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The Fiddler's Companion

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ACCURSED KERRYMAN, THE (An Ciarraioch Mallaithe). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. The melody appears in Bunting's second collection of Irish tunes (1809). Ó Canainn (1978) bemoans Joyce's cavalier treatment of the text of this famous song in the latter's Ancient Irish Music (1875) wherein he writes:
***
Of the Irish song I retain only a few fragments, which are not
worth preserving. Perhaps the reader will be better pleased if
I give instead a song of my brother's, composed to suit the air.
***
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 76, pg. 67.

AIRDE CUAN. Irish, Air (4/4 time). B Minor. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 49, pg. 44. Rounder 3067, Alan Stivell - "Renaissance of the Celtic Harp" (1982).

AISLING GHEAL (A Bright Vision). Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. The song was recovered from the Martin Freeman collection by Seán Ó Riada, according to Tomás ÓCanainn (A Lifetime of Notes, 1996), originally collected in the west Cork gaeltacht from the singing of a woman in the late 19th century. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 104. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 60, pg. 54

AMHRÁN NA LEABHAR (The Song of the Books). AKA and see "Cuan Bhéil Inse," "Valentia Harbor," "Valentia Lament." Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Dorian. Standard. One part. Cranitch relates that the song to this air was written by Tomás Rua Ó Súilleabháin (1785-1848), a poet and musician from Iveragh. Ó Suilleabhain had been a teacher at Caherdaniel and was being transferred to Portmagee. As he was leaving he placed his treasured and huge library of leather bound books on a boat going from Derrynane to Goleen, while he himself travelled by road. The boat struck a rock and was lost, tragically along with the priceless collection of books, prompting Ó Súlleabháin to song. The air is known in modern times as a slow piper's tune. Tomas Ó Canainn's translation goes:
By Valentia harbour I happened once
Near sweet Goleen Dairbhre
To be the master in Portmagee
Where ships set sail for the ocean deep.
Soon all had the sorrowful story then
Of the sturdy craft, lost at Owen Finn,
Sad was my heart for the ship that failed;
Better this land had it survived the gale.
The melody is very popular as a slow air with pipers, though is usually known by the titles "Valentia Lament" or "Cuan Bhéal Inse."
Cranitch (The Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 102. Sceilig Records SRCD 002 Tim Dennehy - "Farewell to Miltown Malbay."
T:Amhrán Na Leabhar (The Song of the Books)
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:Edor
B2|E2 EF G2 A2|Be e5 f|e3 d B3 A|Bc d4 e2|
E3 F G3 F|GA B3 B2 A|G2 E5 D|E5 z B2|
E3 F G2 A2|Be e5 f|e3 d B3 A|Bc d5 z |
E2 EF G3 F|GA B3 B2 A|G2 F E4 D|E5 z e2|
e2 ed e3 d|ef g4 f2|e3 d B3 A|B5 z Bc|
d2 dc d3 c|dd e4 ed|B3 A G3 A|B5 z B2|
E2 EF G2 A2|Be e4 ef|e3 d B3 A|Bc d5 e|
E2 EF G3 F|GA B4 BA|G2 F E4 D|E6 ||

AMHRÁN NA TRA BAINE. Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 18.

ANACH CUAN [2]. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Dorian. Standard. One part. Words to the air were written by Blind Rafferty, the poet, born in 1784, and tell of a boating tragedy. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 40, pg. 37. Paul Dooley - "Rip the Calico."

AR THAOIBH NA CARRAIGE BAINE. Irish, Air. The tune printed under this title in Petrie's 1855 collection is, in fact, "Bruach na Carraige Baine" (The Brink of the White Rock), explains Ó Canainn (1978), despite Petrie's protestations in his introduction that it is not "Bruach na Carraige Baine."

BANCHNOIC EIREANN O. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 22, pg. 25.

BANKS OF SULLANE. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). A Dorian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 91, pg. 78.

BANKS OF THE SUIR [2]. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). E Minor (G Major?). Standard. AB (Ó Canainn, O'Neill, Roche): AAB (Stanford/Petrie). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 35, pg. 34. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 517, pg. 90. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. I, pg. 10, #12. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; Nos. 802 & 803, pg. 200.

BAPTIST JOHNSON. Irish, Slow Air or Planxty (6/8 time). C Major (Complete Collection): D Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. AABB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 62, pg. 56-57. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 53, pg. 48.

BEAN DUBH A' GHLEANNA (The Dark Woman of the Glen). AKA and see "The Maiden," "Moll Dubh an Gleanna," "The Dark Maiden of the Valley." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). Ireland, Connemara. G Major. Standard. One part. The Irish is pronounced 'Ban dhuv an glanna'. This Connemara melody is a variant of "Seamas Og Pluincead" (Young James Plunkett). "The Maiden" and "The Dark Maiden of the Valley" are simpler forms of the tune. Source for notated version: fiddler "Daniel Sullivan of Boston, a native of Millstreet, County Cork," via 'the celebrated Irish piper' Patrick Touhey [O'Neill]. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 96, pg. 82. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 6, pg. 2. Green Linnet SIF 1045, Joe Burke - "The Tailor's Choice."
T:Bean Dubh An Ghleanna
T:Dark Woman of the Glen
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:70
S:Seamus Ennis
R:Air
Z:Paul Kinder
K:G
D|G>AB>c d>>B G3 B/2d/2|g4 a/2g/2e/2f/2 d3 c/2A/2 B4|!
G3 A/2B/2 cB A4 A/2G/2F/2A/2 G6:|(3def g4 (3feg a4|!
(3bba g4 (3aag f/2 d2 c/2A/2 B4|G3 B/2d/2 g4 (3efg a4|!
bc' b2 a2 g4|(3aag f/2 d2 c/2A/2 B>cAF G4|!
(3ABd|g4 a/2g/2e/2f/2 d4 c/2A/2 B4|!
G4 A/2B/2 cB A4|A/2G/2F/2A/2|G6||!

BEINSIN LUACHRA. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 89, pg. 77.

BLIND MARY (Maire Dhall). Irish, Planxty ("very slow" air in 2/4 time, O'Neill: 4/4 time, Joyce). D Major (Ó Canainn, O'Neill {2 editions}): F Major (Joyce): G Major (Sing Out). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn, Sing Out): AB (Joyce, O'Neill). The tune is attributed to blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738), although Donal O'Sullivan, in his definitive work on the bard, could find no incontrovertable evidence of its origin. If Carolan did compose the tune, it was probably for another blind harper named Maire Dhall (Blind Mary) who lived in his locality. Maire Dhall was a professional harper (one of the few women recorded as being in the profession) who taught another blind woman, Rose Mooney, who appeared at the Belfast Harp Meeting of 1792, one of the last gatherings of ancient Irish harpers (Sanger & Kinnaird, Tree of Strings, 1992). Source for notated version: Miss Ellen Phelan, Cork (Joyce). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 182, pg. 127. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 814, pg. 396. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 56, pg. 50. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 233. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 655, pg. 117. Sing Out, Vol. 35, No. 2, Spring 1990; pg. 24. Claddagh Records CC18, Derek Bell - "Carolan's Receipt" (197?). Island ISLP9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976). Shanachie 79013, Derek Bell - "Carolan's Receipt" (1987).
T: Blind Mary
C:#182 O'Sullivan: Carolan, The Life Times and Music
M:2/4
L:1/16
Z:transcribed by Jeff Weismiller
K:D
"Andante"
A2|d4 d3c|{d}B4 A2 FG|A3B A2F2|E6 FG|A2f2 f3e|d2B2 A2DE|F3G {F}E3D|D6||
de|f3g f2B2|e3c A2Bc|d3D D2EF|E6 AG|F3G A2d2|f3e d2DE|F3G {F}E3D|D6||

BLACKBIRD AND THE THRUSH, THE [3] (An Londubh is an Cheirseach). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AA'B. Not related to version #2. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 72, pg. 63.

BOITHRIN BUI. Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 25.

BRIANACH ÓG, AN. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 42, pg. 39.

BRIDIN BHEASACH. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 111, pg. 94.

BRINK OF THE WHITE ROCKS, THE [3] (Bruac Na Cairraige Báine). AKA and see "Bruach Na Cairraige Báine." Irish, Air (6/8 time, "gaily"). Ireland, Munster. E Minor (O'Neill): D Minor (O'Sullivan/Bunting). Standard. AB. O'Sullivan (1983) remarks there are a number of versions of this tune, including five printed in Petrie's 1855 volume, pgs. 137-143 (one appears under the title "Ar Thaoibh na Carraige Baine"), while Ó Canainn (1978) reports the music can be found in John O'Daly's Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849). O'Daly has a story that the song was written for a wedding gift for the Blacker family of Portadown about the year 1666. The air retains some currency among traditional musicians today. This, the Munster version, is quite different from northern versions. Source for notated version: Source for notated version: The Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody for his 1840 collection from a blind man at Westport in 1802. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 84, pg. 15. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 26, pgs. 42-43.
T:Brink of the White Rocks, The [3]
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Gaily"
S:O'Neill - Music of Ireland (84)
K:E Minor
B2^d e2f|g2f e2=d|BdB AFA|d3 B2A|B2^d e2f|{a}g2f e2=d|BdB AF{A}G/F/|E3E2||
BdB AFD|d2e f2z|e2d BAB/^c/|d3 B2A|B2^d e2f|{a}g2f e2=d|BdB AF{A}G/F/|E3E2||

BROWN THORN, THE [2] (An Droignean Donn). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). F Major (Roche): D Major (Ó Canainn, O'Neill): E Flat Major (Stanford/Petrie). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn, O'Neill, Roche): AAB (Stanford/Petrie). Two versions of the song appear in "Amhrain Mhuighe Seola" (1927), collected by Mrs. Costello, "both collected in Mayo but one, in fact, a Galway version" (Ó Canainn). Ó Canainn (1978) remarks that it is interesting that the song was alive in the tradition one hundred years after Bunting collected the same song in the same area. Stanford claims his version of the air is "correctly set." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 21. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 32, pg. 6. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 10, pg. 9. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 451.

BUACHAILL CAOL DUBH, AN. Irish, Air (3/4 time, or 4/4 time with irregular measures). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part (Cranitch): AA'B (Ó Canainn). The phrases of this tune resemble those of the air "Ballylee." Accordion player Brendan Begley, a native of Baile na mBoc, Ballyferriter, County Kerry, remembered hearing this song sung at summer house parties when he was young, the sounds drifting into his bedroom. For his family "singing was the main thing...even milking the cows we might be singing" (Vallely & Piggott, Blooming Meadows, 1998). Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 96, pg. 165. Ó Cannain (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 86, pg. 74. Claddagh CC39, Willie Clancy - "The Pipering of Willie Clancy 2" (1983).

BUACHAILL Ó'N ÉIRNE. AKA and see "Come by the Hills." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 or 6/8 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The melody is used for the song "Come by the Hills," by Scottish journalist and television producer W. Gordon Smith in the 1960's. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 34, pg. 33. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 2.
T:Come by the Hills
T:Buachaill ó'n Éirne
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:G
B3AB2|A2G2E2|D4D2|E G3G2|(G6|G4)D2|G3AB2|c3BA2|d4d2|BG3B2|
(A6|A4)d2|d3BA2|G3AB2|c2d2e2|dB3G2|(A6|A4)GA|B3AB2|A2G2E2|
D4D2|EG3G2|(G6|G6)||

BUACHAILLÍN BÁN, AN [2]. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Minor. Standard. AA'B. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 58, pgs. 52-53.

BUNCLODY. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The air is "Cailin deas rua." Bunclody is in County Wexford, where the river Clody joins the Slaney river. Some of the lyrics to this song, an emigrant's farewell, appear in the American ballad "Pretty Saro," according to John Loesberg (1979).
***
O were I at the moss-house, where the birds do increase,
At the foot of Mount Leinster or some silent place;
By the streams of Bunclody where all pleasures do meet,
And all I would ask is one kiss from you sweet.
***
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 99, pg. 85.

CARRICKFERGUS [2]. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. A harp air. The Castle of Carrickfergus is on the coast of northern Ireland not far from Belfast. It was a stonghold of the English at least from the time of Scotland's James IV, for he ransacked the place with his flagship The Great Michael, the great ships only battle. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 26, pg. 28. Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). RCA 5798-2-RC, "James Galway and the Chieftains" (1986). Shanachie Records 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972/1983).

CATH CHEIM AN FHIA. Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 13.

CAILÍN NA GRUAIGE DOINNE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 15.

CAILÍN OG A STUAIR ME ("Little Girl of My Heart for Ever and Ever" or "Young Girl, My Treasure"). AKA and see "Cal(l)ino Casturame," "Colleen Oge Astore," "Calen o custure me," "Charley Reilly," "The Croppy Boy," "I am a Girl from the River Suir," "Newlyn Town," "The Robber," "An Irish Tune." Irish, English; Air (6/4 time). C Major (Flood): D Major (Kines): A Major (Chappell). Standard. One Part (Flood, Kines): AB (Chappell). Flood (1905, 1906) traces the air's history, asserting that the tune was originally an Irish harp melody of c. 1570. Tomas Ó Canainn (1978) writes that this was the "very first genuinely Irish tune" in collections. Chappell (1859) demurs as to the national origin, and quotes Sir Robert Stewart who, writing on Irish music in Grove's Dictionary, remarks that the piece "seems deficient in the characteristic features of Irish melody." A ballad with this title was entered on the books of the Stationers Company in 1581-82 (an early attempt at copyrighting), and the song to which it is sung was published in Robinson's A Handful of Pleasant Ditties of 1584, in the Anglicized form "Calen o custure me." It appears in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (c. 1610, set by the famous early English musician and composer William Byrde) and in William Ballet's Lute Book (c. 1590) under the Latinized title ("Callino Casturame"). It was quoted by Shakespeare in Henry V (act ii, sc. 4) where Pistol addresses the French Soldier:
Quality! Calen o custure me. In A Handful of Pleasant Delites (1584) the words "Caleno Custurame" are interpolated as a refrain between every line of the poem "When as I view", which begins:
***
When as I view your comely grace,
Caleno custurame;
Your golden haires, your angel's face,
Caleno custurame. (Kines)
***
Almost a century after the tune was composed it appears again in Playford's Musical Companion of 1673 set in four parts and titled "An Irish Tune." Some writers note a similarity with the French tune "Malbrouk." Hoffman (1877) published the melody in his arrangement of tunes mostly from the George Petrie collection. Source for notated version: The Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, c. 1610 [Flood]. Flood (The Story of the Harp), 1905; pg. 81. Kines (Songs From Shakespeare's Plays and Popular Songs of Shakespeare's Time), 1964; pg. 56.
T:Cailín og a Stuair Me
T:Callino Casturame
L:1/8
M:6/8
B:Chappel - Popular Music of the Olden Times
K:C
e2e e>de|f2f e3|d2d d>ef|e>fe d3|e>f(g g)ec|B>c(d d)BG|Gc2 c>de|d>cd c3||

CAISEAL MHUMHAN (Cashel of Munster). AKA - "Caiseal Mumhan." AKA and see "The Bog Deal Board," "Cois na Brighde," "The Soft Deal Board." Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 20, pg. 24.

CAISIDEACH BAN, AN (Fair Cassidy). Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Mixolydian/Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 11, pg. 17.

CAIT NI DHUIBHIR (Kitty O'Dwyer). Irish, Air (4/4 time). Ireland, Munster. G Major. Standard. One part. An anonymous 18th century Munster song, expressing the desire for political and cultural freedom. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 101. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 106, pg. 90. Columbia 35612, "The Chieftains" (1978. Appears as part of the medley "Dochas"). RCA 09026-60916-2, The Chieftains - "An Irish Evening" (1991).

CAITLIN TIRIAL (Kitty Tyrell). AKA - "Caitlin Triall." AKA and see "Kitty Tyrell." Irish, Air (3/4 time). A Major (Roche): G Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. AB (Roche): AAB (Ó Canainn). The melody appears in Cooke's Selection of Favourite Original Irish Airs arranged for Pianoforte, Violin or Flute (Dublin, 1793). A version of the tune in 6/8 time can be found as "The Little Red Lark." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 23, pg. 26. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 3, pg. 7, No. 25 (second setting). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). Rounder Records 3067, Alan Stivell - "Renaissance of the Celtic Harp" (1982).

CAOINEAD AN SPAILPIN ("The Wandering Laborer's Lament" or "The Spalpeen's Lament"). Irish, Air. Ireland, West Kerry. D Mixolydian/Minor (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham): G Mixolydian/Dorian (Cranitch): A Mixolydian/Dorian (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Cranitch, Ó Canainn): AB (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham). Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham's version is in 4/4 time, Cranitch's in mixed 4/4 and 5/4 time, and Ó Canainn's in 3/4 time. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 114. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 88, pg. 50. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 66, pg. 59.

CAOINEADH NA dTRI MUIRE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 10, pg. 16.

CAOINEADH UÍ DHOMHNAILL (O'Donnell's Lament). AKA - "Caoineadh Uí Dhonail." AKA and see "Lament for O'Donnell." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. G Major. Standard. AABB. This song and its air have some currency in Kerry but apparently not elsewhere. The Munster air is in memory of Red Hugh O'Donnell, an Ulster chieftain who (along with Hugh O'Neill) waged the Nine Year War against the English forces of Elizabeth I at the end of the 16th century. O'Donnell, O'Neill and their Spanish allies were defeated at the Battle of Kinsale in 1601, having been outmanoeuvred by Mountjoy's army, with the effect that the rebellion quickly collapsed and English control over the entire island was assured. A story, perhaps from a winking Denis Murphy (?), has it that "Lament for O'Donnell" is about a man who, while dancing at a party, cuts his foot on a tap from his shoe and contracts blood poisoning from which he soon expires. His friends take him to the field in the hopes of reviving him, and an angel appears and sings this lament for him! Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 19, pg. 24. Folkways FW8781, Denis Murphy - "Traditional Music of Ireland Volume 1" (appears as "Queen of O'Donnell," a misinterpreting of the Gaelic title "Caoineadh Ui Dhomhnaill", which when rendered in English sounds like "Queen of O'Donnell" {caoineadh is pronounced 'kween'}). Green Linnett SIF 1139, Eileen Ivers - "Eileen Ivers" (learned from Brendan Mulvihill). RTE Records, "Denis Murphy: Music from Sliabh Luachra". Topic Records, Padraig O'Keeffe - "Kerry Fiddles" (Padraig probably learned it from the singing of his grandmother Mrs. Callaghan). Topic Records, Denis Murphy - "The Star Above the Garter."

CAPE CLEAR. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Minor (Joyce): E Minor (Ó Canainn). Standard. AB. Source for notated version: "From O'Driscoll of Clonakilty" [Joyce]. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 653, pg. 329. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 67, pg. 59.

CILL CHAIS. AKA - "What are we going to do without timber?" Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). Ireland, County Clare. E Minor. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Russell). The tune appears as "An Arran Air" in Hoffman's 1877 arrangement of melodies mostly taken from the George Petrie collection. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989; pg. 28. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 90, pg. 77.

CITI NA gCUMANN. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Dorian. Standard. AA'B. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 3, pg. 12.

CONLACH GHLAS AN FHOMHAIR. Irish, Air (3/4 time). A Dorian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Slow Airs), 1995; pg. 16.

CONNERYS, NA. AKA - "Conneries." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 32, pg. 32. Gael-Linn CE 12 (78 RPM), Liam (Willie) Clancy. Gael-Linn CEF 075, Liam (Willie) Clancy - "Na Ceirnini 78 (1957-1960)."

CONTAE MHUIGHEO (County Mayo). AKA and see "Paddy Lynch's Boat." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 50, pg. 45.

COOLUN/COOLIN, THE (An Chuilfhionn) AKA- "An Cuilfion Le Atrugad," "An Cuilrionn," "The Coulin," "The Coolin," "Cuilin." AKA and see "In This Calm Sheltered Villa," "Had You Seen My Sweet Coolin," "Oh! Hush the Soft Sigh," "Oh! The Hours I Have Passed," "Though the Last Glimpse of Erin," "The Lady of the Desert." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major (Gow): G Major (Ó Canainn, O'Neill/1915 & 1850, Roche): F Major (Joyce). Standard. AB (Joyce, O'Neill/1850, Sullivan): AAB with variations (Roche): AA'B (Ó Canainn): AABB (Gow). "The Queen of Irish Airs" maintains Francis O'Neill (1913). There are many versions of this ancient and celebrated air "of which Bunting's and Moore's are not among the best: they are both wanting in simplicity," states Joyce (1909), who prints the tune as collected by Forde from Hugh O'Beirne (a Munster fiddler from whom a great many tunes were collected). He considers Forde's version "beautiful...(and) probably the original unadulterated melody," and adds that it is similar to the version he heard the old Limerick people sing in his youth during the 1820's. Flood (1906) states it is probable the air dates from the year 1296 or 1297, believing it must have been composed not long after the Statute, 24th of Edward I, in 1295, which forbade those English in Ireland (who were becoming assimilated into the majority Gaelic culture) to affect the Irish hair style by allowing their locks to grow in 'coolins.' The original song, told from a young maiden's point of view, berates those Anglo-Irish who conformed to the edit by cutting their hair, and praises the proud Irishman who remained true to ancestral custom (the Gaelic title "An Chuilfhionn," means 'the fair-haired one'). The Irish Parliament passed another law in 1539 forbidding any male, Irish or Anglo-Irish, from wearing long or flowing locks of hair--this enactment, relates Flood, is the supposed impetus for the claim that Thomas Moore wrote the song and tune of "The Coolin," which was printed by Walker in 1786.
***
The tune was played by Irish harper Charles Fanning for the first prize (ten guineas) at a harp festival organized at Grannard in 1781. Fanning, then 56 years old, won a similar contest eleven years later at the Belfast Harp Festival with the same air (Flood, 1906), though Bunting (who was in attendance, recording the tunes played) says he was not the best performer but used modern variations on the tune which was much in vogue with young pianoforte players at the time. It was well known enough to have been mentioned by name by the Belfast Northern Star of July 15th, 1792, as having been one of the tunes played in competition by one of ten Irish harp masters (i.e. by Fanning) at the last great convocation of the ancient harpers, the Belfast Harp Festival, held that week.
***
In the alternate title for the tune, "The Lady of the Desert," the word 'Desert' may refer to "Dysert" (though it has the same meaning), a place name in several parts of Ireland, including North Kerry. Bunting's source Hempson claimed to have his version from Cornelius Lyons, a North Kerry musician.
***
Sources for notated versions: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the tune from the harper "Hempson, at Magilligan in 1796," who learned his set with variations from the famous harper Cornelius Lyons (of the Barony of Clanmaurice) who composed them in 1700 (Lyons, a friend and companion of O'Carolan, had built his reputation as the arranger of variations in a more 'modern' style to old melodies such as this and "Eileen a Roon"); Joyce prints the version collected by Forde from Hugh O'Beirne, a reknowned fiddler from Ballinamore in the mid-19th century; "From Taig MacMahon, as sung in Clare" [Stanford/Petrie]; fiddler James O'Neill (Chicago) [O'Neill]. Carlin (Gow Collection), 1986; No. 537. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 10. Hime (Pocket Book), c. 1810; pg. 33. Holden (Old Established Tunes), 1806-7; pg. 28. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 564, pg. 299 (appears as "The Coolin"). Kinloch (100 Airs), c. 1815; No. 25. McFadden (Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), volume V, 1790-7; pg. 29. Mooney (History of Ireland), 1846; pg. 532. Murphy (Irish Airs and Jigs), 1809; pg. 8. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 103, pg. 88. O'Farrell (National Pipe Music), 1797-1800; pg. 33. O'Farrell (Pocket Companion), 1801-10; No. 122. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 46, pg. 30 (with variations). O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 89, pg. 16 (with nine variations). O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 119, pgs. 168-170. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 1, pg. 22, No. 43. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; Nos. 598 & 599, pgs. 150-151. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 40, pg. 17. Walker (Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards), part X, 1786; pg. 8. Green Linnet SIF 1084, Eugene O'Donnell - "The Foggy Dew" (1988).
T:Coolun
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:D
(3ABc|d2 ~d>f (f/e/)d/c/|~d2 A2 (3DFA|d2 (de/f/) {f}e>d|(d2c)z ~d>c|
~(B2 B)c/d/ (e/d/)(c/B/)|A2 (FA)(d>A)|(c/B/)A/G/ F2 E2|D4:|
|:A>G|~F>E(D>E)(FG)|A>^G ABcA|~d>c (de/f/) ed|(d2c2) d>c|
~B2 (B/c/d/c/) (e/d/)(c/B/)|A2 (FA)d>A|(c/B/)(A/G/) F2 E2|D4:|

COUNTY MAYO [2]. AKA and see "Contae Mhaigheo," "Paddy Lynch's Boat." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Some general similarities to "County Mayo" [1]. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 50, pg. 45 (appears as "Contae Mhuigheo").

CREGGAN CHURCHYARD (Uir-chill a' Chreagain). Irish, Air (3/4 time). Ireland, Northern Ireland. G Major. Standard. One part. According to O Canainn (1978) this is one of the great airs of the Northern tradition. It appears in Sean O Baoighill's Cnuasacha de Cheoltai Uladh. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 113, pg. 96.

CROPPY BOY, THE [2]. AKA and see "The Robber," "Callino Casturame," "Charley Reilly," "Newlyn Town." Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. "This song was a great favourite in the southern and south-eastern counties: and I have known both air and words from my childhood. I published the air and the first verse of the song in my Ancient Irish Music. More than 50 years ago I gave it to Dr. Petrie, and it is included in the Stanford-Petrie collection. I have a broadsheet with the words rudely and very incorrectly printed. The words, of course, date from 1798: but the air is much older" (Joyce). Tomas Ó Canainn (1978) names this air as "the very first genuinely Irish tune" that appears in early collections, and cites its appearance in both William Ballet's Lute Book (Trinity College, Dublin) and the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (Cambridge) where it appears under the title "Callino Casturame" (Cailin o chois tSiuire me). O'Sullivan (1983) notes the melody was popular in England also, and variants appear in many folksong collections from that country, including Kennedy's Folksongs of Britain and Ireland (as "Newlyn Town," No. 326) and Kidson's 1926 A Garland of English Folk Songs (beginning "In Newlyn town I was born and bred).
***
'Twas early, early, all in the spring,
The pretty small birds began to sing;
They sang so sweet and so gloriously,
And the tune they played was sweet liberty.
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 385, pg. 193.
T:Croppy Boy [2]
L:1/8
M:3/4
N:"Slow and expressive"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:D
dB|AF E>F A/F/ E/F/|DD D2 DE|FF e2 cd|BA B2 DE|FF d2 cd|BA B>c d>B|
AF E>F AF E/F/|DD D2||

CUAICHIN GLEANN NEIFIN. Irish, Slow Air (9/8 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn's note states this is the "Glenroe" theme. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 81, pg. 71.

CUAN BHEIL INSE. AKA and see "Amhran na Leabhar" (Song of the Books). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). E Dorian. Standard. AAB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 31, pg. 31.

DAWNING OF THE DAY, THE [4] (Fáinne Geal an Lae). Irish, Air or March (2/4 or 4/4 time). E Flat Major (Stanford/Petrie): D Major (Cranitch, Tubridy): G Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Cranitch, Ó Canainn, Tubridy): AB (Stanford/Petrie). The melody is within the span of an octave. A variant is "Oh Johnny dearest Johnny, what dyed your hands and cloaths?" Source for notated version: "From Kate Keane, Dec., 1854" [Stanford/Petrie]. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 35. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 30, pg. 31. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 694, pg. 174. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 3.
T:Dawning of the Day, The
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:D
DE|F2F2F2EF|A2A2B2 AF|D2FE D2D2|D6A2|B3AB2d2|F3ED2F2|A2F2d2F2|
E6A2|B3AB2d2|F3ED2F2|A2F2d2F2|E6DE|F2F2F2EF|A2A2B2AF|D2FED2D2|D6||

DE BHARR AN CNOCH (Over the Hill). AKA - "De Bharr na gCnoc." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. AB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 114, pg. 97. Green Linnet SIF-1084, Eugene O'Donnell - "The Foggy Dew" (1988).

DEAR WHITE-BACKED BROWN COW, THE [2] (Drimin Donn Dilis). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 95, pg. 81 (appears as "Drimin Donn Dilis").

DEATH AND THE SINNER [2] (An Peacac Agus An Bas). Irish, Air (3/4 time). F Major/G Dorian (O'Neill/Roche): G Major/A Dorian (Ó Canainn). Standard. AB (Roche): AAB (Ó Canainn, O'Neill). Source for notated version: Chicago police Sergeant Michael Hartnett, a neighbor of Chief O'Neill's and the source of numerous airs [O'Neill]. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 73, pg. 64. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 471, pg. 82. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 3, pg. 1, No. 2.

DO YOU REMEMBER THE NIGHT? ("A Meabruigeann Tu an Oidce Sin?" or "An Cumhain leatsa an Oiche ud?") Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). A Major. Standard. One part (O Canainn): AB (O'Neill). The melody was collected by Joyce in the early 19th century in the Limerick area. Joyce, Ancient Irish Music (1875). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 42, pg. 39. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 145, pg. 26.

DONAL OG. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 28, pg. 29.

DOWN BY THE SALLY GARDENS [2]. AKA and see "Maids of the Mourne Shore," "Sally Gardens." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 93, pg. 80.

ÉAMONN A' CHNUIC (Nos na Ronne). AKA and see "Ned of the Hill," "Edmond of the Hill." Irish, Air (3/4). G Major. Standard. One Part (Ó Canainn): AB (Roche). The melody first appears in the appendix to Walker's Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards (1786). The song tells of Edmund Ryan of the Hill (Éamonn a' Chnuic), of Knockmeoil Castle, County Tipperary, an Irish earl who refused to go into exile and instead chose to stay on in Ireland after the Battle of the Boyne to fight the English. One of the rapparees o f the era, Éamonn had been forced into outlawry as the result of a altercation with a tax collector, and by 1702 had a price of 200 pounds on his head. He found some shelter for a time with an old lover but at the end was killed by a neighbour who had similarly offered him safe haven, but who betrayed him for English reward money (only to find that the reward had recently been withdrawn due to a service Edmund had performed for an Englishman). Éamonn was an associate of Sarsfield's famous scout "Galloping Hogan" (see "Galloping O'Hogan"). An English translation of the lyrics goes thus:
***
Who is that outside with anger in his voice beating my closed door?
I am Éamann of the Hill, soakend through and wet
From constant walking of mountains and glens
My love, fond and true, what else could I do
but shield you from wind and from weather?
When the shot falls like hail, they us both shall assail
and mayhap we will die together.
***
Through frost and through snow, tired and hunted
I go in fear both of friend and of neighbour;
My horses run wild, my acres untilled
and all of lost to my labour.
What grieves me far more than the loss of my store
is there is no one would shield me from danger
so my fate it must be to bid farewell to thee
and languish amid strangers
***
My darling, my beloved
we will go off together for a while
to forests of fragrant fruit trees
and the blackbird in his nest
the deer and the buck calling
sweet little birds singing on branches
And the little cuckoo on top of the green yew tree
Forever, forever, death will not come near us
in the middle of our fragrant forest.
***
(translation by Barbara Carswell on Connie Dover's CD "If Ever I Return").
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 92, pg. 79. O Sullivan, Songs of the Irish. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 3, pg. 1, No. 3.
T:Éamonn a' Chnuic
L:1/8
Q:90
K:G Major
B{c}{B}A|"G" G2{A}{G} E3 F |"Em" {A}G4 {A}GA |
"G" B{a}g3{a}{g} fd |"C" {a}e4 f{a}{f}e |"G" d4 B{c}{B}A |
"Em" G4 AB |1"C" c3 B{c}{B}A{B}{A}G |
"D" E4 :|2"C" A4 {B}{A} "D" GF |"G" G4 ||
Bd | "C" e c3 g2 |"G" {c}d4 d2 |"C" e2{a}f2{g}{f}e2 |"G" d4 de |
d4 B{c}{B}A |"Em" G4 AB |"C" c3 B {c}{B} A{B}{A} G|"D"E4 |
B{c}{B}A |"G" G2{A}{G} E3 F |"Em" {A}G4 {A}GA |
"G" B{a}g3{a}{g} fd |"C"{a}e4 f{a}{f}e |"G" d4 B{c}{B}A |
"Em" G4 AB |"C" A4 {B}{A}"D" GF |"G" G4 ||

EAMONN MHAGAINE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 78, pg. 69.

EASTER SNOW. Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh explains the title is an English version of the Gaelic name Diseart Nuadhain, a placename in north Roscommon which can today be found in the form of Estersnow, a Boyle rural district. Mac Aoidh states that Petrie appears to have literaly translated the English back into Irish as "Sneachia Casga" as an alternate title. The same air is to be found in Brendan Rogers manuscript collection (in the Irish Traditional Music Archive) noted from the performances of attendees at the Feis Ceoil competitions held in Belfast in 1898 and 1900. The musical family the Dohertys of Donegal had a different air by the same title, and the great Donegal piper, Tarlach Mac Suibhne, played a different air than the Dohertys. Mac Suibhne's playing of "Easter Snow" was recorded by the Dublin Evening Telegraph in 1897, when he was one of seven pipers at the first Feis, held in that city (the title in the newspaper was "Sneachta na Casga"). Finally, regarding this tune, Mac Aoidh notes that fiddler John Doherty personified "Easter Snow" as a woman, Ester Snow, whom he maintained was over six feet tall, very beautiful, and had skin as white as snow (leading to her name). Source for notated version: the Irish collector P.W. Joyce, 1864. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 105, pg. 89. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905, Vol. III, No. 1123.

EILEEN AROON [3] (Eilionoir a Ruin). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): ABC (O'Sullivan/Bunting). Source for notated version: Bunting noted his version from the harper "Denis Hempson at Magilligan in 1792," who played variation by the famous harper Cornelius Lyons from the turn of the 18th century. Lyons had made a reputation as the arranger of variations to such tunes as this and "The Coolin" in a more 'modern' style. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs from Ireland), 1995; No. 37, pg. 35. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 123, pg. 175-178.

ELEANOR PLUNKETT. Irish, Slow Air or Planxty (3/4 time). G Major/A Dorian. Standard. One part. A popular composition by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 150, pg. 103. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 21, pg. 25.
T:Eleanor Plunkett
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:G
GA|B2 AGED|E2 ag e2|ed B2 AG|E2 A3 B|A4 :|
|:ga|b2 aged|e2 ef|g2 g2 b2|a2 bagf| g2 agfe|
d2 B2 d2|e2 g2 G2|B4 AG|E2 A3 B|A4:|

EOCHAILL. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 39, pg. 36.

FATH MO BHUARTHA. Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; pg. 11.

FANNY POWER ("Fanny Poer" or "Fannuidh Power"). AKA and see "Fanny Poer," "Madame Trench," "Mrs. Power/Poer," "Mrs. Trench (of Garbally)," "Planxty Fanny Power." Irish, Air or Planxty (6/8 or 3/4 time). G Major (Complete Collection, O Canainn, O'Neill, Sullivan): A Major (O'Sullivan/Bunting). Standard. AABB. Composed before 1728 by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) in praise of the daughter and heiress of patrons David and Elizabeth Power of Coorheen, Loughrea, Co. Galway. O'Carolan called her "the Swan of the Shore" from the fact that her father's residence was situated on the edge of Lough Riadh (Rea). When Fanny married in March, 1732, one Richard Trench of Garbally she became the "Mrs. Trench (of Garbally)" or "Madame Trench" by which title the air sometimes appears. She was long-lived and provident, surviving to 1793, the mother of a future Lady (Clancarty), and Baron, Viscount and Earl (William Power Keating Trench, born in 1741 and created Baron Kilconnel in 1797) {Flood, 1906; O'Sullivan, 1983}. John McCutcheon (1981) states the tune was very popular in its day, and was written in the Italian Baroque style. Source for notated version: Bunting collected the tune either from Charles Byrne or Arthur O'Neill, both harpers of the late 18th century and whom he credits singley and respectively in his MS and the index to his 1840 collection. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 155, pg. 106. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 63, pg. 56. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 238. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 67, pgs. 104-105. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 48, pg. 20. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 42. Front Hall FHR-021, John McCutcheon - "Barefoot Boy wiith Boots On" (1981). RCA 5798-2-RC, "James Galway and the Chieftains in Ireland" (1986). Shanachie 79013, Derek Bell - "Carolan's Receipt" (1987).
T:Fanny Power
T:Planxty Fanny Powers
C:Turlough O'Carolan
S:The Carolan Albums, Maire Ni Chathasaigh
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:G
z|G2 D G>AB|c2 B A2 G|G>FE D>ED|F2 G A>Bc|B>AG B>cd|
e2 A A2 G|G>FE DGF|G2 G G2::B|dB/c/d dB/c/d|GBG GBG|
ec/d/e ec/d/e|AcA AcA|B>cd e>fg|fga dec|B>AG A/B/cF|G2 G G2:|]

FIRST TUESDAY IN AUTUMN, THE (An Chead Mhairt 'e Fhomhar). Irish, Air. Ireland, Ulster. According to Ó Canainn (1978) this is one of the great songs of the northern tradition.

FOR IRELAND I WON'T SAY HER NAME (Ar Eirinn ni Neosfainn Ce Hi). AKA - "For Ireland I'd Not Tell Her Name." AKA and see "'Ar Eirinn ni 'Neosfainn Ce Hi." "I Am a Disconsolate Rake," "Nancy Pride of the West," "The River Lee," "Storeen Machree." Irish, Slow Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). Ireland; Munster, West Kerry. D Major (Boys of the Lough): G Major (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Ó Canainn, O'Neill). Standard. One part (Boys/Lough, Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Ó Canainn): AB (O'Neill). The song attached to this slow air, according the Boys of the Lough, relates the tale of a beautiful maiden who appeared for a short time to a Gaelic poet, resisted his advances and then disappeared forever, leaving him heartbroken. Another version has it that the protagonist falls secretly in love with a maid, although he is too poor to support her and too shy
to propose. He goes abroad to seek his fortune, and once made and emboldened he returns home to claim his beloved, only to discover she has married his brother. Brokenheared, he composes this song, though for obvious reasons he refuses to reveal the name of his beloved. The Boys of the Lough note some similarity between this tune and the English/Scottish border tune known as 'Tweedside.' "...It is often called 'Binn lisin aerach a Bhrogha' (The melodious little lis of Bruff, Co. Limerick) from a song about that place" (Joyce). The melody was published by both Petrie and Joyce (pg. 221, appears as "Nancy the Pride of the West") as the vehicle for songs, and the music appears in Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849). Joyce also later included it in his Irish Music and Song." Words to the song begin:
***
Aréir is mé téarnamh um' neoin,
Ar an dtaobh thall den teóra 'na mbím,
Do théarnaig an spéir-bhean im' chómhair
D'fhág taomanach breóite lag sinn.
Do ghéilleas dá méin is dá cló,
Dá béal tanaí beó mhilis binn,
Do léimeas fé dhéin dul 'na cómhair,
Is ar Éirinn ní n-eósainn cé h-í.
***
Last night as I strolled abroad
On the far side of my farm
I was approached by a comely maiden
Who left me distraught and weak.
I was captivated by her demeanour and shapeliness
By her sensitive and delicate mouth,
I hastened to approach her
But for Ireland I'd not tell her name. (Mary O'Hara, A Song for Ireland).
***
Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 24. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 89, pg. 51. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 57, pg. 51 (appears as "Ar Eirinn"). O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 87, pg. 15. North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Transatlantic TRA 296, Boys of the Lough, "Recorded Live."
T:For Ireland I Won't Say Her Name
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:G Major
GA | B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 GA | B2 D2 D2 | E2 G2 B2 | B4 GA |
B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 A2 | G2 E2 D2 | E2 G3 A | G4 || Bc |
d2 B2 A2 | G2 B2 d2 | e4 ge | d2 B2 A2 | G2 A2 B2 | A4 GA |
B2 D2 D2 | E2 c2 BA | B4 A2 | G2 E2 D2 | E2 G3 A | G4 |]

FOX'S SLEEP, THE (Codlad An Sionnaig). AKA and see "When He Who Adores Thee." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (O'Neill). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 80, pg. 70. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 335, pg. 589.

GATES OF THE YELLOW TOWN, THE (Geaftai Bhaile Buí). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). Ireland, Northern Ireland. G Major. Standard. One part. According to Ó Canainn (1978) this is one of the great songs of the northern Irish tradition. It is in the sean-nos repertoire and is in the form one of a complaint about women and they touble they give to men. Interestingly, Harry O'Prey points out that one line of the song goes:
***
Focal ar bith mná, ní chreidfidh mé go bráth,
Mur' bhfá' mise scríobhtha 'mBéarla é"
***
Meaning: "I will never again believe any promise from a woman unless I get it written in English." He says: "The reference to English is, of course, due to its being the only language acceptable to officialdom in Ireland, thus carrying with it all the power and influence of the State. The same promises in Irish would not have been worth the paper they were written on." O'Boyle/Ó Baoill (Ceolta Gael/Songs of the Gael), Mercier Press, Dublin,1975; p.56. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; pg. 15.

GENERAL MONROE'S LAMENTATION (Marbna Ceannairt Munroe). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Minor (O'Neill): A Dorian (Ó Canainn). Standard. AB (O'Neill): AA'B (Ó Canainn). Henry Monroe was chosen to lead the rebels from County Down in the rising of 1798. After an initial success at Saintfield he was defeated in the Battle of Ballynahinch and was forced to flee to a farmhouse for refuge. He was betrayed, arrested, brought to Lisburn, County Antrim, and subsequently hanged there in front of his own home (and then beheaded, according to O'Neill), just three days after his defeat (Ó Boyle, 1976). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 74, pg. 65. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 6, pg. 13. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 37, pg. 7.

GIVE ME YOUR HAND (Tabhair domh do Lámh). AKA - "Mihi Manum." Irish, Air (6/8 time) {"boldly"} or Waltz (i.e. Bulmer & Sharpley). G Major/Mixolydian (Brody, Matthiesen): G Mixolydian (Mallinson, O'Neill, O'Sullivan/Bunting, Tubridy). Standard. One part (Brody, Mallinson, Ó Canainn, O'Neill): AB (Tubridy): ABC (Matthiesen). The index of the Irish collector Edward Bunting's 1840 collection gives that the piece was composed in 1603 by Ruainn Dall O'Catháin (d. 1653), or familiarly Rory Dall (Ó Cahan), originally an Ulster harper who performed and composed primarily in Scotland (the Gaelic appelation 'dall' means 'blind'). Rory Dall is said to also have been an accomplished performer on the bagpipes and was much respected by the Highland gentry. There is some indication that O'Catháin changed his name to Morrison while in Scotland. The O'Catháin/O'Cahans were a powerfull clan in parts of Antrim and Derry, which lands were called the O'Cahan country, and were loyal pledges to Hugh O'Neill, whose harper Rory Dall was said to be (O'Neill, 1913). A legendary account, related by Francis O'Neill (1913), gives some idea of the lasting loyalty of fuedal obligation. It seems that "Give Me Your Hand" (or, in Latin, "Mihi Manum") became renowned in Rory Dall's lifetime, and that both tune and the story of its composition (related below) reached the ear of King James the Sixth, who bade the harper appear at the Scottish court. He performed the tune and so delighted the king that James familiarly laid his royal hand on the musician's shoulder. When he was asked by a courtier if he realized the honor the king had shown him by the action, Rory is said to have replied: "A greater than King James has laid his hand on my shoulder." Who was that man? cried the King. "O'Neill, Sire," proudly said the harper, standing up. Rory's branch of the family came into conflict with the powerful O'Donnell clan of
***
An account of the occasion of Rory Dall's composing this tune is included in O'Neill's Memoirs (MS 46, pg. 27), and goes:
***
(Rory Dall) took a fancy to visit Scotland where there were
great harpers. He took his retinue (or suit) with him. Amongst
other visits in the style of an Irish chieftain he paid one to a
Lady Eglinton, and she not knowing his rank in a peremptory
manner demanded a tune which he declined, as he only came
to play to amuse her, and in an irritable manner left the house.
However, when she was informed of his consequence she
eagerly contrived a reconciliation and make an apology, and
the result was that he composed a tune for her ladyship, the
handsome tune of "Da Mihi Manum" (Give Me Your Hand)
on which his fame spread thro' Scotland.
***
The melody's popularity was long-lived, as attested by its appearance in many collections througout the 18th century, including Wright's Aria di Camera (1730), Neal's Celebrated Irish Tunes (c. 1726), Burk Thumoth's Twelve English and Irish Airs (c. 1745-50), Thompson's Hibernian Muse (c. 1786), Brysson's Curious Selection of Favourite Tunes (c. 1790, and Mulholland's Ancient Irish Airs (1810). The Latin title first appears in the Wemyss manuscript of 1644 and in the Balcarres manuscript of 1692, though the English or Gaelic translations were not given until Bunting's 1840 edition (Sanger & Kinnaird, 1992). In modern times this ancient harp air has entered modern Irish playing tradition, and is a favorite in County Donegal, for one. Sources for notated verisons: Bunting noted the tune in 1806 from the elderly harper Arthur O'Neill [O'Sullivan/Bunting]; Planxty (Ireland) [Brody]; Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Matthiesen]; O'Neill credits himself with the version in his Music of Ireland, though it seems nearly identical to Bunting's versions. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 120. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 83. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 97, pg. 41. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pgs. 20 & 21. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pgs. 20-21. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 406, pg. 71. O'Neill, 1913; pg. 60. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 63, pgs. 97-98. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 40. Bay 203, Jody Stecher- "Snake Baked a Hoecake." Polydor 2383 397, Planxty- "Planxty Collection" (appears as "Tabhair Dom Do Lamh"). RCA 5798-2-RC, "James Galway and the Chieftains in Ireland" (1986). Shanachie 79009, "Planxty" (appears as "Tabhair Dom Do Lamh"). Shanachie 79012, Planxty - "The Planxty Collection" (1974).
T:Tabhair Dom Do La/mh
T:Give Me Your Hand
C:Rory Dall O'Cathain
B:Robin Williamson "The Pennywhistle Book p 60
Z:By Phillip L. Sexton
M:6/4
L:1/4
Q:55
K:G
D|EGG G2D|EG>A G2D|EGG GAB|B"tr"ed/2e/2 B2A/2G/2|
AAe/2d/2 BBd/2B/2|AA/2B/2 A/2G/2 "tr"E2D|EGG G2D|EGG G2||
D|"sm"EGG GAB|d/2e/2 d/2B/2 A/2B/2 G2D|EGG GAB|Bed B2A/2G/2|
AAe/2d/2 BBd/2B/2|AA/2B/2 c/2d/2e2d/2B/2|dde "sm"g2e/2d/2|
ee (3g/2e/2g/2 a2 d/2e/2|gg d/2e/2 gg d/2e/2|gg (3a/2g/2a/2 b3|bbb b2a/2g/2|
aa/2g/2 a/2b/2 a2g/2f/2|~e3/2f/2(3g/2f/2e/2 ddg|~B3/2d/2 c/2B/2 A2(3c/2B/2A/2|
GG/2A/2 B/2d/2 "sm"=f2e/2d/2|eeg e2d/2B/2|ddg BBd/2B/2|AA/2B/2 (3c/2B/2A/2 G2||

GLENSWILLY. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 84, pg. 73.

GOIRTIN EORNAN, AN (The Little Field of Barley). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major (Boys/Lough, Ó Canainn): C Major (Cranitch). Standard. One part. "This is a Munster version of a fairly common Gaelic love song, in which the young man tells that he would rather have the kisses of his love than all her wealth and riches." Boys of the Lough, 1977, pg. 13. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 103. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 108, pg. 91. Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough - "Second Album" (1974). Trailer LER 2086, Boys of the Lough, "Second Album" (1974).

GOL NA mBAN SAN ÁR (Lament of the Women in Battle). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The title is variously translated as "The Lament of the Women in Battle" or "The Crying of the Women in the Slaughter." The title has been thought to have been inspired by a number of different battles; some think it refers to the Battle of Aughrim in 1691, between the Jacobite forces and the British troops and their allies under the Dutch general Ginkel. Breathnach (1997) says the piece relates to the victory of Lord Inchequin at Knockinnoss, County Cork, in 1647 (see note for "Macalisdrum's March" for another tune connected with this battle). The last of the old Kerry pipers, Michael O'Sullivan (who admittedly had some extremely idiosyncratic and 'eccentric' notions), maintained it was about the battle of Cnoc an Áir, in which Fionn Mac Umhaill defeated Meargach and his hosts with great slaughter. A piping piece, it programmatically simulates the march of the troops to battle, the struggle itself, and the women lamenting the slain in the aftermath. It appears in the appendix to Walker's Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards (1786) and Thompson's Hibernian Muse (1786), although in the latter collection in appears under the title "An Irish Dump" (dump meaning here a lament or sad tune). According to music historian Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin (1998), a cylinder recording still exists from the 1890's of blind Micí Chúmba Ó Súilleabháin/Micheal O'Sullivan playing the piece. Breathnach (1997) expands on this to explain that O'Sullivan competed in the Feis Ceoil held in Dublin in 1899, in which he tied for second place. He also was an entrant in the competition for unpublished airs, which could either be submitted by manuscript or could be played into an Edison phonograph. Those thought worthwhile would be notated and the cylinders scraped for further use, however, by some bit of luck or twist of fate, the 1899 cylinders were retained and survived to the present day. Moreover, an account of O'Sullivan playing at the Feis appeared in the Irish-American journal Gael (New York) in July 1899:
***
Michael O'Sullivan is also blind, and is named in his own country Micahel
Dall. He is the last of a long line of pipers and has a great store of airs. The
impatience of the audience however, prevented his being asked very
minutely regarding them before the other competitions commenced.
He however, played Gol na mBan san Ár. This was an important contribution.
It is the Lamentation of the Women amidst the Slaughter. There are five
lamentations, one for each province.
***
As noted above, O'Sullivan could harbour odd ideas. He attributed his not taking top honors in the competition to his landlady feeding him fairy butter, the effect exacerbated by the malign influence of the dead man's trousers he was wearing (Breathnach explains the piper had been outfitted with a ready-made suit when departing for the Feis, and nothing would convince him that it had not been taken from a funereal corpse).
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 116, pg. 99.
T:Gol Na mBan San Ár
T:Lament of the Women in Battle
M:3/4
L:1/8
Q:70
R:Air
B:Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland, Tomas Ó Canainn
Z:Transcribed by Paul Kinder
K:G
B2 dBAG|B2 dBAG|A2 ABAG|A2 ABAG|!
B2 dBAG|B2 dBAB|G3 BAB|G3 BAG|!
e2 degd|e2 dBAG|A2 ABAG|A2 ABAG|!
e2 degd|e2 dBAG|B2 dBAB|G3 BAB|!
G3 BAG|B2 dBAG|B2 dBAG|A2 ABAG|!
A2 ABAG|B2 dBAG|B2 dBAB|!
G3 BAB|G3 BAG|G6|!

HARE'S PAW, THE [2] ("Cois an Ghiorria" or "Cois a' Ghaorthaidh"). Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 62, pg. 55 (appears as "Cois a' Ghaorthaidh").

HEWLETT. AKA and see "Fine Toast to Hewlett," "Hulet's Health," "Planxty Hewlett." Irish, Air (3/8 or 3/4 time). D Major (Brody, Johnson, Spandaro): A Major (Complete Collection ...). Standard. AB (Complete Collection...): AAB (Brody, Mallinson, Tubridy): AA'B (Ó Canainn): AABB (Johnson). This lively bacchanalian composition (read: drinking song) is generally credited to blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738), who lost his sight at the age of 18 from smallpox. By the age of 21 he had been trained as an itinerant musician, and set off with a guide and two horses to make his way in the world. The melody is called "Hulet's Health" (Sláinte Bhreagh Huilet, or 'a toast to Hulet') in Bunting's 1804 collection of Irish tunes (in which the tune is set in E Flat Major), where the melody first appears. O'Sullivan (Complete Collection) prints the tune in A Major, though D is generally the key favored in modern times. In New England it is sometimes played as a waltz at dances. Bunting gave no source for the piece but collected some stanzas of lyric supposedly set to the tune from Blind Billy O'Malley of Louisborough, County Mayo:
**
Sláinte bhreagh Hiúlit sgaoil chughain é gan mhaill,
'S ná cásaigidh dúbuilte lionn, "punch" is meadhar.
Mar bhíos plátaí 'gus púntaíag an u/r-fhlaith le raint
Ins a' tráth nach mbíonn diúrna i m-éan-chumann a mbíonn _sign_.
Imirt is ól fíona, céol píoba, _viol_ is cruit,
Cúilfhionn na n-ór-dhlaoi i sco/mra dhá saigheadh aige,
Óir is é siúd _delight_ an fhir mheidhrigh gan brón
Bheith páirteach le maighdean fá_mhoidore nó dhó.
**
Source for notated version: Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 133. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 56, pg. 54. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 5. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 93, pg. 39. Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 28. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 101, pg. 86 (appears as "Planxty Hewlett"). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 21. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 44. Claddagh CC14, Chieftains- "Chieftains 4" (1973). North Star NS00331, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Shanachie 79010, Planxty - "The Well Below the Valley." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1983). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Wild Asparagus 002, Wild Asparagus - "Music from a Little Known Planet." Maureen Brennan - "To Bend the Knotted Oak."
T:Hewlett
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:D
AF | D2D2FG | ABc2A2 | d2f2fg | fed2dB|A2F2FA|GFGABG|AFD2DE| D4 :|
|: A2|A2D2AB|A2D2AB|A2d2de|dcBAGF |G2GFG |G2GFGA|GFGABG|AFD2E2 |FEF2G2|ABc2A2|d2f2fg|fed2dB|A2F2FA|GFGABG|AFD2DE|D4:|

I AM ASLEEP AND DON'T WAKEN ME [2] ("Taim I Mo Chodhladh Is Na Duisigh Me," "Taimse im/mo Chodladh" or "Ta me mo chodladh"). AKA and see "Cold, frosty morning," "Past one o'clock," "Thamama Hulla" (an Englished version of the Irish title), "Lament of a Druid." Irish, Air (3/4 time). F Major (O'Sullivan/Bunting): F Mixolydian (Stanford/Petrie). Standard. AB (O'Sullivan/Bunting): AAB (Stanford/Petrie). A variant of version #1. Cowdery (1990) identifies this tune as a member of "The Blackbird" family. The first printing of the tune was apparently in Neales' Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first collection of Irish melodies (Ó Canainn, 1978), though the Scots were quick to take it up as it appear in Stuart's Music for TTM, c.1725/6 (where it appears as "Chami ma chattle"). It was used in ballad operas of the 18th century and is still quite common in the tradition.
**
A wonderful story is told by O'Neill regarding this tune, quoted in O'Sullivan (1983):
**
When at Mr. Macdonnell's of Knochranty in the county of
Roscommon, he met a young nobleman from Germany who
had come to Ireland to look after some property to which
he had a claim through his mother. "He was one of the most
finished and accomplished young gentlemen," says O'Neill,
"that I ever met. When on one occasion Hugh O'Neill and I
played our last tunes for him, he wished to call for 'Past one
o'clock,' or 'Tha me mo chodladh, naar dhoesk a me,' which
he had heard played somewhere before, but for the name he
was at a loss. Perceiving me going towards the door, he followed
me, and said that the name of his bootmaker was Tommy
McCullagh, and that the tune he wanted was like saying
'Tommy McCullagh made boots for me;' and in the broad
way he pronounced it, it was not unlike the Irish name. I
went in with him and played it, on which he seemed
uncommonly happy.
**
Source for notated version: Bunting noted the melody from Hempson the harper at Magilligan in 1792. Holden (Collection of Old-Established Irish slow and quick tunes), volume II, Nos. 15 & 35. Mulholland (Ancient Irish Airs), No. 32. Neal (Collection of most Celebrated Irish Tunes), 1726; pg. 12. O'Farrell (Pocket Companion for the Irish or Union Pipes), No. 168. O'Neill (1850), No. 599. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 100, pgs. 144-146. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 488, pg. 123. Burke Thumoth (Twelve Scotch and Twelve Irish Airs), pg. 15. Walker (Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards), No. 32. RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993). Topic 12T184, Willie Clancy - "The Breeze From Erin" (1969).

IRISH WASHERWOMAN, THE (An Bhean Niochain Eireannach). AKA and see "Corporal Casey," "Country Courtship," "Dargason," "Irishwoman," "The Irish Wash-Woman," "Irish Waterman," "Jackson's Delight," "Paddy McGinty's Goat," "The Wash Woman," "The Scheme," "The Snouts and Ears of America," "Star at Liwis," "Sedany." Irish, English, Scottish, American; Double Jig. USA; Very widely known. G Major ('B' part is in G Mixolydian in some Scottish versions). Standard. AA'B (Breathnach): AABB (most versions): AA'BB' (Gow, Perlman): AABBCC (Ashman). Although the tune has popularly been known as an old, and perhaps quintessential Irish jig, it has been proposed by some writers to have been an English country dance tune that was published in the 17th century and probably known in the late 16th century. Samuel Bayard (1981), for example, concludes it probably was English in origin rather than Irish, being derived from the air called "Dargason," or "Sedany" as it is sometimes called. Fuld (1966) disagrees, believing "Dargason" (which he gives under the title "Scotch Bagpipe Melody") and "The Irish Washerwoman" developed independently. "Dargason" was first printed in Ravenscroft's Pammelia (1609) and appears in the Playford's Dancing Master editions from 1651 to 1690, but subsequently the "folk process" melded the strain to other parts, thus making other tunes (see "The Green Garters" for example) including the precursors to the Washerwoman tune. One of these precursors was the English tune "Country Courtship" which dates from at least 1715 and probably to 1688, in which latter mentioned year it was first entered at Stationers' Hall. "The Irish Washerwoman" appears to have developed from "The Country Courtship," which was extremely popular in the 19th century, as the tune under the "Washerwoman" title was to become a little later. The ending of the jig is the same as the endings of "In Bartholemew Fair" and "The Free Masons." Breathnach (1976) finds the second part identical to that of "Star at Liwis or The Scheme" printed by Walsh in Caledonian Country Dances (c. 1730, pg. 59).
The melody was found by the author of English Folk-Song and Dance (pg. 144) in the repertoire of fiddler William Tilbury (who lived at Pitch Place, midway between Churt and Thursley in Surrey), who used, in his younger days, to play at village dances. Tilbury learned his repertoire from an uncle, Fiddler Hammond, who died around 1870 and who was the village fiddler before him. The conclusion was that "Haste to the Wedding" and melodies of similar type survived in English tradition (at least in southwest Surrey) well into the second half of the 19th century.
***
A variant of the modern version of the tune appears as air 13 in Samuel Arnold's stage piece The Surrender of Calais, report Van Cleef and Keller (1980), which was first performed in London in 1791. It was sung by the character O'Carrol, and Irish soldier, and the song became known as "Corporal Casey:"
***
When I was at home I was merry and frisky
My Dad kept a pig and my mother sold whiskey.
My Uncle was rich but he would never be easy
'Til i was enlisted by Corporal Casey.
Oh, rub a dub, row de dow Corporal Casey,
My dear little Sheelah I thought would run crazy,
Oh when I trudged away with tough Corporal Casey.
***
As "Corporal Casey," the tune appears in Instructions for the Fife (London, 1795). The melody also found its way into various broadsides and similar 'low' publications, such as the latter 18th century "Irishman's Epistle to the Officer's and Troups at Boston" (sic). Later the song "Paddy McGinty's Goat" was set to the tune of "Irish Washerwoman." Shropshire musician John Moore penned a version in his notebook of c. 1837-1840 which has a third part in 3/8 time, breaking the pattern of the rhythm--perhaps, thinks editor Gordon Ashman, it was used in an introductory mode for "setting" or "step to your partner."
***
Fuld (1966) finds the earliest printings of the tune under the title "Irish Washerwoman" to be in Neil Gow's A Third Collection of Strathspey Reels &c for the Piano-forte, Violin and Violoncello (1792) and James Aird's A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs (1794). Breathnach noted Dublin publication of "The Wash Woman" by Henry Mountian, c. 1785 and Ó Canainn (1978) finds it printed in Brysson's A Curious Selection of Favourite Tunes with Variations to which is appended "Fifty Favourite Irish Airs" (Edinburgh, 1790) under the title "Irish Waterman." Fuld also finds the melody under the title "The Melody of Cynwyd" in Edward Jones' Musical and Poetical Relicks of the Welsh Bards (London, 1794). Bruce Olson suggests that "The Wash Woman" was probably the original title, with 'Irish' being prefixed to the title outside of Ireland as an identifier--he thinks there were probably many tunes with 'Irish' in the title that identified place of origin and that were not part of the original title.
***
By the end of the 18th century the tune was identified with Ireland, and it is not surprising that that country also has laid claim to the tune. It has been reported that it was written by 19th century piper, fiddler and composer "Piper" Jackson, who was from either County Limerick or County Monaghan (according to the Boys of the Lough). Breathnach (1976) reports that Henry Mountain, No. 20 White Friar Street, Dublin, printed the melody in about the year 1785, calling it "The Wash Woman," a favourite New Country Dance. A few years later is appeared in Lee's New Collection of Irish Country Dances for the year 1788. The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). In modern times in Ireland the tune is rarely played, remarks Caoimhin Mac Aoidh, as it is considered trite and hackneyed, though it does retain strong currency among County Donegal fiddlers who play several elaborate versions. Doolin, County Clare, whistle player Micho Russell called it "The Big Jig."
***
American versions with the "Washerwoman" title appear toward the end of the 18th century. It was contained in A Collection of Contra Dances (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1792) under the title "Irish Wash Woman," and several American dance copybooks contain various dances to the melody, including Nancy Shepley's Manuscript (Pepperell, Massachusetts, c. 1795) and different figures in Asa Wilcox's MS (Hartford County, Conecticut, 1793). A third dance can be found in Gentleman and Lady's Companion (Norwich, Connecticut, 1798), while A Collection of Contra Dances (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1792) gives a dance similar to that copied by Shepley. Van Cleef and Keller (1980) state the name changes from "Irish Wash Woman" to "Irish Washerwoman" around 1795. The tune retained its popularity, at least for contra dancing, and was cited as having commonly been played for Orange County, New York country dances in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), by 20th century Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner for dances in the Southwest, and by contemporary Buffalo Valley, Pa., dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. Viola "Mom" Ruth, in her collection Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948) appends to the "Irish Washer Women" that it was what she played when she "Won the state's (Arizona) championship 1926." Other than for dancing, it was popular as a vehicle for "American stage Yankees," and according to Bronner (1987) it was included in the music to the "Federal Overture" (published by B. Carr in 1795) which played to theatres in Philadelphia and New York just prior to and at the beginning of the 1800's. Outside of the east coast Musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph recorded the tune for the Library of Congress from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's and it was recorded as having been predicted by a local southwest Alabama paper (the Clarke County Democrat) in May, 1929, that it would by played at an upcoming fiddlers' contest. It appears in the repertoire list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham (the elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the 1920's). Referred to by Bayard (1944) in his note for "The Snouts and Ears of America," and Breathnach (1976) regards it as a "stain on the honour of washer women" that the tune was used for that song and "Paddy McGinty's Goat" in the United States. Bayard reports that in Pennsylvania the following rhymes were collected with the tune:
***
Jim Doodle, he dramp that his father was dead,
And his father he dramp that Jim Doodle was dead. (x2)
Chorus:
Jim Doodle, Jim Daddle, Jim Doodle, Jim Daddle,
Jim Doodle he gramp that his father was dead;
Jim Doodle he dramp that his father was dead,
And his father he dramp that Jim Doodle was dead.
or:
Jim Doodle didn't know that his father was dead,
And his father didn't know that Jim Doodle was dead,
And they both lay dead on the same damn' bed,
And neither one knew that the other was dead. (Bayard)
***
I have heard nearly the same rhyme with the name "McTavish" substituted for "Jim Doodle." Also from Pennsylvania:
***
We've plenty of horses, the best to be got,
The ones that can canter, the ones that can trot-- (Bayard).
***
Introduced to the Shetland islands "by Scots girls (in the last decade of the 19th century) who came up in their hundreds during the herring season to live and work as gutters and packers at the numerous fishing stations which mushroomed each year around the Shetland shoreline" (Cooke, 1986).
***
Perlman (1996) notes that, unlike Ireland, the tune is one of the most widely played by fiddlers on Prince Edward Island. At the beginning of the 20th century in Cape Breton a solo dance called The Irish Washerwoman was in the repertoire of Donald Beaton, an itinerant tailor and an influential dancer and fiddler in the region around Mabou. It originally consisted of 12 steps.
***
Sources for notated versions: John Bennett (Cimarron County, Oklahoma) [Thede]: Edson Cole (Freedom, N.H.) [Linscott]; {1} Floyd Woodhull, 1976 and {2} Hornellsville Hillbillies, 1943 (New York State) [Bronner]; 13 southwestern Pa. fiddlers and fifers [Bayard]; fiddler Paddy Fahy, 1970 (Ballinasloe, Co. Galway, Ireland) [Breathnach]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; Attwood O'Connor (b. 1923, Milltown Cross, South Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Adam, 1928; No. 3. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 14, pg. 4. American Veteran Fifer, 1902 & 1927; No. 11. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 1, pg. 1. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 446A-M, pgs. 415-419. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 19, pg. 12. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 140. Bronner (Old-Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 9, pg. 55 and No. 19, pg. 89. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 336. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 12. Cazden, 1955; pg. 23. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 57. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 43. Harding's All-Round, 1905-1932; No. 201. Harding Collection (1915) and Harding's Original Collection, 1928; No. 187. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; No. pgs. 44 & 62. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. or pg. 8. Johnson, Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 5. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 10 (appears as "Circassian Cirle"). Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 94; pg. 46. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 8, pg. 36. Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 117. O'Malley, 1919; pg. 3. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 164, pg. 91 (appears as "The Irishwoman"). O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 317, pg. 67. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 129. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 30. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 108. Reavy, 1979; No. 38. Reavy, No. 90, pg. 100 (an idiosyncratic version). Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 22, pg. 9. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 139. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 32. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 118-119. Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 46. White's Excelsior Collection, 1907; pg. 73. Flying Fish FF70610, Robin Huw Bowen - "Telyn Berseiniol fy Ngwlad/Welsh Music on the Welsh Triple Harp" (1996. Appears as "Yr Hen Olchyddes/The Washerwoman"). Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker (Michigan)" (1966). Fretless 122, Emile Boilard- "Old Time Fiddling 1976". North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." RCA Victor LCP 1001, Ned Landry and His New Brunswick Lumberjacks - "Bowing the Strings with Ned Landry." Supertone 9169 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (Ky.). Victor 20537 (78 RPM), Mellie Dunham, 1926. Pibroch MacKenzie - "The Mull Fiddler" (1969). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Better than an Orchestra" (1977).
T:Irish Washerwoman
L:1/8
M:6/8
R:Jig
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Major
d/c/|BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|
BGG G2:|
|:d|gdg gdg|gdg bag|=fcf fcf|=fcf agf|egg dgg|cgg Bgg|cBc Adc|BGG G2:|

IS TRUA GAN PEATA AN MHAIOR AGAM [2]. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 27, pg. 29.

JIMMY OF A THOUSAND WELCOMES (Jimmy Mo Mhile Stor). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major (O Canainn, Russell): A Major (Roche). Standard. One part (Roche, Russell): ABB' (O Canainn). The song was sung in Irish and well and English (which sounds quite stilted). The last verse in English goes:
***
I'll go to the woods and stay there the rest of my days,
Where no mortal I'll suffer my soul to tease,
With the wild rowans with red berries drooping o'er
I'll wait for my true love, sweet Jimmy, mo mhile stor.
Clare tin whistle player Micho Russell's mother's version went:
I will let my hair grow long and I will let up a beard.
I will sleep in my bed, cold, with a quilt made of my old trousers,
And if I don't get this girl from the mountain
I will leave this girl altogether.
***
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 87, pg. 75. Roche Collection, 1983, Vol. 1; No. 15, pg. 11. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989, pg. 25.

JOB OF JOURNEY WORK, THE ("Greim/Mir Obairaonlae" or "Obair an Aistir"). Irish, Set Dance (cut time or 4/4). Ireland, Munster. D Mixolydian (Roche): D Major (O'Neill): D Major/Mixolydian (Cranitch, Joyce, Mulvihill, Stanford/Petrie). Standard. AB (Standord/Petrie): AABB (Cranitch, Joyce, Mulvihill, O'Neill, Roche). Samuel Bayard (1954) published a study of a tune family he called "The Job of Journeywork," evidently feeling "this long, irregular tune developed by the eighteenth century Irish dancing masters was somehow archetypical" (Cowdery, 1990). The second strain of the melody has been the one which has spawned the most variants, one of many of the "standard building blocks" (Ó Canainn, 1978) of the Irish melodic tradition. See "Tom Sullivan's Polka" and "Matt Hayes's Polka" for examples of conjoining phrases based in part on "The Job of Journeywork." Joyce (1890) states the tune was "a great favourite" in some of the Munster counties twenty or thirty years before he first published his volume in 1873. However, the first printed appearance of the tune appears to be in Aird's Airs, Vol. 3 (1788). Robert Burns used the tune for one of his songs appearing in the Scots Musical Museum (No. 480). The great east Clare fiddle stylist Paddy Canny's recording of the tune has been called the standard for modern settings and was used as the theme for the radio program of the same name in Ireland. Some similarity has been noted between "Job of Journeywork" and a tune printed by Stanford in his Irish Melodies (1894) called "The Little Red Fox." Source for notated version: "A Munster dance. From (the Irish collector) Mr. Joyce" [Stanford/Petrie]; Joyce himself learned it from "hearing it constantly played by pipers and fiddlers" [Joyce]. Cranitch (The Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 92, pg. 163. Joyce (Ancient Irish Music), 1890; No. 37, pgs. 38-39. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 1, pg. 109. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 394, pg. 188. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1792, pg. 336. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 966, pg. 166. Reavy (The Music of Corktown). Roche Collection, 1983, Vol. 2; No. 271, pg. 29. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 892, pg. 226. Columbia Legacy CK 48693, "The Best of the Chieftains" (1992). Gael-Linn CEF 045, "Paddy Keenan" (1975).
T:Job of Journeywork, The
M:C|
R:SetDance
Z:O'Neill's
K:D
fe|dcAG FGAB|(3=cBA BG A2 {fa}fe|d2{e}dc {e}dcAF|GBAF DEFG|\
(3ABA GA FGEF|DCDE ~F3G|AD {e}(3dcd cdec|d2{e}dcd2::de|\
(3faf ef gfef|dedc ABde|(3faf ef gfec|dedc A2 fg|\
agfa gfec|~d3e f2 ec|dcAG FGAB|(3=cBA BG A2 fe|\
(3ded (3cdc (3BAG AF|DCDE ~F3G|Ad {e}(3dcd cdec|d2{e}dcd2:|

LAMENT FOR SARSFIELD [1]. AKA - "Marbna Sairseul." Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. AB. Patrick Sarsfield was a general in King James' army in the wars against the forces of William of Orange in the very beginning of the 18th century. He led the 'flight of the wild geese' after the defeat of the Irish and French forces, leading 14,000 men into exile on the Continent.
**
I have two brothers and they are in the army,
The one of them's in Cork and the other's in Killarney
With my ri-fol-de-lay.
**
Stanford (1902) identifies this particular version as the 'modern' air, while Ó Canainn (1978) notes the original appears in Neale's Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first real collection of Irish folk music. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 433, pg. 76. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 312, pg. 78

LAMENT FOR STAKER WALLACE, THE. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. See also "The Death of Staker Wallace." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 14. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Brian Conway - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991).

LAMENT FOR THE FOX. Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. ABB'. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 69, pg. 61.

LAMENT OF THE WOMEN IN THE BATTLE, THE (Gol na mBan san Ar). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The air appears in the appendix to Walker's Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards (1786) and Thompson's Hibernian Muse (1786), though in the latter collection in appears under the title "An Irish Dump" (dump meaning here a lament or sad tune). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 116, pg. 99.

LEANBH SI, AN. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 100, pg. 85.

LIMERICK'S LAMENTATION [1]. AKA - "Lament for Limerick." AKA and see "The Clothiers March," "Lochaber No More." Irish, Slow Air (3/2 time). A Mixolydian: A Major. Standard. AABB. The Boys of the Lough identify this beautiful slow air as having a common origin with "Lochaber No More," but remark that no one seems to really know which came first, the Irish or Scottish version. Robin Morton (1976) says the weight of evidence lends credence to the Scots claim, despite O'Neill's seeminglu cogent argument that a tune composed by the 17th century County Cavan harper Myles O'Reilly was the common ancestor of both. The esteemed harper Connellon has also been given credit for the tune.
***
The Irish version derives its title from the siege and fall of the city of Limerick to the English forces of Ginkel in 1691, at the end of the Williamite Wars. The tune is sometimes known as "Sarsfield's Lamentation" from the name of the commander of the Irish forces at Limerick. Flood also dates the melody in Ireland to the year 1691 (Flood, 1906, pg. 173), when the Irish were defeated by the forces of the English monarch William of Orange. Thomas Duffet's lyrics (which had originally been set to "Fortune My Foe") "Since Coelia's my Foe" were translated from Gaelic in 1720 by Dermot O'Conor and adapted to this tune in 1730. The melody first appears in Neales' Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first real collection of exclusively Irish folk music (Ó Canainn, 1978), and also was printed by Thompson in his Hibernian Muse of 1786. It appears in the Bunting Collection of Irish music (1840). The air has regained some popularity among traditional musicians in the latter 20th century. O'Sullivan (1929) remarks that there is still some controversy about whether the melody is Irish or Scots in origin, however, O'Neill (1913) maintains that the air was played by the pipers of the "Wild Geese," those Irish regiments who fled to France rather than surrender to the English. The melody continued to be played in Irish encampments on the continent, and in 1746 was taught, maintains O'Neill, by one Colonel Fitzgerald to musicians in the Scottish camp before the battle of Culloden. It entered Scottish tradition from this time, though preserved under the title "Lochaber No More."
***
Another air with the title "Limerick's Lamentation" (see "Limerick's Lamentation" [2]) appears in Wright's Aria di Camera (1730), communicated by "Mr. Dermt. O'Connor, of Limerick," but differs from the air given in Neale. O'Connor Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 23. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 53, pg. 23. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Green Linnett GLCD 1181, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill - "The Lonesome Touch" (1997. Appears as "Lament for Limerick"). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993). Shanachie 97011, Duck Baker - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990. Learned from a recording by Sean O'Riada). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger."
T:Limerick's Lamentation
S:O'Neill/Bunting
M:3/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:G
G>A | B2 d<B A<G | A2 G2 G>A | B2 d<B A<G | A4 ~G>A |
B<G c<A B<G | E>D E2 G>A | B2 G2 G>A | G4 :||
||: G>A | B2 d2 d>e | d2 cB A>B | G2 g2 g>a | g4 G>A |
B2 d2 de | d2 cB A>B | G2 g2 g>a | g4 de |
=f>e f>g a>f | e>d e>=f g>e | d>e gB AG | A4 GA |
B<G c<A B<G | E>D E2 G>A | B2 G2 G2 | G4 :||

LOCH NA GARR [2]. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Minor (Joyce): D Major/Mixolydian (O Cannainn). Standard. AAB (Joyce): AA'B (O Canainn). "Byron's 'Loch Na Garr' was often sung by the people to the following slow Irish air, which may be compared with 'The Bunch of Green Rushes That Grew at the Brim' (Moore's 'This Life is all Chequered')" {Joyce}. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 96, pg. 50. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 77, pg. 68.
T:Loch na Garr [2]
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
N:"Slow"
K:D Minor
A>d|d2c2d2|B2 AGFD|c2d2A2|B2A2G2|F2G2A2|B2A2G2|A2F2D2|D4:|
d>e|f2e2f2|g4 f>g|a2f2d2|dc A3A|f2e2f2|g2f2g2|a2f2d2|d4 fg|a2g2a2|
g4 fe|d2c2d2|de f2 AG|F2G2 A2|{A}d3 c A2|{F}GF D2D2|D4||

LORD INCHIQUIN. Irish, Slow Air or Planxty (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) in honor of the young fourth Earl (1719-1799). Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 175. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 58, pg. 55. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 16. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 44, pgs. 40-41. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 51, pg. 22. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 39. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 92. Island 9379, "Chieftains 3." Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Rounder 0216, John McCutcheon - "Step by Step" (1986). Shanachie 79023, "Chieftains 3" (1971/1982).
T:Lord Inchiquin
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:D
A2|d2 de fe|d2 ed cB|A2F2A2|f4 e2|d2 ed cB|A2G2F2|G2 BA GF|E4 ag|
f3e d2|d2c2B2|A2F2A2|f4 e2|d2 ed cB|A d3 F2|E4 D2|D4:|
|:A2|AB cd e2|e2d2e2|f2d2f2|e4d2|de fg a2|a2b2g2|f2d2f2|e4 fe|
de fg a2|a2b2g2|f3g e2|d4f2|gf e2e2|e2f2d2|c3d B2|A4 ag|
f3e d2|d3cB2|A2F2A2|g4 fe|d2 ed cB|A d3 F2|E4 D2|D4:|

LORD MAYO [2] ("An Tigearna Mageo/Mhaigheo" or "Tiarna Mhuigheo"). Irish, Air (3/4 or 4/4 time). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part (Feldman & O'Doherty): AB (Roche): AA'B (Ó Canainn). Source for notated version: fiddler John Doherty (1895-1980, County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 96. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 82, pg. 72. Roche Collection, 1983, Vol. 1; no. 72, pg. 34.

LORD MAYO [3] (An Tigearna Mag-eo). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Dorian. Standard. AB. This song/tune was composed by Thady Keenan the harper, according to Flood (1906), who flourished early in the 17th century. Theobald, the sixth Viscount Mayo, who married an unrequited love of O'Carolan's, Peggy Brown, but who none-the-less became a great patron of that harper's (See also "Margaret Brown" and "Maggie Brown's Favorite"). Ó Canainn (1978) finds an early version of the air in Neale's Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first real collection of exclusively Irish music. In modern times this ancient harp tune has entered current playing tradition and is a popular air in County Donegal, Ireland. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) calls it "a strong favourite amongst older Donegal fiddlers." Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 78. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 209, pg. 36. O'Neill, 1913; pg. 60. Green Linnet SIF-1084, Eugene O'Donnell - "The Foggy Dew" (1988). Island 9379, "Chieftains 3." Shanachie 79023, "Chieftains 3" (1971/1982).

MAIDIN LUAN CINCISE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 19.

MAIGHDEAN MHARA. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 107, pg. 91.

MAIRIN DE BARRA. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 71, pg. 63.

MARBHNA LUIMNÍ. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. One part. A popular air first printed in Neale's A Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 112, pg. 95.

MO GILE MEAR (My Nimble Lad/My Spirited Lad). AKA - "Ó, Mo Laoch, Mo Ghile Mear," "Seal do Bhíos im' Mhaighdin Shéimh," "De bharr na gCnoc 's i nImigéin," "Air Bharr na G-Cnoc 's an Ime G-Céin." AKA and see "Will Ye No' Come Back Again?" Irish, Slow March or Air (4/4 time). Ireland, West Kerry. G Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham, Tubridy). A Jacobite song originally composed by Seán Clárach Mac Dónaill (1691-1754), in which Eire laments her love, Bonnie Prince Charlie Stuart, then in exile. The verses have been reworked in the folk process and there is a modern chorus to the song. As "Air Bharr na G-Cnoc 's an Ime G-Céin" it appears in Edward Walsh's Irish Popular Songs (Dublin, 1847).
***
Seal da rabhas im' mhaighdean shéimh,
'S anois im' bhaintreach chaite thréith,
Mo chéile ag treabhadh na dtonn go tréan
De bharr na gcnoc is i n-imigcéin.
***
Curfá:
'Sé mo laoch, mo Ghile Mear,
'Sé mo Chaesar, Ghile Mear,
Suan ná séan ní bhfuaireas féin
Ó chuaigh i gcéin mo Ghile Mear.
***
For a while I was a gentle maiden
And now a spent worn-out widow
My spouse ploughing the waves strongly
Over the hills and far away.
***
Chorus:
He is my hero, my dashing darling
He is my Caesar, dashing darling.
I've had no rest from forebodings
Since he went far away my darling.
***
The tune was played at the funeral of Seán Ó Riada, when he was buried in the little church in Cúil Aodha on October 3rd, 1971. Ó Riada is credited with helping to revitalize Irish traditional music in the mid-20th century and was founder of Ceoltóirí Cualann, the group out of which developed the Chieftains.
***
Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 87, pg. 50. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 98, pg. 84 (Appears as "Gile Mear"). Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 4. RCA 62702, Chieftains (& Sting) - "Long Black Veil." Green Linnet, Relativity.
T:Mo Ghile Mear
M:4/4
C:Traditional
B:A Stór 's a Stórín
Z:Transcribed by Martin Wanicki
K:G
%Verse 1 and chorus:
D3DD2DE|G2A2B4|c2BAB2A2|G3ED4|
G3FE2D2|G2GAB3c|d3ed2B2|A3GG4||
%Other Verses:
B2d2d2B2|A2G2G3A|B2d2d2B2|A2G2A3A|
B2d2d2B2|A2G2G2AB|c2BAB3A|G2E2D4||

MO MHUIRNIN BAN. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 75, pg. 66.

MONTH OF JANUARY, THE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs from Ireland), 1995; No. 110, pg. 93.

MORGAN MAGAN. AKA - "Planxty Morgan Megan." Irish; Slow Air, Planxty or March (4/4 time). G Major (Brody, Johnson, Ó Canainn, Sullivan): A Major (Complete Collection..). Standard. One Part (Johnson): AB (Brody, Sullivan): AABB (Complete Collection..., Ó Canainn). The air was composed by the blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) in honor of one Morgan Magan of County Westmeath. Magan died in 1738, and is probably the "Captain Magan" referred to in another of O'Carolan's tunes (Donal O'Sullivan). Source for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody, Sullivan]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 196. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 92, pg. 72. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 3. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 109, pg. 92. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; NO. 35, pg. 14. Claddagh CC14, Chieftains- "Chieftains 4." Front Hall 05, Fennigs All Stars- "Saturday Night in the Provinces." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). June Appal 028, Wry Straw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978). North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Rounder 0113, Trapezoid- "Three Forks of Cheat." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972/1983). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2."
T:Morgan Megan
L:1/8
M:2/4
C:Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738)
K:G
D|"G"DG GA/B/|c/B/A/G/ B/c/d|"C"eA "A"AG|"D"G/F/E/F/ DE/F/|"G"G2 G/F/G/A/|
"C"GF/E/ "G"D>G|"D"F/G/A "A"AE/G/|"D"FD DE/F/|"G"G>G "D"A/G/A/F/|
"G"G3B|"C"c>B AB/c/|"G"d2 "C"e2|"G"dB "Am"c/B/A/G/|"D"A/G/F/E/ DE/F/|
"G"G>G "D"A/G/A/F/|"G"(G2 G)d/c/||"G"Bd de/f/|gG B/c/d|gG B/c/d|
"C"e/d/c/B/ "D"A>c|"G"B/A/B/c/ dB|"C"ec "G"dB|"Am"cA "G"dG|
"D"FD DG|"C"EC C>D|EC C>E|"D"FD DA/G/|F/G/E/F/ DB/c/|
"G"d/B/G/B/ "C"e/d/c/B/|c/B/A/G/ "D"F/G/A/F/|"G"DG "D"A/G/A/F/|"G"G2||

MUNSTER CLOAK, THE (An Fhalaingín Mhuimhneach). Irish, Air or Mazurka (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. The melody appears as the second half of a tune called "The Bonny Black Irish Maid" in Cooke's Selection of Twenty-one Original Irish Airs arranged for Pianoforte, Violin or Flute (Dublin, 1793). Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), Vol. 1, No. 80. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 38. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 25, pg. 28. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 3. Flying Fish 217, Barde - "Images" (1978).
T:Munster Cloak, The
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:G
G2 GABG|A2 ABcA|G2 GABd|c2A2F2|G2 GABG|A2 ABcA|
D2 defd|c2A2F2:|
|:g2gagf|d2g2a2|b2a2g2|f2g2a2|b2a2g2|f2defd|dcAdcA|A2G2G2:|

MY LAG(G)AN LOVE. Irish, Air (2/4 or 3/4 time). C Major (Roche): G Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Roche). The Lagan is a river in northern Ireland which runs through Belfast, but it also refers to the locality of East Donegal/West Tyrone; the word itself refers to 'low-lying ground'. Words are by Joseph McCahill, set to an ancient Irish air. It is sometimes played by Scottish and Canadian pipe bands, and, in America, sung as a song known as "The quiet joys of brotherhood." "From Hughes" (Roche). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 88, pg. 76 (appears as "Lagan Love"). Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 9, pg. 3. Green Linnet SIF 1077, Capercaille - "Crosswinds" (1987).
T:My Lagan Love
R:Air
D:Brendan Power "The New Irish Harmonica"
M:3/4
L:1/8
Z:Paul Kinder
Q:60
K:GMix
d ef|"G"g3 (3d/2f/2d/2 "C"(3cBG|"F"F3 G "G"(3Bcd|"C"c3 B/2A/2 GF|
"C"G3 d/2e/2 "F"(3fef|!
"G"g3 d "F"c/2B/2A/2G/2|"F"F3 G A/2B/2c/2d/2|"C"c3 B {B}G>G|
"C"G3G/2A/2"G"B/2c/2|!
"C"e3 d "G"(3dcB|"C"c4 (3edf|"C"g3 c (3ede|"Bm"^f>g "Gm"g_b>g=f|!
"G"g3 (3d/2f/2d/2 d/2c/2B/2G/2|"F"F3 G/2A/2 "G"(3Bcd|
"C"c3 B {B}G>G|"G"G4|

O'RAHILLY'S GRAVE. AKA - "O'Reilly's Grave." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Dorian. Standard. One part. The title undoubtedly refers to the poet Aogán Ó Rathaille (c. 1675 - 1729), whose name is also given as O'Reilly and Egan O'Rahilly, born in Screathan an Mhil (Scrahanaveel), in the Sliabh Luachra region some ten miles east of Killarney. He appears to have received a good formal schooling, being versed in Latin and English as well as in Irish literature and history. The Browne family and the McCarthy's were both patrons of Ó Rathaille, and his fortunes rose and fell with them. Sir Nicholas Browne (of old Elizabethan planter stock, although Catholic and Jacobite) backed King James, and after the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 in which James was defeated, Browne lost his lands and titles for the remainder of his life. Ó Rathaille, in consequence, had to leave his native district and lived in poor circumstances at Tonn Tóime, at the edge of Castlemaine Harbour, some twelve miles west of Killarney. His poetry, the best of which has a heroic desolation and grandeur, is in many ways a result of his effort to come to terms with the chaos in which he and his people found themselves. Ó Rathaille is buried with the McCarthys in Muckross Abbey, Killarney. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 117, pg. 100. Green Linnett SIF 3041, Matt Molloy - "Stony Steps." Julia Clifford - "Star Above the Garter." Joe Burke - "Tailor's Choice."

PAÍSDÍN/PAISTIN FIONN [1] (The Fair-Haired Child). AKA and see "The Little Fair Child." Irish, Slow Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). D Dorian (Roche): D Major (Russell): D Major/Mixolydian (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn, Russell): AB (Roche). The tune can be found in Cooke's Selection of Twenty-one Favourite Original Irish Airs arranged for Pianoforte, Violin or Flute (Dublin, 1793) and Joyce's Irish Music and Song. Doolin, north County Clare, tin whistle player Micho Russell had a major version of the melody (which his father and mother both sang), though remarkably similar to the dorian setting in Roche. Russell (1989) said vaguely the tune had "something to do" with a rogue who abducted a woman, only to find the girl he had carried off was not the one he had intended. In fact, the lyrics can be found in Father Walsh's Songs of the Irish Gael, and seem to be an ferverent ode to a young woman (or perhaps a very young woman, for the singer laments that its his "woe that I don't have you from your mother") rather than a 'child'. The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). See also "Pausteen Fawn." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; No. 79, pg. 70. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 21, pg. 13. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989.
T:The Fairhaired Child (An Paistin Fionn)
M:3/4
K:D Major
B2 | e3 f e2 | d2 e2 f2 | g4 e2 | f4 gf |e3 d cB | G3 A Bc | d4 B2 | B4 B2 |
e3 f e2 | d2 e2 f2 | g4 e2 | f4 gf |e2 d2 B2 | A2 G2 F2 | E6 | E4 || EF |
G3 A Bc | d2 B2 B2 | c2 A2 A2 | d2 B2 A2 |G3 A Bc | d2 B2 d2 | e6 | e4 EF |
G3 A Bc | d2 B2 A2 | B e3 f2 | g3 a fe |e2 d2 B2 | A2 G2 F2 | E6 | E4 |]

PLANXTY GEORGE BRABAZON [2] (Pleraca Seoirse Brabason). AKA and see "Prince Charlie's Welcome to the Island of Skye," "Isle of Skye." Irish, Air. G Major. Standard. One part (O Canainn): AB (Complete Collection, O'Neill/1850): AABB (O'Neill {Complete Collection..., Krassen, Skye}). Composed by Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Donal O'Sullivan included this piece in his work on Carolan, but noted there was no definitive evidence for its being composed by the harper. Some have attributed Captain Francis O'Neill's over-zealotous assertion of tunes to O'Carolan as the source for naming him as composer, although stylistically it would seem to be an composition of his. After the Jacobite rebellion "George Brabazon" was re-titled in Scotland "Prince Charlie's Welcome to the Island of Skye" in honor of the Pretender. "Planxty George Brabazon" was the first O'Carolan work the Chieftains recorded, taken by Paddy Moloney from the O'Sullivan collection his sister had given him in 1959 for his 21st birthday (Glatt, The Chieftains, 1997). Source for notated version: Yankee Ingenuity (Mass.) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddlers' Fakebook), 1983; pg. 220. Carlin (Gow Collection), 1986; No. 76 (appears as "Isle of Skye"). Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 7, pg. 29 (2nd Air). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887 (appears as "Prince Charlie's Welcome to the Island of Skye"). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 83, pg. 73. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 234. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 657, pg. 118. Claddagh CC7, The Chieftains - "Chieftains II" (1969). Claddagh CC18, Derek Bell- "Carolan's Receipt" (1975). Fretless 200A, Yankee Ingenuity- "Kitchen Junket" (1977). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). June Appal 014, John McCutcheon- "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" (1977).

PLANXTY IRWIN (Pleraca Iarbain). AKA and see "Colonel John Irwin," "Oh! Banquet Not." Irish, Planxty (6/8 time, "spirited"); New England, Waltz. D Major (Brody, Matthiesen, O'Neill): C Major (Complete Collection...): G Major (Cranitch, Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Complete Collection, Cranitch): AAB (Matthiesen, O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Brody, O'Neill/1850, Tubridy). Composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) for a patron, Colonel John Irwin. The noted Irish piper, fiddler and composer Walter "Piper" Jackson composed a piece in the mid-18th century called "Jackson's Welcome Home" that uses a strain quite similar to O'Carolan's first strain. Bayard (1981) opines that the strain was "by no means of striking originality," and that the use by Jackson may have been accidental, that the two composers may have been influenced by an earlier tune, or that Jackson may have been "unconsiously" influenced by O'Carolan's tune. The air was adapted by Thomas Moore for his song "Oh! Banquet Not." Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 220. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 59, pg. 55 (appears as "Colonel John Irwin"). Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 43. Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 40. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs), 1995; pg. 22. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 239. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 677, pg. 123. O'Sullivan (Carolan), Vol. 1, 1958; No. 59, pg. 195. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 40. Front Hall 010, Fennigs All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer Strikes Again." Front Hall FHR 021, John McCutcheon - "Barefoot Boy with Boots On" (1981). Shanachie 79009, "Planxty."
T:Planxty Irwin
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:D
A|d2c Bcd|A2G FED|G2E FGA|C2D E2A|d2c Bcd|A2G FED|G2E FGA|D2C D2A:|
|:ded d2d|e2e ecA|f2f efd|cdB ABc|d2c Bcd|A2G FED|G2E FGA|D2C D2:|

PORT GORDON{AC} (Gordon's Tune). AKA and see "Mary of Ballyhaunis." Scottish/Irish, Air (4/4 time, "with spirit"). G Dorian (O'Neill): A Dorian (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (O'Neill). A harp air composed for a Scottish patron by early 17th century Ulster-born (Francis O'Neill says he was born c. 1646) harper Rory Dall O'Cahan, who travelled into Scotland and long played for the great families of that country. The tune was reworked a century later by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) and later used for the Irish song "Maire beil ata h-Amnair." Several early Scottish versions of the melody appear in the (Crawford of) Balcarres Lute Manuscript, compiled in 1694. It can be found in Cooke's Selection of Twenty-one Favourite Original Irish Airs arranged for Pianoforte (Dublin, 1793).
***
There are actually several airs entitled "Port Gordon." One of them is in John Bowie's Collection of Strathspey Reels and Country Dances (1789), a partial version of which (under the title "Port 2nd") also appears in the MacLean-Clephane Manuscript of 1816, written by the seventeen-year-old Lady Margaret Wemyss, a member of a prominent Lowland Scots family. The subject of one of them is likely to have been George Gordon, the first Marquess of Huntly (1562-1636), maintain Sanger & Kinnaird (Tree of Strings, 1992), who defeated Argyll at the battle of Balrinnes. It had been fortold that Argyll's harp would be played in the Gordon territory of Strathbogie, encouraging Argyll to attack thinking his victory was assured; indeed the harp was so played-as the spoils of war. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 61, pg. 55. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 40, pg. 7.

PORT NA bPÚCAÍ (The Fairy Lament). AKA and see "Port na Hinise." Irish, Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). Ireland, West Kerry. The tonality shifts between A Mixolydian/Dorian and G Major. Standard. AAB (Mac Amhlaoibh): AA'B (Ó Canainn). There is a story that this tune was heard by travelers or fisherman who stayed overnight on Inis Mhic Fhaolain in the Blasket Islands and heard this tune coming from the mists.
**
Is bean on slua si me do tainig tar toinn;
Is do toidead san oice me tamall tar lear;
Is Go bFuilim sa rioct so fe geasa mna si,
Is ni bead ar an saol so go nGlaofaid an coileac.
**
Source for notated version: Tom Daly/O Dalaig (1907-1989) [Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham]. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 93, pg. 53. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 68, pg. 60. CCE CL13, Tommy Peoples. Claddagh Records, Sean 'Cheist' Ó Cathain - "Beauty an oilean" (Ó Cathain was a resident of Blasket Island until it was cleared in the 1950's). Gael-linn CEFCD 114, Tony MacMahon & Noel Hill - " "I gCnoc na Graí." Ronan Browne - "Drones and Chanters, Vol. 2." Ovation, Tommy Peoples - "Master Irish Fiddle Player."
T:Port na bPúcaí.
M:3/2
L:1/4
Q:1/2=60
K:D
d>c A3 B | A{BA} G/E/ F2 G2 |
A>B =c3{dc} B | A3/2{BA} G/ {AB}A4 |
d>c {AB}A3 B | A{BA} G/E/ {A}F2 {A}G2 |
A{BA} G/F/ G4- | G{AG} F G4 :|
|: A>B c2 d2 | e f/g/ {fg}f2 g2 |
{b}a{ba} g/f/ g2 e>f | {ef}e{fe} d/B/ c4 |
[1 {AB}A>B c2 d2 | {ef}e f/g/ {fg}f2 g2 |
{b}a{ba} g/f/ g2 e>f | e{fe} d/c/ d4 :|
[2 d>c {AB}A3 B | {c}A{BA} G/E/ F2 G2 |
A{BA} G/F/ G4- | G{AG} F G4 ||

PRINCESS ROYAL, THE [1] ("Bean-Priunsa Riogda" or "Beanphrionsa Rioghamhuil"). AKA and see "The Arethusa," "Brian the Brave," "The Gaelic League March," "Miss MacDermott" (Inion Nic Diarmada), "Port Shean tSeain," "Rodney's Glory." Irish, Air or Planxty (2/4 time, "lively"); English, Morris Dance Tune (4/4 time). England; Northumberland, Cotswolds. A Minor (Carlin): A Dorian (Mulvihill, Sullivan): B Minor (Ó Canainn): G Minor (Gow, McGlashan, O'Neill): D Minor (Bacon, Raven): E Minor (Mallinson): F Minor (Complete Collection). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Complete Collection, O'Neill): AABB (Carlin, Gow, Mulvihill, Raven, Sullivan): ABB, x4 (Mallinson). One of the most celebrated compositions attributed to the blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). The air under the title "Princess Royal" or "Miss MacDermott" is attributed to O'Carolan by Bunting (1840), Donal O'Sullivan (1983), Flood (1906) and other sources, although apparently earliest by O'Farrell (c. 1810) in his work Pocket Companion, book IV, and by Bunting in his MS collection of c. 1800, which O'Sullivan notes "has the tradition of the harpers behind it." Flood says the tune was composed by the harper in 1725, and published in 1727, 1730 (in Walsh's Complete Dancing Master where it appears as "The Princess Royal, the new way") and 1731 (by Daniel Wright), and republished several times between 1735 and 1745, though no words have survived.
***
The English writer Frank Kidson disagrees with the attribution to O'Carolan and Irish provenance. He says that the air was commonly known in the early part of the 18th century as an English country dance tune named "The Princess Royal, the new way," and that about 1730-35 it appeared in several London publications (presumably the Walsh and Wright publications cited by Flood). It appears in Wright's Compleat Collection of Celebrated Country Dances, vol. I, c. 1730-35 as "New Princess Royal."
***
No matter what its origins, it was admired by William Shield (who arranged the song with words set by Prince Hoare) who retitled it "The Arethusa," and published it in his 1796 small opera or musical entertainment "Lock and Key" (Arethusa was name of an Engish ship which fought an engagement with a French frigate La Belle Poule in the English Channel in June, 1778). Shield never claimed composition of the melody, only maintaining he had added the bass, but it became tremendously popular. Through publication and subsequent republication, maintain Irish advocates, it became popularly but erroneously considered an English air. Editor Gordon Ashman states the tune later became one of Hamilton Harty's sea song settings, called "On Board the Arethusa," which is often heard at the Last Night of the Proms.
***
The 'princess royal' of the title, states Flood, was an honor for Mary MacDermot, daughter of the Princess of Coolavin and Princess Royal of the MacDermot Family, or, as Bunting says, "daughter of MacDermott Roe, the representative of the old princes of Coolavin (County Sligo)." O'Sullivan, however, notes there were two branches of the County Roscommon family; the MacDermotts of Alderford, usually known by the title MacDermott Roe, and the MacDermotts of Coolavin. The head of the latter branch was known in O'Carolan's time as the Prince of Coolavin, and O'Sullivan believes it probable that the Princess Royal was his eldest daughter and not of the MacDermott Roes. O'Carolan may also composed another song for her called "Maire an Cuilfhin" (Fair-Haired Mary), according to Flood. Princess Royal also is the title reserved for the eldest daughter of the British royal family, if the sovereign sees fit to award it. Kidson (Groves) maintains the princes royal referred to is Anne, daughter of George II, who married William, Prince of Orange, in 1734.
***
Bayard (1981) begs comparison of the tune with James Oswald's "My Love is Lost to Me" and questions whether Oswald's composition was derivative from "The Princess Royal" (it could not be ancestral to, as he also speculates for O'Carolan's composition preceded his, published c. 1780, by some sixty years). Further, he wonders if O'Carolan based his tune on "some form" of the widely known tunes "Bung Your Eye" and "O As I Was Kist Yestreen." The Mallinson/Raven/Bacon morris dance version of the tune is from the village of Adderbury, Oxfordshire, in England's Cotwolds (Carlin's similar version is listed as "Scottish" in origin). In Cape Breton a twelve-step solo dance (also called Princess Royal) was performed to the tune, handed down from Donald 'The Tailor' Beaton, an itinerant tailor from South West Margaree. As a vehicle for folk songs the tune has proved popular and can be heard as "Lord Nelson" and "Raggle Taggle Gypsy O," among others. A Cape Breton hornpipe derivative goes by the title "Jenny's Dream." Another Turlough O'Carolan composition titled "Mrs. MacDermott Roe" has some melodic similarities. Sources for notated versions: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody from harper Arthur O'Neill in 1800; from the Bridge Céilí Band [Mulvihill]. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 15. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 185, pg. 107. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 87, pg. 70. Gow (Complete Repository), Book 2, 1802; pg. 7. Mallinson (Mally's Cotswold Morris Book), 1988, Vol. 1; No. 32, pg. 22. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), 17__; pg. 13. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 1, pg. 118. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 33, pg. 33. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 231. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 641, pg. 115. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 79. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 28, pg. 11. Carthage CGLP 4406, Hutchings et al - "Morris On" (1983/1972). Flying Fish FF70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976).
X:1
T:Miss MacDermott or The Princess Royal
C:Turlough Carolan
B:Carolan, by Donal O'Sullivan
N:transposed from Fm
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:110
K:Dm
AG|F2E2 D2AG|F2E2 D2A2|B2A2 G2cB|ABAG F2A2|
GAGF EFED|C2B,2 A,2AG|F2ED FED^C|D4 D2||A2|
d3^c d2e2|f2F2 F2f2|fedc BAGF|EFGE C2DE|
F2EF G2FG|A2A2 d4|c4 B2cB|A4 G2AG|
GFFE DFED|CDCB, A,2AG|F2ED FED^C|D4 D2||
X:2
T:Princess Royal, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Scottish Measure
B:McGlashan - Collection of Scots Measures
K:G Minor
GA|B2AB G2dc|B2A2G2d2|e3d c2f2|edcd B4|B2gB A2fA|FGFE D2 dc|BABG DG^FA|
GDB,D G,2 GA|B2 AB G2dc|BcAB G2 d2|e3d cgfe|decd B4|B2gB A2fA|FGAF A2 dc| BAGB D2^F2|G2D2G,2||d2|g^fga gfga|b2B2B2 ba|gfed edcB|ABcA F4|B2AB c2Bc|d2d2 g4|f2B2 e4|d2B2c4|B3A GABG|FGFE D2dc|BAGB D2^F2|G6 d2|
g^fga gfga|b2B2B2 ga|bagf edcB|ABcA F4|B2AB c2Bc|d2d2g3a|f2B2e2dc|
d2B2c3d|B3A GABG|FGFE Dedc|BABG DG^FA|GDB,D G,2||

PRISON OF CLONMEL, THE (Priosuin/Priosun Chluain Meala). Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. This air belongs to the family of tunes which includes "As a Soldier and a Sailor were Walking One Day." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 19.

RAITEACHAS NA TAIRNGREACHT. Irish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 115, pg. 98.

ROISIN DUB [2] (My Dark Rosaleen). Irish, Air (4/4 time). Ireland, West Kerry. D Major. Standard. One part. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 94, pg. 53. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 45, pg. 41.

ROSC CATHA NA MUMHAN (The Battle Cry of Munster). AKA - "Marchechaid na Buinne." AKA and see "The Boyne Water." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). E Dorian. Standard. One part. Ciaran Carson (Last Night's Fun, 1996) proclaims it the Catholic version of the tune Irish Protestants call "The Boyne Water." The same tune is employed by English morris dancers as the vehicle for the dance The Three Musketeers. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 118, pg. 100.
T:Rosc Catha na Mumhan (The Battle Cry of Munster)
L:1/8
M:4/4
S:Ó Canainn - Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland
K:E Dorian
E2B2 B>cdB|A>BAF D2 EF|G2 FE BAGF|E2 E>F E2 GF|
E2B2 B>cdB|A>BAF D2 EF|G2 FE BAGF|E2 E>F E4|
B e2 e e2 f2|e2d2B2A2|B e3 e3f|e2d2B3c|d2 d>d d3B|
A>BAF D2 EF|G2 FE BAGF|E2 E>F E4||

SAMRADH, SAMARDH (Summertime, Summertime). AKA and see "We Brought the Summer In" (Thugamar Féin an Samradh Linn). Irish, Air. According to Tomas Ó Canainn in his book, Traditional Music of Ireland, the tune was first published in 1726 in Neales' A Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes. As Tomás notes, it could be very much older than that. It also appeared in other publications after Neale. Breandan Breathnach, in Folk Music and Dances of Ireland, notes that the air is an example of the rare airs in Lah (Aeolian) mode. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 2. Chieftains - "Chieftains 5."

SCEILPÍN DROIGHNEACH, AN. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 48, pg. 44.

SEÁN Ó DUIBIR AN GLEANNA [1] (John O'Dwyer of the Glen). AKA - "Seán Ó Duibhir a' Ghleanna." AKA and see "John O'Dwyer of the Glen." Irish, Air (4/4 time) and set dance. Ireland, Munster. A Minor (Roche): A Dorian (Breathnach): G Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. AAB (Ó Cainainn, Roche): AA'BB (Breathnach). John O'Dwyer of Aherlow, County Tipperary, was a soldier during the mid-17th century wars between the native Irish the English forces under Oliver Cromwell. When the Irish were defeated a number fled the country rather than surrender, O'Dwyer among them. He made his way to Flanders where he fought on the side of the Spanish. The melody, a lament for the hero (the song is still a staple of the sean nós repertoire), appears in O'Farrell's c. 1800 Collection of National Irish Music for the Union Pipes and/or his Pocket Companion for the Irish or Union Pipes, and also is given in the 1849 Poets and Poetry of Munster. Joyce included it in his Irish Music and Song. See also the variant "Uair Bheag Roimh A' La" (A little hour before day), which O'Neill (1910) believes is a variant of this tune; as well as the melodies "Farewell to Ardmore" and "A dhochtuir dhilis." O'Neill (1913) quotes a grand story told by the famous 19th century Donegal uilleann piper Turlogh McSweeney (which will make a bit more sense by reading the note for "The Wild Irishman"):
***
...when I was living alone in the little cabin after my mother
died--God rest her soul--there came to the door in the dusk
of the evening a stranger and nothing less than a piper, by
the way, who with a 'God save all here,' introduced
himself as was customary. I invited him in, of course,
and after making himself at aise he says, 'Would you like
to hear a 'chune' on the pipes? 'I would that,' said I, for
you know a piper and his music are always welcome in an
Irish home. Taking his pipes out of the bag, he laid them on
the bed beside him, and what do you think but without anyone
laying a finger on them, they struck up "Toss the Feathers" in
a way that would make a cripple get up and dance. After a
while, when they stopped, he says, 'Will you play a 'chune'
for me now?' I said I would and welcome, pulling the blanket
off my pipes that were hid under the bedclothes, to keep the
reeds from drying out. 'Give us "Seaghan ua Duibhir an Gleanna"
says I to the pipes, and when they commenced to play, the
mysterious stranger, who no doubt was a fairy, remarked 'Ah!
Mac, I see you are one of us.' With that both sets of pipes played
half a dozen 'chunes' together. When they had enough of it, the
fairy picked up his pipes and put them in the green bag again. If I
had any doubts about him before, I had none at all when he said
familiarly, 'Mac, I'm delighted with my visit here this evening,
and as have several other calls to make I'll have to be after bidding
you good night, but if I should happen to be passing by this way
again, I'll be sure to drop in.
***
The first verse of the song goes:
***
An sionnach rua ar a' gcarraig, Míle liú ag marcaigh,
Is bean go dúch sa' mbealach, Ag áireamh a gé.
Anois tá'n choill dá gearra, Triallfaimid thar cala,
'S a Sheáin Uí Dhuibhir a' Ghleanna, Chaill tú do chéim.
(The red fox on the rock, A thousand shouts from the riders,
And a woman on the roadside, sadly counting her geese.
Now the wood is being cut down, We shall cross the seas,
O Seán Ó Duibhir of the Glen, You have lost your lordship.)
***
As usual with Irish airs, different versions have differing tonalities, ranging from those set in minor and modal tonality, to Ó Canainn's, set in a major key. Breathnach (1985) says the set dance is based on the song, and that it is associated with County Clare. Source for notated version: fiddler Bobby Casey (Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 60, pg. 30. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 52, pg. 47 (appars as "Seán Ó Duibhir"). Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 32, pg. 16. Mulligan Records LUN 018, Bobby Casey - "Taking Flight" (1979). Green Linnet SIF-1084, Eugene O'Donnell - "The Foggy Dew" (1988). GTD Heritage Trad. HCD 008, Tommy Peoples - "Traditional Irish Music Played on the Fiddle." Piping Pig Records PPPCD 001, Jimmy O'Brien- Moran - "Seán Reid's Favourite" (1996. Learned from Willie Clancy).

SHEELA O'GARA ("Sighile/Síle Ní Ghadhra" or "Sigle Ní Gadra"). AKA - "Sheila na Guira," "Shee La Na Quira," "Sheela Nee Ghadra." AKA and see "Druken Parson." Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. "Of this fine air there are two very distinct versions, of which one is represented in Moore's Melodies, with the words 'Oh, had we some bright little isle of our own;' with sixteen bars in each Part. The version generally known in Cork and Limerick has twenty bars in the second Part; and in other respects it is considerably different from Moore's setting. The songs composed to sing to this--whether Irish or English--have always five lines in the second part of each verse to correspond with the twenty bars of the air (instead of four lines as in Moore's song). I find among the Pigot MSS a setting of this version: but on the whole I prefer my own, which I give here, with one verse of the English song--both from memory as I learned them in boyhood. 'Sheela Nee Guira' was one of the numerous allegorical names of Ireland; and this song was a patriotic one, though it could be sung with safety in the time of the Penal Laws, as it was in the guise of a love song. See 'The Blackbird'..." (Joyce). Darley & McCall also identify the song as symbolic of Ireland, and say the Irish lyric was written by Tadg O'Sullivan, to whom it is credited in O'Daly's Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849). Kane O'Hara used the melody for his ballad opera Midas (1764). Other early sources in which the air appears are Burke Thumoth's 12 Scottish and 12 Irish Airs collection of c. 1750 (or 1744, depending on the opinion--it appears as "Chiling O guiry") and Walker's Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards (1786). It is still very much a part of the living tradition (Ó Canainn, 1978).
***
Source for notated version: Rev. Father Gaynor, C.M. (Cork, Ireland), collected from his playing at one of the Feis Ceoil competitions of the early 20th century [Darley & McCall]. Darley & McCall (Darley & McCall Collection of Traditional Irish Dance Music), 1914/1984; No. 57, pg. 25. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 742, pg. 367.

SHUTTER'S HUMOURS. English, Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AAB. See note for "Shuter's Hornpipe." Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 359.

SI BHEAG, SI MHOR. AKA - "Sidh Beag Agus Sidh Mor," "Sheebag, Sheemore," "Sheebeg and Sheemore," "Shebeg, Shemore," "Shi Bheag, She Mhor." AKA and see "The Hills of Haversham," "The Bonny Cuckoo." Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Cranitch): AABB (most versions). The air, according to O'Sullivan (1958) and tradition, was probably the first composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). The title of the air often appears as "Sheebag, Sheemore," an Englished version of the original Gaelic "Si Bheag, Si Mhor" which means "so big, so little," but it has been suggested that "Si" is derived from the medieval Irish "Siod," meaning "fairy hill" or "fairy mound;" thus the title may also refer to "big fairy hill, little fairy hill." It seems that the young Carolan first found favor at the house of his first patron, George Reynolds at Letterfain, Co. Leitrim (himself a harper and poet), who told the harper the legend of the two nearby hills and the fairy bands who lived inside. These fairies had a great battle with much shooting, and Reynolds encouraged Carolan to write a song about the event. Some versions of the legend have the mounds being topped by ancient ruins, with fairy castles underneath in which were entombed heros from the battle between the two rivals. O'Sullivan believes the air to be an adaptation of an older piece called "An chuaichin Mhaiseach" ("The Bonny Cuckoo" or "The Cuckoo"), which can be found in O'Neill, Bunting (1796) and Mulholland's Collection of Ancient Irish Airs (1810). A dance by Gail Tickner appeared in CDSS news #69, March/April 1986 by the title "The Bonny Cuckoo" to the melody.
***
The following set of words for Si Bheag, Si Mhor was published by the Irish Text Society in The Poems of Carolan (Amhrain Chearbhallain):
***
Imreas mór tháinig eidir na ríoghna,
Mar fhíoch a d'fhás ón dá chnoc sí,
Mar dúirt an tSídh Mór go mb'fhearr í féin,
Faoi dhó go mór ná 'n tSídh Bheag.
***
"Ní raibh tú ariamh chomh uasal linn,
I gcéim dár ordaíoch i dtuath ná i gcill;
Beir uainn do chaint, níl suairceas ann,
Coinnigh do chos is do lámh uainn!"
***
An tráth chruinnigh na sluaite bhí an bualadh teann,
Ar feadh na machaireacha anonn 's anall;
'S níl aon ariamh dár ghluais ón mbinn
Nár chaill a cheann san ár sin.
***
"Parlaidh! Parlaidh! agus fáiltím daoibh,
Sin agaibh an námhaid Charn Chlann Aoidh,
Ó bhinn Áth Chluain na sluaite díobh,
'S a cháirde grá dhach, bí páirteach!"
***
Source for notated version: Shetland fiddler Aly Bain via Fred Breunig (Putney, Vt.) [Miller]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 253. Bunting, 1796; No. 63. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 98, Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 42. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 58. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 24, pg. 27. Phillips (Fiddle Case Tunebook: British Isles), 1989 {B}; pg. 43. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1979; pg. 55. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 41. Acorn Music, Tony Elman - "Shakkin' Down the Acorns." CBS MK 42665, Pierre Bensusan - "Spices" (1988). Claddagh CC18, Derek Bell- "Carolan's Receipt" (appears as "Sidh Beag Agus Sidh Mor"). June Appal 014, John McCutcheon- "The Wind That Shakes The Barley" (1977. Appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor"). Kicking Mule 206, Tom Gilfellon- "Kicking Mule's Flat Picking Guitar Festival." Kicking Mule 301, Happy Traum - "American Stranger" (1977. Learned from Boys of the Lough). North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Rooster Records, "Swallowtail." Rounder 0113, Trapezoid - "Three Forks of Cheat" (1979). Rounder 3038, Pierre Bensusan - "Musiques" (1979). Shanachie 79002, "Boys of the Lough" (1973). Shanachie 79009, "Planxty" (appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor"). Shanachie 79013, Derek Bell - "Carolan's Receipt" (1987). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Trailer 2086, "Boys of the Lough" (1973). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Warner Brothers, Dave Bromberg- "My Own House" (appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor").
T:Si Bheag, Si Mhor
M:3/4
L:1/8
Q:225
K:D Major
de|f3ed2|d3ed2|B4 A2|F4 A2|BA Bc d2|e4 de|f4 e2|d4 f2|\
B4 e2|A4 d2|F4 E2|D4 f2|B4 e2|A4 dc|d6-|d4:|*
de|f3 e d2|ed ef a2|b4a2|f4 ed|e4 a2|f4 e2|d4 B2|B4 BA|\
F4 E2|D4 f2|B4 e2|A4 a2|ba gf ed|e4 dc|d6-|d4:|**

SIUBHAN NI DHUIBHIR. Irish, Air (6/8 time). E Dorian. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 1, pg. 11.
T:Siubhán Ní Dhuibhir
R:Air
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:D
E>BB B>cd|B>AF E2 E|F3- F2 B|e2 e ddd|!
c>BA c2 d|B3- B2 B|e2 e ddd|c>BA c2 d|!
B3- B2 F|F>BB B>cd|B>AF E2 E|E3 - E3||

SIÚL A GHRÁ. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). B Minor. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 85, pg. 74.

SLÁN LE MÁIGH (Farewell to the Maigue). AKA and see "The Bells of Shandon." Irish, Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AAB (Miller & Peron). The collector George Petrie remarks that the author of this song is "the clever but deplorably licentious Irish poet Andrew Magrath" and "one of the most distinguished of a class of men--usually hedge schoolmasters--who, for nearly a century by their writings, teachings and, too generally, reckless lives, exercised an influence over the minds and, as may be feared, even the moral feelings of the fine-hearted but excitable peasantry of Munster."
***
A set of lyrics was written to the tune by Francis Sylvester Mahony (Father Prout), honoring the famous bells of St. Anne's in Shandon, Cork. The cleric wrote them while studying in the Jesuit College in Rome in 1804, no doubt remembering the eight bells, one of which bears the inscription We were all cast at Gloucester in England. Abel Rdhall, 1750. The church itself was built in 1726 on the site of an earlier church, destroyed during an attack on the city in 1690, and good views are to be found from the bell tower. Father Prout's song begins:
***
With deep affection and recollection
I often think of those Shandon Bells
Whose sounds so wild would, in my days of childhood
Fling round my cradle their magic spells
On this I ponder where'er I wonder
And thus grow fonder sweet Cork of thee
With thy bells of Shandon that sound so grand on
The pleasant waters of the River Lee

St. Anne's, Shandon, Cork.
***
Ceolta Gael. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 3, No. 61. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 102, pg. 87. Tradition TLP 1024, Mary O'Hara.

SLIABH GEAL gCUA NA FEILE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AA'B. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 46, pg. 42 (appears as "Sliabh Geal gCua"). RCA 09026-60916-2, The Chieftains - "An Irish Evening" (1991).

SLIABH NA mBAN [4] (The Mountain of the Women). Irish, Slow Air (3/4 or 6/8 time). G Major. Standard. One part (Cranitch, Ó Canainn): AA'B (Mulvihill). Crantich (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 105. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 61, pg. 132. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 29, pg. 30.

SNOWY-BREASTED PEARL [1]. AKA and see "Pearl of the White Breast." Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major (O'Neill): D Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (O'Neill). Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 38, pg. 36. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 87, pg. 50.

SOFT DEAL BOARD, THE (An Clar Bog Del/Deil). AKA - "Claur Bug Dale." AKA and see "Caiseal Mumhan/Mhumhan," "Cois na Brighde," "The Bog Deal Board." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). A Minor (Joyce): A Mixolydian (O Canainn): F Dorian (Stanford/Petrie). Standard. One part. "Also called by two other names--Caiseal Mhumhan, 'Cashel of Munster;' and Cois na Brighde (Cush na Breeda), 'Beside the river Bride' (Bride a river in Cork and Waterford). In the Stanford-Petrie collection there are six settings of this beautiful air, scattered through the book; but the one I give here fidders from all. It is the characteristic Munster version, as I heard it scores of times in my youth, played by the best fiddlers and pipers, and sung by the accomplished traditional singers. The original Irish song of Clar bog del, better known in Munster by the name of Caiseal mhumhan, will be found in Edward Walsh's Irish Popular Songs, p. 168. It was a universal favourite sixty or seventy years ago. Another song to the same air, which held as high a place in popular estimation, was one composed by a well-known Gaelic poet, the Rev. William English, beginning with--'Cois na Brighde, seal do bhiossa, go sugach samh'--'While I dwelt by the (river) Bride, pleasantly and tranquilly.' This will be found in O'Daly's 'Poets and Poetry of Munster,' second series, p. 120. I once heard 'Cashel of Munster' sung under peculiarly pleasant and characteristic circumstances, when I was a mere child. The people of the village had turned out on a sunny day in June to 'foot' the half-dry turf in the bog at the back of Seefin mountain which rises straight over Glenosheen: always a joyuous occasion for us children. Dinner time came--about 1 o'clock: each family spread the white cloth on a chosen spot on the dry clean bog-surface. There might have been half a dozen groups in that part of the bog, all near each other, and all sat down to dinner at the same time: glorious smoking-hot floury savoury potatoes, salt herrings (hot like the potatoes), and good wholesome blathach, i.e. skimmed thick milk slightly and pleasantly sour--a dinner fit for a hungry king. After dinner there was always a short interval for rest and diversion--generally rough joyous romping. On this occasion the people, with one accord, asken Peggy Moynahan to sing them a song. Peggy was a splendid girl, noted for her singing: and down she sat willingly on a turf bank. In a moment the people clustered round; all play and noise and conversation ceased; and she gave us the Clar bog del in Irish with intense passion, while the people--old and young, including myself and my little brother Robert--sat and listened, mute and spellbound. I have good reason to fear that the taste for intellectual and refined amusements--singing, music, dancing, story-telling, small informal literary clubs and meetings, etc.--once so prevalent among the people of my native district, which often expressed itself in scenes such as I describe here, is all gone; and we shall never witness the like again. Is muar an truagh e: more's the pity!" (Joyce). A Donegal version was recorded by Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh and Frankie Kennedy in 1983 (Green Linnett 3090). Source for notated version: "From Father Walsh" [Stanford/Petrie]. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 127, pgs. 64-65. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 581, pg. 147.
T:Soft Deal Board, The
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
N:"Slowly and tenderly"
K:A Minor
fd|e>d cA AA|d>c AG (3^FEF|G4 A2|A3B cA|G2A2 AB|c2A2 (A/B/c/d/e/)|
f3a gf|e3g (6f/d/c/A/G/^F/|G2A2 AB|c2A2 de|f4g2|a3g fg|e>d cA {G}AA|
d>c AG (3^FEF| G4 A2|A4||

SPAILPÍN FÁNAC(H), AN. AKA and see "As Slow Our Ship," "Brighton Camp," "The Girl I Left Behind Me," "The Rambling Labourer," "The Wandering Labourer." Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part.
***
AN SPAILPÍN FÁNACH
***
Go deo deo arís ní raghad go Caiseal
ag díol ná ag reic mo shláinte,
Ar mhargadh na saoire im shuí cois balla
nó im scaoinse ar leataoibh sráide;
Bodairí na tíre ag tíocht ar a gcapaill
á fhiafraí an bhfuilim híreáilte;
'Téanam chun siúil, tá an cúrsa fada!'
-seo ar siúl an spailpín fánach.
***
Im spailpín fánach a fágadh mise
ag seasamh ar mo shláinte,
Ag siúl an drúchta go moch ar maidin
ag bailiú galair ráithe;
Ní fheicfear corrán im láimh chun bainte,
súist ná feac beag rámhainne,
Ach colours na bhFrancach os cionn mo leapa
is pike agam chun sáite.
***
Go Callainn nuair théim 's mo hook im ghlac is
mé ansúd i dtosach gearrtha,
Is nuair théim go Dúilinn 's é clú bhíonn acu
'Seo chúibh an spailpín fánach!';
Cruinneoidh mé ciall 's triallfad abhaile
is cloífead seal lem mháithrín,
's go bráth arís ní ghlaofar m'ainm
sa tír seo 'an spailpín fánach'.
***
Mo chúig chéad slán chun dúthaigh m'athar
'gus chun an Oileáin ghrámhair,
's chun buachaillí na Cúlach ós dóibh nár mheasa
in aimsir chasta an gharda ann;
Ach anois ó táimse im thráill bhocht dhealamh
i measc na ndúthaí fáin seo,
Is é mo chumha croí mar fuair mé an ghairm
bheith riamh im spailpín fánach.
***
I gCiarraí an ghrinn do gheofaí an ainnir
go mb'fhonn le fear suí láimh léi,
'na mbeadh lasadh trí lítis 'na gnaoi mar eala,
is a cúl fionn fada fáinneach;
A cruinne-chíocha riamh nár scaipeadh,
's a mala chaol mar shnáthaid,
's mór go mb'fhearr í ná sraoill ó Challainn
'na mbeadh na céadta púnt le fáil léi.
***
'S ró-bhreá is cuimhin liom mo dhaoin' bheith sealad
thiar ag Droichead Gáile,
Faoi bhuaibh, faoi chaoirigh, faoi laoigh beag' geala
agus capaill ann le háireamh;
Ach b'é toil Chríost gur cuireadh sin astu
's go ndeaghamar i leith ár sláinte,
Is gurbh é bhris mo chroí i ngach tír dá rachaim-
'Call here you, spailpín fánach!'
***
Dá dtigeadh an Francach anall thar caladh
is a champa daingean láidir,
'gus Bóic Ó Gráda chúinn abhaile
is Tadhg bocht fial Ó Dálaigh,
Do bheadh barracks an rí go léir á leagadh
agus yeomen 'gainn á gcarnadh,
Clanna Gall gach am á dtreascairt-
sin cabhair ag an spailpín fánach!
***
This is taken from Nua-Dhuanaire, Cuid III. A Connaught version is also
cited, and the following verse quoted:
***
Tá na Franncaigh anois istigh i gCill Eala
agus béidhmuid go leathan láidir;
Tá Bonaparte i gCaisleán an Bharraigh
ag iarraidh an dlighe a cheap Sáirséal;
Béidh beairicí an ríogh is gach éan-oidhche thrí lasadh
agus yeomen againn á gcarnadh;
Puiceanna an Bhéarla go síorruidh d'á leagan-
sin cabhair ag an Spailpín Fánach.
***
THE ROVER (George Sigerson)
***
No more, no more in Cashel town
I'll sell my health a-raking,
Nor on days of fairs rove up and down
Nor join the merry making.
There, mounted farmers come in throngs
To seek and hire me over,
But now I'm hired, and my journey's long,
The journey of the Rover.
***
I've found, what rovers often do,
I trod my health down fairly;
And that wand'ring out on morning dew
Will gather fevers early.
No more shall flail swing o'er my head,
Nor my hand a spade-shaft cover,
But the banner of France will float instead,
And the Pike stand by the Rover!
***
When to Callan once, with hook in hand,
I'd go for early shearing,
Or to Dublin town-the news was grand
That the "Rover gay" was nearing.
And soon with good gold home I'd go,
And my mother's field dig over,
But no more-no more this land shall know
My name as the "Merry Rover!"
***
Five hundred farewells to Fatherland!
To my loved and lovely Island!
And to Culach boys-they'd better stand
Her guards by glen and highland.
But now that I am poor and lone,
A wand'rer-not in clover-
My heart it sinks with bitter moan
To have ever lived a Rover.
***
In pleasant Kerry lives a girl,
A girl whom I love dearly;
Her cheek's a rose, her brow's a pearl,
And her blue eyes shine so clearly!
Her long fair locks fall curling down
O'er a breast untouched by lover-
More dear than dames with a hundred poun'
Is she unto the Rover!
***
Ah, well I mind, my own men drove
My cattle in no small way;
With cows, with sheep, with calves, they'd move
With steeds, too, west to Galway.
Heaven willed I'd lose each horse and cow,
And my health but half recover-
It breaks my heart, for her sake, now
That I'm only a sorry Rover.
***
But when once the French come o'er the main,
With stout camps in each valley,
With Buck O'Grady back again,
And poor brave Tadhg Ó Dálaigh-
Oh, The Royal Barracks in dust shall lie,
The yeomen we'll chase over;
And the English clan be forced to fly-
'Tis the sole hope of the Rover!
***
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 94, pg. 81. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 972, pg. 167.
T:Spalpeen Fanach, The
T:Spailpín Fánach, An
L:1/8
M:C
R:Set Dance
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (972)
K:G
gf|efed B2A2|GABG E2 EF|G2 GF GABc|dedc B2 gf|
efed B2A2|GABG E2G2|FGAF DEFA|G3 G2:|
|:GA|Bdef g2 fg|agfe d2 Bd|edef gfed|e2f2g2 fg|efed BcBA|
GABG EDEG|FGAF DEFA|G3G2:|

SPAILPÍN RÚIN (Migrant Farmworker, My Love). AKA and see "The Tumbling Down Teady's Acre," "The Stranger," "Along the Mourne Shore," "The Reading Made Easy." Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. The melody, which appears in the Stanford-Petrie collection (No. 1379), is a variant (or, as Cowdery {1990} says, an "outlining correspondent") of "The Blackbird," notwithstanding sean nos singer Joe Heaney's emphatic assertion that this was the older of the the two tunes. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 59, pg. 53. Claddagh CC 9, Sean MacDonagh - "An Aill Bhain" (1971).

SPEIC SEOIGHEACH, AN (The Joycean Greeting). Irish, Air (3/8 time). G Major. Standard. One part. The melody appears in Thompson's Hiberian Muse of 1786. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 65, pg. 58. Columbia Legacy CK 48693, "The Best of the Chieftains" (1992).

STOIR MO CHROI, A [2]. Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. AAB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 64, pg. 57.

TÁIMSE AR AN mBAILE SEO. Irish, Air (12/8 time). D Major. Standard. One part. The melody is better known as "The Wild Colonial Boy." Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; pg. 13.

TÁIMSE MO CHODLADH. Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AAB. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 54, pg. 49.

TRIP WE TOOK OVER THE MOUNTAIN(S), THE [1]. Irish, Waltz or Air (3/4 or 6/8 time, "with life and spirit"). G Major (Joyce, Mitchell, Sullivan): G Major/Mixolydian (Ó Canainn). Standard. AB (Joyce, Mitchell, Sullivan): AA'BBC (Ó Canainn). "I have a whole song to this air on a ballad-sheet, beginning:--
***
One night as the moon luminated the sky,
When I first took a notion to marry. (Joyce).
***
Sources for notated versions: "Sent to me (in 1884) by Mr. Francis Hogan of South Lodge, Brenormore, near Carrick-on-Suir, a good musician and a great enthusiast for Irish music and songs" (Joyce); piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Seamus Ennis [Sullivan]. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 269, pg. 128. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 128, pgs. 102-103. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 41, pg. 38. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 33, pg. 13.
T:Trip We Took Over the Mountain, The
M:3/8
L:1/16
S:Dave Swarbick
R:air
K:G
G3E|D2G2G2|B2G2G2|A2ABA2|f2f2ga|gfd2d2|d2edcA|G2GABG|F2FGFE|
D2G2G2|B2G2G2|A2AcA2|f2f2ga|gfd2d2|cd/2c/2A2F2|FG2GG2|1 G2G2:|2 G2G2gg|:gfd2gg|gab2g2|f2d2e2|f2f2ga|gfd2d^c|d2edcA|G2GABG|
F2FGFE|D2G2G2|B2G2G2|A2ABA2|f2f2ga|gfd2d2|(3cdc A2F2|
FG2GG2|1 G3gg:|2G2g2 f/2g/2f/2e/2|:
de ce Bg|de ce Bg|(3cBc cd ec|d2 df ga|gd Bg Bd|DA df ga|gd BG Bd|DA dgfe|
de ce Bg|de ce Bg|(3cBc cd ec|d2 df ga|gd BG Bd|cG E2 d2|G,D GA (3def|1
gzfze2:|2 g2gfge|: gd ad bg|gd ad bA|ag fd fg|ag fd fa|E2 Be gb|DF Ad fa|
DB DG Bd|DF Ag fe|de ce Bg|de ce Bg|c/2B/2c cd ec|d2 df ga|gd BG Bd|cG E2 d2|
G.D GB de/2f/2|1 g2gggg:|2 g2 gG ED||
T:Trip we took over the mountain
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"With life and spirit"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
D2|G>FG EFG|ABG A2 B/c/|d>BG FED|DG2 z2D|G>FG EFG|ABG A2 B/c/|
d>BG FEF|AG3 z2||B/c/|dBG GBd|e>cA A2c|B>GF EAG|FDE D2D|
G>FG EFG|ABG A2 B/c/|d>BG FEF|A G3||

TUESDAY MORNING (Maidin De Mairt). Irish, Air. Ireland, Ulster. According to Ó Canainn (1978) this is one of the great Northern songs in Irish tradition.

UNA BHAN. Irish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 70, pg. 62.

WE BROUGHT THE SUMMER WITH US (Thugamar fein an Samhradh linn). AKA and see "Samhradh, Samhradh." Irish, Slow Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). E Major/Mixolydian (Stanford/Petrie): D Mixolydian (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Stanford/Petrie). The melody, which is still very much a part of the living tradition, appears earliest in Neales' Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), which Ó Canainn (1978) believes to be the first real collection of exclusively Irish folk music. It also appears in Burke Thumoth's collection of c. 1750 and Cooke's Selection of Twenty-one Favourite Original Irish Airs arranged for Pianoforte, Violin or Flute (Dublin, 1793). Breandan Breathnach, in Folk Music and Dances of Ireland, notes that the air is an example of the rare airs in Lah (Aeolian) mode.
**
Of all the fish that's in the sea,
The Herring is king, the herring is king.
Sing thugamur fein an samhra linn
Tis we have brought the summer in.
**
Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 97, pg. 83 (appears as "Thugamar Féin an Samhradh Linn"). Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 502, pg. 127. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 2 (appears as "Thugamar Féin an Samhradh Linn").

WERE YOU AT THE ROCK? (An/A' Rabais Ag an gCarraig). AKA and see "An Raibh Tu ag an gCarraig." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time, with irregular measures in some settings). Ireland, Munster. D Dorian (Roche): E Dorian (Cranitch,Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Cranitch,Ó Canainn): AB (Roche). Hamish Henderson (1971) remarks that the tune is one of the best-known Munster song-tunes. The Gaelic title can mean 'Have you been at Carrick?' or "Have you been at the Rock?', giving rise to speculation that the piece was a 'secret' song during the Penal Age, containing a covert message about a secret rite of Mass at a Mass-Rock during the time when such ceremonies were outlawed by the English, or that it refers to the removal of the rock from Christ's tomb. Henderson himself believes it to be a straightforward love song, and in fact others (such as Prof. Michael Robinson) have also voiced skeptecism over the mass-rock legend, pointing out that the Gaelic "An Carraig", as well as meaning "the rock", is also a fairly common name for a town and that the lyrics could simply be a straight-forward love ballad. Further, regarding the level of represion necessary for a coded message, there are many political songs from the 18th and 19th century which are very explicitly anti-English but which are without any sort of code and which presumably were discretely though popularly sung, and there is only a very small number of sean-nos songs in the body of the literature referring to religion or religious issues. Music for the piece appears in Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849), though Ó Canainn (1978) says the version in that volume "is a rather frightening example of the worst excesses of a player who feels that the more notes he puts into a tune the better it is." Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 99, pg. 167. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 55, pg. 50. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 61, pg. 30. Shanachie 79023, "Cheiftains 3" (1971/1982).
T:A' Raibh T\'u ag an gCarraig?
T:Were You At The Rock?
B:Matt Cranitch, The Irish Fiddle Book
M:3/4
L:1/8
E:7
K:EDor
ed|BB3 Bd|ee3 ef|gg-ga/g/ fe|ff-fe (3dBA|B4 ef|\
gg-ga/g/ fe|ff-fe dB|e4 de|\
M:2/4
f6 (3gfe|\
M:3/4
e4 g(3a/g/f/|ed B(3d/B/A/ Bc|d2B2gf|e3d BA|\
M:2/4
F6E2|\
M:4/4
D4-Dz EF|GGG4 e/d/B/A/|FFF4 AF|\
M:3/4
E4 DE|F4E2|E4|]

WHITE BLANKET, THE [1] (An Súisín Bán). AKA and see "Súisín Bán." Irish, Long or Set Dance (2/4 or 4/4 time). G Major (Mulvihill, O'Neill, Roche, Tubridy, Williamson): A Major. Standard. One part (O'Neill/1001, Williamson): AABB (Mulvihill, O'Neill, Roche, Tubridy). The title is sometimes known in Englished Gaelic as "The Suisheen Bawn." Musically, it begins on the subdominant chord and for those versions with separate parts, the 'A' and 'B' parts are not the same lengths, as is not uncommon in set dances. An early version of the melody appears in Neales' Collection of the Most Celebrated Irish Tunes (Dublin, 1726), the first real collection of Irish folk music (Ó Canainn, 1978). Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 10, pg. 111. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 223. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1794, pg. 335. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 981, pg. 168. Roche Collection, Vol. 2; No. 273, pg. 30. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 15. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 79. RCA 09026-60916-2, The Chieftains - "An Irish Evening" (1991). Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4." Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1972-73, 1983. Learned by Uilleann piper Paddy Moloney from Junior Crehan at the funeral of Irish piping great Willie Clancy {Alun Owen}). Gearóid O hAllmhuráin - "Traditional Music From Clare and Beyond" (appears as "An Cuisin Ban").
T:The White Blanket
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:Lorna LaVerne
K:G Major
(3ABc |dFFE FGAF | EF (3ABc d3B |cBAF E2FA | B2Bc B2AB |
cBAF ECEF | A2AB A2(3ABc |dFFE FGAF | EF (3ABc d3B |
cBAF E2FA | B2Bc B2AB |cBAF ECEF | A2AB AAce |
f2fe fgaf | ec(3ABc d3B |cBAF E2FA | B2Bc B2AB |
cBAF ECEF | A2AB AAce |f2fe fgaf | ec(3ABc d3B |
cBAF E2FA | B2Bc B2AB |cBAF ECEF | A2AB A2 |

WHITE'S DAUGHTER FROM THE GLEN. AKA - "Inghin/Inion an Fhaoit On N-Gleann". Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AAB (Joyce). Cowdery (1990) identifies this melody as "a kind of outlining correspondent of the first strain of 'The Blackbird,' although the overall form is not the same." He analyzes the tune and its tune family in his work "The Melodic Tradition of Ireland." Source for notated version: James O'Farrell of Cootehill, Co. Cavan (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 807, pg. 392. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 36, pg. 35. Dolphin DOL 1008, Tomas Ó Canainn - "A Kindly Welcome" (1974).

WILD GEESE, THE [1] (Na Geadna Fiadaine). AKA and see "Gage Fane," "The Origin of the Harp," "Old Ireland Rejoice," "Armstrong's Farewell," "The Old Head of Denis," "The Meeting of the Waters," "Todlin Hame," "My Name is Dick Kelly," "An bacac buide," "An Cana Draigeann Eille," "Tis believed that this harp." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). A Major (O'Neill, O'Sullivan/Bunting): G Major (O Canainn). Standard. One part. This Irish air dates back to the mid-17th century and has often been used as a song tune. Perhaps the first lyrics were written in 1670 by John Fitzgerald, son of the Knight of Glin. In the next century a version called in Irish "Na Geandna Fiadaine" had its title mangled into English as "Gage Fane" and appeared in several collections. The given title commemorates the thousands of Irish soldiers who fled to France and Spain after the Treaty of Limerick in 1691, preferring an honorable exile to remaining in their country when their cause was lost. These exiles sustained the national reputation afterwards under the name of the Irish Brigade in the wars on the Continent.
***
A legend has it that the air was sung by the women assembled on the shore at the time the troops embarked after the defeat of the Gaelic chiefs. O'Sullivan (1983) points out this is poetic license for the exodus was gradual, and not an embarkation along the lines of Dunkirk in this century, but (quoting MacGeoghan, who states in his History of Ireland {pg. 599}) "within the 50 years which followed the Treaty of Limerick 450,000 Irish soldiers died in the service of France." O'Sullivan also adds the title "Na Geadna Fiadhaine" is a translation of the English "The Wild Geese," and not vice versa, but that even the Gaelic-speaking majority at the time referred to these men as "Wild Geese," for they flocked before taking flight.
***
Source for notated version: Bunting noted the tune from Patrick Quin, the harper, in 1803. Holden (Collection), volume II, 1806 (appears as "Gage Fane"). Mulholland (Collection), 1810 (appears under the erroneous title "The Wild Swan"). Neale (Celebrated Irish Tunes), pg. 25. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 51, pgs. 46-47. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 170, pg. 30. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 113, pgs. 162-164. Thompson (Hibernian Muse), c. 1789 (appears as "Irish Air"). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976). RCA 09026-61490-2, The Chieftains - "The Celtic Harp" (1993).

WILLIE LEONARD. AKA and see "The Lake of Coolfinn." Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. One part. The song appears in Joyce's "Ancient Irish Music" (1875). O Canainn (1978) singles out Joyce's note to the tune as a prime example of Joyce's maltreatment of several Irish songs. It is unfortunate that Joyce thought that:
***
The ballad, as I received it, is a singular mixture of vigour
and imbecility; in some parts vivid and true to nature, in
others vulgar, feeble and prosy. I have curtailed the tedious
matter-of-fact narrative at the end and retrenched other parts
also; added something of my own; changed many of the
lines; and restored the rhythm where it was necessary. But
I have retained as much of the old ballad as possible.
***
Source for notated version: "Set from J. Martin. Mr. Joyce" [Stanford/Petrie]. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 746, pg. 187.

WOUNDED HUSSAR, THE. AKA and see "Cailin Tighe Moir," "Captain O'Kane." Irish, English; Slow Air (6/8 or 3/4 time). B Flat Major (Howe): A Minor (Huntington, Knowles): A Dorian (Ó Canainn): G Minor (Ashman). Standard. AB (Ashman): AAB (Ó Canainn): ABB (Huntington, Knowles). Once a very popular song by Thomas Campbell, set to a variant of the air "Captain O'Kane" by Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). Knowles indicates the tune is found "all over Britain" but that his version is from England's Lake District. Source for notated version: a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 93a, pg. 37. Howe (Musician's Omnibus), No. 2, pg. 129. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 44. Johnson (Our Familiar Songs), pgs. 543-544. Knowles (A Northern Lass), 1995; pg. 7. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 47, pg. 43.

YELLOW BITTERN, THE ("An Bunnan Buí" or "An Bonnán Buidhe"). Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). Ireland, Ulster. C Major (Joyce, O'Sullivan/Bunting): D Major (Ó Canainn). Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Joyce, O'Sullivan/Bunting). O'Sullivan (1983) and Ó Canainn (1978) both note the song is still sung today by traditional musicians, to a variety of melodies. O'Sullivan edited the Irish collector Edward Bunting's works but uses the tune as given by the Cork collector William Forde (c. 1846) because it is a closer variant of the modern version than the one in Bunting's 1840 collection. "In Bunting's third collection (1840), p. 56, is given a fine air, The Yellow Bittern: in 3/4 time...(,however, Forde's tune) is in common time and is at least as good as that of Bunting: besides being simpler and more vocal. Compare with 'Maire Aroon'" (Joyce).
***
The song "The Yellow Bittern" was written in the 18th century by an Ulster poet, Cathal Bui Mac Giolla Ghunna (1690-1756). It seems that Bui Mac Giolla Gunna, or in English 'yellow Charlie Gunn', went walking one wintry day near his home by the shores of Lough MacNean. He came upon a yellow bittern lying frozen on the icy lake, and Gunn, identifying with the creature, suspected that the death was brought about because the bird could not drink from the iced-over water. His suspicion was the product of his own fears, for one of his greatest was the absence of convivial drink. The song was translated by Thomas MacDonagh, ultimately executed for his role in the Easter Rising of 1916, and goes, in part:
***
It's not for the common birds that I'd mourn,
The blackbird, the corncrake or the crane,
But for the bittern that's shy and apart
And drinks in the marsh from the lone bog-drain.
Oh! If I had known you were near your death,
While my breath held out I'd have run to you,
Till a splash from the Lake of the Son of the Bird
Your soul would have stirred and waked anew.
***
Sources for notated versions: the index to Bunting's 1840 collection reveals he noted the tune from a "blind man at Westport in 1802;" Forde noted the melody from fiddler Hugh O'Beirne (Co. Limerick) [Joyce]. Joyce (Forde MS), 1909; No. 609, pg. 314. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 104, pg. 88. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 77, pgs. 120-121.
T:Yellow Bittern, The
T:An Bonnán Buidhe
L:1/8
M:C
S:Bunting
K:C
E/F/|G2 G>E F2 EF|G2A2_B2 AG|AGED C2 D/C/D|C2C2 C3E/F/|
G2 G>E F2 EF|G2A2_B2 AG|AGED C2 D/C/D|C2C2C3||E|
G2 GA c2d2|e2 fe d3f|e2 dc c2 GA|_B2A2G2 cA|{A}G21 GE F2 EF|
G2A2_B2 AG|AGED C2 D/C/D|C2C2 C3||


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