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The Fiddler's Companion

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Result of search for "Old Joe Clark":

FINGER RING. AKA and see "I Wish't I Had a New Five Cents," "New Five Cents." Old-Time, Breakdown/ Song. USA, Oklahoma. D Major. ADAE. AABB. Originally from African-American tradition. Source for notated version: R.E. Perkins (Sequoyah County, Oklahoma) [Thede].
***
I would not have a yeller gal, I'll tell you the reason why,
She'd blow her nose on yeller corn bread and call it pumpkin pie.
***
Refrain
Wish't I had a finger ring (or, new five cents),
Wish't I had a dime;
Wish't I had a finger ring (new five cents),
To give that gal of mine.
***
I would not have a yeller gal, I'll tell you the reason why,
Her neck's so long and yeller I'm afraid she'd never die.
***
Mawsy had a yeller gal, brought her from the South,
Her mouth looked like an old fireplace with the ashes all raked out.
***
Mawsy had an old gray mare I know her mighty well,
If she ever jumps in my corn patch she'd better jump in hell.
***
Mawsy had an old blind horse, he calls him Bawly Sam,
Every tooth in his old head is sixteen inches round.
***
(See "Old Joe Clark," "Old Dan Tucker" for similar floating verses, also the song "Raise a Ruckus (Roughhouse) Tonight")
Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 67.

LEATHER BREECHES/BRITCHES. See "Lord MacDonald's Reel" which is thought to be the origin of the American version. AKA and see "Old Leather Britches," "Oh Those Britches Full of Stiches," "MacDonald's Reel," "McDonald's Reel," "Slanty Gart." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, very widely known. G Major. Standard. AB (Bayard): AABB (Brody, Lowinger): ABCDD (Christeson): AABBCC (Shumway, Thede): AA'BB'CC' (Phillips): AABCCDDC' (Krassen). 'Leather Breeches' was a knickname in some parts of the south for green beans dried in the pod and later cooked, although any verses connected with the tune have referred to garments made out of leather.
***
Many sources note this tunes popularity in the United States: for example, Marion Thede said it was "among the most frequently heard fiddle tunes in the Southwest," while Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner stated it was "a great favorite in early Texas cattle country" (Shumway). It was in repertory of Alabama fiddler D. Dix Hollis (1861-1927) who considered it one of "the good old tunes of long ago" (as quoted in the Opelika Daily News of April 17th, 1926), and it was commonly played by Rock Ridge Alabama fiddlers around 1920 (Bailey). It was mentioned in the autobiography of fiddler Tom Freeman of Cullman County, Alabama, and was listed in the Tuscaloosa News of March 28th, 1971 as a specialty of "Monkey" Brown of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, who had a local reputation in the 20's and 30's (Cauthen, 1990). The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress (by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph) from the playing of Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, and (by Herbert Halpert) from the playing of Mississippi fiddlers John Hatcher, Stephen B. Tucker, and Hardy Sharp in 1939. "Leather Breeches" was played in the non-standard key of 'D' Major by Surry County, North Carolina, fiddler Benton Flippen (b. 1920).
***
The melody was a standard at fiddlers' contests in many areas of the South and Mid-West. It was a 'category tune' for an 1899 fiddle contest in Gallatin, Tenn., in which each fiddler would play his version; the best rendition won a prize (C. Wolfe, The Devil's Box, Vol. 14, No. 4, 12/1/80). It was predicted to "vie with the latest jazz nerve wreckers for first place" at a fiddlers' convention in Chilton County, Alabama, according to the Chilton County News of June 1, 1922 (Cauthen, 1990), and was also predicted by the Northwest Alabamian of August 29th, 1929, that it was likely to be played at an upcoming contest. A.B. Moore, in his 1934 History of Alabama, said it was one of the standard tunes in the square dance fiddler's repertoire, and it was listed as one of the definitive fiddle tunes for a contest in Jackson, Alabama, in the Clarke County Democrat of May 6, 1926 (Cauthen, 1990). "Leather Breeches" has retained popularity to this day as a contest tune. A story has been told of California old-time mandolin player Kenny Hall who played this tune in the 1970's at the 'national' contest at Weiser, Idaho, a hot-bed of Texas-style or 'contest' fiddling. Hall said he had learned the tune from an old Texas fiddler, and that his was what "real" Texas fiddling was all about, which did not endear him to many Texans that weekend. Compounding his faux pas, was that he referred the Texas version of the tune by the title "Perma Press." The Texans were not amused.
***
Samuel Bayard suggests the rhyme sung to the melody by old-time musicians is borrowed from an Irish air (song) called "The Britches On." "This (Bayard's 1944 set) is the best set of 'Leather Breeches' yet to turn up in western Pennsylvania. The tune is often accompanied by a rhyme which in Greene County (Pa.) tradition runs:
***
Leather breeches full of stitches,
Old shoes and stockings on--
My wife she kicked me out of bed
Because I had my breeches on.
***
Mrs. Armstrong recalled only two lines:
***
Leather breeches, full of stitches,
Mammy sewed the buttons on.
***
Bayard notes the tune is descended from, or related to, an Irish air called "The Breeches On" or "The Irish Lad" and a widespread Scottish reel generally called "(Lord) McDonald's Reel." Ford (1940) prints these words:
***
Leather Breeches full of stitches,
Leather Breeches, Leather Breeches;
Mammy cut 'em out an'
M'daddy sewed an' sewed the stitches. (Ford)
***
Sources for notated versions: 'Uncle' Am Stuart (b. 1855. East Tennessee) [Krassen]; John White (Garfield County, Oklahoma) passed down from Uncle John MacDonald (Jack County, Texas) [Thede]; Stick Osborn (St. Joseph, Missouri) [Christeson]; Mrs. Sarah Armstrong, (near) Derry, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1943 [Bayard, 1944]; 15 southwestern Pa. fiddlers [Bayard, 1981]; Kenner C. Kartchner (Arizona) [Shumway]; Ralph Sauers (Dice, Pa.) [Guntharp]; Wil Gilmer with the Leake County Revellers and Howard Forrester [Phillips]. Adam, No. 33. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 16. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 328A-O, pgs. 293-298. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 166. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 88. Cole, pg. 22. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 48. Guntharp (Learning the Fiddler's Ways), 1980; pg. 72. Jarman, 1944; pg. 5. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 15-16. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 19. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 139. Robbins, No. 61. Shumway, 1990; pg. 268. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 53, pg. 19. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 115. Thomas (Devil's Ditties), pgs. 134 & 135. White's Excelsior Collection, pg. 27. Caney Mountain Records CEP 210 (extended play LP, privately issued), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66. Columbia 15149 (78 RPM), The Leake County Revelers (1927). Columbia 33397, Dave Bromberg - "Midnight on the Water" (1975). County 201, The Old Virginia Fiddlers- "Rare Recordings." County 506, The Skillet Lickers- "Old Time Tunes." County 532, "The Leake County Revelers: 1927-1930 Recordings" (1975). County 543, Earl Johnson and His Clodhoppers - "Red Hot Breakdown" (originally recorded in 1927). County 707, Lewis Franklin- "Texas Fiddle Favorites." County 714, Kenny Baker and Joe Greene- "High Country." County 733, Clark Kessinger- "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Edison 51548 (78 RPM), 1923, John Baltzell (appears as last tune of "Drunken Sailor Medley"). Flying Cloud FC-023, Kirk Sutphin - "Fiddlin' Around." Flying Fish FF-336, Pete Sutherland - "Poor Man's Dream" (1984). Folkways FTS 31098, Ken Perlman - "Clawhammer Banjo and Fingerstyle Guitar Solos." Hilltop Records 6022, Uncle Jimmy Thompson. June Appal 024, Luke Smathers String Band- "Mountain Swing." June Appal 028, Wry Staw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978. Learned from Virgil Cravens of Cedar Falls, N.C. "one of the last of the traditional southern hammer dulcimer players). Library of Congress AFS 4804-B-1, 1941, Osey and Ernest Helton (Western N.C.). Marimac AHS #3, Glen Smith - "Say Old Man" (1990. Learned from Bob Crawford). Marimac 9038, Dan Gellert & Brad Leftwich - "A Moment in Time." Marimac 9060, Jim Bowles - "Railroading Through the Rocky Mountians" (1992). Marimac 9111, Carter Brothers and Son - "Goin' Up Town: Old Time String Bands, Vol. 2" (orig. rec. 1928). Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH-002, John Hatcher - "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo-American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1985). Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough (with mandolinist Kenny Hall) - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977). Rounder 1027, Johnnie Lee Wills- "Tulsa Swing." Rounder 0024, "Hollow Rock String Band." Vocalation 5456 (78 RPM), Uncle Jimmy Thompson (Tenn., Texas) {4/1930}. Vocalation (78 RPM), Uncle Am Stuart (b. 1856, Morristown, Tenn.), 1924. Voyager 309, Benny and Jerry Thomasson- "The Weiser Reunion: A Jam Session" (1993).
T:Leather Breeches
L:1/8
M:2/4
S: Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:G
|:D/G/B/G/ A/G/B/G/|D/G/B/G/ A/G/E/G/|D/G/B/G/ A/G/B/G/|
D/E/D/C/ B,/(A,/ G,)| D/G/B/G/ A/G/B/G/|D/G/B/G/ A/G/E/G/|
c/B/A/G/ FD/D/|D/G/G/A/ B/G/G||
K:D
d>ddd|A/d/d/e/ f/(d/d)|d>ddd|A/B/A/G/ (F/E/)D|d>ddd|
A/d/d/e/ f/(d/d)|g/f/e/d/ c>A|A/d/d/e/ (f/d/)d:|
K:G
|:d/g/b/g/ a/g/b/g/|d/g/b/g/ a/g/e/g/|d/g/b/g/ a/g/b/g/|d/e/d/c/ B/A/G:|

LITTLE BROWN JUG. American; Jig, Schottische (2/4 time) and Song Tune. D Major ('A' part) & D Mixolydian ('B' part) [Cole]: D Major [Bayard, Ruth, Sweet]: C Major [Ford]: G Major [Phillips]. Standard. AB (Ruth): AA'B (Bayard): AABB (Phillips): AA'BB' (Sweet). The tune goes to a once-popular college song, but it appears to have originally been composed for the minstrel stage by one 'Eastburn', believed to be a pseudonym for Joseph E(astburn) Winner (1837-1918). He copyrighted the melody in 1869. J.E. Winner, as the name on the copyright goes, of Philadelphia, was the younger brother of the composer and publisher Septimus Winner. "Little Brown Jug" is credited to one Jas. Hand in Cole's 1001, although this is considered unreliable. It has been suggested that the second strain of the "Jug" tune is a variant of the first strain of Irish melody "Tatter Jack Walsh."
***
Me and my wife, little black dog,
Crossed the creek on a hickory log;
She fell in, got stuck in the mud,
But I still hung to my little brown jug.
***
Despite its stage origins, the tune quickly entered traditional repertoire and appears to have been widely disseminated. "Little Brown Jug" was cited as having commonly been played at Orange County, New York, country dances in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), and it was known at the same time at the other end of the country by Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner, who said, "many an amateur plays this simple old song" (Shumway). The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. Mt. Airy, North Carolina, fiddler Tommy Jarrell learned the tune from his father, because the lyric "tickled" him. African-American fiddler Cuje Bertram (Ky.) recorded the tune in 1970 on a home recording made for his family. Another African-American fiddler, North Carolinian Joe Thompson, played the tune in FCGD tuning. It was recorded on a 78 RPM by Kanawha County, West Virginia fiddler Clark Kessinger (1896-1975).
***
"Little Brown Jug" was the second tune that Missouri fiddler Art Galbraith learned as a boy, who received instruction from his Uncle Mark (a three-fingered fiddler, the result of an accident chopping corncobs), his cousin and others. Art's father, no musician, was proud of his son's budding talent and was constantly prodding him to play for anyone who would listen, and this was well-known in the family. One day the young Galbraith attended a Fourth of July picnic on the James River that featured a square dance:
***
So most of the time while they were dancing, all I was doing was
listening to the music. Dancing didn't interest me much. Then (his
cousin) said, "Come here a minute. Take this fiddle and play. I want
to dance one." And, oh, it just scared me to death to get up before
all those hundreds of people. I knew nearly every one of them and
they knew me, but that was the worst thing that could happen.
But he kept on. He said, "Why, you can do it. I showed you how
to play it. Play Little Brown Jug." So I got up there and the
guitar player says, "Well, I'll play with you!" So I played for
a square dance set. It scared me. I was just miserable. But I got
through it and they danced, so I guess it was all right. And later
on I played with him and others for dancing after I got to
learning more tunes. (Bittersweet Magazine, 1981)
***
Phillip's version is only loosely based on the familiar song tune. Sources for notated versions: Wilbur Neal (elderly fiddler from Jefferson County, Pa., 1948) [Bayard]; Brian Hubbard [Phillips]; caller George Van Kleeck (Woodland Valley, Catskill Mtns., New York) [Cazden].
***
Adam, No. 7. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 428, pg. 406. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 6. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 54. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 33. Jarman (Square Dance Tunes), No. or pg. 20. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 142. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 12, pg. 6. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 10. County 778, Tommy Jarrell - "Pickin' on Tommy's Porch" (1984).
T:Little Brown Jug
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:D
F[F/A/][F/A/] [F/A/][F/A/][F/A/][F/A/]|G[GB][G2B2]|
A[E/c/][E/c/] [E/c/][E/c/][E/c/][E/c/]|A[Fd] [d2f2]|
F[F/A/][F/A/] [F/A/][F/A/][F/A/][F/A/]|G[GB][G2B2]|
A[Ec] c/B/c/d/|e[Fd] [F2d2]||f/g/a/f/ d2|fe g2|gc c/d/e/f/|
ed f2|f/g/a/f/ d2|fe g2|{a/}bc c/d/e/f/|ed d2||

OLD JOE CLARK. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Widely known. A Major/Mixolydian (most versions): C Major (Ford): D Mixolydian (Bayard). AEAE (Art Stamper), GDGD, or standard. AB (Bayard): AABB. Bayard (1981) thinks it was originally a song tune that later (or parallelly) became a fiddle standard and playparty tune. Mike Seeger (1983) relates the local story of the origins of the tune where he lives in Rockbridge County, Va.:
***
Joe Clark's father settled around Irish Creek, near South River,
in the early 1800's. Joe Clark had a daughter, and a jilted beau
is said to have written the song, out of jealousy, in the late 1800's.
The Clarks have been family-style string musicians right down
through the years.
***
Another investigation determined the source of the tune to be the murder in Maryland of a traveling salesman named Herbert Brown by Joe Clark and Brown's wife Betsy sometime after the Civil War. Joe and Betsy attempted to cover up the crime by asserting that Brown was on a trip up North. This perhaps explains the verse:
***
Old Joe Clark killed a man
Layed him in the sand.
***
...and the chorus, many versions of which include "goodbye Betsy Brown."
***
The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. Virginia family band "Fiddlin'" Cowan Powers and Family's recording of the piece was the third best-selling country music record of 1924, while the Skillet Lickers (north Georgia) 1926 recording was the fourth best-selling for that year. These and similar ditties were collected with the tune:
***
I has to ride the leadin' mule,
A switch in my right hand;
Gwine to ride with Old Joe Clark,
To a foreign land.
Chorus:
Going around with Old Joe Clark,
Going around I'm gone;
Going around with Old Joe Clark,
Good-bye Lucy Long. (Thede)
***
I don't like Old Joe Clark,
I'll tell you the reason why;
He caught his foot in a panel of my fence
And tore out all my rye. (Bayard)
***
Many old-time fiddlers play the piece in cross-tuning, AEAE, although some, like African-American fiddler Joe Thompson, play it in GDGD.
***
Sources for notated versions: Emmet Newman (Delaware County, Oklahoma) [Thede], Wiley Jobes (Greene County, Pa., and northern W.Va., 1930's) and Walter Ireland (Greene County, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]; Judy Hyman (Ithica, N.Y.) [Phillips]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 161A-B, pgs. 98-99. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 207. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 20. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 121. Frets Magazine, "Mike Seeger: Traditional Music," July 1983; pg. 55. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 16. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 12. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 30-31. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 172 (two versions). Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1979; pg. 38. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 99, pg. 35. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 28-29. AFS 20-21, Wayne Crowley (Louisiana, 1934. A field recording by Alan Lomax). AFS 23, Horace Forman (Louisiana, 1934. A field recording by Alan Lomax. Mr. Forman was elderly, having been born in the mid-19th century). Briar 4202, The Kentucky Colonels- "Living in the Past." Brunswick 313 (78 RPM), Lonnie Austin (1929). County 524, "Da Costa Woltz's Southern Broadcasters, 1927 Recordings." County 723, Cockerham, Jarrell and Jenkins- "Back Home in the Blue Ridge." County CO-CD-2729, Art Stamper - "Goodbye Girls I'm Going to Boston" (2000). Folkways FA 2337, Clark Kessinger- "Live at Union Grove." Folkways FA 2395, New Lost City Ramblers- "Vol. 5." Front Hall 01, Fennigs All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Heritage 080, Enoch Rutherford - "Old Cap'n Rabbit." Marimac 9038, Dan Gellert & Brad Leftwich - "A Moment in Time." MCA 88, Bill Monroe- "Bluegrass Ramble." Poppy PP-LA210-G 0698, Doc Watson- "Two Days in November." Victor 19434 (78 RPM), Fiddlin' Cowan Powers (Russell County, S.W. Va.), also recorded by him for Edison in 1925.
T:Old Joe Clark
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:A
E|[E2A2] [E2A2]|ed [E2c2]|Ac B^G|(E2 E)E|[E2A2] [E2A2]|
ed [E2c2]|Ac BE|[E2A2][EA]||A|[c2e2] [c>e>]f|=gfe>d|ef=gf|
(e2 e)A|e2 e>f|gfe>c|Ac BE|A3||

RAGTIME ANNIE [1]. AKA and see "Raggedy Ann (Rag)," "Bugs in the 'Taters." Old-Time, Canadian; Breakdown. USA, very widely known. D Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & G Major ('C' part). Standard. AAB (Phillips/1989): AA'B (Sweet): AABB (Ford, Welling): AA'BB (Ruth): AA'BB' (Krassen): ABCC (Christeson): AABCC (Jarman, Johnson): AA'BCC' (Reiner & Anick): AA'BBC (Messer): AA'BB'CC (Miskoe & Paul): AA'BB'CC' (Phillips/1995). A popular tune and a staple of the North American fiddling repertoire. "Ragtime Annie is almost certainly a native American dance tune, possibly less than 100 years old" (Krassen, 1973), in fact, rumors persist that it first was heard played by Texas fiddlers around 1900-1910. Guthrie Meade has a similar point of view regarding the tune's antiquity, noting that this very popular piece appears in many relatively modern collections, but not in early ones. Reiner & Anick (1989) suggest the tune is derived from a piano piece called "Raggedy Ann Rag," and catagorize it as a 'Midwest' and 'Southwest' tune. One "Raggedy Ann Rag" was written by Joe "Fingers" Carr and published in 1952, far too late to have been the original for "Ragtime Annie," which was first recorded by Texas fiddler Eck Robertson (along with Henry C. Gilliland) in June, 1922, (backed with "Sally Goodin'" it was the best-selling country music record for that year), and a few years later by the Texas duo Solomon and Hughes. It was later recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's.
***
There is often some confusion among fiddlers whether to play the tune in two or three parts, and both are correct depending on regional taste. Eck Robertson's version was in three parts (the third part changes key to G major) as are many older south-west versions, and some insist this form was once more common that the two-part version often heard in more recent times. Other Texas fiddlers only learned the two-part version. Glen Godsey writes: "Of the fiddlers I knew in Amarillo in the 1940's-1950's, Eck was the only
one who played the third part. I learned only two parts as a kid, and we always played just two parts for the square dances. I only learned the third part many years later from Eck's recording." Little Dixie, Missouri, fiddler Howard Marshall says the third part has been a vital part of the tune in Missouri for many many years, offering that the renowned regional fiddler Taylor McBaine remembered playing it that way as a child in the very early 1920s. Marshall reports that local speculation is that the third part was inserted to relieve a square dance fiddler from the stress of keeping the main part of the tune going through a long set. Some feel the third part is reminiscent of "Little Brown Jug," although there can be considerable variation from fiddler to fiddler in the way third parts are rendered.
***
"Ragtime Annie" was the first tune learned by itinerant West Virginia fiddler John Johnson (1916-1996), originally from Clay County, from fiddler Dorvel Hill who lived in a coal-mining town called Pigtown, not far from Clay, W.Va.
***
I was bashful back then and wouldn't go in anybody's house hardly. I'd
sit on the railroad and listen to Dorvel play the fiddle at night. And I
learned most all of Dorvel's tunes. I just set down there and listened
to all his tunes and then go home and play them. (Michael Kline, Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed. 1999).
***
See the related "Going Uptown." Sources for notated versions: African-American fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Hector Phillips [Reiner & Anick]; Alexander Robertson [Phillips/1995]; transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.) who "played (the tune) way back in Canada" [Miskoe & Paul]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 171-172. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 44. Frets Magazine, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle," July 1980; pg. 64 (includes variations). Jarman, 1944; pgs. 2-3. Johnson, Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 12. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 48-49. Messer, 1980; No. 10, pg. 1 (appears as "Raggedy Ann"). Miskoe & Paul, 1994; pg. 35. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 107. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 131. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 123, pg. 43. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 75. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 5 (with variations). Caney Mountain CEP 212 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.). Columbia 15127-D (78 RPM), 1926, Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers (Posey Rorer, fiddler). County 507, The Kessinger Brothers (Clark Kessinger, fiddler) - "Old Time Fiddle Classics." County 509, "Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers, Vol. 2." County 725, "The Riendeau Family: Old-Time Fiddling from Old New England." County 733, "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways 8826, Pers Four--"Jigs and Reels." Fretless 200a, Yankee Ingenuity--"Kitchen Junket" (1977). Front Hall 01, Bill Spence and Fennigs All-Stars--"The Hammered Dulcimer." Heritage 048, Gordon Tanner - "Georgia Fiddle Bands" (Brandywine 1982). Marimac 9110, Floyd County Ramblers - "It'll Never Happen Again" (orig. rec. 1930). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers Association 002, Taylor McBaine - "Boone County Fiddler" (played in three parts). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling." Rounder 0100, Byron Berline - "Dad's Favorites." Vanguard VSD 79170, "Doc Watson and Son." Victor LPV 552, Eck Robertson - "Early Rural String Bands" (a reissue of the original 1922 recording). Victor 19149 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1922). Victor Vi V-40244 (78 RPM), {Ervin} Solomon & {Joe} Hughes (1929. A twin fiddler version). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999). Voyager, Benny Thomasson - "Say Old Man Can You Play the Fiddle?"
T:Ragtime Annie
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
FE|DFBF AFBF|DFBF A2FE|DEFG ABAF|A2c2c2cB|
ABcA B2cB|ABcA BAcB|ABcd egfe|d2dc d2:|]
fg|a2ab afd2|A6 fg|a2ab agf2|g6 ef|
gfef gfef|gagf e2ef|gagf edcB|A6 fg|
a2ab afdB|A2AB A2 AA|d4 =c4|B6 A2|B2 b2 b2ag|
f2a2 a2gf|A2ef gfec|d2=c2 B2A2||
K:G
:G6 AB|c6 cB|A2f2 f2ef|gfga gedc|D2B2 B2AB|E2 c2 c2cB|
A2f2 f2ef|gfga g2:|
Variant of 'C' part from Dave Barton:
|: "G" B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| "G" gage dBAG
| B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| gfga g4:|

ROCK THE CRADLE JOE [1]. See also related part 'B' of "Sally Ann" (B version). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Patrick & Franklin Counties, Virginia; North Carolina, West Virginia. D Major. Standard. AABB. Most modern "revival" versions of the tune come from the playing of J.W. "Babe" Spangler of Meadows of Dan, Virginia, who recorded it in the late 1940's. The following ditty is sometimes sung to the tune in old-time tradition:
***
('B') Rock the cradle Lucy, rock the cradle low,
Rock the cradle Lucy, Rock the Cradle Joe.
***
Rock the cradle Lucy, rock the cradle high,
Rock the cradle Lucy, don't let that baby cry. (Kuntz)
***
('A') Can't get up, can't get up,
Can't get up in the morning;
What we gonna do if the baby cries?
Rock the cradle Joe.
***
('B') Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock the cradle Joe;
Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock it nice and slow. (Johnson)
***
What'll we do when the baby cries
I don't know;
What'll we do when the baby cries
Rock that cradle Joe.
***
Variations of the words, however, were in tradition as "Uncle Joe Cut Off His Toe," a nursery rhyme which has variants with verses which also resemble some of the "Old Joe Clark" verses:
***
Uncle Joe cut off his toe
And hung it up to dry;
The ladies began to laugh
And Joe began to cry.
***
Chorus:
Rock the cradle, rock the cradle,
Rock the cradle, Joe.
'I will not rock, I shall not rock,
For the baby is not mine.' (Version 'C', Number 97, The Frank C. Brown Collection Of North Carolina Folklore, Volume 3)
***
Lani Herrmann finds a similar verse in the biography of Jennie Devlin (1865-1952) by her granddaughter Katharine D. Newman (Urbana, IL: Univ of Illinois Press, 1995; "an Illini Book"). Allan Lomax recorded this version as a recitation by "Grandma Deb," one of the names by which Jennie Devlin was known. It seems to echo the North Carolina version:
***
O, rock the cradle, John,
O, rock the cradle, John,
There's many a man
Rocks another man's child
When he thinks he's rocking his own.
***
Apparently a "Rocke the Cradle, John" "was licensed by Laurence Price in 1631 in England, and there is an Irish song called "The Old Man Rocking the Cradle." Sources for notated versions: Alan Block (N.H.) [Spandaro]; Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Kuntz]; Babe Sengler (Va.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 232. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician: Occasional Collection of Old-Timey Fiddle Tunes for Hammer Dulcimer, Fiddle, etc), No. 2, 1982/1988; pg. 10. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 333-334. Sing Out, Vol. 36, No. 2, August 1991; pg. 77. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 169. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 16. Tennvale 004, James Leva and Bruce Molsky- "An Anthology." County 201, The Old Virginia Fiddlers- "Rare Recordings 1948-49." June Appal 015, Plank Road String Band- "Vocal and Instrumental Blend." Kicking Mule 213, David Winston- "Southern Clawhammer Banjo."
T:Rock the Cradle Joe [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:D
f/g/|aa/g/ f/e/f/g/|aa/g/ f/e/f/g/|aa/b/ a/g/e|[Af]>[Ag] [Af][Ae]|[Af]f/e/ d/e/g/e/|
ff/e/ de/f/|g/f/e/d/ c/A/B/c/|d>e d:|
|:c/B/|A[A/e/][A/e/] c[c/e/][c/e/]|d/c/d/e/ [d/f/]d/e/f/|g/f/g/f/ g<a|f>g f/e/d/B/|
A[A/e/][A/e/] c[c/e/][c/e/]|d/c/d/e/ [d/f/]d/e/f/|g/f/e/d/ c/A/B/c/|d>e d:|

SALLY JOHNSON [1]. AKA and see "Katy Hill." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Virginia, Kentucky, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Georgia. G Major. Standard. AABB. The title is often confused with "Sally Ann Johnson," a different tune altogether in the same key. Thede says: "One of the fiddlers learned the strains of Sally Johnson in 1884 from a man of seventy who first learned it as a child of ten. It was a well-known tune during his childhood, and today nearly all fiddlers still play this tune." Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner identified it as an "old Texas tune. Buddy Durham, Ft. Worth (Texas) plays it best of all" (Shumway, 1990). The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by folklorist/musicologist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. The Kentucky/Tennessee duo of fiddler Leonard Rutherford and guitarist John Foster recorded the tune for Gennett in 1929, and though the record was issued a copy has never been found. Sources for notated versions: Eck Robertson (Texas) [Brody]; Orville Burns (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Herman Johnson [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 248. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 211. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 92. Columbia 15620 (78 RPM), 1930, Lowe Stokes (north Ga.). County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 517, The Lewis Brothers- "Texas Farewell." County 517, Solomon, Solomon, and Hughes- "Texas Farewell." County 544, Lowe Stokes- "Georgia Fiddle Bands." County 733, Clark Kessinger- "The Legend of Clark Kessinger" (appears as "Sally Ann Johnson"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" Front Hall FHR-017, Michael & McCreesh - "Dance, Like a Wave of the Sea" (1978). Gennett 6913 (78 RPM), Burnett and Rutherford (1929). Global Village C-302, Lazy Aces - "New York City's 1st Annual String Band Contest - November 1984". Marimac 9008, The Lazy Aces - "Still Lazy after all These Years" (1986). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Pete McMahon - "Kansas City Rag." Rounder 0046, Mark O'Connor- "National Junior Fiddle Champion." Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson- "Master Fiddler." Victor 19372 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (Texas) {1922} [appears as "Sallie Johnson"]. Victor Vi V-40244 (78 RPM), {Ervin} Solomon & {Joe} Hughes (1929. A twin fiddle version). Voyager 309, Benny & Jerry Thomasson - "The Weiser Reunion" (1993).

WINDER SLIDE. AKA - "End of the Lane." Old-Time, Breakdown. A modern 'old-time' tune composed around 1980 by Joe LaRose, in the style of Gus and Theodore Clark, who recorded 2 sides in North Georgia about 1930 --"Barrow County Stomp" and "Wimbush Rag." Two versions are played, one from Joe's original recording, covered by Bruce Molsky. A second version was developed by LaRose, who added to the 'B' part of the tune. This latter version was recorded by Rayna Gellert, learned from Bill Dillof. Kerry Blech writes: "Bruce first heard it on a tape sent to him by a friend. Joe's original
recording of it was double tracked guitar and fiddle, with 78rpm surface noise overlaid. The first version he sent around was jokingly titled as by Gus and Theo. Clark. I forwarded it, as is, to many friends, and that is what Bruce apparently received in the mail. WS also was left alongside the other two real 78rpm cuts of the the Clarks, and was at the end of the taped interview with Bert Layne. Bruce later told me that what he found out from me was called "Winder Slide" was untitled on that tape and that he started calling it "The End of the Layne."


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