Paddy Glackin (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 149, pg. 70. Gael-Linn Records CEF 018, John Kelly & Willie Clancy - "Seoda Ceoil I" (1968). Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993).

JOHN DRURY [1]. Irish, Planxty (6/8 time). D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) to celebrate the marriage of John Drury of Kingland, Co. Roscommon, to Elizabeth Goldsmith in 1724. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1985; No. 42, pg. 46. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976).

JOHN NAUGHTON'S (JIG). AKA and see "The Ball (Humours) of Ballynafeidh," "The Banks of Lough Gowna," "The Clare Jig," "Delaney's Drummers," "The Jug of Brown Ale," "The Kitten and the Frog," "Kitty in the Fog," "The Mug of Brown Ale," "Old Man Dillon," "One Bottle More," "Paddy in London" [2], "Paddy O'Brien's," "The Raffle Jig," "The Rambler From Clare," "The Stonecutter's Jig," "Tom Billy's Jig," "Winter Apples," "Young Tom Ennis." Irish, Jig. Ireland, County Clare. G Dorian. A version of "Old Man Dillon." Mary MacNamara - "Traditional Music from East Clare." Gearóid O'hAllmhuráin - "Traditional Music from Clare and Beyond." Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993). Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).
T:John Naughton's Jig
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:120
R:jig
D:G. O'hAllmhuráin, Traditional Music from Clare and Beyond
K:GDor
DGG GAc|dfd cAG|{B}AFF ~F3|FAG FDC|
DGG GAc|def g2g|{a}gfd cAc |1 dGG G2F :|2 dGG G2f||
{g}fde f2g|fde fcB|AFF CFF|FAG F/2E/2DC
|1 fde f2g|fde fdc|=BGG {A}GA=B|ced c2f :|2 DGG GAc|def g2g|{a}gfd cAc|d
GG G3||

JOHN NAUGHTON'S (REEL). Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).

JOHN STENSON'S NO. 1 Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. John Stenson, a County Sligo accordion player, was the first person Burke heard playing these tunes and, having no other name, they were awarded to Stenson).

JOHN STENSON'S NO. 2. AKA and see "The Glass of Beer," "Listowel Lasses," "McFadden's." Irish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 114. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. John Stenson, a County Sligo accordion player, was the first person Burke heard playing these tunes and, having no other name, they were awarded to Stenson).
T:John Stetson's #2
M:C
L:1/8
K:A
|: cB | ABcA B2 cB | ABcA BAFA | ABcA B2 ef | edcA BAFA |
ABcA B2 Bc | ABcA BAFA | d2 dc dfed | cABc A2 :|
|: cd | edcd edcd | edcA BAFA | edcd edcA | B2 cA BAFA |
edcd edcd | edcA BAFA | d2 dc dfed | cABc A2 :|

JOHNNY MHOSAI'S REEL (Ril Sheain Mhosai). AKA and see "The Laides of Tullybardee," "The Monaghan Switch." Irish, Reel. The title refers to John Mhosai McGinley. Green Linnet GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (learned from the fiddling of the late John Doherty).

JOHNNY'S WEDDING ("Banais Seanin" or "Posad Seaganin"). AKA and see "Colonel McBain," "Galway Bay," "Sporting Molly." Irish, Reel. G Dorian. Standard. AA'B. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 99. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1216. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 493, pg. 94. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).
T:Johnny's Wedding
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (493)
K:G Minor
GA|BGdG BGGB|AFcF AFFA|1 BGdG BGGB|AF (3D=E^F G2:|2 GBAc Bdce|
dg^fa g2||ga|bgag fdd=e|fdcB AFFA|bgag fddc|dg^fa g2 ga|bgag fdd=e|
fdcB AFFA|GBAc Bdce|dg^fa g2||

JOSEPH BANK. Irish. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

JIMMY ON THE MOOR. Irish, Reel. Composed by guitarist Dennis Cahill. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).

JOE BANES. Irish, Reel or Fling. G Major. Standard. AA'B. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Martin Hayes - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993). Danu - "
T:Joe Bane's
R:reel or fling
M:C|
K:G
B2~B2 BAGA|BABc dedc|B2~B2 BAGB|1 d2cA AGGA:|2 d2cA AGG2||
e2a2 g3e|d2Bc d2d2|e2a2 g3e|d2cA AGG2|
e2a2 g2e2|d2e2 f2g2|abaf g2ge|d2cA AGGA||

JOE RYAN'S BARN DANCE. Irish, Barn Dance. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Learned from a tape of Inagh, County Clare, fiddler Joe Ryan, a cousin of Joanie Madden's mother).

KEAN O'HARA [1]. AKA and see "O'Hara's Cup" (Cupan Ui hEaghra). Irish, Air or Planxty (3/4 time). C Major (Complete Collection...): D Major (Joyce). Standard. One part. Composed by Turlough O'Carolan. "The Irish words of this song, composed by Carolan in honour of his friend Kean O'Hara of Nymphsfield, Co. Sligo, will be found in Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy, Vol. I., p. 64; and in Edward Walsh's Irish Popular Songs, p. 70" (Joyce). Source for notated version: partly from John Windele, "the distinguished Cork archaeologist (d. 1865), and P. Carey, a piper of the Co. Cork, via Forde (Joyce). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 130, pg. 93. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 685, pg. 342. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).

KERFUNTEN. AKA - "The Kerfunken Jig." AKA and see "Hamilton's Jig" [2]. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Kerfunten/Kerfunken is a town in Brittany, France. Source for notated version: Deirdre Havlin, flute player for the Northern Irish group Deanta, who had it from flute player and craftsman Hammy Hamilton [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 228, pg. 122. Green Linnet SIF 1147, Deanta - "Ready for the Storm." Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997. Appears as "The Kerfunken Jig").
T: Kerfunten
C: Hammy Hamilton
Q: 325
R: jig
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: G
A | B3 BAG | dBd efg | dBd edB | ABA AGA |
B3 BAG | dBd efg | dBd gdB | AGA G2 :|
d | gfg gab | ege edB | gfg gab | bag a2 d |
gfg gab | ege edB | dBd gdB | AGA G2 :|

KILFENORA JIG [2]. AKA and see "Micko Doyle's," "The Old Favorite." Irish, Single Jig. G Major. Standard. AAB. Tubridy (Irish Tradtional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 30. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Green Linnett SIF3084, Four Men and a Dog - "Shifting Gravel"
T:Kilfenora Jig [2]
L:1/8
M:6/8 time
K:G
A|B2B BAB|dBA G2B|ded d2d|ded B2A|B2B BAB|dBA G2B|ded cBA|G3 G2:|
d|g2g f2f|e2e edB|ded d2 d|ded B2d|g2g f2f|e2e edB|dge dBA|G3 GBd|
g2g f2f|e2e edB|ded d2d|ded B2d|g2g f2f|e2e edB|dge dge|dge dBA||

KILNAMONA BARNDANCE. Irish, Dance Tune. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995). Shanachie SH-78010, Solas - "Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers" (1997).

KING GEORGE THE IV HIGHLAND. Irish, Highland. Ireland, County Donegal. A Dorian. Standard. AB. A variant, at least in the 'A' part, of "King George IV" AKA "King George IV's Welcome." Source for notated version: Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 173. Claddagh CC44CD, Francie Byrne (Cashel, Donegal) - "The Brass Fiddle: Traditional Fiddle Music of Donegal." Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993).

KING OF THE PIPERS [1] ("Rig na Piobairide" or "Rí na bPíobairí"). AKA and see "The Farting Badger," "The Kilraine Jig," "McSweeney's Jig." Irish, Double Jig. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABCC' (Breathnach): AABBCCDD (Alewine, Brody, Carlin, Feldman & O'Doherty/Doherty): AABBCCDDE (O'Neill): AABBCCDDEE (Taylor): AABBCCDDEEFF (Feldman & O'Doherty/Byrne). A popular jig in County Donegal, where there are two different versions (See version #2). Francis O'Neill (Irish Folk Music) says that the multi-part tune "created a sensation" when introduced to Chicago traditional musicians and dancers ("who had never heard" it before) by the elderly fiddler Edward Cronin, originally from Limerick Junction, County Tipperary. O'Neill thinks it "quite probable" it had originally been a clan march. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) states that the tunes "clearly have piping origins" and remarks on the melody/drone rendition of the piece by Teelin, Donegal, fiddlers Francie Dearg and Mickey Ban Byrne--a style imitative of the pipes. Feldman & O'Doherty (1979) believe the brothers probably obtained their version from piper Mickey Gallagher, a travelling cousin of John Doherty's. Alternate titles are "The Kilraine Jig," named after a townland outside Glenties in the central mountain district of County Donegal, "McSweeney's Jig," named for the famous Donegal uilleann piper and fiddler Tarlach McSweeney, and "The Farting Badger." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh maintains that the "King of the Pipers" title references McSweeney, although because of McSweeney's fame a number of tunes he played were simply titled "King of the Pipers." "The Farting Badger" title Mac Aoidh indicates was specific to the Teelin region of County Donegal (which had an abundance of good fiddlers in the 1920-30s). Sources for notated versions: Edward Cronin [O'Neill]; Sean Keane (Ireland) [Brody]: fiddler John Doherty, 1966 (1895-1980, Co. Donegal, Ireland) [Breathnach, Feldman & O'Doherty]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 22. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 45, pg. 25. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 159. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 234, pg. 136. Feldman & O'Doherty (Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 57 & pg. 177. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 702, pg. 130. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 26. Gael-Linn 068, Seamus Glackin- "An Fhidil." Claddagh CC17 Sean Keane- "Gusty's Frolics." Green Linnett, "Mick Moloney." Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. A five-part version learned "many years ago on a visit to the house of the late Mickey and Francie Byrne of Kilcar, Co. Donegal"). GTD Heritage Trad. HCD 008, Tommy Peoples - "Traditional Irish Music Played on the Fiddle." Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Tourish, Dermot McLaughlin, Seamus Glackin, Kevin Glackin - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991).
T:King of the Pipers [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:E Minor
A (3A/A/A/ D B (3B/B/B/ D|ABG FED|A (3A/A/A/ D BAF|GAG FED|
A (3A/A/A/ D B (3B/B/B/ D|ABG FED|CEG cGE|GAG FED:|
|:fga afd|ded {c/d/}cAG|~F2D (3c/B/A/ GF|GAG FED|fga afa|geg fdA|
GFG (3c/B/A/ GF|GAG FED:|
|:def def|def dFA|def dAF|GEF GFE|~d3 ^cdc|B^cB AFD|CEG cGE|
GAG FED:|
|:d (3D/D/D/ D c (3D/D/D/ D|B (3D/D/D/ D A (3D/D/D/ D|
d (3D/D/D/ D cAF|GAG FED|d (3D/D/D/ D c (3D/D/D/ D|
B (3D/D/D/ D AFD|CEG cGE|GAG FED:|

KITTY COME DOWN TO LIMERICK. Irish, Slip Jig. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

KYLEBRACK RAMBLER(S). AKA and see "Finbar Dwyer's Fancy." Irish, Reel. D Major/Mixolyidan (Cranford, Mulvihill): A Major/Mixolydian (Flaherty). Standard. AABBAAB'B'(Cranford): AABBCC (Flaherty): AA'BB'CC' (Mulvihill). "Kylebrack Rambler" has been credited to Irish accordion player Finbar Dwyer, who currently resides in England. Editor Paul Cranford (1994) states the title was "Finbar Dwyer's Fancy" on one of the accordionist's early (c. 1973) albums, "The Intercontinental," and that the title "Kylebrack Rambler" came from a recording by another Irish accordionist, P.J. Hernon. Source for notated version: learned by fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton, from her father, Robert Stubbert, who had it from a tape of an Irish fiddler [Cranford]; Jim McElhone (County Derry) [Mulvihill]. Cranford (Brenda Stubbert's), 1994; No. 45, pg. 16. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 19 (appears as "Unknown"). Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 138, pg. 37. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton, N.S.) - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993). Green Linnet SIF 3004, Dolores Keane - "Broken Hearted I'll Wander." Kells Music 9502, Dervish - "Harmony Hill."
T:The Kylebrack Rambler
C:Finbar Dwyer
R:Reel
M:4/4
K:DMix
DA,~A,2 D2FE | DA,~A,2 CA,G,2 | DA,~A,2 D2DE | FGAF G2FG|\
Ad~d2 dcAB | c2Bc GECE | DCA,C D2DE | FGAF D4 ::\
A2GA FDD2 | d2Ad FdAd | c2Gc EcGc | cded cAGc |\
defe d2AB | c2Bc EcGc | G2ED CDEG | cAGE D4::\
ADD2 A,DD2 | d2de dcAB | c2Bd cAGE |1 CcBd cAGc :|2 CEGE D4|]

LAD O'BEIRNE'S/O'BYRNE'S (REEL) [1]. AKA - "A Kilfen Reel." Irish, American, Canadian; Reel. Ireland, County Sligo. USA, New York. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. G Major. Standard. AABB (Cranford/Holland, Mallinson, Mulvihill): AA'BB' (Perlman). James 'Lad' O'Beirne, who either composed this tune or else it was learned from him, was an influential County Sligo raised New York City fiddler whose hey-day was the mid-20th century. Bill Black (1996) relates the story that this reel supposedly was the last tune composed by O'Beirne prior to his death, while Philippe Varlet relates that he was told by O'Beirne's son Jim that Lad had composed the tune on the subway coming home from work. He was a younger contemporary of Michael Coleman and far outlived him, passing away in 1980, although unlike Coleman he unfortunatley never commercially recorded, though there are a few tracks of informal recordings available (see the album "Milestone at the Garden"). In fact, O'Beirne and Coleman are quite intertwined musically and personally. They came from the same village in County Sligo, Killavil, and O'Beirne married Coleman's neice. O'Beirne's father Phillip was one of Coleman's early mentors, according to collector and fiddler Philippe Varlet. David Taylor (1992), however, believes the reel is traceable to the great Co. Mayo/New York fiddler John McGrath (1900-1955). Sources for notated versions: tenor banjo player Tommy Finn (b. 1964, Marlow, Ballymote, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]; learned from a recording of tenor banjo player Kevin Griffin (Doolin, County Clare) by fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Liam Donnelly (Lisburn, County Antrim) [Mulvihill]; Kenny Chaisson (b. 1947, Rollo Bay, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; fiddler Brian Conway (Queens, New York) [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 8, pg. 4. Cooper (The Complete Irish Fiddle Player). Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 177, pg. 50. Darsie (Traditional Tune Sourcebook). Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 50. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 15, pg. 6. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 151, pg. 41. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 50. Claddagh Records, Mary MacNamara - "Traditional Music from East Clare." Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - "A Session with Jerry Holland (1990). Green Linnet, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection" (1995). GIFT 10007, Arty McGlynn & Nollaig Casey - "Lead the Knave." Green Linnet SIF 1063, The Irish Tradition - "The Times We've Had." Green Linnet SIF-1110, Brian Conway, Tony DeMarco & Marin Wynne - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "Mouth of the Tobique" set, learned from Mirella Murrey, Clifden, Co. Galway). Tulla Ceili Band - "A Celebration of 50 Years." Dervish - "The Boys of Sligo."
X:1
T:Lad O'Beirne's
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
DG~G2 DGBG|(3ABc BG AGEG|DG~G2 DGBd|(3efe dg eagf|\
dB~B2 dBGB|1cE~E2 GEDB,|DEGA ~B2eB|dBAc BGGE:|2\
cE~E2 GEDB,|DEGA (3Bcd eB|dBAc BGGB|:\
(3ded Be dGBd|egdg eage|dB ~B2 dBGB|cE~E2 GED2|\
BddB d2ef|~g3 a bgdB|DEGA B2Bc|dBAc BGG:|
X:2
T: Lad O'Beirne's
S: Brian Conway
Z: transcribed by B.Black
Q: 300
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
DG G2 DGBG | AcBG AE E2 | DG G2 DGBd | egfg e2 ge |
dB B2 AGEG | cE E2 GEDB | DEGA B2 eB | dBAc BG G2 :|
d2 ce d2 Bd | egdg e2 ge | dB B2 AGEG | cE E2 GEDc |
Bd d2 Bdef | gfga gedB | DEGA B2 eB | dBAc BG G2 :|

LADY BIRR. Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

LADY GORDON OF GORDONSTOWN. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. C Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Composed by William Morrison, appearing in his 1812 collection (Inverness, Scotland). Originally written in the key of C Minor, in Cape Breton it is usually played in the Mixolydian mode according to Paul Stewart Cranford (1995). The melody was played by influential Cape Breton fiddler Angus Chisholm. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 78, pg. 23. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Green Linnet GLCD 1156, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection."

LADY OF THE HOUSE (Maighstreas an Ti). Irish, Reel. Related in parts to "Bummer's Reel," "The Cows Are A-Milking," "Woman of the House" (Bean an Tighe ar Lar). Breathnach (CRE II), 1971; No. 71. Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).

LAFFERTY'S. AKA and see "The Glen of Aherlow," "Reddigan's." Irish, Reel. Composed by Sean Ryan. The tune is sometimes called "The Glen of Aherlow," though that it properly the name of another Sean Ryan composition. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, Vol. 3; No. 3 (appears as "Reddigan's"). Sean Ryan (The Hidden Ireland), No. 28. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Kevin Burke - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

LAINGTON'S REEL. Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978. Learned from a recording of Paddy Killoran).

LARGO'S FAIRY DANCE. AKA and see "Daunse ny Farishyn," "Fairy Dance," "The Jolly Banger," "La Ronde des Vieux." Scottish, Reel. C Major (Emmerson, Gow): D Major (Hardie, Hunter, Skinner). Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (most versions). A piece for the eightsome reel composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831) for the Fife Hunt in 1802, by which organization he was employed for their balls. Largo is a small parish in Fife containing two villages, Upper Largo and Lower Largo, and a hill, Largo Law. The original "Largo's Fairy Dance" was a medley consisting of two Gow-composed tunes, "The Fairy Dance" and "The Fairies Advance," according to Nigel Gatherer. According to David Johnson, Gow seems to have then set the melody as an introduction and march for keyboard in D Major, which was published on a single sheet about 1805 (such sheets often contained sets for dancing). It was again published in reel form in C Major in the Gow's Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels of 1809. A tune "as popular today as the day it was written" (Collinson, 1966), it is Nathaniel's most famous reel (though modern fiddlers invariably play it in D Major, rather than the C Major of the 1809 printing). A famous set of variations were composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his Harp and Claymore collection. Emmerson (1971) identifies a sub-group of Scots reels with the characteristic quarter note/two eighths notes/quarter note/two eighths notes per measure rhythm, including this tune as well as "De'il Among the Tailors," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley" (he says this last tune is "substanitally" a set of "Fairy Dance." The Hardie family, notes Bill Hardie, "have traditionally played this reel as a follow-lup to 'The Smith's.'" The melody entered North American tradition and can be found in America under the title "Old Molly Hare" and similar variants, and in Canada as "La Ronde des Vieux." On the Isle of Man it is called "Daunse ny Farishyn." Breathnach (1985) believes it was composed "under the influence of " "The Wind that Shakes the Barley." Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 83, pgs. 133-134 (original tune), and Ex. 108, pg. 185 (Skinner variations). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 268. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 51, pg. 141. Gow, 5th Collection, 1809. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pgs. 16-17 (includes J. Scott Skinner's variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 219 (includes variations arranged by James Hunter, based on Scott Skinner's). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Variations by the late Ronald Cooper and others by Scott Skinner).
T:Fairy Dance, The
C:Nathaniel Gow
S:Peter Hardie's MSS, via Scottish Country Dance Book 3
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
f2 fd f2 fd|f2 fd cAec|f2 fd gfed|1cABc d2 de:|]2cABc defg|]
a2 af b2 ba|gfge a2 ag|fefd B2 ge|cABc defg|
a2 af b2 ba|gfge a2 ag|fefd B2 ge|cABc d2 z2|]

LARK'S MARCH, THE. AKA and see "The Green Meadow." Irish, Jig. "The Lark's March" was Seamus Ennis' name for the melody, which also goes (along with other tunes) by the title of "Geese in the Bog." Ennis told a story about the tune to fiddler Caoimhin Mac Aoidh once during a visit in Galway. It seems that two pipers were in a competition, with the first piper to run out of tunes being the looser. Both musicians played through the night and as the sun was dawning both had played their entire repertoires, with the result that the one who played first had to concede, though only if the second could discharge one more tune. The second struggled to come up with just one more and was feigning thought to buy time when he spied a lark wading through the dewy grass looking for a morsel. It began its morning song which inspired the piper played to play an imitation, and with that he won the competition. Source for notated version: flute player Matt Molloy [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1976, Vol. 4; No. 62. Green Linnet GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

LARRY REDICAN'S BOW. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by the late Larry Redican, multitalented musician from Long Island, New York, noted for his unusual and distinctive bow trebles. Sources for notated versions: Phillip Duffy (b. London, 1966, since to County Sligo) [Flaherty]; the Gavins of Ballina [O'Malley]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 186, pg. 98. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1991; pg. 34 (appears as "unknown"). O'Malley, No. 13. Green Linnett GLCD 1987, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988). Rounder Records, Tim Britton - "Light Through the Leaves."
X:1
T:Larry Redican's Bow
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:Reel
K:D
D2FD A,DFD | E2GE B,EGE | Ddcd BAFD | E2EF EDB,C, | D2FD A,DFD |
E2GE B,EGE | Ddcd BAFD |1 EDC,E D2A,B, ||2 EDC,E DEFA :||
B2BA B2Bc | d2cd BAF^G | A2cA EAcA | ABce aecA | B2BA B2Bc |
d2cd BAFE | DEFA dfec |1 dBAF EFGA ||2 dBAF EGFE :||
X:2
T:Larry Redican's Bow
C:Larry Redican
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
D2 FD A,DFD|E2 GE B,EGE|Dddc B2 AF|E2 ED EGFE|
D2 FD A,DFD|E2 GE B,EGE|FAdA BdAF|1GECE D2 FE:|
2GECE D3 A||
B3 A B2 Bc|dBBA BdcB|A2 fc eAcB|ABce fecA|
B2 (3cBA B2 Bc|dBBA B2 Bc|dBBA BAFB|ABce faec||
B3 A B2 Bc|dBBA BdcB|A2 fc eAcB|ABce fecA|
B2 (3cBA B2 Bc|dBBA B2 Bc|(3dcB (3cBA BAFD|
E2 EF GECE||
X:3
T: Larry Redican's Bow
S: T. DeMarco
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
D2 FD A,DFD | E2 GE B,EGE | Ddcd BAFD | EDEF EDB,C |
D2 FD A,DFD|E2 GE B,EGE|Ddcd BAFD|1 EDCE DA,B,C:|2 EDCE DEFA ||
B2 BA B2 Bc | d2 cd BAFG | A2 (3cBA eAcA | ABce afec |
B2 BA B2 Bc | d2 cd BAFE | DEFA dfec |1 dBAF EFGA :|2 dBAF E4 ||

LAURA LYNN CUNNINGHAM. Scottish, Air. Composed by accordion player Phil Cunningham. Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).

LEAVING GLEN AFFRIC. Scottish. Green Linnet GLCD 1102, Phil Cunningham - "Palomino Waltz."

LEAVING LERWICK HARBOUR. Shetland, Slow Air (4/4 time). A modern air in the Scottish style composed in 1970 by Lerwick, Shetland, fiddler William "Willie" Hunter (1933-1994), on the occasion of his sister Lorna's emigrating from Shetland to New Zealand. It is considered to be the finest composition of a fiddler who was considered to be the best of his generation, of whom it was said he could move an audience to tears through his sensitive rendering of slow airs. Green Linnet GLCD 1151, Seamus McGuire - "The Wishing Tree" (1995). Greentrax, Willie Hunter - "Leaving Lerwick Harbour" (1995).

LEXY/LEXIE McASKILL. Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABBCCDD. Composed by Dr. John McAskill. Identified as a "traditional Shetland Islands" tune on Sharon Shannon's CD. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 44. Green Linnet SIF 1047, John Cunningham - "Fair Warning" (1983). Green Linnet SIF-1986, John & Phil Cunningham - "Silly Wizard- Live in America" (1986). Green Linnet SIF-104, John & Phil Cunningham - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as second tune of "Bag of Cats" medley).

LIMERICK RAKE, THE (Fa gaimi'd sui'd mar ata se'). Irish, Double Jig. A Dorian. Ewan McColl wrote the song "Champion at Keepin' 'em Rollin'" to this tune, parodied by Ian Robb and others. The melody originally was called "An Caitin Ban," and was also used for "The Galbally Farmer." The words below are from a 19th century broadside ballad sheet.
***
I am a young fellow that's easy and bold, in Castletown corners I'm very well known,
In Newcastle West I spent many a note, with Kitty and Judy and Mary;
My father rebuked me for being such a rake, and spending my timein such frolicsome ways,
But I ne'er could forget the good nature of Jane, Agus fagaimid siud mar ata se.
***
Green Linnet GLCD 1010, Mick Moloney & Joe McKenna) - "Mick Moloney & Eugene O'Donnell."

LIMERICK'S LAMENTATION [1]. AKA - "Lament for Limerick." AKA and see "The Clothiers March," "Lochaber No More." Irish, Slow Air (3/2 time). A Mixolydian: A Major. Standard. AABB. The Boys of the Lough identify this beautiful slow air as having a common origin with "Lochaber No More," but remark that no one seems to really know which came first, the Irish or Scottish version. Robin Morton (1976) says the weight of evidence lends credence to the Scots claim, despite O'Neill's seeminglu cogent argument that a tune composed by the 17th century County Cavan harper Myles O'Reilly was the common ancestor of both. The esteemed harper Connellon has also been given credit for the tune.
***
The Irish version derives its title from the siege and fall of the city of Limerick to the English forces of Ginkel in 1691, at the end of the Williamite Wars. The tune is sometimes known as "Sarsfield's Lamentation" from the name of the commander of the Irish forces at Limerick. Flood also dates the melody in Ireland to the year 1691 (Flood, 1906, pg. 173), when the Irish were defeated by the forces of the English monarch William of Orange. Thomas Duffet's lyrics (which had originally been set to "Fortune My Foe") "Since Coelia's my Foe" were translated from Gaelic in 1720 by Dermot O'Conor and adapted to this tune in 1730. The melody first appears in Neales' Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first real collection of exclusively Irish folk music (Ó Canainn, 1978), and also was printed by Thompson in his Hibernian Muse of 1786. It appears in the Bunting Collection of Irish music (1840). The air has regained some popularity among traditional musicians in the latter 20th century. O'Sullivan (1929) remarks that there is still some controversy about whether the melody is Irish or Scots in origin, however, O'Neill (1913) maintains that the air was played by the pipers of the "Wild Geese," those Irish regiments who fled to France rather than surrender to the English. The melody continued to be played in Irish encampments on the continent, and in 1746 was taught, maintains O'Neill, by one Colonel Fitzgerald to musicians in the Scottish camp before the battle of Culloden. It entered Scottish tradition from this time, though preserved under the title "Lochaber No More."
***
Another air with the title "Limerick's Lamentation" (see "Limerick's Lamentation" [2]) appears in Wright's Aria di Camera (1730), communicated by "Mr. Dermt. O'Connor, of Limerick," but differs from the air given in Neale. O'Connor Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 23. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 53, pg. 23. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997. Appears as "Lament for Limerick"). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993). Shanachie 97011, Duck Baker - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990. Learned from a recording by Sean O'Riada). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger."
T:Limerick's Lamentation
S:O'Neill/Bunting
M:3/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:G
G>A | B2 d<B A<G | A2 G2 G>A | B2 d<B A<G | A4 ~G>A |
B<G c<A B<G | E>D E2 G>A | B2 G2 G>A | G4 :||
||: G>A | B2 d2 d>e | d2 cB A>B | G2 g2 g>a | g4 G>A |
B2 d2 de | d2 cB A>B | G2 g2 g>a | g4 de |
=f>e f>g a>f | e>d e>=f g>e | d>e gB AG | A4 GA |
B<G c<A B<G | E>D E2 G>A | B2 G2 G2 | G4 :||

LOG SPLITTER, THE. Scottish. Composed by Phil Cunningham. Green Linnet GLCD 1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts" (1997).

LONELY BIRD, THE (Yksinainen Lintu). Finnish, Slow Air. Composed by Hatti Hintikka. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Learned from some fiddlers at a festival in Finland). Whirlie Records CD2, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird."

LUCY FARR'S. English, Irish; Barndance. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. From Galway born fiddler Lucy Farr, who has lived in England for some time. The tune is also played in other keys; Mairtin O'Connor plays it in D Major. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes -"Under the Moon" (1995). Old Hat Music OH!02, "The Old Hat Dance Band" (1992).
T:Lucy Farr's - Barn Dance
R:barndance
S:Linda Hickman: Galvin School of music weekend, Nov 29th, 1997
Z:Transcribed by Mike Hogan
M:C|
L:1/8
K:G
D|:G2 G2 G2 G2|GABG E2 D2|B2 B2 B2 B2|BcdB A3 A|
BcdB G2 G2|GABG E2 D2|DEGA BcdB|A2 G2 G4:||
BcdB G2G2|GABG E2 D2|DEGA BcdB|B2 A2 A3 A|
BcdB G2G2|GABG E2 D2|DEGA BcdB|A2 G2 G4:||

MADAM IF YOU PLEASE (A Bean Uasal Ma's Toil Leat). AKA and see "Girl of the Golden Tresses." Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 944, pg. 161. Green Linnett GLCD, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1994).
T:Madam If You Please
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (944)
K:G
GF|DGBD G2 FD|GAcd fdge|fdcA dcBG|FDBA GFDC|
DGGF DGBA|GAcd g2 ge|fd (3cBA BGAF|D2G2G2:|
|:Bc|dcde fABg|fdcA d2 de|fedc (3ABc AG|FDBA GFDC|
DGGF GBAG|FGAB cd (3efg|fdce dcBA|G2 GF G2:|

MAGGIE'S PANCAKES. Scottish, Reel. B Minor. Standard. AABB. Green Linnet GLCD 1081, The Tannahill Weavers - "Dancing Feet."
T: Maggie's Pancakes
M: 2/2
L: 1/8
R: Reel
C: Stuart Morison
D: Tannahill Weavers, "Dancing Feet"
K: Bm
fB~B2 fgfe|dB~B2 GBdB|cAAd AAec|AfdB ecAe|
fB~B2 fgfe|dB~B2 GBdB|cABc ABce|afec B2de:|
|:~f2dB GBdB|caec dB~B2|~f2dB GBdB|caec Bcde|
fd~d2 fgfe|dB~B2 GBdB|cAdA eAce|afec B2de:|

MAIDS OF FEAKLE, THE. Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1155, Martin Hayes - "Under the Moon" (1995).

MAIDS OF TULLYKNOCKBRINE, THE. AKA and see "The Rat in the Thatch." Irish, Reel. According to Caoimhin Mac Aoidh, the Kelly's source (see abc's) was Donegal fiddler John Doherty, who was the source of the "Maids" title. Tullyknockbrine is a Donegal townland on the southern slopes of the Croaghs Mountains in the vicinity of Reelin Bridge. The tune is well-known by the alternate title. Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994. "A mixture of the version played in the Teileann Kilcar area and that played by John Doherty").
T:Maids of Tullyknockbrine, The
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:100
R:reel
H:transcribed by Bill Black from the James/John Kelly recording (Tara 1008).
K:G
G2 dc BDGB |dGBc ecAF | G2 dc Bcde | dBcA BGGD |
G2 dc BDGB| dGBc ecAF | G2 dc Bcde | dBcA BGBd ||
egfg egfe | ^cdfd adfd | egfg efga | (3bag af gfef |
ebge bge^c | defd Adfd | G2 dc Bcde | dBcA BG G2 ||

MÁIRE O'KEEFFE. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by luthier, fiddler and composer Otis Tomas (Goose Cove, St. Ann's Bay, Cape Breton), in appreciation for the hospitality of Maire O'Keeffe, who took him and companions Jerry Holland, Paul MacDonald, Tommy Basker and Paul Stewart Cranford, to sessions in Kerry, Clare and Galway during a tour of Ireland and the United Kingdom (Paul Stewart Cranford). Cook (Night in the Kitchen Collection), 1996; pg. 16. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 126, pg. 36. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - "A Session with Jerry Holland" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 1134, Cherish the Ladies - "Out and About." Green Linnet, Cherish the Ladies - "Out and About." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998).

MALCOLM FINLAY('S REEL) {"Calum Fhionnlaith" or "Calum Fhionnlaid"}. AKA - "Calum Finlay." AKA and see "Larry Down's." Scottish, Canadian; Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island. E Major. Standard. AAB (Brody, Cranford, Perlman): AABB' (Little). The tune has considerable currency among Cape Breton fiddlers. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Allan MacDonald (b. c. 1950, Bangor, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 183. Cranford (Brenda Stubbert's), 1994; No. 64, pg. 23. Little (Scottish and Cape Breton Fiddling in New Hampshire), 1984; pg. 8. MacQuarrie's Cape Breton Collection. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 109. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as last tune of "Bag of Cats" medley). Rounder 7008, "Jerry Holland." Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier- "The Dances Down Home" (1977).
T:Calum Fhionnlaith (Malcolm Finlay)
M:4/4
L:1/8
C:Traditional, arranged by Dan Beaton
R:Reel
O:Scotland
B:The Cape Breton Collection
K:E
c| BEGB EB bg| e/2e/2e fe gfec| BEGB EB bg| fefg e/2e/2e :|
!g|: gebe gb eg| fefe c/2c/2c ce |1 gebe gb eg| fefg e/2e/2e eg:|
!|2 BEGB EB bg| fegf e/2e/2e||

MAN FROM BUNDORAN, THE. AKA and see "Miller of Draughin." Irish, Reel. The tune is associated with fiddler Patrick "Paddy" Kelly of Bundoran, Co. Donegal, and, since the original title of the tune was lost, it commemorates Kelly. Kelly's son is also a Paddy, and like his father is a well-known fiddler who still resides in Bundoran. Green Linnet GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992). Four Men and a Dog - "Barking Mad."

MARCHIONESS OF HUNTLEY('S), THE [1]. AKA and see "The Duchess of Gordon." Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard. One part (Kerr): AB (Cole): AAB (Athole, Skye): AABB (Perlman). Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833), originally set in the key of B flat (it appears in A Major in Gow's Collection). His 1822 Collection is dedicated to the Marchioness, Elizabeth Brodie (1794-1864), wife of George (1770-1836), Marquis of Huntly and the future 5th Duke of Gordon. Moyra Cowie (The Life and Times of William Marshall, 1999), says the Marchioness was instrumental in the publication of Marshall's 1822 collection of music and was a great aid to Marshall, promoting his music to her friends. Despite a number of tunes composed in her honor, Hunter (1988) says Elizabeth was more partial to psalms and hymn tunes than dance music. Cowie, however, says she was an accomplished musician and loved to play traditional Scottish music. Source for notated version: Kenny Chaisson (b. c. 1947, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Rollo Bay) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 124. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 67, pg. 31. Gow (Collection). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 137. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 37, pg. 7. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 22. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 1. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 196. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 19. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 17). Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988).
T:Marchioness of Huntly, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
A,>CE>C D<F ~E2|F<B B>c d/c/B/A/ G/F/E/D/| C>D E<C D<F ~E2|
F>B A/G/F/E/ A2 A:|
d|c>eA>e c>e d/c/B/A/|G>BE>B G>BE>d| c>eA>e c>e d/c/B/A/|
F>B A/G/F/E/ A2 A>d|c>eA>e c/e/f/g/ a2|F<B B>c d/c/B/A/ G/F/E/D/|
C>DE>C D<F ~E2|F>B A/G/F/E/ A2A||

MARGAREE REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Mixolydian. Standard. AB (more common) or ABCDDC (Dunlay & Reich): AA'BB' (Perlman): ABB'CDC (Dunlay & Greenberg). The tune is usually played as a two-part reel on Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton, though the Beaton (Mabou, Cape Breton) version is longer. Dunlay & Greenberg (1996) believe the tune to be related to the strathspey "Donalbane," in Kerr's Fourth Collection. There are several towns in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, with the name Margaree, including Margaree, Margaree Harbour, Margaree Forks, Southwest Margaree and Margaree Valley. The tune is often associated with Cape Breton fiddler Buddy MacMaster. Sources for notated versions: Donald Angus Beaton & The Beaton family (Mabou, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) [Dunlay and Reich, Dunlay & Greenberg]; Buddy MacMaster (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; Paul MacDonald (b. 1974, Charlottetown, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 56. Dunlay & Reich (Traditional Celtic Fiddle Music from Cape Breton), 1986; pg. 39. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 101. Shears (Gathering of the Clans Collection), 1991. CAT-WMR004, Wendy MacIssac - "The 'Reel' Thing"(1994. Appears as "Donalbane"). Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988. From the playing of Buddy MacMaster). Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992. Learned from Alasdair Fraser). Rounder 7011, "The Beatons of Mabou" (1978. Appears as 2nd of "Two Traditional Reels"). Rodeo (Banff) RBS 1066, Dan Joe MacInnis- "The Cape Breton Fiddle Of ..." (1962. The first two turns only). Topic 12TS354, John Willie Campbell - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (1978. Appears as "Untitled" after "Fear nan Casan Caola").

MARTIN MULHARE'S NO. 9. AKA - "Mulhaire's." AKA and see "Ril Chiarain Ui Rathallaigh," "Roly Poly." Irish, Reel. G Major (Peoples). Composed by Martin Mulhare in the 1950's. Peoples (Fifty Irish Fiddle Tunes), (appears as "Mulhaire's). Green Linnet GLCD 1135, Martin Mulhare (with Jack Coen & Seamus Connolly) - "Warming Up."

MASON'S APRON (Práiscín an Mhásúin/Saorcloice). AKA and see "Braes of Glenorchy," "Carton's Reel," "Gallagher's," "I Don't Like the Guidewife," "The Isla Reel," "Lady/Miss Carbury/Carberry," "Lowrie Tarrel," "The Mason's Cap," "The Mason Laddie," "Miss Hope's Favorite--Scotch," "Praiscin An Saorcloc," "'S' Coma Leam Do Shean Taighe" "Le Tablier Du Macon." See also related American tunes "Jack of Diamonds" and "Wake Up Susan." Irish, Scottish, English, Shetlands, Canadian, American; Reel. A Major (most versions): A Mixolydian (Roche):G Major (some Irish versions). Standard or AEAE. AB (Athole, Breathnach, Gow, Hardie, O'Neill, Roche, Sweet): AAB (Kerr): AABB (Brody, Cole, Jarman, Kennedy, Mallinson, Miller & Perron, Raven, Skye, Songer): AA'BB' (Phillips): AABBCCDDE (Gatherer). The melody is Scottish in origin, according to most sources, despite having been strongly associated with Irish fiddling tradition in the present day. Early Scots versions appear in Alex McGlashan's (173?-1797) collections under the titles "The Isla Reel" and "Braes of Glenorchy," while one called "The Mason Laddie" is in Robert Ross' 1780 volume A Choice Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances (Edinburgh). It quickly became a popular piece, with continued longevity; for example, a note in MacDonald's Skye Collection, printed a century after Ross's volume, states: "One of the best tunes that can be played for a Country Dance." It was a particular favorite of William Hardie Jr. of Methlick (1856-1944), and was the usual encore of the Scottish fiddler Duncan McKerracher (1796-1873), the so-called "Dunkeld Paganini" (whom family history had it once danced on a table to the playing of Niel Gow), who it was said played the tune wearing his masonic apron. Mason's Apron is also the name of a Scottish country dance, though uncommon in the repertoire.
**
The melody lends itself to innumerable variations, and many fiddlers, even those not particularly known for spontaneous expostulation, compose their own. Of the two variations printed by Gatherer (1987), the first was composed by him, while the second, "quite common amongst Scottish and Irish fiddlers, was claimed by both Bobby McLeod and Sean Maguire." The latter, a famous Irish fiddler, has been credited with taking (this) "rather common two-part reel," adding variations and creating a virtuostic piece which impressed other Irish musicians who either copied it or added their own variations, say the Boys of the Lough. Some fiddlers play pizzicato notes during the tune as a variation and some Irish versions have been rendered in the key of G major, including that by Paddy O'Brien (of Tipperary) and flute player Matt Molloy; the latter's is a much admired version on that instrument. Joyce printed the tune as "Lady Carbury" and O'Farrell included it in his 4th volume of hi s Pocket Companion (1804-16) under the title "Miss Hope's Favourite - Scotch." Breathnach (1976) says the tune was sometimes played in AEAE tuning by Irish fiddlers.
**
Many fiddlers in a variety of traditions have used the tune as a vehicle to display their skill at theme and variations. The melody is, for example, widely played in the French-Canadian fiddling tradition of Québec (see "Le Tablier Du Macon"), and variants can frequently be found in several American regional styles. Alan Jabbour (1971), for example, sees associations with this tune and the "Hell On the Wabash"/"Wake Up Susan"/"Hell on the Potomac" complex of American tunes. Sources for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Scotland) [Brody]; fiddler Sean McGuire (Ireland) [Phillips]; fiddler Patrick Kelly, 1966 (Cree, Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Eddy Arsenault (b. 1921, St. Chrysostom, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Kevin Burke (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 211, pg. 110. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 185. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 485. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 50. Gatherer (Gatherer's Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 10 (with variations). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pgs. 24-25. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 27. Jarman (The Cornhuskers Book of Square Dance Tunes), 1944; pg. 21. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 50, pg. 25. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 3, pg. 23. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 2. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 22, pg. 9. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddler's Repertoire), 1983; No. 84. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 122. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1343, pg. 251. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 598, pg. 109. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 96. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 36. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 174. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol.1; No. 1523, pg. 61. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 132. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 5. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 64. Avoca 139, Sean Maguire--"Music of Ireland" (c. 1961. A definitive version of the tune). Beltona BL2096 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Columbia IDB 499 (78 RPM), Paddy O'Brien (1953). Copley Records EP9-20 (45 RPM), Paddy O'Brien (195?). Fretless 103, "Clem Myers: Northeast Regional Old Time Fiddle Champion 1967 & 1970." Green Linnet GLCD 1081, The Tannahill Weavers - "Dancing Feet." Green Linnet 3082, Paddy O'Brien (Tipp.) - "The Banks of the Shannon" (set in the key of G). Legacy 120, Jean Carignan- "French Canadian Fiddle Songs." Green Linnet GLCD 3009/Mulligan LUN 021, Kevin Burke- "If the Cap Fits" (1978. A two-part settiing learned from a 78 RPM recording of Paddy Killoran, 1930's). Outlet 1031 and Outlet 1006, Sean McGuire- "Ireland's Champion Traditional Fiddler." RCA 09026-60916-2, The Chieftains - "An Irish Evening" (1991). Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough- "Second Album" (1974). Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend- "Le Violin/ The Fiddle." "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Fiddlers Three Plus Two." BBC LP, Sean McGuire & Barney McKenna - "Ulster's Flowery Vale."
T:Mason's Apron
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
|:ed|c2A2 AB AF|EF AB c2 BA|dB B2 Bc BA|Bc de f2 ed|
c2A2 AB AF|EF AB c2 BA|Bc de fe fa|AA cB A2:|
|:ed|cA eA fA eA|cA eA fe dc|dB fB gB fB|dB fB gf ed|
cA eA fA eA|cA eA fe dc|Bc de fe fa|AA cB A2:|

MAUDABAWN CHAPEL. Irish, Reel. E Dorian. Standard. ABB' (Reavy): AABB' (Feldman & O'Doherty). Composed by the late fiddler and composer Ed Reavy (1898-1988) of Cavan, Ireland, and Corktown, near Philadelphia, Pa. The tune is named for a church in his native Cavan parish which the family attended. Along with "Hunter's House," this is the most famous Reavy composition in the tradition. Eileen Ivers (Bronx, New York) selected the melody as one of the pieces with which she won the Senior All Ireland fiddling title. Source for notated version: Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 171 (appears as third and fourth part of "Untitled Reel"). Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 27, pg.s 28-29. Green Linnett SIF1041, Kevin Burke - "Portland." Green Linnett GLCD 1166, Eileen Ivers -"Wild Blue" (1996. Not the usual reel setting, but rather a slowed down version of the tune). Green Linnet SIF3051, Frankie Gavin - "Frankie Goes to Town." Shanachie 34011, Andy McGann & Paul Brady. Tara 2006, "Tony Linnane & Noel Hill" (appears as "Ryans," following "The Drunken Landlady").
T:Maudabawn Chapel
C:Ed Reavy
L:1/8
M:C|
K:Edor
~G3D E2DB,|G,A,B,D EB,DB,|G,A,B,D GABd|gabg eaaf|
gabg efge|dged B^cde|g2fa gedB|A=cBA GEED:|
|:E2BE dEBE|E2BE AFDF|~E3F GFGB|AF~F2 DF~F2|
EBBA ~B3A|BAGA B^cde|~f3a gfe^c|dBAF GEED:|
"Variations:"
G2FG EGDB,|G,A,B,D EB,DB,|G,A,B,D EGBd|gbag ea~a2|
gbag egfe|dged B^cde|g2fa gedB|A=cBA GEED:|
|:E2BE dEBE|Ed^cB AFDF|~E3F GFGB|AFDF A,DFD|
EBBA B^cdA|BAGA B^cde|~f3a gfe^c|dBAF GEED:|

McFADDEN'S HANDSOME DAUGHTER (Ingean Datamuil Mic Paidin). AKA and see "Coming Home from the Bog," "Donegal Lasses," "The Gardener's Daughter," "The Groves of Mt. Talbot," "I Wish I Had Never Seen You," "Magic Slipper," "Maud Millar" [2], "McFadden's Handsome Daughter," "The Montua," "Morrison's," "Mrs. Smullen's," "Paddy McFadden," "The Pride of Rockchapel." Irish, Reel. A Major (O'Neill): G Major (Alewine). Standard. ABC (O'Neill): AA'B. Paddy Killoran recorded the tune on a c. 1950's 78 RPM recording under the title "My Love is Fair and Handsome." Parts of O'Neill's three-part tune are similar to parts of the alternate titles named above. Source for notated version: fiddler player John McFadden, originally from near Westport, County Mayo, then living in Chicago, and a musician whose skills at playing and improvisation O'Neill admired [O'Neill]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 25. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1289, pg. 242. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 554, pg. 103. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Green Linnet SIF 3018, "Molloy/Peoples/Brady." Shanachie SH-78010, Solas - "Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers" (1997). "Music at Matt Molloy's." Four Men and a Dog - "Barking Mad."
T:McFadden's Handsome Daughter
L:1/8
M:C|
S:O'Neill - MOI 1289
K:A
E3F ABcA|BABa ecAF|(3EEE FG A2 af|ecBd cAAF|E3F ABcA|BABa ecAF|
(3EEE FG A2 af|ecBd cAAg||aece fgaf|edcA BF ~F2|aece fgaf|edcB Ac (efg|
aece aecA|B2 cA BAFA|agfe fgaf|edcB ABcd||c e2 f ecac|ecac f(B ~B2)|
c e2 f ecac|EFAe cA A2|ceef ecac|ecac f(B ~B2)|cefg abaf|ec (3efg aecA||

McFARLEY'S. Irish, Reel. Ireland, Donegal. D Major. Standard. AABB. Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992). Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Tourish, Dermot McLaughlin, Tommy Peoples, Seamus Gibson, Seamus Glackin, Kevin Glackin - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991).
T:McFarley's
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:230
S:Altan
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Philippe Varlet
K:D
(3ABc|dD (3DDD {G}EDB,D|A,DFA {d}BAFA|dDcD BDAD|{G}EDAD {d}BAFA|
dD (3DDD {G}EDB,D|A,DFA {d}BAFA|(3Bcd ec dBAF|{G}EDEF D2 :||
ag|fgab afdg|fdad bdad|efga ge=c=f|e=cg=c a=cg=c|
fgaf bfaf|gfeg fdBc|defd ecdB|AFEF D2 :||

McGLINCHY'S [2]. AKA and see "Splendid Isolation." Irish, Reel. A Minor. Standard. AABB. The tune was composed by Armagh fiddler Brendan McGlinchey, originally titles "Splendid Isolation" and set in the key of G Minor. He paired it with another of his compositions, "Lawries." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999).
T:McGlinchey's
T:Splendid Isolation
R:reel
Z:From Lunasa (in set with The Floating Crowbar)
Z:Transcribed by Gerry Strong
M:C|
L:1/8
K:Am
|:GA{B}AG AedB|~A3 B ~G2 (3Bcd)|eBdB ~A2 Bd|eaag a3 b|c'abg ae ~e2|~g3 a
gedB|~A3 B G2 Bd|eBdB A2 z2:|
|:agba ge ~e2|aged (3Bcd) ed|BA ~A2 (3Bcd) ed|BA ~A2 ~G4|EA{B}AG AedB|~A3 B
~G2 (3Bcd)|ea ~a2 gaba|gedB A2 z2:|

MICHAEL COLEMAN'S [2]. Irish, Reel. Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978).

MIDNIGHT ON THE WATER. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Texas. D Major. DDAD. AABB (Spandaro): AA'BB' (Brody, Matthiesen, Reiner & Anick). This popular composition is usually credited to Texas fiddler Luke Thomasson, although it has been published that Luke's son Benny (a famous Texas-style fiddler who popularized the melody) long remembered the night he heard both his father and uncle composing the tune on the family porch (c. 1900?). Several sources have noted this tune's resemblance to an Oklahoma-collected tune called "Old Paint," and there is an ongoing debate about whether "Midnight" is derivative of "Paint" (or vice versa). The Library of Congress recording "Cowboy Songs, Ballads, and Cattle Calls from Texas" (LOC lp L28), collected by John A. Lomax and edited by Duncan Emrich, has a version of the "Paint" song by Jess Morris which has quite similar melodic material with "Midnight on the Water." The liner notes to the album point out that Morris was born in 1878 and would perhaps have been contemporary with the Thomassons, who, like Morris, lived in the Texas panhandle. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 187. Matthiesen (The Waltz Book), 1992; pg. 35. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 137. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 21. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Columbia C 33397, Dave Bromberg - "Midnight on the Water" (1975). County 724, Benny Thomasson (Texas) - "Country Fiddling from the Big State." County CD2712, Art Stamper (Ky.) - "The Lost Fiddler" (c. 1982). Front Hall 01, Fennigs All Stars (New York) - "The Hammered Dulcimer." Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Learned from Jay Ungar). Philo 1023, Jay Ungar and Lyn Hardy (New York) - "Songs, Ballads and Fiddle Tunes" (1975. Learned from the playing of Fennig's All Stars). Revonah RS-932, The West Orrtanna Stringband (Pa.) - "An Orrtanna Home Companion" (1978). Rounder 0068, Mark O'Conner- "Pickin' in the Wind."
T:Midnight on the Water
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:D
DE|F2F2 FE|F2F2 FE|FA3 B|A2 F2 DE |F2 d2 B2|A2F2 DE|F2AFEF|D4:|
|:(3ABc|d4 de|d2c2 Bc|d4B AF|D4 d2|e4 ef|e2d2e2|f3a fe|d2B2c2|d4 de|
d2c2Bc|d4B AF|D4 DE|F2A2B2|A2F2 DE|F2 AFEF|D4:|

MIDNIGHT RAMBLE, THE. Irish, Slide (12/8 time). Green Linnet GLCD 1184, Patrick Street - "Made in Cork" (1997).

MIDSUMMER NIGHT, THE. AKA and see "Vincent Broderick's." Irish, Reel. Composed by flute player Vincent Broderick, a member of the Kincora Ceili Band from 1952-1957. "Midsummer Night" is often played in a set with two other Broderick compositions, "The Tinker's Daughter" and "The Crock of Gold." Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999). Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977).

MIGHTY SPARROW, THE. Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999).

MILLER OF DRAUGHIN, THE. AKA and see "Man from Bundoran." Irish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AB. A distanced version of the Scots tune "Miller of Drone." Source for notated version: Paddy O'Brien [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 280, pg. 150. Green Linnet GLCD 1200, Lunasa - "Otherworld" (1999. Appears as "Miller of Drohan"). Green Linnet SIF 3040, De Dannan - "Ballroom" (learned from the playing of Dermy and Tara Diamond of Belfast, although the group thinks it may have originally come from fiddler Tommy Gunn, from Co. Fermanagh).
T: Miller of Draughin
S: Paddy O'Brien (Offaly)
Q: 350
R: reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
Bd | eE E2 DEB,E | DEGA BAGA | GE E2 DEB,E | DEGA BABd |
eE E2 DEB,E | DEGA BAGA | GE E2 DEB,E | DEGA BdBA ||
G2 BG dGBG | Beef gedB | G2 BG dGBA | GEGA BdBA |
G2 BG dGBG | Beef gfeg | faef dedB | GEGA BABd ||

MOHER REEL, THE. AKA and see "The Abbey Reel," "The Union Reel." Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). Shanachie 79018, De Dannann - "Star Spangled Molly."

MOLL HALFPENNY/HA'PENNY. AKA and see "Molly MacAlpin," "Paul/Poll Ha'penny," "Maili Nic Ailpin," "O'Carolan's Farewell to Music," "Carolan's Dream," "(Remember the Glories of) Brian the Brave." Irish, Air (4/4 time). A Minor/A Dorian. Standard. AB. "This name is the same as 'Molly MacAlpin,' and the air is a dance setting, and also a song setting--a very good one too--of the fine air (Molly MacAlpin) to which Moore wrote his song, 'Remember the glories of Brian the Brave'" (Joyce). See also hornpipe versions under the titles of "Poll Ha'Penny." Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 134, pgs. 68-69. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).
T:Moll Halfpenny
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:A Minor
ed|c2A2A2Bc|dcAF G2cd|edce dcAG|A2A2A2de|f2gf e2fe|dcde g2 (3e^fg|
aged cAdc|A2A2A2||e^f|g2ga gede|g^fga gede|a2 ab c'bag|e2aa a2ag|
fagf egfe|dcde eaaf|gfed cAdc|A2A2A2||

MISS LYALL [2]. AKA and see "Mrs. Grant of Laggan." Scottish (originally), Canadian; Reel. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. A Minor (Hunter, MacDonald, Stewart-Robertson): A Dorian {'A' part} & A Mixolydina {'B' part} (Perlman). Standard. AAB. Composed by the 19th century Scottish fiddler, compiler and composer Captain Simon Fraser. The reel version of the strathspey "Miss Lyall" [1]. The two are often paired as a set. Some nice modal passages in the 'B' part. See also the County Donegal variant "Old Cameronian." Sources for notated versions: Angus Cameron (Scotland) [Hunter]; Peter Chaisson, Sr. (b. 1929, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 191. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 103. Perlman (Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 85. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 42. AMI 92 EMI 94, Ashley MacIssac - "Close to the Floor" (1992). Atlantica Music 02 77657 50222 26, Ashley MacIssac - "Atlantic Fiddles" (1994). Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog."
T:Miss Lyall
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:Aminor
c/B/|AE E/E/E cABG|EGDG B,G,DB,|A,/A,/A, EA, CDEd|cAB^G A/A/A A:|
B|Aaa^g ae^cA|Bgg^f gdBG|Aaa^g ae^fd|e^cdB =cAAB|Aaa^g ae^cA|
Bgg^f gdBG|AcBd ced^f|ea^g^f ed^cB||

MISTY MOUNTAIN, THE. AKA and see "The Mist Covered Mountians." Irish, Jig. A Dorian. Standard. AA'BB'. The tune was composed by West Clare fiddler Junior Crehan, adapted from the Scottish song "The Mist Covered Mountains of Home" (Chi Mi na Morbheanna). "The Mist Covered Mountain" refers to Slieve Callen in Clare, according to Caoimhin Mac Aoidh. Accordion player Charlie Piggott learned the tune from Doolin, County Clare, tin-whistle and flute player Micho Russell (1915-1994). Piggott infers the original Scottish melody was often marched to in years past by pipe and brass-and-reed bands around west Clare (Blooming Meadows, 1998). The tune continues to be associated with the playing of Junior Crehan. Source for notated version: Kevin Chaisson (b. 1950, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 3, No. 61. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 143. Green Linnet GLCD 1127, "Martin Hayes" (1993).
T:Misty Mountain, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G Dorian
DGG GAc|dcA GFD|F3 FGA|{d}cAG GFD|DGG GAc|(dcA GFD|def AGF|{B}AGG G3:| gfd g2a|gfd {e}dcA|GFD F2 G|AGA GFD|gfd g2a|{a}gfd dcA|GFD F2 G|AGG G2g|
{a}gfd g2a|gfd dcA|GFD F2 G|AGA GFD|DCD F2 G| AGF ABc|def AGF|AGG {A}G3||

MORAG'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. Composed by Scottish bandleader Bobby McLeod. Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog."

MORGAN MAGAN. AKA - "Planxty Morgan Megan." Irish; Slow Air, Planxty or March (4/4 time). G Major (Brody, Johnson, Ó Canainn, Sullivan): A Major (Complete Collection..). Standard. One Part (Johnson): AB (Brody, Sullivan): AABB (Complete Collection..., Ó Canainn). The air was composed by the blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) in honor of one Morgan Magan of County Westmeath. Magan died in 1738, and is probably the "Captain Magan" referred to in another of O'Carolan's tunes (Donal O'Sullivan). Source for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody, Sullivan]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 196. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 92, pg. 72. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 3. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 109, pg. 92. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; NO. 35, pg. 14. Claddagh CC14, Chieftains- "Chieftains 4." Front Hall 05, Fennigs All Stars- "Saturday Night in the Provinces." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). June Appal 028, Wry Straw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978). North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Rounder 0113, Trapezoid- "Three Forks of Cheat." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972/1983). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2."
T:Morgan Megan
L:1/8
M:2/4
C:Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738)
K:G
D|"G"DG GA/B/|c/B/A/G/ B/c/d|"C"eA "A"AG|"D"G/F/E/F/ DE/F/|"G"G2 G/F/G/A/|
"C"GF/E/ "G"D>G|"D"F/G/A "A"AE/G/|"D"FD DE/F/|"G"G>G "D"A/G/A/F/|
"G"G3B|"C"c>B AB/c/|"G"d2 "C"e2|"G"dB "Am"c/B/A/G/|"D"A/G/F/E/ DE/F/|
"G"G>G "D"A/G/A/F/|"G"(G2 G)d/c/||"G"Bd de/f/|gG B/c/d|gG B/c/d|
"C"e/d/c/B/ "D"A>c|"G"B/A/B/c/ dB|"C"ec "G"dB|"Am"cA "G"dG|
"D"FD DG|"C"EC C>D|EC C>E|"D"FD DA/G/|F/G/E/F/ DB/c/|
"G"d/B/G/B/ "C"e/d/c/B/|c/B/A/G/ "D"F/G/A/F/|"G"DG "D"A/G/A/F/|"G"G2||

MORNING DEW, THE [1] (Giorria sa bhFraoch). AKA and see "The Hare Among the Heather," "The Hare in the Heather." Irish, Reel. E Dorian (Em). Standard. ABC (Breathnach, Miller): AABC (Mallinson, Taylor): AA'BC (Feldman & O'Doherty): ABCC (Brody): AABBCC (McNulty). Part of the tune was used by Chieftains piper Paddy Moloney for his first film score, Ireland Moving. Sources for notated versions: piper Maitiu Mac Tighearnain (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 198, pg. 77. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 196. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 21. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 166. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 54, pg. 24. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 12. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 37. Taylor (Through the Half-Door), 1992; No. 12, pg. 10. Claddagh CC14, Chieftains- "Chieftains 4" (1974). Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Green Linnet SIF-1110, James Kelly - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992. Joe Cooley's version learned by Joanie Madden via Patricia Kennedy). Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Green Linnet GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997). IRC Records, Michael Coleman - "The Musical Glory of Old Sligo." Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). Mooncrest Pegasus 9, Steeleye Span- "Ten Man Mop." Shanachie 29002, "Kathleen Collins." Shanachie 33006, Michael Coleman- "The Classic Recordings of Michael Coleman." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftians 4" (1974/1983). Shaskeen - "The Joys of Life."

MOTHER AND CHILD REEL, THE. Irish, Reel. Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997).

MOUTH OF THE TOBIQUE, THE. French Canadian, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB (Brody, Hinds, Messer): AABBCCBB (Songer). See "Mouth of the Potomac" for a jig version of this tune. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 198. Hinds/Hebert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 13. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 29. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 46, pg. 32. Songer (Porland Collection), 1997; pg. 141. Fretless 200A, Yankee Ingenuity- "Kitchen Junket." Green Linnet SIF 1125, Patrick Street - "All in Good Time." Green Linnet SIF 1133, Kevin Burke et al -"The Celtic Fiddle Festival" (1992). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Learned from Mirella Murrey, Clifden, Co. Galway). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Northern Spy - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Springwater S6, Graham and Eleanor Townsend - "The Great Canadian Fiddle." Voyager VRCD 342, Rodney Miller - "Rodney Miller's All-Round Collection of Jigs, Reels and Country Airs."
X:1
T:Mouth of the Tobique
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
K:G
(3DEF|:GFGA Bded|BdBG DGBG|AGFE DFAc|BdBG D2 (3DEF|
GFGA Bded|BdBG DGBG|AGFE DFAc|BG2G G2:|
|:e>f|gfga gfeg|fdAd fagf|ecAF DFAc|BGBc d2 ef|gfga gfeg|
fdAd fagf|ecAF DFAc|BG2G G2:|
X:2
T:R_48.1 The Mouth of the Tobicue
M:4/4
L:1/8
S:Kevin Burke/Jackie Daly
R:reel
D:Patrick Street CD "All in good time"
Z:Barney
K:G
(3DEF|:G2 GA (3Bcd ed|Bd BA GA BG|AB AF DE FD|
GA Bc d2 (3DEF|
GF GA (3Bcd ed|Bd BA GA BG|AB AF DE FD|
1 GB AF G2 (3DEF:|2 GB AF G3z||
g2 ga gd Bd|fd Ad f2 gf|ec AG FG AF|GA Bc d2 ef|
gf ga gd Bd|fd Ad f2 gf|ec AG FG AF|
1 GB AF G3z:|2 GB AF G2 (3DEF||
G2 BG Gc GG|BG Gc GG BG|FG AB cA FD|GA Bc d2 (3DEF|
G2 BG Gc GG|BG Gc GG BG|FG AB cA FD|GB AF G2 (3DEF:||
G2 GA (3Bcd ed|Bd BA GA BG|AB AF DE FD|
GA Bc d2 (3DEF|GF GA (3Bcd ed|Bd BA GA BG|AB AF DE FD|
1 GB AF G2 (3DEF:|2 GB AF G3z||
g2 ga gd Bd|fd Ad f2 gf|ec AG FG AF|GA Bc d2 ef|
gf ga gd Bd|fd Ad f2 gf|ec AG FG AF|
1 GB AF G3z:|2 GB AF G2 (3DEF||
G2 BG Gc GG|BG Gc GG BG|FG AB cA FD|GA Bc d2 (3DEF|
G2 BG Gc GG|BG Gc GG BG|FG AB cA FD|GB AF G4:||

MRS. CREHAN'S REEL (Ríl Bhean Uí Chroidheáin). AKA and see "The Ballymahon Reel." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB (Breathnach): AA'B (Alewine). Source for notated version: whistle player Mary Bergin (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 26. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 138, pg. 65. Gael-Linn Records CEF 071, Mary Bergin - "Feadoga Stain" (1979). Green Linnet Records SIF 1058, Matt Molloy & Sean Keane - "Contentment is Wealth" (1985). Green Linnet GLCD 1145, Wolfstone - "Year of the Dog." Outlet/Tara Records, John & James Kelly - "The Ballymahon Reel."

MRS. JAM(I)ESON'S FAVOURITE [1]. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AA. Composed by Charles Grant (1807-1892) of Aberlour, Aberdeenshire, a schoolmaster who was a pupil of the great Scottish composer and fiddler William Marshall. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 32. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

MRS. JUDGE. Irish, Planxty (A & B parts in whole time, C and D parts in jig time). E Minor. Standard. AABBCCDD. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 68, pg. 60-61. Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993).
T:Mrs. Judge
C:Turlough Carolan
B:"Carolan: The Life, Times and Music of an Irish Harper"
B:by Donal O'Sullivan (two volumes)
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:Paul de Grae
N:tempo indicated as "Moderato"
K:Em
{F}E>D | B,2 E2 E2 G2 | F>GFE D2 B2 | B<AG<F A<GF<E |
~D4 {^CD}B,2 B,2 | E2 F2 G2 A2 | B>cBA G2 e2 | e>f g2 B2 g2 |
~f4 e2 e2 | {f}ed B2 B2 e2 | d>edB G2 B2 | A>GF>G A2 G2 |
{G}F4 E2 D2 | B2 G2 c2 A2 | d2 B2 e2 B2 | c<BA<G B<AG<F |
~E4 E2 :||: GA | B2 B2 c2 B2 | BAGF G2 d2 | e>f g2 B2 g2 |
e>f g2 B2 g2 | fg a2 d2 a2 | gfge bgbe | dBde BAB^c |
~B4 {AB}B2 g2 | gfef g2 f2 | e3 f e2 d>c | B2 cB A2 G2 |
G2 F2 ~E2 D2 | E>FG>A B2 e2 | D>EF>G A2 d2 |
B<AB<G B<AG<F | ~E4 {DE}E2 :||
N:"Jig"
M:6/8
L:1/8
N:tempo indicated as "Piu mosso"
K:Em
EGB EGB | GA/G/F/E/ FB,B, | DdF EeB | GA/G/F/G/ E2 z :||
||: Bdg Bdg | g/f/e/d/e/f/ gdB | cc/B/A/G/ AdD | BeE e2 d |
e/d/B/d/e d/B/A/B/d | B/A/G/A/B/G/ AFD | E/F/GE F/G/AF |
G/A/BB, E2 z :||

MRS. McGHEE. Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Composed by Northside fiddler Mike McDougall (1928-1992), Ingonish, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1992. Learned by Ciaran Tourish from the playing of Cape Breton/Massachusetts fiddler Jerry Holland).

MUILLEANN NA MAIDÍ (The Twig Mill). AKA - "Crushing the Twigs," "Mill na Maidí." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major. Standard. A popular reel in County Donegal. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) identifies this fiddle tune as having piping influences. Donegal fiddler Mickey Doherty had a five-part version of it. Mac Aoidh relates that this was the favorite tune for a famous Donegal step dancer by the name of Fear na Ropai (Man of the ropes) whose feat it was to dance in a circle on the floor made by a short length of rope he carried with him while fiddlers played this reel. He strove not to dance outside the bounds of the rope and at each successful repetition he would draw the rope tighter until the circumference was little bigger than the space taken up by his feel. The reel is strongly associated with Vincent Campell, according to the band Altan. Green Linnett GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992). Vincent Campbell - "The Brass Fiddle" (learned from Mickey Doherty).
T:Mill na Máidí
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Yuval
D:Vincent Campbell - TheThe Brass Fiddle
M:C|
K:D
FD~D2 FDGD|FD~D2 EFGE|FD~D2 FDEF|G2BG EFGE:|
|:A3d B2AF|DFAF EFGB|A3d BFAF|G2BG EFGE:|
|:fd~d2 fdgd|fd~d2 efge|fd~d2 fdef|g2bg efge:|
|:d2ad bdad|dfaf efge|dfaf bfaf|g2bg efge:|
|:d2AG FD~D2|FD (3EFG FA~A2|A3d BFAF|EDCD EFGE:|

MUNSTER BACON (Bagun Muman). AKA and see "Kitty Got a Clinking Coming to the Fair." Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 340, pg. 71. Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988). Lochshore CDLDL 1215, Craob Rua - "The More that's Said the Less the Better" (1992).
T:Munster Bacon
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill
K:D
G|ABA AFD|dfe d2c|BGB dAF|GEE E2G|AFA dcd|BGB e/f/ge|agf ede|fdd d2:|
|:f|afd dfa|bge efg|faf ged|ecA A2G|Fdd cee|dff efg|f/g/af ede|fdd d2:|

MUTT'S FAVOURITE. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. Composed by fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton). Cranford ("Jerry Holland's"), 1995; No. 41, pg. 12. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Green Linnet GLCD 1156, Jerry Holland - "The Fiddlesticks Collection."

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