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The Fiddler's Companion

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A' CHUACHAG. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 106.
T:A' Chuachag
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
e|fedB dBAB|eeed feef|fedB dBAB|defe d2d:|
|:f|aefd eAAB|eeed feef|aefd eAAB|defe d2d:|

A MHISG A CHUR AN NOLIG OIRN (Christmas Carousing). Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 14. The Seaforth Collection. Flying Fish FF 299, Battlefield Band - "There's a Buzz" (1982. Appears as "Christmas Carousal"). Green Linnet GLCD1182, The Tannahill Weavers - "Choice Cuts 1987-1996."
T:A Mhisg a chur an nolig oirn
T:Christmas Carousing
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
a|eAA<A BGGB|A<Afe dBBa|eAA<A BGGB|A<Afe d2d:|
a|fdfa fdfa|eAef dBBf|fdfa fdfa|eAef d2 dg|fdfa fdfa|eAef dBBe|
daaf edef|gage d2d||

A U HINNY BURD. AKA - "A.U.A." English, Air (2/4 time). England, Northumberland. C Major. Standard. AB. Title appears (as "A U A") in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800.
**
Its O but aw ken well
A U hinny burd
The bonny lass o' Benwell,
A U A;
She's lang-legged and mother-like,
A U hinny burd,
See she's rakingup the dyke,
A U A. (Bruce & Stokoe)
**
Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 120.
T:A U Hinny Burd
L:1/8
M:2/4
S: Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:C
G|c2 ec|B2d2|G2 (Bc)|dg BG|cc ec|B2d2|G2 (AB)|c3||c|
(fe) df|ee c2|G2 (Bc)|dg (BG)|fe df|ee c2|G2 (AB)|c3||

ABAIR LÉI GO BHFUIL MÉ. AKA and see "Tell her I am."

ABERARDER RANT. AKA and see "The Farmer's Daughter." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB'. A pipe tune, better known in the 20th century as "The Farmer's Daughter," under which title it first appears in The Seaforth Highlanders (1936). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 70.
T:Aberarder Rant
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
B|d2 ag f2 ef|d2 dB d2 de|d2 ag f2 ef|A<AeA cAA:|
|:B|d2 fd B<BfB|dBfB dBB>c|1 d2 [fg]B B<BfB|c<AeA cAA:|2
dcde faef|A<AeA cAA||

ABERCAIRNY HOUSE [2]. Scottish, Strathspey. C Minor. Standard. AB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 272.
T:Abercairny House
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:C Minor
C|C<c c>G c>d ed/c/|B>cB>G F/E/D/C/ B,>D|C<c c>G c>d ed/c/|
BF/B/ G/F/E/D/ E<C C>G,|C<c c>G c>d ed/c/|B>cB>G F/E/D/C/ B,>D|
C<c c>B c>d ed/c/|d>B g/f/e/d/ e<cc||
|:G|c>de>c g>ce>c|B>df>b f/e/d/c/ B>d|1 c>de>c g>ce>c|d>B g/f/e/d/ e<cc:|2
e>cd>=B c/B/c/d/ ed/c/|B/G/F/E/ D/E/F/G/ E<CC||

ABERCARNEY'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AAB. The melody first appears in McGlashan's Collection. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 25.
T:Abercarney's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Strathspey Reels
K:A Dorian
e|A<A c>(e e)A/B/ ce|G<G B>A G2 GB|A<A c>(e e)A/B/ ce|ae/f/ gB A2 A:|
e|^c>B Af/g/ a>egB|G<G B>A G2 GB|^c>B Af/g/ aegB|ae/f/ gB A2 Ae|
^c>B Af/g/ ae/f/ gB|G<G B>A G>ABG|A>Bc>e d>eg>a|g<e g>B A2 A||

ABERDEEN HUNT. Scottish, Strathspey. G Dorian. Standard. AAB. The Aberdeen Hunt was one of the numerous aristocratic hunt clubs in Scotland in the 18th and 19th centuries which patronized musicians (who, if they were astute, composed tunes in their honor) for their balls and gatherings. The name Aberdeen comes from the Brittonic prefix 'Aber-', meaning 'mouth', coupled with a river name, Don, for a word meaning 'mouth of the Don', over time becoming Aberdeen (Matthews, 1972). Aberdeen was a Pictish village in the 4th century and expanded in the 6th century around the church of St. Machar. Old Aberdeen was made a royal burgh in 1154 by the Scottish king David I. Aberdeen's King's College was founded in 1485 by James IV and built 1500-6. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 197.
T:Aberdeen Hunt
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Minor
D<G G>A B>de>=e|f<d c>B A<fA<F|D<G G>A B>c d<^f|
g<d f>A G2G:|
d|g/a/b g>d B<dg<b|a/b/f/=e/ f<c A>cf>a|g/a/b f>d B<d b>g|
f<d f>A G2 G>d|g/a/b g>d B<dg<b|a/g/f/=e/ f>c A>c f<a|
g<b^f>a g>=ed>c|d>D d/c/B/A/ B<GG||

ABERDEENSHIRE VOLUNTEERS. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887, pg. 53.
T:Aberdeenshire Volunteers, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:D
A,|D<D F>B A<F F>A|B/c/d/c/ B/A/G/F/ G/F/E/D/ C<E|D<D F>B A<F F>A|
(3Bec (3ABc (3dAG (3FGE|D<D F>B A<F F>A|B/c/d/c/ B/A/G/F/ G/F/E/D/ C<E|
D<D F>B A<F F>A|(3Bec (3ABc (d2d)||A|d<d d>g f/g/a/f/ d<f|g<B e>d c<A A>c|
d<d d>g f/g/a/f d>f|(3efg (3ABc d2 d>A|d<d d>g f/g/a/f/ d<f|g<B e>d c<A A>c|
(3dfd (3cec (3BdB (3AGF|(3GAB (3ABc [F2d2] [Fd]||

ABERLOUR'S SQUEEZE. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard. AAB (Marshall, Skye): AABB' (Kerr). Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 104, pg. 13. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 44. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 118. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 82.
T:Aberlour's Squeeze
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B: Stewart-Robertson - The Athole Collection
K:C
d|c2 c>e d>B c2|G<c c>e ~d>ef>g|e<c c>e e/d/c/B/ c<A|A<c G>E D>EF:|
e/f/|g>ce>c g>c e2|g>ce>g a>df>a|g<ce<g c<g e>g|c>A G<E D>E Fe/f/|
g>ce>c g>c e2|~g>c e<g a>df>a|(3efg (3def (3edc (3dcB|(3ABc (3GFE E>EF||

ABE'S RETREAT. AKA and see "The Battle of Bull Run," "Manassas Junction." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, W.Va. A Mixolydian. Standard, AEAE or GDGD (Harvey Sampson). AABB. The alternate title makes it clear that the Abe referred to is Abraham Lincoln, who, as President, was Commander in Chief of the Union army which met a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Bull Run (or, in the South, the Battle of 1st Manassas), Virginia, July 21st, 1861. Another famous West Virginia fiddler, Burl Hammons, plays a similar tune, according to Bill Hicks (1975), and remembers a song connected with the tune having to do with Noah's Ark, with the refrain "forty days and forty nights." Sources for notated versions: collected in the 1950's from W.Va. fiddler Emory Bailey by Dr. Malvin Artley of Elon College, N.C., via the Red Clay Ramblers (N.C.) [Spandaro]; Paul Kotapish (Berkeley, CA, c. 1970's) [Songer]. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997, pg. 17. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 47. Augusta Heritage Recordings AHR-004C, Harvey Sampson and the Big Possum String Band - "Flat Foot in the Ashes" (1986/1994. Learned by Calhoun County, W.Va., fiddler from his father and brother Homer). Cassette C-7625, Wilson Douglas - "Back Porch Symphony." Flying Fish 009, Red Clay Ramblers - "Stolen Love" (1975).
T:Abe's Retreat
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A Mix
AdBG A2 cd|efgd e4|A2BA GABA|G E2 G E4|AcBG A2 cd|efgd e3a|
B2a2g2 ed|c A2 B A4:|
|:a3g agef|g2f2 e4|agba gaba|g e2 g e4|a3g agef|g2f2 e3a|b2a2g2 ed|c A2 B A4:|

ABOUT/ABOOT THE BUSH, WILLY. English, Air (6/4 time). England, Northumberland. B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Bruce & Stokoe (1882) print the words, beginning:
***
Aboot the bush Willy, Aboot the beehive,
Aboot the bush Willy, I'll meet the belyve.
Then to my ten shillings, Add you but a groat,
I'll go to Newcastle, And buy a new coat.
***
Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 110.
T:Aboot the Bush, Willy
L:1/8
M:6/4
S: Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:B_
c2|d2B2c2A2F2c2|d2B2c2 A4c2|d2B2c2A2F2f2|e2c2A2 B4||
c2|d2e2f2A2F2c2|d2e2f2A4c2|d2e2f2A2F2f2|e2c2A2 B4||

ABSENT MINDED MAN, THE (An Fear Dearmadac). AKA and see "The House in/on the Corner," "The Little House around the Corner," "The Royal Irish Jig," O, as I was kissed Yestreen," "The Hare in the Corn," "The Hare in the Corner," "Fhiach an Mhada Rua." Irish, Double Jig. A Major. Standard. AABB. Old Scottish variants can be found in the Trotter Manuscript of 1780 and the Skene Manuscript of c. 1630-1640 under the "Hare in the Corn" title. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 21. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 758, pg. 141. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 254, pg. 56.
T:Absent Minded Man, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (254)
K:A
d|cAc efg|aed c2A|dfd cec|dBB B2d|cAc efg|aed c2A|Bba gfg|aAA A2:|
|:c|ecc Acc|ecc Acc|dBB GBB|dBB GBB|ecc fdd|gee aff|ecc dBG|ABA A2:|

ABSENTMINDED WOMAN, THE (An Bean Dearmadac). Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No 268, pg. 137. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 772, pg. 134.
T:Absent-Minded Woman, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (772)
K:G
G2 GA BGBd|edgd edBA|G2 GA BABd|(3efg dB AGEF|G2 GA BGBd|edgd e2 dB|
dega bage|d2 BG AGED||g2 bg agbg|g2 bg aged|g2 bg agbg|{a}gedB AGED|g2 bg agbg|
g2 bg aged|bgaf {a}gedB|{d}cABG AGED||

ACE AND DEUCE OF PIPERING, THE [1] ("Aon's Do Na Piobaireacda" or "A hAon sa dó na píobaireachta"). Irish, Set or Long Dance (cut time). G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Joyce): AABB (Mulvihill, O'Neill). The title means the highest quality of performance on the Uillean pipes, and the tune was considered "the perfection of music when well played on the bag-pipes, and its correct performance was believed to be a sufficient test of the instrumental skill of a piper" {Joyce). Joyce (1873) specifies hornpipe time for the melody. Source for notated version: noted in 1853 from the whistling of John Dolan, Glenosheen, County Limerick [Joyce]. Joyce, 1890; No. 14, pg. 15. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 8, pg. 111. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 224. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1781, pg. 333. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 956, pg. 164. Reavy (The Music of Corktown). Columbia 35612, "The Chieftains" (1978. Piper Sean Keane incorporates "remnants of what is thought to be an old version of the tune as played by Gareth Barry"). Gael-Linn CEF 045, "Paddy Keenan" (1975).
T:Ace and Deuce of Pipering, The [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Set Dance
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (956)
K:G
dc|B2 cA BGcA|BdcA B2 AG|d2 ec d2 ec|dfec dcBA|e2 fd edcA|
Adde dcBA|BgcA B2 AG|FGAB cBcA|G2 ge fdcA|FGAB {d}cAFG|
AG{A}GF G2 FG|AG{A}GF G2:|
|:GF|G2 =f2 e2f2|G2 =fg fdcA|G2 g2f2g2|d2 ga gfdc|
A2=f2e2f2|d^cde fefg|agfa gfdc|BgcA B2 AG|G2 ge fdcA|
FGAB {d}cAFG|AG{A}GF G2 FG|AG{A}GF G2:|

ACHORACHAN. Scottish, Strathspey. F Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 53.
T:Achorachan
L:1/8
M:C
S:Marshall - 1822 Collection
K:F
f|c>BA>G FCC(D/E/)|FF B/A/G/F/ dGGf|c>BA>G FCC(D/E/)|FFFd c2 A:|
c|fffa cAAc|dB B/A/G/F/ EGGe|f/e/f/g/ fa cAAc|dcAc f2 (fc)|fcfa cAAc|
dB c/A/G/F/ E(GG)A/B/|cABG FCA,C|FFFd c2A||

ACROBAT'S HORNPIPE [1]. AKA - "Acrobat's Clog," "The Nightengale." American, Irish; Hornpipe. B Flat Major ('A' part) & F Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB (Cole, McNulty, Mulvihill): AA'BB (Cranford). The attribution "As performed by G.L.Tracy" appears in Ryan's/Cole's. This tune was called "The Nightengale" until P.T. Barnum began using an adapted version as a theme for his circus acrobats. "Can be used as a Clog" (Cole). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 97. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; pg. 4. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 23. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 35, pg. 99 (appears as "The Acrobat"). Ryan's Mammoth Collection.
T:The Acrobat
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:Bb
F>E|D>FB>c d>Bg>f|(3ecA (3ecA a2a>g|f>=e_e>c A>ag>f|=e>fg>f d>BF>E|
D>FB>c d>Bg>f|(3ecA (3ecA a2a>g|f>=e_e>c A>ag>A|B2b2B2:|
c>B|A>cd>c a>f=e>f|d>Bd>g b>g^f>g|=e>c=B>c ^c>d=ef|(3gf=e (3f=ed c2c>B|
A>cd>c a>f=e>f|d>Bd>g b>g^f>g|=e>c=B>c ^c>d=ef|f2a2f2:|

ACROSS THE BRIDGE TO CONNAUGHT. Irish, Jig and Air. C Major. Standard. AAB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 203, pgs. 100-101.
T:Across the Bridge to Connaught
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:C
g/f/|ecc dcA|Gcc dcA|Gcc cBc|def agf|ecc dcA|Gcc dcA|Gee dcB|c3 c3:|
|:cd|edc edc|Bgf g2f|edc cBc|Bcd G2 c/d/|edc edc|Bgf g2f|edc dcB|c3 [c2c'2]:|

ACTIVE OLD MAN, THE. Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. One part. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 37. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 882, pg. 164.
T:Active Old Man, The
M:6/8
L:1/8
R:Jig
B:O'Neill - Music of Ireland (882)
K:G
(G~GG) GBG|(G~GG) AFD|(G~GG) (G~GG)|GcA {B}AFA|(G~GG) GBG|(G~GG) AFD|G2g
{a}gfe|dcB AFA|G2d {e}dAc|BGB AFA|G2d {e}dAc|(B~BB) AFD|G2d dAc|BGB AFA
|G2g {a}gfe|dcB AFA|G2g {a}gdc|BGB AFA|G2g {a}gdc|(B~BB) AFD|G2g {a}gdc|
BGB AFA|G2g {a}gfe|dcB AFA|def gdf|dfg (G~GG)|efg {a}gd=f|efg| A2g|geg =
fd=f|ece dBd|dcB gfe|dcB AFA||

ADAM BUCKHAN, O! English, Air (4/4 time). England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AB. Bruce and Stokoe print lyrics, beginning:
***
Its doon the Lang Stairs, And strite alang the Close,
All in Baker's Entry, Adam Buckham knows.
O Adam Buckham, O, O Adam Buckham, O;
O Adam Buckham, O, Wiv his bow legs.
***
Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 124.
T:Adam Buckhan O!
L:1/8
M:C
S: Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:D
G|FA (Ac) (dA) (AF)|GB Bc d3z|ce ef (ge) (ed)|cA Bc d3||
Z|{d/e/}f2 ed cA (Ac)|{B/c/}d2 cB AF (FA)|{G/A/}B2 AG FA (dA)|
Bg (ec) d2||

ADIEU TO O'REILLY. Irish, Air (3/4 time). C Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 257, pg. 124.
T:Adieu to O'Reilly
L:1/8
M:3/4
N:"Tenderly"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:C Mixolydian
CD|EFG>edc|BAG>ECD|EFG>EFD|CC C2:|
|:EF|G c e2 dc|dcc>B G2|Gc e>dcB|GA/=B/ c>d|e>dc>BGE|
FAG>EC>D|EFG>EFD|CC C2:|

ADMIRAL BENBOW. English, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AB. Walker (History of Music in England, 1924) dates the tune to about 1700. He points out that the melody is also known as a religious carol {"The Land o' the Leal" (Church of England, English Hymnal, 1906), which is simply "Scots wha hae" sung slowly.} Admiral Benbow was an English admiral who defeated a fleet of French warships in West Indian waters at the turn of the 16th century, the only thing marring the victory was the fact that four of this men-of-war refused to join the fight, instead standing-too to watch. The commanders of those ships did not fare well; two were executed, one imprisoned for life, and the last died before punishment could be meted out. The "Admiral Benbow" is the inn in which we first meet Long John Silver in Robert Louis Stevenson's novel "Kidnapped." See also note for the air "Benbow, the Brother Tar." Chappell collected the ballad from Dale's collection, i. 68. Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times), Vol. 2, 1859; pg. 92.
T:Admiral Benbow
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:G
G>D|G2B2d2|d>c B2 G>A|B2 cB A>G|G4:|
F>G|A2E2 A>G|F>E D2 GD|G2 GABG|c4 BA|
G2B2d2|d>c B2 GA|B2 cB A>G|G4||

AFFAIRE DE PERRODIN, L'. Cajun, Reel. USA. D Major. Standard. AABB. Greenblatt (The Cajun Fiddle Book), 1985; pg. 11.

AFTER THE BLIZZARD. Irish, Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black after weathering the winter of 1996--a particualarly harsh one on the North American east coast. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 311, pg. 166.
T: After the Blizzard
C: (c) B. Black
Q: 325
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: D
A | ded BAF | ADD D2 A | ded cBA | FAd B2 A |
ded cdc | Bcd ABc | dAF EDE | FDD D2 :|
A | eff dcB | Add FED | DFA def | baf e2 A |
eff dcB | Add FED | DFA BGE | FDD D2 :|

AFTER THE SUN GOES DOWN (Tareis Luide Na Greine). AKA and see "Albany Beef," "Buckley's Fancy," "Buckley's Favorite," "From Night Till Morn," "Lord St. Clair's Reel." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1001 & 1850): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 145. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1471, pg. 272. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 700, pg. 124.
T:After the Sun Goes Down
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (700)
K:G
G2 BG EGBG|egfa gedB|G2 BG EGBG|AcBA GE E2|G2 BG DGBG|
egfa gedB|(3efg (3fga gedB|AcBA GE E2||gfeg fedB|gfga bgef|gfeg fedB|
AcBA GE E2|gfeg fedB|gfga beeg|bgaf gedB|AcBA GE E2||

AGGIE WHYTE'S. AKA - "Aggie White's." AKA and see "Father Aheam's," "Paddy Kelly's." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Aggie White was a fiddler player from Ballinakill, County Galway, who lived for many years in New York. She died in the 1960's. The tune was recorded as "Father Aheam's" by James Keane and was printed in Treoir as "Paddy Kelly's." According to the liner notes on Mary Bergin's "Feadoga Stain 2" it would seem that Paddy Kelly composed this tune. Source for notated version: Galway fiddler Aggie White (Mrs. Sean Ryan) [Breathnach]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 342, pg. 182. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 186, pg. 98 (appears as "Gan anim/Untitled"). Green Linnet SIF-1110, Paddy Reynolds - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991).
T: Aggie Whyte's
S: Mike/Mary Rafferty
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
fage d2 Bd | ADFD EFGB | AGAB =cA (3B^cd | eA (3Bcd efge :|
f2 df afdf | f2 df efge | f2 df afdf | eA (3Bcd efge :|

AIGO DE ROTZO, L'. French, Scottish (2/4 time). France, Central France. G Major. Standard. AABB. Stevens (Massif Central), 1987; No. 8.


AIN KIND DEARIE. AKA - "Ain Kind Deary O," "My Ain Kind Dearie," "Own Kind Deary O." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. The tune was known, as are many Scots tunes, in County Donegal, Ireland, as evidenced by the old diary entry of a fiddler named William Allingham, employed as a customs officer but whose vocation was traditional music. He visited a poor fiddler named Tom Read in the (probably Ballyshannon) poorhouse who played for him both "Ain Kind Dearie" and "Paudeen O Rafferty" in November of 1847, the time of the famine. Allingham gave George Petrie several tunes which appear in the latter's collection of Irish music. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 408. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 24. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 294 (appears as "Own Kind Deary O").
T:Ain Kind Dearie
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Gow - 3rd Repository
K:A
B|A>F EF A2 AB|(A/B/c) B>A BFF>B|AFEF A2 Aa|f2 ec eAA:|
f|(ef/g/) ae fe ac|B/B/B c>A BFF>B|A>FEF A2 Aa|f2 ec eAAf|
(ef/g/) ae f>e ac|B/B/B c>A BFFB|AFEF ABce|faef cAA||

AIRCHIE BROWN. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by James Scott Skinner (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1884; pg. 20.
T:Airchie Brown
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:A
f|(eA)ce a2 ec|Bcde f(BB)f|eAce a2 ec|Bcde cAA:|
f|e(aga faea)|da ca bBBf|e(aga faea)|da Ba c(AA)f|
e(aga faea)|da ca b(BB)d|(cA)ce a2 ec|Bcde cAA||

ALABAMA GALS. AKA and see "Round-Town Gals," "Buffalo Gals." Old-Time; Breakdown, Song. USA; north Ga., central Ala. G Major. Standard. AABB. This popular melody was in the repertoire of Fiddlin John Carson (north Ga., 1922) under this title. It was predicted (in the Chilton County {Ala.} News of June 1st, 1922) to "vie with the latest jazz nerve wreckers for first place" at a Chilton County convention (Cauthen, 1990). See note for "Buffalo Gals." African-American fiddler Joe Thompson played this tune in GDGD tuning.
***
I know a gal with a wart on her chin,
Her eyes turned out and her ears turned in;
She's a darned good gal for the shape she's in
And I told her just to come out tonight.
***
Alabama Gals won't you come out tonight,
Come out tonight, come out tonight,
Alabama Gals won't you come out tonight,
And dance by the light of the moon.
***
Source for notated version: Woodring and Neithammer (Pa.) [Kuntz]. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 323. Marimac Cassette, "Tuesday Nite Live."
T:Alabama Gals
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:G
(3D/E/F/|G/)F/G/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/e/d/A/ B/A/B/B/|c/d/c/B/ A/F/A/(^c/|d/)e/d/A/ B(3D/E/F/|
G/F/G/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/e/d/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/e/d/A/ B/G/A|G>G G:|
|:e/f/|g/g/f/f/ e/(A/d/)(e/|e/)f/e/A/ B/A/B|c/d/c/B/ Ad|e/dd/ Be/f/|gf/f/ e/A/d|
e/f/e/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/e/d/c/ B/G/A|G3:|

ALASDAIR MACALISTER. AKA - "Alistair/Allister/Alister MacAlastair/McAlister/Mac Alasdair." AKA and see "Little Katie Kearney." Scottish, Strathspey. A Minor (Kerr, Skye): G Minor (Cole). Standard. AB (Cole): AAB (Athole, Skye): AABB (Hardings). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 126. Hardings All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 165, pg. 52-53. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 53, pg. 9. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 119. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 45.
T:Alasdair Mac Alasdair
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:Aminor
e/d/|c<A A>G E<A A>B|c<A A>B e2 e>d|c<A A>G E<A A>c|
B<G G>B d2 d:|B|c>d e>f g>ag>e|c>de>f ~g2 g>e|c>de>f g>ag>e|
B<G G>B d2 d>B|c>de>f g>ag>e|c>de>f ~g2 g>a|_b>ga>f g>ef>d|
B<G G>B d2 d||

ALDIVALLOCH. AKA - "Aldavaloch." AKA and see "O'er the Muir Amang the Heather." Scottish, Slow Strathspey (first two parts are sometimes played as a reel). D Major. Standard. AABB (Kerr): AABBCCDD (Skye). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 3 (appears as "Aldavaloch"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 23, pg. 5. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 24. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 157.
T:Aldivalloch
M:C
L:1/8
Q:80
K:D
(A,<D) D>E ~D>EDA,|(B,E) E>F {F}G>FED|!
(FA)A>B d>e {de}f>e|{e}d>B (A/2B/2d/2).F/2 E>FED:|!
(A2>d2)d2>e2 {c}d2>e2d2A2|(B2>e2)e2>f2{ef}g>fed|!
{d}f>edB (Ag) f>e|{e}d>B (A/2B/2d/2).F/2 E>FED:|!
A,/2B,/2D/2E/2 D/2A,/2D/2E/2 F/2G/2E/2F/2 (D/2E/2).D/2.A,/2|
(B,/2D/2E/2F/2 E/2)(B,/2E/2F/2) (A/2F/2)(d/2F/2) E>D|!
(D/2E/2F/2G/2) A>B (A/2D/2)F/2A/2 d>e|
(f/2d/2)(e/2B/2) (d/2A/2)(B/2F/2) (E/2F/2G/2).F/2 ED:|!
L:1/16 DD/2 (dc/2d) f>d dc/2d/2 Ddfe d2A2|
E=GB^d (ed).e.f (ga)(fg) {f}e2=d2|!
(fd).e.f (dA).B.d (FA)(EF) (AB).d.e|f>de>B d>AB>F (EFG).F E2D2:|

ALDRIDGE'S ALLEMAND. Scottish, Allemand (2/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. See note for "Aldridge's Hornpipe" [1] for information on Aldridge. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), c. 1780; pg. 37.
T:Aldridge's Allemand
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:McGlashan - Collection of Scots Measures
K:D
f|e/g/e/c/ df|e/g/e/c/ dA|BABc|d/c/d/e/ df|e/g/e/c/ df|e/g/e/c/ dA|
BABc|d3 :|
|:g|f/a/f/d/ f/a/f/d/|g/b/g/e/ g/b/g/e/|f/a/f/d/ f/a/f/d/|e/d/c/B/ Ag|
f/a/f/d/ f/a/f/d/|g/b/g/e/ g/b/g/e/|f/a/f/d/ e/g/e/c/|d3:|

ALDRIDGE'S HORNPIPE [1]. Scottish, Hornpipe. A Major (Cole, Kerr): B Flat Major (Atholl). Standard. AABB (Cole, Emmerson): AA'BB (Kerr). Emmerson (1971) explains that toward the end of the 18th century a genre of tunes gained popularity as vehicles for stage hornpipes "performed by the numerous ent'racte dancers then so much in fashion." The name of the hornpipe derives in all probability from the dancer for whom it was composed, Robert Aldridge, whom Chambers describes as 'a famous pantomimist and dancing master'. A doggerel poem in Gentleman's Magazine (January, 1772) describes him as "a dancer of ease." The Irish born Aldridge was a familiar performer in the theaters of London and Dublin in the 1760's and 1770's, and even seems to have resided in Edinburgh for a time at the end of the 1770's where he is recorded to have founded the Boar Club with the elder Schetky. Alexander McGlashan's 1781 Collection of Scots Measures, Hornpipes, Jigs, Allemands, etc. has several items marked "as danced by Aldridge." Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 86. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 85, pg. 163. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 344, pg. 38. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884.
T:Aldridge's Hornpipe [1]
L:1/8
M:C
K:A
E2|:A2 A2 Acec|defg aecA|BEcE dEcE|BdcB AGFE| A2 A2 Acec|defg aecA|gbge faf^d|
e2 e'2 e2:|
|:cd|ecec eaga|fedc dcBA|GABc defg|afe^d e2 E2|AcAc BdBd|cAce aecA|GEGB dBAG|
A2a2A2:|

ALDRIDGE'S HORNPIPE [2]. Scottish, Hornpipe. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), c. 1780; pg. 36.
T:Aldridge's Hornpipe [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Collection of Scots Measures
K:B_
DC|B,DFB dBFD|CEGc ecGE|DB,FD BF ed|d2 c4 DC|B,DFB dBFD|
CEGc ecGE|DBE_A Ggfe|d2 B4:|
|:ga|bfgb Bdfb|fdcB bfdB|ecge dBfd|d2 c4 BA|BGFE DFBd|FAce BAGF|
g/a/b Bd cAFe|d2 B4:|

ALEXANDER BRODIE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 115.
T:Alexander Brodie
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
f|gefd edcA|gefd B2Bf|gefd edcA|dBAF D2D:|
F|DFAF BGAF|dBAF E/E/E EF|DFAF BGAc|
d/c/B/A/ dF D/D/D DF|DFAF BGAF|dGAF E2Eg|
afge fdec|dBAF D2D||

ALEXANDER'S HORNPIPE. AKA - "Alexanders's," "Alexander's Favourite" "Ballymanus Fair." AKA and see "Byrne's Hornpipe" [2]. Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB (Allan, O'Neill, Sing Out): AA'BB' (Moylan). The tune appears as "Byrne's Hornpipe" in the Feis Ceoil Collection of Traditional Irish Music (1914). Curiously, O'Neill printed it in 1903 in his Music of Ireland, but omitted it from his 1907 Dance Music of Ireland. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 82, pg. 21 (appears as "Alexander's Favourite"). Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 344, pgs. 193-194. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 193. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1683, pg. 313. Sing Out, Vol. 34, #4, Fall 1989; pg. 97. Rounder 1087, Tommy Reck - "From Galway to Dublin" (Reissue of a 78 RPM. Learned from Seamus Ennis).
T:Alexander's Hornpipe
M:C
L:1/8
K:D Major
(3ABc|:dAFA DFAd|fdcd A2ef|gfed edcd|(3efe(3dcB A2(3ABc|\
dAFA DFAd|fdcd A2ef|gfed cABc|1(3dddf2 d2(3ABc:|2(3dddf2 d2AG|:\
FAdA FAdA|GBdB GBdB|Acec Acec|dfaf (3dfd(3BAG|\
FAdA FAdA|GBdB GBdB|Aceg fdec|1(3dddf2 d2AG:|2(3dddf2 d2(3ABc|\

ALL ALIVE [1] (Lan Beoda). Irish, Double Jig. F Minor (Complete Collection...): G Minor (O'Neill {1850}). Standard. AABB. The tune is attributed to blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738), thought Donal O'Sullivan, in his definitive work on the bard could find no incontrovertable evidence of its origin. Complete Collection of Carolan's Irish Tunes, 1984; No. 181, pg. 127. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1105, pg. 208. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 295, pg. 64.
T:All Alive [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill
K:G Minor
G/A/|BdB cAc|B<GG G2A|BdB cdB|A<FF F2A|
B>AB cBc|d2g gfe|d>cB A/B/cA|BGG G2:|
|:A|Bdg fdB|fdB fdB|Acf cAF|cAF cAF|Bdg fdB|
bag fdB|c/d/ec A/B/cA|BGG G2:|

ALL COVERED WITH MOSS (Falaigte Go Leir Le Caonac). AKA and see "Roger the Weaver." Irish, Double Jig. C Major ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part). Standard. AA'BB'. The original title for this tune was unknown, and when a member of Francis O'Neill's traditional Irish music circle, one Sergeant Early (of the Chicago police force) remarked "with evident appreciation, 'Ah, that's well covered with moss'-alluding to its ancient strains" O'Neill seized upon the remark as a convenient title. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 23. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 782, pg. 146. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 58, pg. 26.
T:All Covered with Moss
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (58)
K:G
c2 E EDE|GED DED|c2E EDE|cBc dcA|GED DED|
DED DEF|EDE GAB|1 c3 BAG:|2 c3 BAB||
|:G2A BGB|AGA BGTE|G2A BGB|c3 BAB|1 G2A BGB|
AGA BAB|ded dcB|c3 B2A:|2 GBd gdB|ded dBA|GED GAB|cdc BAG||

ALL HANDS AROUND (Gac Einne Gabail Timceall). Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB (Cranitch, O'Neill/Krassen). Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 73, pg. 153. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; 93. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1188, pg. 224. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 467, pg. 90. Front Hall FHR-024, Fennig's All-Star String Band - "Fennigmania" (1980. Learned from the Gallowglass Ceili Band).
T:All Hands Around
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (467)
K:G
G2 Be d2 Bd|gdBd cAFA|G2 Be d2 Bd|dcAB GDEF|
G2 Be d2 Bd|gdBd cAFA|GBAc (Bcd eg|fdcA G3z:|
|:bagb a2 fa|gfeg fd d2|bagb a2 fa|gfef d2 ga|bagb a2 fa|
gfeg fdBA|GBAc (3Bcd eg|fdcA G3z:|

ALL HANDS UPON DECK. AKA and see "Jimmy at the Helm" (Shetland). English, Scottish; Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AAB. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 160.
T:All Hands Upon Deck
L:1/8
M:C
S:Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:D
d2 fg a2 fd|cecA Aeef|defg ^gafd|edcB Ad d2:|
F2 ED DddF|G2 FE EeeG|GFED Dddf|ebag fd d2|
F2 ED DddF|G2 FE Eeeg|fagf gbag|faea fd d2||

ALL 'ROUND MY HAT [1]. AKA and see "Green Willow." Irish, English; Air and Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). D Dorian. Standard. One part. As "Green Willow," the tune is used for an English country dance, fashioned in 1932.
***
All round my hat I will wear the green willow:
All round my hat for a twelvemonth and a day;
And if anyone should ask me the reason that I wear it,
I'll tell him that my true-love is gone far away. (Joyce).
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 90, pg. 47. Chrysalis CHR 1091, Steeleye Span - "All Around My Hat."
T:All around my hat
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G Dorian
G2 AF G2 f>e|d2 c>A G>F D2|G2 A>F G2 Bc|dcBc d2 d>e|fedc f2 A>G|
GBAG G>F D>E|FEFG F>G A/=B/c|d2 c>A G3z||

ALL THE NIGHT I LAY AWAKE. English, Dance Tune (3/4 time). England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 160.
T:All the Night I Lay Awake
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:A Dorian
e>dBe d/B/A/G/|BggBdg|e>dBg d/B/A/G/|AeeA c2:|
|:Bd e/d/c/B/ d/B/A/G/|Bd e/d/c/B/ dg|Bd e/d/c/B/ d/B/A/G/|
AeeA c2:|
|:G>ABg d/B/A/G/|BggBdg|G>Abg d/B/A/G/|AeeA c2:|
|:GbbG e/f/g/e/|B/c/d/B/ gB d2|BggB e/f/g/e/|AeeA c2:|

ALL THE WAY TO GALWAY [1] ("An Bealach ar fad go Gaillimh" or "An Botar Ar Fad Go Gaillim"). AKA and see "A' the Way to Galloway," "The Sarsfield March," "The Road to Lisdoonvarna," "Slash Away the Pressing Gang," "The March of the Tribes to Galway." Irish (originally), American; Reel or Air. D Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Cole, Stanford/Petrie, Taylor): AAB (O'Neill): AABB (Breathnach). The air was set to a Jacobite era (early 18th century) song and was the precursor to "Yankee Doodle," which it resembles, particularly in the 'B' part. Breathnach (1976) finds the first printing of the tune in Aird's Selections (1780-1803) under the title "The Galway Girls." He quotes Crofton Crocker's The Popular Songs of Ireland (1839) which states "'All the way from Gallaway, early in the morning' is the burden of a popular song descriptive of the march of the Galway militia." See also the Scots relatives "Ciorsdan Mhor", "Big Kirsty", "Miss Stewart Bun Rannoch" and "A' the Way to Galloway." Source for notated version: flute and whistle player Micko Russell (Doolin, Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 282, pg. 144. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 21. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 999, pg. 172. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 849, pg. 212. Chieftains - "Chieftains 3." Green Linnet SIF 3005, The Bothy Band - "Old Hag You Have Killed Me" (1981. A reissue of the 1976 Mulligan LP).
T:All the Way to Galway [1]
L:1/8
M:C
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (999)
K:D Mix
A|d>efd cAA>c|BGGA/B/ cAA>c|d>efd cAA>c|BGAF|D2D:|
G|A>BAG ABcA|G>AGF EFGE|A>BAG ABcd|cAGE D2 DG|
A>BAG ABcA|G>AGF EFGE|A>BAG AddB|cAGE D2D:|

ALL THE WAY TO GALWAY [3]. AKA - "All the ways to Galway." AKA and see "Bhó chiarraloch, An," "The Kerry Cow," "Yankee Doodle." Irish, American; Polka or March. USA; New England, Northwest. D Major (Songer): D Mixolydian (Mallinson). Standard. AABB. A simplified major-key variation of the reel given in #1. Sources for notated versions: set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]; accordion player Dennis Rothrock (Dallas, Oregon) via George Penk [Songer]. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 26, pg. 11. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddler's Repertoire), 1983; No. 66. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997, pg. 19. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 33.
T:All the Way to Galway
L:1/4
M:C
K:D
|:A>BAG|FAD2|EFG (3F/G/F/|EFG^G|A>BAG|FAd>d|cAGE|D2 D2:|
|:d>efd|cAA>c|BG G/A/ B/G/|BA A2|d>efd|cA A>a|bage|d2 d2:|

ALLAN RAMSAY. Scottish, Jig. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Allan Ramsay was the reknowned Scottish composer of several famous works, including the Tea Table Miscellany in the 18th century. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 490. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 26.
T:Allan Ramsay
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Gow - 2nd Repsoitory
K:A
f|e2A ~c2A|c/d/eA c2A|dB=G GBd|=gdB G2f|e2A ~c2A|
c/d/eA c2A|ece eca|ecA A2:|
B|Ace ae=g|fdf edc|(B/c/d)B =GBd|=gdB G2B|Ace ae=g|fdf ecA|cde eca|ecA A2B|Ace ae=g|fdf edc|(B/c/d)B =GBd|=gdB G2f|e2A ~c2A|c/d/eA c2A|c/d/ee eca|ecA A2||

ALLAN'S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Ontario. A Major ('A' part) & E Major ('B' part). Standard. AA'BB'. Perhaps named for Ward Allen, a Canadian fiddler most famous for his tune "Maple Sugar." Source for notated version: fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario), who learned the tune from Canadian 'Down East' fiddling exponent Don Messer [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 37, pg. 49.
T:Allan's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Caremelle Begin - from a transcription of Ontario fiddler Dawson Girdwood
K:A
(c>B)|:A>ce>g a>ec>A|A>df>a e>cA2|(E>G)B>e A>ce>a|B>^df>b e2 (3efg|
a>f=d>f e>(c>A>c)|d>BG>B A>(FD>F)|E>GB>e A>ce>a|1
g>ed>B A2 [c>e>]B:|2 g>ed>B A3 A||
K:E
[B2e2] GB eeBe|gge>g b>ge>g|f2 (f>g) a>fd>f|({g/}f>)ed>c B2 (GA)|
BBGB eeBe|ggeg bge>g|(f/g/f/e/)f>g afdf|1 ({g/}fe) e2 e2 (GA):|2
({g/}fe) e2 c<B||

ALLEMAND DE GRACS. English (?), Country Dance Tune (2/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), c. 1780; pg. 19.
T:Allemand de Gracs
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:McGlashan - Collection of Scots Measures
K:D
Dd/e/ dA|Df/g/ fd|A,e/g/ ec|Dd/e/ dA|Dd/e/ dA|Df/g/ fd|De/g/ ec|d2d2:|
f2 g/f/e/d/|e/A/B/c/ d/e/f/g/|f2 g/f/e/d/|e2 A,2|f2 g/f/e/d/|e/A/B/c/ d/e/f/g/|f2 g/f/e/d/|e2 A,2:|
|:a2 a/b/a/g/|f/e/f/g/ fd|a2 a/b/a/g/|f2 f2|a2 a/b/a/g/|f/e/f/g/ fd|a2 a/b/a/g/|f2 f2:|
|:Gg/b/ ge|Df/a/ fd|A,g/b/ ge|Fa/b/ af|Gg/b/ ge|Df/a/ fd|A,e/g/ ec|d2d2:|

ALLIE CROKER. AKA - "Ally Croaker," "Ally Crocker," "Alley Crocker." AKA and see "Alas My Little Bag," "Stick the Minister," "The Shamrock Cockade." Scottish, Irish, English, American, Canadian; Reel, Country Dance. USA, New England. D Major. Standard. AB (Kerr's, Messer): ABB (Brody): AABB (Miller & Perron, Sloanaker, Sweet). This song, as "Ally Croker," was written and music composed by Lawrence (Larry) Grogan of Johnstown Castle, County Wexford, who was reknowned as a "gentleman piper" and composer of Irish airs (Grogan, by the way, was the first performer on the improved version of the Irish pipes called the uilleann or (archaically) Union pipes). It is his most famous composition. Both the air and song date from 1725, according to Crofton Croker, with single sheet editions of the song from c. 1730 and c. 1740 extent. The lyrics describe the vagarancies of a disappointed suitor of Miss Alicia Croker, the sister of Edward Croker, High Sheriff of County Limerick (for more on Larry Grogan and Alicia Croker see T.C. Croker's Popular Songs of Ireland). It quickly found favor and was adopted by ballad singers, inform Flood (1906) and O'Neill (1913), and was soon introduced into the play Love in a Riddle (1729), Sam Foote's comedy The Englishman in Paris (1753, in which the lyrics were slightly revised and the tune called "Ally Croaker," by which spelling it usually appears after this date), and Kane O'Hara's Midas (1760). The tune was printed by Rutherford c. 1754 in his Choice Collection of 60 Country Dances.
***
In 1803 the air was wedded by George Colman to a song entitled "The Unfortunate Miss Bailey" and Tom Moore used it for his lyric "The Shamrock." The English musicologist Chappell claimed the air was English because of its appearence in "Love in a Riddle," however, Flood asserts Larry Grogan is the author/composer due to a reference to the tune by Pierce Creagh of County Clare in his 1730 "The County of Limerick Buck Hunt." Creagh may have been partisan though, for he and Grogan were great friends (Creagh even named one of his race horses after him-- "Larry Grogan" won at least one purse for its owner). "Allie Crocker/Croaker" continued to be in vogue throughout the century and was the air set to the song "The Shamrock Cockade," popular in Munster with the Irish Volunteers (1774-1784). It is one of the "lost tunes" from William Vicker's 18th century Northumbrian dance tune manuscript. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 21. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 8 (appears as "Ally Croaker"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 9, pg. 22. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 6. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 26, pg. 26. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 135 (Appears as "Alice Crocker's Reel"). Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 47. Fretless 119, Rodney and Randy Miller- "Castles in the Air."
T:Allie Crocker
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
Ad dc d2df|ed cd ef ga|fd dc d2df|ed cB AG FE|
Dd dc d2df|ed cd ef ga|fd dc d2df|ed cd ef ge:|
|:fa a^g a3a|ba gf ef g2|Ag gf g2gb|ag fe de f2|
Ad dd dc cc|cB BB BA AA|Ag gf g3b|ag fe d2d2:|

ALLOWA KIRK. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Joseph Lowe, who published a set of collections in the 1840's. This strathspey has become his most famous composition in Cape Breton, according to Paul Stewart Cranford (1995). Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 166, pg. 47.
T:Allowa Kirk
L:1/8
M:4/4
C:Joseph Lowe
K:G
D|G>ed>B A/GE>A|G>ed>B d/Bg>a|b/2a/2g/2f/2 g>B A>GE/A|G>EF/D {D}G2 G:|
|:f|g>d g/2a/2b a/ee>f|g>d g/2a/2b e/gd>g|c>aB>g a>A AB/2A/2| G>EF>D {D}G2 Gf|
g>d g/2a/2b a/ee>f|(3gab (3agf (3efg (3dcB| (3cac (3BgB a>A AB/2A/2|
G>EF>D {D}G2 G:||

ALLT A' GHOBHAINN. AKA and see "The Smith's Burn." Scottish, Reel. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABB'. Composed by editor James Stewart-Robertson. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 5.
T:Allt a' Ghobhainn
T:Smith's Burn, The
L:1/8
M:C|
C:James Stewart-Robertson
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
e|c2ec fddf|f>ec>A B=GGB|c2ec fddf|ecBc A/A/A A:|
|:g|a2ec fddf|a2ec B/B/B ~B>f|1 a2 ec fddf|ecBc A/A/A A:|2afec fgaf|ecBc A/A/A A|]

ALONG THE OCEAN SHORE. Irish, Slow Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 80, pg. 43.
T:Along the ocean shore
L:1/8
M:C
N:"Slow and tender"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:F
FG|A2 AG FGAB|c4 A2 fe|d2 cA GAGF|D4 C2 FG|A2 AG FGAB|c4d2 fe|
dcAG AGFE|F6||de|f2 ed dfed|e3c A2 de|d2 cA cdeg|f6 FG|A2 AG FGAB|
c4 A2 fe|dedc AGFE|F6||

ALSTON HORNPIPE, THE. AKA and see "The Lancaster and Manchester Hornpipe." English, Scottish; Hornpipe. F Major. Standard. AABB. A clog dance. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 49. Knowles (Northern Lass), 1995; pg. 42.
T:Alston Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C
S:Honeyman - Tutor
K:F
c>B|A>c f4 a>f|e>g b4 g>a|b>ga>f g>ef>a|g>e c4 c>B|A>c f4 a>f|e>g B4 d>B|
A>FB>G A>FG>E|F2 f2 F2:|
|:c>B|A>cf>c a>cf>A|d>BF>D B,2 d>c|=B>dg>d _b>dg>d|e>cG>E C2 c>B|
A>c f4 a>f|e>g B4 d>B|A>FB>G A>FG>E|F2 A2 F2:|

ALWAYS PLEASED. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AABB. The melody first appears in McGlashan's Collection. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1781; pg. 2.
T:Always Pleased
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Strathspey Reels
K:D
E|F<D D>B A>F EA|F<D D>d A>F DE|F<D D>B A>F EA|F<D Dd A>df>d|
e>df>d e>FEA|F>D D>d A>F D2:|
|:g|f<dfg a>feg|f<dfg af>df/g/|a/g/f/e/ d/e/f/g/ a>feg|f<d e>f d>df>d|e>df>d e>FEA|
F<D D>d A>F D:|

ALWAYS WELCOME (Failte A Gcomnuige). Irish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard. AABBCC. The 'A' part of this tune is nearly similar to the American tunes "The Darkey's Dream" (Bayard) and "Old Yeller Hound" (Ford). O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1755, pg. 327. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 211. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 927, pg. 159.
T:Always Welcome
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (927)
K:A
AF|E2 EF A2 AB|cBAB ceeg|fefg agaf|ecBc AFFA|
E2 EF A2 AB|CBAB ceeg|fefg agaf|ecBc A2:|
|:c2|A2 Ac eccf|ecac eccd|B2 Bd fefg|agaf edcB|
A2 Ac eccf|ecac ecce|fefg agaf|ecBc A2:|
|:e2|a2 ga faea|faea fccB|E2 EF AGAB|cBAc BFFe|
a2 ga faea|faea fcce|fefg agaf|ecBc A2:|

ALY GROGAN. Welsh, Jig. G Major. Standard.
T:Aly Grogan
M:6/8
L:1/8
K: G Major
dBG dBG|cAF cAF|B/2c/2dB c>AF|G2G G3:|:
gag gfe|ded dBG|gag efg|A2A A3|gag gfe|ded dBG|B/2c/2dB c>AF|G2G G3:||

AM BODACH LUIDEACH ODHAR. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AABBCCD. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 155.
T:Am Bodach Lúideach Odhar
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
D>DF>D A>DF>D|E/E/E F>A B>AB>d|D/D/D F>D A>DF>D|
E>FE>D B,2 A,>B,:|
|:d>ed>c d>AA>d|B>cd>e f>BB>c|d>ed>B A>Fd>B|A>FE>D B,2 A,>B,:|
|:D>AF>A D>AF>A|E/E/E F>A B>AB>d|D>AF>A A>DF>D|
A,>A G/F/E/D/ B,2 A,>B,:|
d>ed>c d>AA>d|B/A/B/c/ d/c/d/e/ f<B B>c|d>ed>B A>Fd>B|
A>FE>D B,2 A,>B,|d>ed>c d>AA>d|B>cd>e f>BB>c|d>fB>d A>dF>d|
E>FE>D B,2 A,>B||

AM I THE DOCTOR YOU WISHED FOR TO SEE? Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. One part. Joyce suggests Donegal connections for this song.
"Am I the doctor you wished for to see?
Am I the young man you sent for to me?"
"O, yes dearest Willie, you can kill or you can cure:
For the pain that I feel, my dear, is hard to endure."
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 153, pg. 78.
T:Am I the doctor you wished for to see?
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:E_
(3EFG|A2 GF GE CE|F2 E>E E2 GA|B2 cd eBGB|c2 BB B2 GA|
BBcd eBGB|cdec BGE F/G/|A2 GF GE CE|F2 EE E2||

AMBELREE/AMBULREE. AKA - "Amulree." Scottish; Reel. G Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Athole, Gow): AABB'. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 390. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 18 (appears as "Ambelree"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 129, pg. 16. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 177.
T:Ambulree
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
A|B2BG c2cA|B2BG A=FFA|B2BG c2cA|B/c/d e/f/g BGG:|
g|e2 ec d2 dB|A/B/c =f2 A=FFf|e2 ec d2dc|B/c/d e/f/g BGG=f|e2 ec d2dB|
A/_B/c =f2 A=FFf|eeec dddc|B/c/d e/f/g BGG||

AMELIA'S WALTZ [1]. AKA - "Amelia." American, Waltz. USA, New Hampshire. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. This waltz was composed in 1981 by New Hampshire accordionist and composer Bob McQuillen (Peterboro, N.H.) for three-and-a-half year old Amelia Stiles, daughter of Deana Stiles, a flute player friend who played with Dudley Laufman's Canterbury Country Dance Orchestra. McCutcheon relates that "current legend" has it that Amelia was named because of the fact that her family lived in a house built around a shipping crate for Amelia Earhart's plane. Deana Stiles has been a member of Dudley Laufman's Canterbury Country Orchestra and currently plays with McQuillen in the trio "Old New England." The tune has proved quite popular at New England dances, an instant classic. McQuillen apparently prefers the title to be simply "Amelia." Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 12. Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 11. McQuillen, Bob's Notebook #5, 1981. Alcazar FR 2204, Rodney and Randy Miller - "New England Chestnuts, Vol. 2" (1981). BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall." Greenhays GR 710, John McCutcheon - "Fine Times at Our House" (1982. Learned from Rodney and Randy Miller). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Whistlers Music, New England Tradition - "Farewell to the Hollow."
T:Amelia's Waltz
M:3/4
L:1/8
S:Gregory Taylor, Ir-trad, april 1997
K:D
"D"D3E3D2|"D"D2F3E|"Bm"D2F2BF|"F#m"A3FA2|\
"G"B2G3B|"D"A2F3E|"Bm"D2B3^A|"G"B4A2|
"D"D3ED2|"D"D2F3E|"Bm"D2F2BF|"G"B3cD2|\
"G"d2e2f2|"A"e2c2A2 :|"A"A3fag|"D"f2a3b|
"D"a2f2df|"A"e3cb2|"A"A3cfe|"Bm"d3cd|\
"Bm"f3ed2|"F#m"c3BA2|"F#m"F3EF2|"G"G2B3G|
"D"F2A2d2|"A"e3ce2|"D"f2d2f2|"G"g3fg2|\
"D"a2f2e2|"A"a2e2c2|"D"d4 |>|

AMELIA'S WALTZ [2]. Scottish, Waltz. Composed by Scottish index author Charles Gore in honor of his granddaughter.
T:Amelia's Waltz
M:3/4
L:1/8
C:Charlie Gore
Z:Transcribed into ABC format by Larry Warren with permission
K:D
AG|F2A2d2|f2a2f2|g2e2d2|c2A2 Bc|d4 AF|G2 A2B2|A2F2D2|E4 DE|
F2A2F2|G2B2G2|A2c2e2|d2A2dc|B2G2ed|c2A2fe|d4ec|d2 AGFE|
F4 Ad|f4af|g2e2 ed|c2 cB A2|d2 fedc|B2 g2f2|e2B2d2|c4AG|
F2 FGAF|G2 GABG|A4 Bc|d2A2dc|B4ed|c4fe|d2 dece|d3 def|
g3 eag|f2d2ef|e2A2ce|f2d2dc|B3c dB|A2d2f2|f2e2d2|c4AG|
F2 FGAF|d2 defd|gf e2d2|c2A2Bc|d2 AG F2|B2 GF E2|A2e2c2|d4

AMERICAN HORNPIPE [1]. Old-Time, Hornpipe or Breakdown. USA (Arkansas?). D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: James Bryan (Ala.) [Phillips]. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 95, pg. 67. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 179. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 114. Rounder 0215, James Bryan - "The First of May."
T:American Hornpipe
D:First of May by James Bryan
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
FG|ABAG F2AF|G2Bc dAFD|GABA GFED|CDEF E2FG|ABAG F2AF|G2Bc dAFA|
dfeg (3fgf ec|dz dc d2::(3ABc|d2 d2 fedf|edef dAFA|dcde fgaf|
edef e2 (3ABc|dcde (3fgf df|edef dAFA|(3B=CB GB Age^c|d2 d2 d2:|]

AMHRÁN NA LEABHAR (The Song of the Books). AKA and see "Cuan Bhéil Inse," "Valentia Harbor," "Valentia Lament." Irish, Air (4/4 time). E Dorian. Standard. One part. Cranitch relates that the song to this air was written by Tomás Rua Ó Súilleabháin (1785-1848), a poet and musician from Iveragh. Ó Suilleabhain had been a teacher at Caherdaniel and was being transferred to Portmagee. As he was leaving he placed his treasured and huge library of leather bound books on a boat going from Derrynane to Goleen, while he himself travelled by road. The boat struck a rock and was lost, tragically along with the priceless collection of books, prompting Ó Súlleabháin to song. The air is known in modern times as a slow piper's tune. Tomas Ó Canainn's translation goes:
By Valentia harbour I happened once
Near sweet Goleen Dairbhre
To be the master in Portmagee
Where ships set sail for the ocean deep.
Soon all had the sorrowful story then
Of the sturdy craft, lost at Owen Finn,
Sad was my heart for the ship that failed;
Better this land had it survived the gale.
The melody is very popular as a slow air with pipers, though is usually known by the titles "Valentia Lament" or "Cuan Bhéal Inse."
Cranitch (The Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 102. Sceilig Records SRCD 002 Tim Dennehy - "Farewell to Miltown Malbay."
T:Amhrán Na Leabhar (The Song of the Books)
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:Edor
B2|E2 EF G2 A2|Be e5 f|e3 d B3 A|Bc d4 e2|
E3 F G3 F|GA B3 B2 A|G2 E5 D|E5 z B2|
E3 F G2 A2|Be e5 f|e3 d B3 A|Bc d5 z |
E2 EF G3 F|GA B3 B2 A|G2 F E4 D|E5 z e2|
e2 ed e3 d|ef g4 f2|e3 d B3 A|B5 z Bc|
d2 dc d3 c|dd e4 ed|B3 A G3 A|B5 z B2|
E2 EF G2 A2|Be e4 ef|e3 d B3 A|Bc d5 e|
E2 EF G3 F|GA B4 BA|G2 F E4 D|E6 ||

AN OLD MAN HE COURTED ME [3]. Irish, Air (6/8 time). G Major. Standard. AB. "The setting I gave to Dr. Petrie long ago is in Staford/Petrie with my name: but I think the following version better:
***
An old man he courted me fond and lovingly,
An old man he courted me-believe me if you can,
An old man he courted me-to my sorrow he married me,
So, maids, never while you live wed an old man.
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 228, pg. 111.
T:An old man he courted me
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Spirited"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
GF|DGG AGG|de/d/c/A/ cd/c/A/F/|DGG AGG|G/F/G/A/B/c/ d2||B/c/|
dge =fdc|BcA GFD|DdB cd (3c/A/F/|AGG G2||

ANACH CUAIN [3]. Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). E Dorian. Standard.
T:ANACH CUAIN
R:Air
M:3/4
L:1/8
Q:70
K:Edor
Z:transcribed by Paul Keating
E EF|"Em"G2 "Bm"FE3/2 (3F/2E/2D/2|"Bm"d2 "Em"ef ed|

ANCIENT BARONS OF KELRAVOCK, THE (Barain Chulrabhaig). Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. AB (Hunter): AAB (Fraser). "This is complementary to the family of Colonel Rose of Kilravock, one of the most ancient and respectable in the north; a family who have for ages been celebrated not only as lovers of the science of music, but for uncommon proficiency and polished taste" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 183, pg. 75. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 59.
T:Ancient Barons of Kilravock, The
T:Barain Chill-reathaig
L:1/8
M:C
S:Fraser Collection
K:E_
(3E/D/C/|B,>A,G,>A, B,AGe|G>FE>F GCC (3E/D/C/|B,>A,G,>A, B,AGe|
[Ac]>[GB][GB][B,D] [G,3E3] (3E/D/C/|B,>A,G,>A, B,AGe|G>FE>F GCC (B/C/)|
G,EA,F B,AG(e|[Ge]>)([Ac] [Ac]>)([GB] [GB]):|
(3B/c/d/|~e>fg>e B>AGe|G>FE>F GCC (3B/c/d/|~e>fg>e b>geB|
[Ge]>([Ac] [Ac]>)([GB] [G2B2]) (B/c/4d/4 e/4f/4g/4)a/4|
(b/a/)(a/g/) (g/f/)(f/e/) (e/d/)(d/c/) (c/B/)(B/A/)|G>FE>F G>CC>D|
EcDB CAB,G|A,FB,D [G,3E3]||

ANCIENT SPORTS OF THE GLEN, THE (Sealg a's Sùgradh nan gleann). Scottish, Slow Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. AB. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1872; pg. 221.
T:Ancient sports of the glen, The
T: Sealg a's Sùgradh nan gleann
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Fraser Collection
K:D
d>c|(BA) F2A2|(f2 [ce]) z B>c|d2F2A2|B3z d>c|BA F2A2|(f2 [ce])z B>c|
d2F2A2|B3z||d>e|f2d2c2|(e2 [Ac])z d<e|f2d2B2|[A3c3]z a>e|f2B2c2|
([F2A2] B)z d>c|(BA) F2A2|B3 z||

ANDERSON'S RANT. Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard. AAB (Glen): AABBC (Marshall). Composed by the great Scots fiddle-composer William Marshall (1748-1833), and first published in his 1781 Collection, although, according to Glen (1895) it did not appear in his collective and posthumous works. Susan Cowie, in her book The Life and Times of William Marshall (1999), states the reel is dedicated to the Reverend John Anderson, a cleric who helped educate Marshall when he came to Gordon Castle as a young lad (Marshall was said to have only had six months of grammer school education prior to joining the castle staff as house boy). Anderson at one time held both the post of parish minister and commissioner upon the Gordon estates, but when this dual role was challenged by the General Assembly Anderson in 1819 opted to remain commissioner, the more lucrative of the two jobs. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), Vol. 2, 1895; pg. 19. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1781 Collection, pg. 7.
T:Anderson's Rant
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Glen Collection
K:C
CEGE c2 ce|GECE D2 DE|CEGE cdfa|gede c/c/c c2:|
gecg ecge|gece d2d2|gecg ecge|fdge c/c/c c2|gecg ecge|
gece d2d2|GcFc Ecfa|gede c/c/c c2||

ANDERSON'S REEL [1] (Ríl Mhic Aindriú). AKA and see "The Flowers of Redhill," "Michael Anderson's," "The Queen of May," "Pretty Girls of the Village" [2], "The Wild Irishman." Irish, Reel. D Major: D Mixolydian (Breathnach). Standard. AB (Breathnach): AAB. Michael Anderson was a piper from County Sligo and an early 20th century comtemporary of the renowned fiddler Michael Coleman (1891-1945, who highly regarded Anderson's playing, according to Harry Bradshaw in his biography of Coleman). Editor David Taylor (1992) notes this tune is frequently played starting on the 'B' part, "especially when coming from a tune in 'G,'" and is sometimes noted that way (as in Irish Tin Whistle Legends, pg. 44). Sources for notated versions: accordion player Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 170, pg. 89. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 163, pg. 64. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), Vol. 4, No. 10. Taylor (Where's the Crack?), 1992; pg. 4. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 33. Shaskeen - "The Joys of Life." Shanachie 29015, Paddy O'Brien & James Kelly - "Is It Yourself?" (1979).
T: Anderson's
S: J.Kelly - P.O'Brien
Q: 350
R: reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
aged BG G2 | BGdG eGdG | aged BG G2 | BddB ABce |
aged BG G2 | BGdG eGdG | aged BG G2 | BddB A2 ae ||
eaaf g3 d | (3efg af gfed | eaaf g2 ba | gede BAAa |
eaaf g3 d | (3efg af gfga | bgaf gedg | eBdB A4 ||

ANDREW CAREY [1]. AKA - "Andy Carey," "Andrew Carr." AKA and see "Tipperary Hills," "Scotland," "The Yairds o' Finnigirth." Irish, English, Scottish; Hop Jig (slip jig) and Air. England, Northumberland. D Major (Athole, Cole, Gow, Raven, Roche): G Major (Bruce & Stokoe, Vickers). Standard. AAB (Athole, Gow, Hunter): AABB. The tune's title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800./ Appears as a country dance called "Scotland" in Playford (1709), and as a slower version in "The Yairds o' Finnigirth" from the Shetlands. Bruce & Stokoe print lyrics to the tune, beginning:
***
As I went to Newcastle, My journey was not far,
I met with a sailor lad, His name was Andrew Carr.
And hey for Andrew, Andrew, Ho for Andrew Carr,
And hey for Andrew, Andrew, Ho for Andrew Carr.
***
Bruce & Stokoe, Northumbrian Minstrelsy, 1882; pg. 179 (appears as "Andrew Carr"). Charlton Memorial Tune Book, 1956; pg. 17 (appears as "Andrew Carey"). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 78. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 36. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 290. O'Neill (1001 Gems), No. 430 (appears as "Tipperary Hills"). Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 130. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. II, pg. 24. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 138 (appears as "Andrew Carr"). Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 306.
T:Andrew Carr
L:1/8
M:9/8
R:Slip Jig
B:The Athole Collection
K:D Major
F2(A A)FA AFD|G2B Bcd c2A|F2A AFA Bcd|A,2 D DEF E2D:|
d2A ABA AGF|E2e efg f2e|d2A AFA Bcd|A,2D DEF E2D|
d2A ABA AGF|E2e efg f2e|d>cB AFA Bcd|A,2D DEF E2D||
T:Andrew Carr
L:1/8
M:9/8
S:Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:G
B2d dBd dBG|B2e efg f2d|B2d dBd def|g2G GAB A2G:|
|:g2e dBG dBG|g2e ege f2d|gfe dBd def|g2G GAB A2G:|

ANDY DE JARLIS. AKA - "Cape Breton Jig." Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. E Major. Standard. Source for notated version: Northside fiddler Mike McDougall (1928-1982, Ingonish, Cape Breton) via fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton); the tune was untitled until fiddler Johnny Wilmot remembered that the tune had been played by Manitoba fiddler and composer Andy De Jarlis (see "Whiskey Before Breakfast"). Irish musician Karen Tweed calls the tune "Tom Trainor's" after the individual she learned it from. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 244, pg. 70. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Green Linnet GLD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993. Learned by Ciaran Tourish from Jerry Holland, Cape Breaton/Massachusetts fiddler). Kells Music 9501, Dervish - "Playing with Fire" (appears as "Cape Breton Jig").
T:Andy Dejarlis Jig
B:Jerry Holland's Collection
Z:Nigel Gatherer <gatherer@argonet.co.uk>
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:E
EGB EGB|EGB c2 B|EBG EBG|=DFA B2 A|EGB EGB|
EGB c2 a|g2 f Bcd|e3 e2::a|gbg efg|b2 a c3|
f2 g f2 e|dcB c2 B|gbg efg|b2 a c2 g|g2 f Bcd|e3 e2:|]

ANDY DUFFY'S. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by Yonkers, New York, uilleann piper Jerry O'Sullivan. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996.
T: Andy Duffy's
C: Jerry O'Sullivan
Z: transcribed by B.Black
Q: 350
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: G
z |: GED DEG | dge dBG | c2 A BAG | AGE E2 D |
GED DEG | dge dBG | c2 A BdB | AGF GBd :|
g3 GBd | g3 edB | c2 A BAG | AGE E2 D |
|1 g3 GBd | g3 edB | c2 A BdB | AGF GBd :|
|2 GED DEG | dge dBG | c2 A BdB | AGE G2 ||

ANDY McGANN'S REEL [1]. AKA - "Andy McGann's No. 1." Irish, Reel. C Major. Standard. AB. The reel is associated with New York City fiddler Andy McGann, who got it from New York fiddler Lad O'Beirne (who may or may not have composed it). Bill Black (1996) remarks that apparently this tune along with the "Humors of Scariff" were played as "Gan Ainm" (untitled) on a tape made by McGann along with other New York musicians, and, for want of a title were called "McGann's #1 and #2" by the Irish-American music community over the years. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 73, pg. 38. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 65, pg. 150. Nimbus NI5415, Martin O'Connor - "Across the Waters."
T: Andy McGann's #1
S: Andy McGann
C: ? Lad O'Beirne
Z: transcribed by B.Black
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: C
gf || eccB cGEG | FEDC B,DGF | EFGE FAdc | Bg^fg agfg |
eccB cGEG | FEDC B,DGF | EF (3GFE FAdc | Bg^fg eccB ||
c2 gc ecgc | c2 ag ^fgdB | c2 gc ecgc | BG G2 BcdB |
c2 gc ecgc | c2 ag ^fgdB | cg (3g^fg eg (3g^fg | ag^fa g2 ||

ANDY McGANN'S NO. 2. AKA and see "John McGrath's Composition." Irish, Reel. "Andy McGann's No. 2" also refers to "The Humours of Scariff" due to its being famously recorded by McGann, a New York City Irish-American fiddler, with "Andy McGann's" (also known as "Andy McGann's No. 1").
T:Andy McGann's No2
T:John McGrath's Composition
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
d ~F3 AGFE|D2FD EDB,D|A,DFA (3Bcd AF| ~E3 D E2FA|
1 d ~F3 AGFE|DEFD EDB,D|A,DFA (3Bcd AF| EA,CE D2FA:|
2 ~d3 B ~c3 A|~B3 d AGFE|D2FA (3Bcd AF|EA,CE D2FA||
d2 fd edfd|~B3 d AGFE|D2FA (3Bcd AF|1 ~E3 D E2FA|
d2 fd edfd|~B3 d AGFE|D FA (3Bcd AF|EA,CE D2FA:|
2 ~E3 D E2de|faba f ~d3| ~B3 d AGFE|D2FA (3Bcd AF|EA,CE D3 ||

ANDY McGANN'S NO. 42 BUNRATTY REEL. Irish, Reel. E Minor ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part). Standard. AB. The title is McGann's, but the reel was learned from Larry Redican without a name. Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady" (the music is notated in the booklet that comes with the album).
T:Andy McGann's No. 42 Bunratty
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:G
GA|BE{F}ED E{F}EDE|GEDB, (3DED B,D|GE{F}ED E{F}EDE|
G2BG ABGA| B~E3 B,~E3|GEDB, (3DED B,D|GE{F}ED E{F}EDE|
G2BG ADEF||
G2{A}GF GBdc|B2{c}BA BcBA|G{A}G GF GBdc|
(3ABA GB A2 (3DEF| G2{A}GF GBdc|(3BcB Ac ~B3A|G2GF GBdc|
(3ABA GB A6||

ANE IRISH TUNE. Scottish, Old Hornpipe (?).
T:Ane Irish Tune
S:Andrew Adam's Music Book (ms) 1710
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:6/4
L:1/8
K:G
DE G2 G2 G2 G2|A3 BAG E4 D2|DE G2 G2 Bc d2 G2|A4 G G6|
c2 dcBA B2 cBAG|A3 BAG E4 D|DE G2 G2 Bc d2 G2|A4 G G4|]
f4 f2 f4 g2|e3 deg e2 d2 B2|d2 e2 g2 d4 BA|G4 G2 G2 E2 D2|
fefg f2 edef e2|dBde d2 G2 E2 D2|DE G2 G2 Bc d2 G2|A4 G G4|]

ANGELINE THE BAKER. AKA and see "Angeline," "Angelina Baker," "Rocky Road" (N.C.), "Coon Dog" (Va.), "Georgia Row," "Walk up Georgia Row" (?). Old-Time; Song, Breakdown. USA, Virginia. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB. This old time song and tune was derived from a sentimental song by Stephen Foster, called "Angelina Baker," whose lyrics tell about a slave who is parted from her lover when sold. Foster's original song can be heard played by the Critton Hollow Stringband on their album "Sweet Home" (Yodel-Ay-Hee 002). A similar tune, or an alternate title, is the Patrick County, Va., "Coon Dog." The 'revival' version commonly played today by old-time style musicians comes from fiddler J.W. 'Babe' Spangler (1882-1970), of Patrick County, Virginia. See also the related "Little Betty Brown" and "Cousin Sally Brown." The following lyrics can be heard in various recorded versions of the piece:
***
Angeline the Baker, her age is twenty-three (or 'forty-three'),
Feed her candy by the peck but she won't marry me.
***
Tell how I took Angeline down to the county fair,
Her father chased me halfway home and told me to stay there.
***
Angeline the Baker, Angeline I say,
You caused me to weep, caused me to mourn, caused me to wear that (beat on the) old jawbone.
***
Angeline the Baker, She lived on the village green;
And the way that I love her, beats all to be seen.
***
Angeline in handsome, and Angeline is tall,
She broke her little ankle bone from dancing in the hall.
***
She won't do the baking because she is too stout,
She makes cookies by the peck, throws the coffee out.
***
Angeline the Baker, her age is forty-three,
Little children round her feet and a banjo on her knee
***
John J. Sharp knows these lyrics to a melody more like the Foster original:
***
Angeline the baker lived near the village green,
Way I always loved her, beats all you ever seen.
Father was a baker, they called him Uncle Sam,
I never can forget her, no matter where I am.
*** Chorus:
Angeline the baker, age of 43,
Gave her candy by the peck, but she won't marry me.
Angeline the baker, left me here alone,
Left me here to weep a tear, and play on the old jawbone.
***
Said she couldn't do hard work, because she was not stout,
Baked her biscuits every day, before they called me out.
***
Sixteen horses on my team, the old grey went before,
Almost broke Angelines heart to hear the wagons roar.
Angeline the baker, Angeline I know,
Wished I married Angeline twenty years ago.
***
Bought Angeline a brand new dress, neither black nor brown,
It was the color of a stormy cloud, before the rain pours down.
Sixteen horses in my team, the leader he was blind,
Came close to dying, they sold my Angeline.
***
Sources for notated versions: J.W. Spangler (Virginia) [Reiner & Anick]; Wretched Refuse String Band (N.Y.C.) [Brody]; Stuart Duncan [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 22 (2 versions). Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 2. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 26-27. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 341-342. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 15. Reiner & Anick (Old-Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 88. Bay 727, "Kenny Hall and the Sweet Mills String Band." Beet 7003, "Wretched Refuse." County 201, J.W. Spangler (Va.) - "The Old Virginia Fiddlers." Rounder 0400, "Pickin' Around the Cookstove." Spudchucker Productions, Bert Edwards (N.C.) - "Bert's Bombaree" (appears as "Rocky Road"). Rounder C-11565, Stuart Duncan - "Rounder Fiddle" (1990). Tennvale 002, Roaring Fork Ramblers- "Galax 73."
T:Angeline the Baker
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:D
(3B/d/B/|AB d>A|B(d d)(3B/d/B/|AB d/B/A|(B2 B)(B/d/B/|
AB d>(e|f)e d/c/d/(e/|f)e (3d/e/d/B|A>B A:|
|:(a|a)g f/g/e|f/g/f/e/ df|{^g}af (3e/f/e/d|B>d B(a|a)g f/g/e|
f/g/f/e/ d/c/d/e/|{=f}^f e (3d/e/d/B|A3:|

ANGLER, THE. Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. "There was a song to this air which was well known in Linerick, about a young man who went our fishing, and met with better luck than he expected. I have often heard the Limerick people sing to this air Byron's two-verse poem beginning 'I saw thee weep'" (Joyce). The first verse goes:
***
As I roved out one morning down by a river side,
To catch some trout and salmon where the stream did gently glide;
Down by the brook my way I took and there by chance did spy
A lovely maid all in the shade, who smiled and passed me by.
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 10, pg. 8.
T:Angler, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
D2|G2F2E2D2|D3f edBA|B2 G>B AGFG|E6F2|G2 F>G E2D2|d3f e3f|
G2f2 ed^ce|d6 B>d|e3f g2B2|g2 fg e>dBA|G3B AGFG|E6 (3DEF|G2F2E2D2|
d3f edBA|G2 A>B G2G2|G6||

ANGLEWORM WIGGLE. AKA - "Jumping Cactus." Old-Time, Quadrille (4/4 time). USA; Arizona, Michigan. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated tune: dulcimer player Donald Baker via his son (also named Donald Baker and a dulcimer player) who taught it to dulcimer player Bob Spinner when Spinner was age 17. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 7: Michigan Tunes), 1986/87, No. 7; pg. 5. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 44, pg. 16 (appears as "Jumping Cactus, or Angleworm Wiggle").
T:Angleworm Wiggle
T:Jumping Cactus
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:G
[d/b/][d/b/][d/b/][d/b/] [db][ca]|[B/g][B/g/][B/g/][B/g/] [Bg][df]|
[c/e/][c/e/][c/e/][c/e/] [ce][Fd]|cB A2|[c/a/][c/a/][c/a/][c/a/] [ca][Bg]|
[d3f3] (f/e/)|ddef|[B2g2][B2g2]:|
|:GABc|[F3d3] (B/c/)|d(B/c/) dB|[F3A3] AA|DFAc|[c3e3]d|
f>e d(e/f/)|gg gz:|

ANGRY PEELER, THE (An Sitmoar Feargac). AKA and see "Buachailli Bhaile Mhic Anndain," "Carraig an tSiop," "The Cook in the Kitchen," "The Drunken Gaugher," "The Tromore Jig." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. A 'peeler' was, and still sometimes is, a slang term for a policeman in the British Isles, and in America until about 1890. Source for notated version: piper Seosamh Breathnach (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 3, pg. 4 (appears as "Carraig an tSiop"). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 59. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1041, pg. 195. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 251, pg. 56.
T:Angry Peeler, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (251)
K:G
B/c/BA GED|DED GED|BAB dBG|ABA A3|
B/c/BA GED|DED GED|BAB dBG|DEG G3:|
|:B/c/BA Bcd|ege dBG|BAB dBG|FAA A3|B/c/BA Bcd|ege dBG|BAB GED|EGG G3:|

ANN DRONEY'S. Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Soucre for notated version: concertina player Chris Droney (County Clare) [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 307, pg. 164. Chris Droney - "The Fertile Rock."
T: Ann Droney's
S: Chris Droney
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
F | Adcd B2 dB | A2 FD EGFE | D2 FA d3 d | Beed cABd |
Adcd fedc | A2 FD EGFE | DEFA dedB | AFEF D3 :|
e | faaf bfaf | gfed Bd (3dcd | fdad bdad | bafe d3 e |
fdad bdad | gfed Bcde | fgfe dedB | AFEF D3 :|

ANN SHEEHEY'S JIG. Irish, Jig. D Mixolydian. Standard. AABB.
T:Ann Sheehey's Jig
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:D Mix
FG|A2(D F)ED|A2(B c)AF|G2(E {F}E)DE|c2d cAG|
A2(D F)ED|A2(B c)AF|GE(E c)EE|DED D2:|
|:A|d2(e f)ed|e2(d c)AF|G2(E {F}E)DE|c2d cA(G|
A)dd fed|e2(d c)AF|GE(E c)EE|DED D2:|

ANNAMACULEEN REEL (Ríl Eanach Mhic Coilín). Irish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: flute player W. Higgins, 1966 (Mohill, Co. Leitrim, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 194, pg. 101.

ANNE MARIE'S REEL. Canadian, American; Reel. Canada, Ontario. A Major ('A' part) & E Major ('B' part). Standard. AA'BB (Phillips): AABB' (Begin). Sources for notated versions: Don Cameron [Phillips]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario), who learned the tune from Canadian 'Down East' fiddling exponent Don Messer [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 36, pg. 48. Phillips (American Traditional Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 16.
T:Anne Marie's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Caremelle Begin - from a transcription of Ontario fiddler Dawson Girdwood
K:A
A2|:A,>CE>A c>BA>c|e>ag>a f>ae>c|d>Bg>f e>dc>B|A>e^d>f e2e2|
A,>CE>A c>BA>c|e>ag>a f>ae>c|d>Bg>f e>dc>B|A>c(3BcB A2:|
K:E
|:(B>A)|GBeB ceBe|gebe gbeg|(3fgfdf afdf|egfe dcBA|GBeB ceBe|
gebe gbeg|(3fgfdf afdf|1{g/}fe e2 e2:|2 {g/}fe e2 A,2||

ANNEE DE CINQUANTE-SEPT. See "L'Annee de Cinquante-sept."

ANNIE/ANNA IS MY DARLING (Anna thug mi gradh dhuit). Scottish (originally), Canadian; Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard or AEAE. AAB. Composed by Captain Simon Fraser, compiler of the Fraser Collection. The editor of the 1986 edition, Paul Cranford of Cape Breton, says it is a good tune for a "raised bass", or AEAE tuning. The tune "celebrates the beauty of a young lady, in terms which she thinks so very far beyond her due, that she requested her name to remain uncommunicated" (Fraser). Source for notated version: Allan MacDonald (b. 1950, Bangor, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 30, pg. 10. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 16, pg. 5. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 31 (as "Annie is my darling"). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 107. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 19. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993).
T:Anna is My Darling
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
c|A2AE CEAB|cdBc AFFG|A/A/A AE CEAe|cAec B2A:|
d|ce e2 cff2|ecBA BFFd|cee2 cefg|agfe fefg|agfe fgaf|ecdB cAFA|
GAEA CEA,e|cAec B2A||

ANNIE O'BRIEN. Irish, Slow Air ("A Lament," 6/8 time). A Major. Standard. One part. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 198, pg. 98.
T:Annie O'Brien
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Slow and with feeling"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:A
E|A2A A<cc|d2e c2A|B2c A2A|(A3 A2)g|f2f ef g2|a2a e2e|B2A Bcd|(e3 e2)g|
f2f efg|a2a e2e|c2A Bcd|(e3 e2)c|A2A ABc|d2f c2A|B2c A2A|(A3 A2)||

ANOTHER JIG WILL DO (Deanfaid Port Eile). AKA and see "He didn't dance all day," "I whistled and called her back," "That's the time o' day," "Whiskey and Beer." Irish, Slip Jig. D Major. Standard. AAB (Brody): AABB (O'Neill). A common slip jig at modern sessions, popularized by the Boys of the Lough. Boys of the Lough, 1977, pg. 25. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 23. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 86. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1163, pg. 219. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 437, pg. 85. Philo 1026, "Boys of the Lough." Trailer LER 2090, Boys of the Lough, "Second Album."
T:Another Jig Will Do
L:1/8
M:9/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (437)
K:D
ABA A2G F2G|ABA AGF G3|ABA A2G F2G|A2d d2c d3:|
||A2g f2d e2c|A2B =c2d c3|A2g f2d e2c|A2d d2c d3|A2g f2d e2c|
A2B =c2d c2^c|dcA A2G F2G|A2d d2c d3||

ANTIETAM JIG, THE. American, Dance Tune. D Major. Standard. The melody appears in Frank B. Converse's Method for the Banjo (1865).
T:Antietam Jig, The
L:1/8
M:C|
Z:Gary Chapin
K:D
DFzA d>AF2|EGzB e3c|d>ed>B A>BA>F|d>BA>F E2z2|DFzA d>AF2|
EGzB e3c|d>ed>B A>BA>F|E2A2D2z2||
EAzB A>FE>D|B,Bzc d>ed>B|EAzB A>FE>D|d>BA>F E2z2|
EAzB A>FE>D|B,Bzc d>ed>B|B>Ad>B A>BA>F|E2A2 D4||

ANTI-GALLICAN PRIVATEER, THE. English, Air (6/8 time). England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard. AAB. A ballad tune to which Stokoe (1882) prints the lyrics. He says: "In Sykes' Local Records, under the date 1779, March 6th, appears the following record:--'The Anti-gallican privateer, of Newcastle, sailed from Shields on a six months' cruise against the enemies of Great Britain (i.e. France and America), being the first that ever sailed from that port Completely fitted and manned.' This song and air were popular at the time the privateer sailed, but the great expectations to which they gave utterance were in this instance doomed to disappointment, as the vessel returned at the end of her cruise without a prize of any kind to reimburse the speculators in what has been called 'legalized piracy.'" The title was included in Henry Hobson's list of Northumbrian songs and tunes popular c. 1800. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pgs. 122-123.
T:Anti-Gallican Privateer
L:1/8
M:6/8
S: Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:G
B|d2B GAB|c2A F2A|d2B G2E|F2A d2:|
B|d2d d2d|e2f g2f/e/|d2B cBA|G2G G3|
A2B c3|B2d g2f/e/|d2B cBA|G2G G2||

ANT(H)ONY MURRAY('S REEL). AKA and see "Hills of Cape Mabou" (Cnuic Rudha Mhabou), "Lord Murray Strathspey," "Port 'ic Artair" (MacArthur's Tune), "Tilly Plump" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel; Cape Breton, Strathspey. A Major. AEAE. AB. The tune was commonly played in scordatura tuning in Scotland in the 19th century and earlier, and is currently played on Cape Breton in AEAE tuning. "Anthony Murray's Reel" first appears in McGlashan's collection. On Cape Breton the tune is sometimes known as "Christie's Sister" because it was often played following "Christie Cambpell." John Shaw, in the booklet for Topic 12TS354 writes: "According to tradition in the Inverness-Mabou area (the tune) was associated with the family of MacArtair Mor (Big MacArthur) of Mabou Coal Mines, whose father ws born on the Isle of Canna, Inner Hebrides Scotland." Source for notated version: Buddy MacMaster and Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 125. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg 15. ACR4-12940, Buddy MacMaster (Appears as "Traditional Strathspey"). EMI E4 80683, John Morris Rankin - "North Country"(1993. Appears as "Lord Murray Strathspey"). Overton 1829-I-LM 88, Dwayne Cote - "Introduction" (1992. Appears as "Cnuic Rudha Mhabou"). RLP 107, Joe MacLean - "And his Old Time Scottish Fiddle" (c. 1967). Rounder 7009, Doug MacPhee - "Cape Breton Piano"(1977. Appears as "Hills of Cape Mabou"). Topic 12TS354, John Willie Campbell - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (1978. Appears as "Port 'ic Artair"). WRC1-1548, Carl MacKenzie - "And his Sound is Cape Breton"(1981. Appears as "Strathspey").
T:Anthony Murray's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Strathspey Reels (pg. 15)
K:A
E|C>E A2 C>E A2|AFEB B,/B,/B, B,2|CD/E/AE FEAE|F>AEC A,/A,/A, A2:|
c/d/|e>cAe c<A e>c|d>fe>c B/B/B Bc/d/|e>cAe c<A e>c|d>fe>c A/A/A Ac/d/|
e>cAe c<A e>c|egdf c/c/c c>B|FAEF DFCE|A/G/F/E/ Ac, A,/A,/A, A||

ANTRIM LASSES, THE (Cailini Aontroma). Irish, Double Jig. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Bayard identifies this tune as belonging to the "Bung Your Eye" tune family, and gives extensive notes to this large relationship of melodies--see "Lanigan's Ball." O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 41. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 911, pg. 170. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 154, pg. 40.
T:Antrim Lasses
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (154)
K:A
E|A2E Acd|ede ABA|=G2D G>Bc|dcd =G2B|A2E ABd|e2f =gfg|edc Bcd|ecA A2:|
|:a|aga A2a|aga A2=g|=gfg =G2g|=gfg G2B|c2c d2d|e2f =gfg|edc Bcd|ecA A2:|

ANTRIM ROSE (Rós Aontroma). Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by accordion player Paddy O'Brien. Source for notated versions: fiddler James Kelly and accordion player Paddy O'Brien [Black, Breathnach]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 164, pg. 86. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 147, pg. 69. Shanachie 29015, Paddy O'Brien & James Kelly - "Is it yourself?" (1979).
T: Antrim Rose
S: J.Kelly - P.O'Brien
Q: 350
R: reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
de | fd (3dcd edBd | Ad (3dcd AdBd | fd (3dcd edBd | Adgf e2 de |
fd (3dcd edBd | Ad (3dcd AdBd | eaaf gfeg | fedB A2 :|
cd | e3 f edBd | (3efe df efgf | egfd edBd | Addc d2 cd |
e3 f edBd | (3efe df efgf | eaaf gfeg | fedB A2 :|

ANVIL, THE. Shetland, Reel. Similar to the Irish reel "Tam Lin" (Howling Wind) and "The Glasgow Reel."
T:The Anvil
L:1/8
M:C|
K:Am
E2AE EAAE|E2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|
|:edcB ABcd|edcB ABAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|
|:eaed cBAe|eaed cBAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|

ANWICK LODGE. Scottish, Scots Measure. B Flat Major. Standard. AAB. "Very slow" (Gow, 1817). Composed by the Earl of Eglinton. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 14.
T:Anwick Lodge
L:1/8
M:C
S:Gow - 4th Repository
K:B_
d2 d>e f2 f>f|(gf)(ed) c2B2|d2 d>e f2 f>f|(gf)(e>d) (d2c2):|
d2 d>d c3B|c>Bcd (e2c2)|d2 d>d dfed|c3B B4|d2 d>d {d}c3B|
{d}c>Bcd {f}e2c2|d2 d>d (dfe)d|c3B B4||

ANY PRIVATION BUT THIS (Creach na ciadainn). Scottish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AB. "The words to this air are in most collections of Gaelic songs, - and hearing these translated, will explain the occasion and circumstances of 'the privation' to a poet who takes up the subject, better than any recapitulation of the editor, - his first provence being to communicate the airs correctly and intelligibly, in order to establish thier standard, before the poet attempts to attach verses" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 85.
T:Any privation but this
T:Creach na Ciadainn
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Fraser Collection
K:G
G>=F|E2 Dz c2|B2 dz g>e|d2 Bz d>B|A2 Gz G>=F|E2 Dz c2|B2 dz g>e|
D2 Bz d>B|A2 Gz||G>A B2 Bz c>B|A2 Gz D>G|A2 Gz =f>g|a2 gz g>=f|
e2 dz B>c|d2 Bz B>c|d2 g2 d>B|A2 Gz||

ANYTHING FOR JOHN JOE? (Rud ar bith do Seán Joe?). AKA- "Anything for Jonjo." AKA and see "Anything When You Die," "Julia Cliffords," "Ríl an Lisin." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. D Mixolydian (Breathnach, Moylan): D Major (Cranitch, Tubridy). Standard. AB (Cranitch, Tubridy): AAB (Mallinson): AA'B (Breathnach, Moylan). Source Johnny O'Leary usually paired this tune with "Johnny When You Die," calling the pair "The Sliabh Luachra Reels." See also "The Lisheen Reel" (Ríl an Lisín). Source for notated version: fiddlers Julia Clifford & Denis Murphy (west Kerry, Ireland) [Breathnach]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Gneevgullia, Kerry) [Moylan]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 164, pg. 76. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 82. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 6, pg. 3. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 296. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 17. Cladagh Records CC5, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford - "The Star above the Garter" (1969).
T:Anything for John Joe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
AG|F2 AF G2 BG|F2 AF E2 DE|F2 AF G2 BG|ABcA d2 AG|
F2 AF G2 BG|F2 AF E2 DE|F2 AF G2B2|ABcA d3||
e|f2 af e2 de|faaf e2 de|faaf efed|cABc d3e|f2 af e2 d2|faaf e2d2|
defg a2a2|ABcA d2||

APPIN HOUSE [1]. AKA and see "Fit da Gutters" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB'CCDD. There are two turnings of "Appin House" which correspond to two turnings of "Fid da Gutters," from the Shetland island of Whalsay and the playing of the Shetland Fiddle Band. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 94.
T:Appin House [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
E|(D<B,) DE G<D D2|D<B, DE G<B, A2|D<B, DE G<D D2|DE DE FG G:|
|:c<B G/G/G BG G2|BA D/D/D (AD) D2|cB G/G/G BG G2|1 BA D/D/D G2G2:|2
BA DE FG G2||
|:e<d B<g B<d B<g|B<A a<a g<A a<a|e<d B<g B<d B<g|de de fg g2:|
|:e>d e>d c>B G<G|BA DD BA DD|de dc B<G G2|BA DE FG G2:|

APPIN HOUSE [2]. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABBCCD. Although in four parts like version #1 and having some rhythmic and sparse melodic similarities, it does appear to be a different tune. The melody, which first appears in McGlashan's Collection, was commonly played in scordatura tuning in the 19th century. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 33. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 21. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 2.
T:Appin House [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
e|c>A A/A/A cA cA|BF F/F/F BF Bd|cA A/A/A cAcA|B>FB.G A2A,:|
|:C|A,CDC ACDC|A,CDC B,CDF|A,CDC ACDC|DFEG A2A:|
|:d|ceAe ceAc|BF dF BFBd|ceAe ceAc|BFBG A2A:|
||c|A/B/c/d/ ec acec|A/B/c/d/ ec acBc|A/B/c/d/ ec acea|g/a/b ec a2ac|
A/B/c/d/ ec acec|B/c/d/e/ fd bdfd|A/B/c/d/ ec acec|defg a2a||

APRIL'S FOOL. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by Chicago accordion player Jimmy Keane, "to commemorate a dirty trick played on him by Liz Carroll" (Black). Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 134, pg. 70.
T: April's Fool
C: (c) Jimmy Keane
Q: 300
R: jig
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
D | GAB GAB | E2 E E2 D | GAB dBd | edB AGE |
GAB GAB | E2 E E2 D | BeB dBA | BGF G2 :|
A | Bdd dBd | egg gab | age dBG | BdB AGE |
|1 Bdd dBd | egg gab | age dBA | BAF G2 :|
|2 GAB GAB | E2 E E2 D | BeB dBA | BGF G2 :|

ARCHDUKE JOHN OF AUSTRIA. Scottish, Strathspey. D Minor. AABB'. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 214.
T:Archduke John of Austria
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
a|f<d d<c A<d d>f|e>cg>c e/f/g/e/ c<a|f<d d>c A<d d>f|e>c a/g/f/e/ f<dd:|
|:A|d>ef>e d<A A>F|E>cG>c E<C C>A|1 d>e f/g/e/f/ d<A A>F|
E>c A/B/^c/A/ d<DD:|2 D>FE>G F>AG>b|a>A a/g/f/e/ ~f<dd||

ARCHIE MENZIE'S REEL. AKA and see "Bells of St. Louis." Scottish, Canadian, New England; Reel. Canada; Ontario, Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. F Major (Brody, Cranford, Hunter, Perlman, Phillips, Welling): D Major (Begin, Bohrer/Kibler). Standard. AB (Hunter): AABB (most versions). Composed by Scottish musician John Lowe (1797-1866), father of the Joseph Lowe who published a collection in 1840, who also wrote the classic tune "Rachael Rae." Menzies was originally a Norman name, introduced into Scotland in the half-century after the conquest of England by William the Conqueror. It is a very popular tune among Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, fiddlers. Perlman (1996) notes that Prince Edward Island fiddlers often play the 'b' flat notes almost natural at several points in the tune. Sources for notated versions: the late Graham Townsend (d. 1999, Ontario, Canada) [Brody]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ontario) [Begin]; Winston Scotty Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Phillips]; unnamed Canadian fiddler [Bohrer/Kibler]; Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 14, pg. 27 (appears as "Archie Menzies Hornpipe"). Bohrer (Vic Kibler), 1992; No. 11, pg. 11. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 24. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 147, pg. 42. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 259. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 116. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 9. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tune Book), 1976; pg. 17. Avoca 139, Sean Maguire--"Music of Ireland." Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX17). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Celtic 17, "Winston Scotty Fitzgerald." Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend- "Le Violin/ The Fiddle." Rounder 7004, Joseph Cormier- "The Dances Down Home" (1977).
T:Archie Menzies Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:From a transcription by Carmelle Begin of the playing of fiddler Dawson Girdwood.
K:D
A,2|:D2 (A,D) FDA,D|FABc dAFD|({E/F/}E2) (B,E) GEB,E|GABc dBAF|
D2 (A,D) FDA,D|FABc dAFD|G2 (EG) (FE)(DE/F/)|1 EDCE D2 (A,B,/C/):|2
EDCE D2 (3ABc||
|:d2 (A>d) f>DA>d|f>de>c d>AFA|e2 (Be) geBe|gefd e(dc>A)|
d2 (A>d) fdAd|fdec dA FD|G>FE>G F>E (3DEF|1 (3EED C>E D2 (3ABc:|2
E>DC>E D2 (A,B,C||

L'ARDEUR DE PARIS. American, Waltz. D Minor. Standard. Composed by Eric Scott (1924-1991) in 1985, who thought the melody reminiscent of French cafe waltzes. His wife suggest the name, which means "glow of Paris." One part. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 3.

ARDLAMON. Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. AABB. Ardlamon is a place name from County Limerick. "From Davy Cleary, piper and dancing-master, Kilfinane: 1842" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 39, pg. 22.
T:Ardlamon
L:1/8
M:C
R:Hornpipe
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
DGGF G2 Bc|dgfa gdBG|EAAG A2 BA|GFGE DCB,A,|G,GGF GABc|
dgfa gdBG|Eedc BAGF|G2G2 G3z:|
|:Eeed efga|bagf edBA|G2 GA BABd|egfd e/d/BAF|E2 ed e2 ga|
b/c'/baf edBG|Eedc BAGF|G2G2G2:|

ARE YOU WILLING? (An E Do Toil E?) Irish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 150. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1494, pg. 276. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 718, pg. 126.
T:Are You Willing?
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (718)
K:A
A2 EA FAEA|ABcA BABc|A2 EA FAEA|faed cABc|A2 EA FAEA|ABcA BABc|
defg agae|fdBd cA A2||agae fece|dBcA GAFA|agae fgae|fdBd cAAg|aece fece|
dBcA BAFA|A,CEA ceae|fdBd cA A2||

ARGLYE('S) BOWLING GREEN. AKA and see "The Braes of Glencoe." Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard. AB (Gow/Repository): AAB (most versions). The melody appears in the Drummond Castle Manuscript, inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Pert by Dav. Young, 1734," which in the early 1970's was in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle. However, perhaps not aware of that work, Glen finds the earliest appearence of the piece in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 70). It has been suggested that the 'bowling green' title is an Englished corruption of the Gaelic "buaile na greine" (sunny cattle-fold). A melody by this name ("Argile's Bouling Green") appears in the Holmain Manuscript (1710-50), a six-page book of instructions for country dances. The name Argyll derives from the Gaelic 'Airer Gaedel', or 'coast of the Gaels,' and refers to the area of Scotland first invaded by the Irish tribes in the 5th century. Source for notated version: George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Gow (Completre Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 31. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 85, pg. 12. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 120. Perlman, 1996; pg. 119. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 66. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852.
T:Argyle Bowling Green
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
E|C2c2 cded|cdcA G^FED|C2c2 cded|cBcE D3:|
c|GecE GEEA|GecE G2 GA|GecE GEEF|GAGE D2Da|
gec'e geea|gec'e g2ga|gec'e geef|gage d2d||

ARKANSAS JITTERS. American, Breakdown. USA, Arizona. G Major. Standard. AB. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 98, pg. 35.
T:Arkansas Jitters
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:G
G|BB/d/ BB/d/|BGAB|c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|
fdef|g/f/g/a/ ge|d/e/d/c/ B/A/G/A/|BB/d/ BB/d/|BGAB|
c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|fdef|g/f/g/a/ g/f/e/f/|
[d3g3] (g/a/)||ba g/f/e/f/|ag ff/g/|ag f/e/d/e/|fe d/B/G/A/|
BB/d/ BB/d/|BGAB|c/B/c/d/ cB|A3 (3A/B/c/|da/g/ fa/g/|
fdef|g/f/g/a/ g/f/e/f/|[B2g2][Bg]||

ARNOLD'S DUCK. Irish, Jig. D Major ('A' part) & B Minor ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 52, pg. 27.
T: Arnold's Duck
C: (c) B.Black
Q: 300
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: D
A | d2 F AFE | DFB AFE | dcd FAd | BAF E2 A |
d2 F AFE | DEF ABA | dfa gfe | dBB B2 :|
A | BFF cAA | dcd efe | fBB gBB | afe cBA |
BFF cAA | dcd efg | faf ece | dBB B2 :|

AROUND THE HOUSE AND MIND THE DRESSER. Irish, Slide (12/8 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. Ciaran Carson references the title in his book Last Night's Fun (1996), in regards to his observations on the spatial changes a room undergoes during a ceili:
***
When a ceili is made the dimensions of the room change subtly as the
talk includes some news of the outside world. Music starts up, and the
dimensions alter once again as dancers take the floor and those not
dancing make space and squeeze up against each other, backs to the
wall. 'Around the House and Mind the Dresser'. The room seems to
expand or contract in Tardis-like defiance of the laws of time and space. (pg. 114)
***
Shanachie 79026, Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat." Shanachie SHA79027, the Chieftains - "Live."
T:Around the House and Mind the Dresser
M:12/8
L:1/8
C:D Major
S:Trad.
R:slide
D:Chieftains "Live"
Z:Gary Chapin
K:D Major
g|f2d A2=c B2A G2g|f2d ABc d3 d2g|f2d A2=c B2A G3|fag fBc d3 d2:!:a|
f2g agf e2f gfe|f2g agf e3 g3|f2g agf e2f g2{a}g|gfe ABc d3 d2:||

(A)ROUND THE WORLD FOR SPORT [1] (Mor-timcioll an Doman l'e h-Aeract). AKA - "Round the World." AKA and see "Diversion Everywhere," "Fairies are Dancing." Irish, Reel. G Major ('A' part) & E Minor ('B' part). Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen): AABB (Kerr). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 19, pg. 35. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 139. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1442, pg. 267. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 679, pg. 120. Hemisphere 7243 8 31216 25, The Bothy Band - "Celtic Graces" (1994). Mulligan, The Bothy Band - "Out of the Wind into the Sun" (1977).
T:Around the World for Sport [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (679)
K:G
GFGB A2 dc|BdAc|BEEF|GFGB A2 dc|BGAG FDEF|GFGB A2 dc|
(3Bcd Ac BEEF|G2 {A}GF GAB^c|dBAG FD D||f|gfef g2 ef|geag fddf|
gfef gfed|BdAG FDDf|gfef g2 bg|fgag fddf|gbaf gfed|(3B^cd AG FDEF||

ARQUENNIERE, L'. French, Polka. France, Central France. C Major. Standard. AABB. Stevens (Massif Central), 1987; No. 112.

ART O'KEEFFE's [3]. AKA and see "Echoes of Killarney." Irish, Slide.
T:Art O'Keeffe's
T:Echoes of Killarney
D:Denis Murphy, Music from Sliabh Luachra (RTE)
R:slide
M:12/8
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
L:1/8
K:G
B2 A|:GEG G2 A B2 d ege|d2 B BAB g2 B BAB|
GEG G2 A B2 d ege|1 d2 B ABA G3 B2 A:|
2 d2 B ABA G3 G3||
|:gfg edd e2 f g2 e|d2 B BAB g2 B BAB|
gfg edd e2 f g3|BcB ABA G3 G3:|
"variation, bars 2 and 6"|d2 B BAB d2 B BAB|

ARTHUR'S SEAT [2]. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833), first published in his 1781 Collection. Susan Cowie, in her book The Life and Times of William Marshall (1999), writes that Marshall, in his position of House Steward for Gordon Castle, accompanied the Duke of Gordon and his family on their frequent trips to Edinburgh. It was the Duke's custom to climb Arthur's Seat on the first of May with his old friend, Professor Andrew Duncan, a habit they continued into Duncan's eightieth year. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; pg. 2 of 1781 Collection and pg. 38 of 1822 Collection.
T:Arthur's Seat [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Marshall - 1822 Collection
K:E
EGBe gfeg|fgag f/f/f f2|EGBe gfed|ecBG E/E/E E2:|
|:cBeB cBAG|AcBG F/F/F F2|cBeB cBAG|AcBG E/E/E E:|
|:egBg faBa|g>abg f/f/f f2|egBg faBa|g>abg e/e/e e2:|
|:edcB cBAG|AcBG F/F/F F2|edcB cBAG|A>c B<G E/E/E E2:|

ARTHUR'S SEAT [3]. Scottish, Reel. B Minor. Standard. AB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 133.
T:Arthur's Seat [3]
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:B Minor
c|BF F/F/F d2de|cAeA fedc|BF F/F/F d2de|fedc dBBc|BF F/F/F d2de|
cBAa fedc|BF F/F/F d2de|fedc dBB||c|Bbba gfed|caed cAAc|Bbba gfed|
caec dBBc|Bbba gfed|caed cAAc|BFBc dcde|fedc dBB||

AS A THÒISEACH (Be Off MacIntosh!). Scottish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AABB'. Composed by Captain Fraser. Williamson says the title means 'keep it up'. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 83. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 253. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976, pg. 62.
T:As a Thòiseach (Be Off, MacIntosh!)
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:E Minor
^c|dEBE dEB^c|dEBE FDD^c|dEBE GBeB|^cAdA FDD:|
|:f|gebe geef|gebe fddf|1 gebe gefd|^cAdA FDD:|2 ebgb faeg|
f^cdA FDD||

AS I WALKED ON THE ROAD TO SLIGO (Air Mo Ghabháil Dhom Air an m-Bóthar Shligigh). Irish, Jig. G Dorian. Standard. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 123, pg. 62.
T:As I walked on the road to Sligo
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Playful"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G Dorian
D2|G2A B2c|d2e fef|g2G c2B|AcA F2D|G2A B2c|d2e f2d|gab agf|g3g2||ga|
B2g a2f|g2f d2e|f2d c2B|AcA F2D|G2A B2c|def g2 a/g/|fed c2A|G3G2||

AS I WAS WALKING BESIDE DUBLIN (Air Mo Ghabhail Dhom Taoibh Bhaile-atha-cliath). Irish, Moderate Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. "From Lewis O'Brien of Coolfree Co. Limerick: 1845" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 173, pg. 87.
T:As I was walking beside Dublin
T:Air mo ghabhail dhom taoibh Bhile-Atha-Cliath
L:1/8
M:3/4
N:"Moderate time"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
g/f/e|d2 d>cBc|B>AGBdB|A2G2G2|G4G2|Bcdefd|gfedcB|c2d2 e>c|d4 d/e/f|
g2 efg>e|=fedc B2|c2d2 ef|g4 eg|=f>edcBc|BAGBd>B|A2G2G2|G4||

AS WE SAILED FROM THE DOWNS. Irish, Air (3/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. AB. "The song tells of the wreck of a vessel on the coast of the County Down on its way from London to Belfast."
***
As we sailed from the Downs near fair London town,
It's then we had fine pleasant weather;
For two days or three we'd a very calm sea,
And our good ship she wrought with much pleasure.
Buth then rose a fog, and our vessel did log,
You could scarcely observe our slow motion;
When to our surprise the storm did arise,
And the billows did foam through the ocean
***
Source for notated version: "Mr. J. McKenzie of Newtownards, a great lover of Irish Music and of the corresponding folk songs, sent me the (air) about 30 yeards ago" (i.e. 1875). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 319, pg. 149.
T:As we sailed from the downs
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:E_
BA|G2G2G2|F4F2|F2E2E2|A4B2|c2B2A2|B2A2F2|F2E2 BA|G2G2G2|
F4F2|F2E2E2|A4B2|c2B2A2|B2A2F2|F2E2||EF|G2A2B2|e4e2|c2B2c2|
E4 EF|G2A2B2|e2_d2c2|c2 B2 zA|B2A2F2|E4 C2|E2E2F2|A4B2|c2B2A2|
B2A2F2|F2E2||

ASH GROVE (Llwyn Onn). AKA - "Ashtree Grove"?? AKA and see "Sir Watkin William Wynn." Welsh (originally), Scottish, New England; Waltz. C Major (Laufman): G Major (Johnson). Standard. AB (Kerr): AAB (Johnson, Laufman). The air is considered by some to be an early 18th century melody from Wales, perhaps because it is attributed to that country in Gow's Strathspey Reels (book 4, pg. 24), where it appears as "Sir Watkin William Wynn." In fact the earliest Welsh printing is not until Jones's Bardic Museum (1802), where it is given that it was named after 'Mr. Jones's mansion near Wrexham'. Robin Huw Bowen says it is played in the form 'theme and variations', a form poular with Welsh harpists of the early 18th century. It appears under different guises in period publications and can be found in Gay's Beggar's Opera (1729) and in the repertoire of Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). "The Ash Grove" was used as a vehicle for English morris dancing, and various words were set to it, bawdy and otherwise. One set begins:
***
Down yonder green valley, where streamlets meander
Where twilight is fading, I pensively rove--
Or at the bright noontide, in solitude wander
Amid the dark shade of the lonely ash tree.
***
Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), No. 1, 1991; pg. 1. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 309, pg. 33. Laufman (Okay, Let's Try a Contra, Men on the Right, Ladies on the Left, Up and Down the Hall), 1973; pg. 23. Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 13. Flying Fish FF70610, Robin Huw Bowen - "Telyn Berseiniol Fy Ngwlad/The Sweet Harp of My Land" (1996). Green Mountain Volunteers - "New England Country Dance Music."
T:Ash Grove
R:Waltz
C:Trad.
M:3/4
L:1/8
K:D
|:"A"A|"D"d2f2ag|f2d2d2|"G"e2gfed|"A"c2A2A2|"D"d2fedc|"G"B2G2B2|"D"A2d2"
A"c2|"D"d4:||:efg||"D"a2fgab|a2g2f2|"A7"g2efga|g2f2e2|"D"f2defg|"Bm"f2e2
d2|"A"c2a2^"E"g2|"A"a4A|"D"d2f2ag|f2d2d2|"G"e2gfed|"A"c2A2A2|"D"d2fedc|"
G"B2G2B2|"D"A2d2"A"c2|"D"d4:||

ASHMOLEAN HOUSE (Teach Ashmolean). AKA - "Ash Maley House." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Belfast. D Major. Standard. AABB. Breathnach (1996) attributes the composition to Belfast/Derrylin, County Fermanagh, fiddler Tommy Gunn. The Ashmolean is the university museum of Oxford, University, England. A cousin to the tune "Mullingar Races." Sources for notated version: Martin Mulvihill (Bronx, NY), Joe & Willie Kelly, Jerry O'Sullivan (Yonkers, NY) [Black]; County Fermanagh & Belfast fiddler Tommy Gunn via the mid-20th century Liam Donnolly (County Tyrone & Belfast) collection [Breathnach]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 87, pg. 45. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 200, pg. 92. Taylor (Crossroads Dance), 1992; No. 25, pg. 19. Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet SIF-1074, Jerry O'Sullivan - "The Invasion" (1987). Green Linnet SIF-104, Jerry O'Sullivan - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the Best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998. Appears as "Ashmaleen House"). Shaskeen - "My Love is in America."
X:1
T: Ashmolean House
C: Tommy Gunn
S: J. O'Sullivan / Kelly Bros.
Z: transcribed by B.Black
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
AF F2 EDB,A, | D2 FD FA A2 | defd efdB | AFDE FE E2 |
AF F2 EDB,A, | D2 FD FAAB | ABde dBAF | A,CEG FD D2 :|
defg a3 b | afdf eB (3BAB | defg a3 b | afdf e3 f |
fd (3ddd ad (3ddd | edBd egfe | dBAF A3 F | A,CEG FD D2 :|
X:2
T:Ashmolean, the
C:Tommy Sands
R:reel
S:Mike Rafferty
H:The Ashmolean is a museum in York (UK),
H:named after its founder, a fellow named Ashmole.
N:Ashmolean House title courtesy of Andrew Kuntz.
D:Jerry O'Sullivan
Z:Lesl Harker [lmh@rcons.com]
M:C
L:1/8
K:Dmix
d3B|:AF~F2 EDBA|D2ED FA A2|defd efdB|AFDE FEE2|
AF~F2 EDBA|D2EDFA A2|ABde dBA2|BDEG FDD2:|
|:defg a~a2b|afdf edBA|defg a2ab|afdf e2eg|
fdd2 Addf|edAd e2fe|dBAF A~A3|BDEG FDD2:|
X:3
T:Ashmolean House
R:reel
C:Tommy Gunn (fiddle), Derrylin, Co. Fermanagh
B:Ceol Rince na hÉireann 4, no. 200
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
AF (3FFF EDB,A,|D2 (3FED FAAB|defd efdB|AFDE FEEE|
AF (3FFF EDB,A,|D2 (3FED FAAB|ABde dBAF|A,B,DF ED D2:|:
defg a2 ab|afdf eB{c}BA|defg a2 ab|afdf {g}feef|
fd (3ddd ad (3ddd|edBd egfe|dBAF ABAF|A,B,DF ED D2:|
X:4
T:Ashmolean House
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Bill Reeder
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
"D"AF~F2 EDBA|"D"D2 (3FED FAA2|"D"d2 fd efdB|"D"AFDE "A"FEE2|!
"D"AF~F2 EDBA|"D"D2 (3FED FAAB|"D"ABde dBAF|"A"AFEG "D"FDD2:||!
"D"defg a2ab|"D"afdf "Em"eBB2|"D"defg a2ab|"D"afdf "A"e4|!
"D"fd~d2 Ad~d2|"A"ed^cd egfe|"D"dBAF A2AB|"A"AFEG "D"FDD2:||

ASHPLANT [1]. AKA and see "An Maide Fuinnseoige." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Co. Sligo. E Minor. Standard. AB (Breathnach, Flaherty, McNulty): AABB (Carlin, Miller & Perron). An ashplant was the name for a common implement among farmers and drovers of cattle in Ireland, made from a sapling of an ash tree. The root ball would be trimmed to a knob which fit easily in the hand, and the length trimmed into a switch. It would be applied to the hide of the buttocks of an animal as a means of motivating and steering them. The implement has been known to be employed in brawls on fair days, grasped at the opposite end with the knob then the business end! Sources for notated versions: piper Pat Brophy (Ireland) [Breathnach]; flute player Noel Tansey (b. 1940, Cuilmore, Co. Sligo, Ireland) [Flaherty]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 116, pg. 48. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 211, pg. 124. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 94. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 5. Miller & Perron (Traditional Irish Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 63. Gael-Linn CEF 114, Noel Hill & Tony MacMahon - "I gCnoc na Graí." Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969).
T:Ashplant, The
R:reel
D:Noel Hill & Tony McMahon: \'I gCnoc na Gra\'I
L:1/8
M:C|
K:Edor
BE~E2 BAGA|BE~E2 ~G3A|1 BE~E2 BABd|gedB A2GA:|2 ~B3A (3Bcd ef|gedB A2GA||
|:B2eB fBeB|~B2ed BAGA|1 B2eB ~f3d|efdB A2GA:|2 (3Bcd ef ~g3a|gedB A2GA||

ASK ME/MY FATHER ("Fiafraigh de m'Athair é" or "Fiafruig Do'm Ataire"). AKA and see "With All My Heart." Irish, Single Jig (6/8 or 12/8 time) or Slide (12/8 time). D Major (O'Neill): D Mixolydian (Breathnach, Mitchell). Standard. AB (Breathnach): AA'B (Mitchell): AABB (O'Neill). See also "Will you come home with me/Tiocfaidh ty Abhaile liom," where the fourth part of Breathnach's version is related to the second part of "Ask My Father." Sources for notated versions: Chicago police patrolman, piper and flute player John Ennis, originally from County Kildare [O'Neill]; piper Seán Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 62, pg. 27. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 143, pg. 113. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 941, pg. 175. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 367, pg. 75. Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976).
T:Ask My Father
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (367)
K:G
A2G|F2D DED|A2D DED|ABA B2G|ABA A2G|F2D DED|A2D DED|G2B A2F|G3:|
|:z2g|f2d efg|f2d cAG|ABA B2G|ABA A2g|f2d efg|f2d cAF|G2B A2F|G3:|

ATHOLE BROSE. AKA and see "Buckingham House," "The Dogs Amongst the Bushes," "Niel Gow's Favorite." Scottish, Canadian; Reel or Strathspey. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. D Mixolydian or D Mixolydian/Major (Dunlay & Greenberg, Perlman). Standard. ABB (Skye): AABB (Gow, Kerr): AA'BB (Athole): AA'BB' (Perlman). "Athole Brose is, according to one recipe, a drink made from the water in which oatmeal has been soaked, mixed with honey and whisky. Stirred with a silver spoon, it is bottled and kept until needed" (Alburger, 1983). Alburger (1983) and Collinson (1966) credit composition to Abraham MacIntosh {b. 1769} (whose father was Robert 'Red Rob' Macintosh, also a fiddler and composer of notable ability), who first published it under the title "Buckingham House," first appearing in his father's Third Book. Glen (1891) and Emmerson (1971) remark that such belief is largely based on an ascription to 'Mackintosh, junior' in his father's third book, though it could refer to Abraham's brother Robert (though the latter did not publish any collection). Since the sub-title was "Niel Gow's Favourite," and it appears in Gow's Third Collection of Strathspey Reels (Edinburgh, 1792), it has often been mistakenly credited to that famous fiddler. The following lines appear in Alexander Whitelaw's Book of Scottish Song (1844):
***
You've surely heard o' the famous Niel,
The man that played the fiddle weel;
I wat he was a canty chiel,
And dearly loved the whisky, O
And aye sin' he wore tartan hose,
He dearly lo'ed the Athole Brose;
And wae was he, yu may suppose,
To bed 'farewell to whisky', O.
***
Cape Breton fiddlers play it as a strathspey in the key of D, where it is often the vehicle for stepdancing. It is also often the practice on the island to play the reel "General Stewart" (AKA "Lady Muir MacKenzie") following it (Dunlay & Greenberg, 1996). Cape Breton fiddler Jackie Dunn, in her thesis "Tha Bals na Gaidhlig air a h-Uile Fidhleir" (The Sound of Gaelic is in the Fiddler's Music), 1991, remarks that there is known to have been Gaelic words to "Athole Brose." In Ireland the melody is known as "The Dogs Amongst the Bushes." Sources for notated versions: Fr. Angus Morris (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; Peter Chaisson, Jr. (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 73, pg. 111. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 5. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 75. Gow (Collection), 1792. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 148, pg. 17. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 73 & 74. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 189. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 118. ATL 8835, Dave MacIsaac & Scott MacMillan - "Live" (1993). CAT-WMR004, Wendy MacIsaac - "The 'Reel' Thing" (1994). Decca 14030, CX 005, Angus Allan Gillis (c. 1936). DMP6-27-2-4, Doug MacPhee - "The Reel of Tulloch" (1985). Nimbus NI 5383, Buddy MacMaster - "Traditional Music from Cape Breton Island" (1993). Paddledoo Music PAD 105, Alasdair Fraser - "Scottish Fiddle Rally, Concert Highlights 1985-1995" (1996).
T:Athole Brose
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
A|:F>D D/D/D A,>DD>G|F>D D/D/D G<B A>G|1 F>D D/D/D A,<D D>=F|
E/=F/G C>E c>GE>G:|2 F>D D/D/D A,<D D>=F|E/=F/G C>E c<G E>C||
|:D<d d>c d>ed>c|A<d d>e =f>de>c|dd=f>d e>df>d|=c>dc>G E<C G>E:|

ATHOLE CUMMERS, THE [1]. AKA and see "Bog An Lochan." Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor. Standard. AABBCDD' (Kerr): AA'BB'CD (Athole). The title first appears in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 78), according to Glen. Athole (or Atholl) derives from the Gaelic ath Fodla, generally translated as New Ireland, and stems from the first invasion of the northern land by the Irish tribe the Scots in the 7th century (Matthews, 1972). The Scottish dialect word 'cummer' probably refers to a girl or woman, the title then meaning 'Athole Lasses'. It has been suggested that 'cummer' was derived from the Old French word 'commere', which itself is probably an elided form of 'comme mere', which translates as "like mother." Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; 4th Set, No. 3, pg. 5. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg. 10. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 252.
T:Athole Cummers
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:E Minor
F|:E/E/E ~E2 E>FB>F|E/E/E ~E2 F<D A>F|E/E/E ~E2 D>FB>A|1
B<d A>d F>DA>F:|2 B<dA<d F<D D>d||
|:B<E B>A B<E E>e|B<E B>A F<D D>d|B<E B>A d>ef>e|1
d/^c/B/A/ d>A F<D D>d:|2 d/^c/B/A/ d>A F<D D>f||
e/e/e e2 d>fb>f|e/e/e e2 f>da>f|e/e/e d2 d>fb>f|g<eb<e df/g/ a>f|
g>eb>e g<e b>e|g<e b>e df/g/ a<f|g<eb<e d>ef>e|d/^c/B/A/ d>A F<DD<d||
B<E B>A B<E E>e|B<E B>A F<D D>d|B<E B>A d>ef>e|
d/^c/B/A/ d>A F<D D>d|B<E B>A B<E E>e|B<E B>A F<D D>d|
B<E B>A d>ef>e|d/^c/B/A/ dA F>DD||

ATHOL(L) HOUSE. AKA - "Athole House." Scottish, Reel. F Major. Standard. AAB. One of the most famous compositions of Edingburgh music teacher Daniel (or perhaps Donald) Dow (c. 1783). Little is known about Dow, who was born in Kirkmichael, Perthshire, but "his compositions were highly esteemed in their time and still live" (Emmerson, 1971). The tune was originally published as a country dance in the Edinburgh Magazine and Review in 1773. Originally printed without dotted rhythms, the Gows later added them in places to change the tune to a strathspey (Alburger says this may illustrate Niel Gow's up-driven bowing style). The piece first appears published by Dow (pg. 1) in his c. 1775 collection.
***
Athole (or Atholl) House was the seat of the Duke of Atholl, who in the mid-18th century was the first patron of the famous Scots fiddler and composer Niel Gow, who besides his noted skill on his instrument, also possessed an earthy frankness and who was not intimidated by social standing. On one occasion when he was playing for dancing at Atholl, a portion of the invited party lingered in the ballroom, loath to forsake the dancing. Gow, not impressed with the fashionable indifference to the waiting supper, soon became exasperated and called out to the remaining crowd: "Gang doun to your supper, ye daft limmers, and dinna hand me reelin' here, as if hunger and drouth were unkent i' the land--a'body can naethin' done for you!" The name Athole (or Atholl) derives from the Gaelic ath Fodla, generally translated as New Ireland, and stems from the first invasion of the northern land by the Irish tribe the Scots in the 7th century (Matthews, 1972).
***
Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 60, pg. 97. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), Vol. II, 1895; pg. 25. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 31. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 151. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 27. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 211.
T:Athole House
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
f|cFAF cF d/c/B/A/|cFAF EGGf|cFAF cAfc|d/c/B/A/ cC DFF:|
c|~f2 a/g/f/e/ fcAc|Fc d/c/B/A/ BGGc|~f2 a/g/f/e/ fcAc|d/e/f e/f/g cf~fc|
fcaf ecbg|afcf eggb|afcf dBGB|AFcC DF~F||

ATHOLE HOUSE. See "Athol(l) House."

ATHOLE LADS. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. ABB'. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pgs. 24-25. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 12.
T:Athole Lads, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:A
e|c2 Ac/d/ ecAB|c2 Ac/d/ ecBd|c2 Ac/d/ ecAa|acA>f ecB>e|c2 Ac/d/ ecAB|
c2 A/c/d/ ecBd|c2 Ac/d/ ecAa|ace>c acBe||c2 Af/g/ acAB|c2 Af/g/ acBd|
c2 Af/g/ acAa|acAf ecBe|c2 Af/g/ acAB|c2 Af/g/ acBd|cAAf efae|faef ceBe||
cA A/A/A e>cAB|cA A/A/A e>CBd|c>A A/A/A e>cAa|AcAf e>cBe|
c>A A/A/A e>cAB|c>A A/A/A ecBd|cAAf efae|faef ceBe||c>A a>a acAB|
cA a>a acBd|c>A a>a acAa|acec acBe|c>A a>a acAB|c>A a>a acBd|
cA aA a>bae|faef ceBe||c<A E>f ecAB|c<A E>f ecBd|c<A E>f ecAa|
acAf ecBe|c<A E>f ecAB|c<A E>f ecBd|c<A E>f efae|faef ceBe||
c<A a>b acAB|c<A ~a>B acBd|c<A a>a a>bae|faef ceBe|c<A ~a>b acAB|
c<A a>b acBd|c<A aA aba>e|fag>e ceBe||
T:Athole Lads
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
e/d/|c2 (ef ecAd|c2 (ef ecBd|c2 (ef ecce|fddf ecAd|c2 (ef ecAd|
c2 (ef ecBd|c2 (ef efae|faef ecBd|: cA A/A/A ecAd|cA A/A/A ecBd|1
cA A/A/A ecce|fddf ecAd:|2 cA A/A/A efae|faef ecBd||

ATHOLE'S BONNIE LASSES. Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by James Stewart-Robertson, editor of The Athole Collection. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 167, pg. 66. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 96. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 180.
T:Athole's Bonnie Lasses
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
C:James Stewart-Robertson
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B|G2DG B,G,DB,|A,A,EA, AA,EA|G2DG B,G,DB,|EGFA BGG:|
c|BG B/c/d g2dB|cedB cAAc|BG B/c/d g2 dB|cedc BGGc|BG B/c/d g2dB|
cedB cAAB|GDEG DGB,G|EGFA BGG||

ATHOLE'S HONEST MEN. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by James Stewart Robertson, editor of The Athole Collection, who included 25 of his own compostions along with mostly traditional tunes. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 37, pg. 7. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 95. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 180.
T:Athole's Honest Men
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
C:James Stewart-Robertson
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
D|G2 D>G D<G, B,>G,|A,<A,C<A, E<A,C<A,|G2 D>E D<C B,>D|
(3EFG (3FGA B<GG:|
B|G<G B>d g>dB>G|(3cde (3dcB c>AA>B|G<GB<d g>dB>G|
c>ed>B G/G/G G>B|G<G B>d g>dB>G|(3cde (3dcB c<AA>B|
G>DB,>G (3B,CD (3EFG|(3ABc (3BdA B<GG||

ATLANTIC WAVE, THE. AKA and see "The Atlantic Hornpipe," "Atlantic Roar," "Tuam na Farraige." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composition credited to Martin Muhaire in publisher Mel Bay's Irish Session Tune Book. Sources for notated versions: Gus Collins (Bronx, NY) [Mulvihill]; Donegal fiddler John Doherty [Jordan]. Jordan (Whistle and Sing!), Vol. 2. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 230, pg. 62.
T:Atlantic Wave, The
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:reel
Z:Transcribed Jeffrey Myers, from the playing of Billy McComiskey
K:G
(3DEF|G3 B d3B|cBcd efge|d2 BG dGBG|FDAD BDAD|G3 B d3 B|cBcd efge|d2 (3g
fe dcBA|(3GAG FA G2:|
|:(3Bcd|gfgd ed^ce|dfab adfa|bagf gdBG|FDAD BDAD|G3 B d3 B|cBcd efge|d2
(3gfe dcBA|(3GAG FA G2:|

AUCHDON HOUSE. AKA- "Twa Craw" (song). AKA and see "Haughton House." Scottish, March. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is similar to the melody of the Scottish folksong "Twa Craw:" It as recorded by Joe Ryan (on "An Buchaille Dreoite", where he lists it as a Shetland tune), and as a result has some currency in Irish sessions.
***
There were twa craw, sitting in a tree,
Sitting in a tree, sitting in a tree;
There were twa craw, sitting in a tree,
On a cold and frosty morning.
***
Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 134, pg. 82. Greentrax C9004, Jimmy Johnson (fiddle, with harmonium accompaniment by Pat Sutherland) - "Scottish Tradition - Shetland
Fiddle Music." Philo 1031, Boys of the Lough - "Lochaber No More" (appears as "Haughton House," identified as a Shetland tune).
T:Auchdon House
M:2/4
L:1/8
R:March
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:G
GB/G/ DG/D/ |B,/C/ D/B,/ G,A/B/ | cBAG | E2 EF |
GB/G/ DG/D/ | B,/C/D/B,/ G,A/B/ | c/B/c/e/ dF |1 G2 GD :|2 G2 Ge/f/ |:
gfed | ed B>d | cBAG | E2 EF | GB/G/ DG/D/ |
B,/C/D/B,/ G,A/B/ | c/B/c/e/ dF |1 G2 Ge/f/ :|2 G2 G2 ||

AUGHDARRA, THE. AKA and see "The Otter's Den," "The Otter's Hole," "The Water Dog's Hole," "The Otter's Holt," "Ríl an Madra Uisce," "The Water Hole," "The Windy Lane." Irish, Reel. Source for notated version: fiddler and piano player Charlie Lennon [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 4, No. 12.

AULD FIDDLER, THE (BERT MURRAY). Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by Billy MacGuire, formerly fiddler with the Scottish band the Whistlebinkies. Willie Hunter - "Leaving Lerwick Harbour." Green Linnet SIF 3107, Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham - "The Pearl."
T:The Auld Fiddler
C:Billy MacGuire
S:Aly Bain \& Phil Cunningham
D:The Pearl
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
(3efg|a2ed cdBc|ABcd eaga|be (3eee c'e (3eee|d'ec'e be (3efg|\
a2ed cdBc|ABcd eaga|be (3eee ^de=de|cecB A2:|Ac|\
BE (3EEE BEcE|dEeE dEcE|BE (3EEE BEBc|dBGB A2Ac|\
BE (3EEE BEcE|dEeE dEcE|BE (3EEE ^DE=DE|CECB, A,3 c|\
BE (3EEE BEcE|dEeE dEcE|BE (3EEE BEBc|dBGB A2Ac|\
BE (3EEE cE (3EEE|dEeE fBgB|aeee ^dede|^defg a2|]

AULD LANG SYNE. Scottish, Air (2/4 time) or Strathsepy. F Major (Neil): A Major (Stewart-Robertson). Standard. AABB. Robert Burns (1759-1796) had the air to which he wrote his famous lyrics from an old man's singing, and immediately wrote it down upon hearing as he thought it "exceedingly expressive" and which he later remarked "has often thrilled through my soul." The song was sent by him to Johnson for inclusion in the Scots Musical Museum with a note that it was an old song with additions and alterations (Neil, 1991). Fuld (1966) states that the extent of Burns' responsibility for the words and tune has always been controversial, and states that it is "generally agreed that he was not the author of the words of the first verse," which he points out is the only one everyone knows. According to Robert Chambers [Scottish Songs Prior to Burns, 1890], the earliest printing of a song called "Old-Long-Syne" [sic] with the famous opening line is in James Watson's Scots Poems, Part III, pg. 71 (Edingburgh, 1711). Chambers wrote that he song appears "as early as the reign of Chas. I, its associations conveyed in a song of many (10) stanzas", finally "brought together (in Watson's book) in a song of many stanzas." In fact, there were ten stanzas given in Scots Poems. These early printings, including Burns' version, were to melodies other than the air famous in modern times (interestingly, Burns wrote another song to the "Auld Lang Syne" melody that is substantially the one we know today, which he called "O Can Ye Labor Lea, Young Man," also known as "I Fee'd a Man at Martinmas," found in the Scots Musical Museum [Edinburgh, 1792-1793]).
***
Fuld finds identifying motifs for the modern melody for "Auld Lang Syne" in Playford's "The Duke of Bucclugh's Tune" in Appolo's Banquet (1687), and subsequently and more elaborately as "The Miller's Wedding" (in Bremner's Scots Reels, c. 1765), "The Miller's Daughter," "The Lasses of the Ferry," "Sir Alexander Don's Strathspey," "Roger's Farewell," and the "Overture" to William Shield's opera Rosina (London, 1783). The words and the present melody were first printed together in 1799 in George Thompson's A Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs (London), but, Fuld states, "it is not clear whether Thomson or Burns brought the words and melody together," and it is not clear exactly which air Burns heard the aforementioned old man singing.
***
Stewart-Robertson prints a strathspey version of the tune arranged by John MacAlpin of Killin, for dancing. Ludwig van Beethoven arranged a setting of "Auld Lang Syne" early in the 19th century.
***
As a young man Mark Twain thought to learn music and tried first one instrument, then another, before finally settling down with an accordion. After determining its rudiments, he learned the popular air "Auld Land Syne," and for about a week he continued to torture his unwilling listeners with the melody, when he, being of an ingenious turn of mind, endeavored to improve upon the original melody by adding some variations of his own device. Just as he finished the tune with a suitable flourish, his landlady stepped into his room and said, "Do you know any other tune but that, Mr. Twain?" He told her meekly he did not. "Well then," said she, "stick to it just as it is; don't put any variations on it; because it is rough enough on the boarders the way it is now." As it happened, half the boarders left anyway, while the other half would have had not the landlady discharged Twain first. The aspiring musician went from house to house, but none would undertake to keep him after one night's music, so, at least, in sheer desperation he went to board with an Italian lady--Mrs. Murphy, by name. He says:
***
The first time I stuck up the variations, a haggard care-worn,
cadaverous old man walked into my room and stood beaming
upon me a smile of ineffable happiness. Then he placed his hand
upon my head, and looking devoutly aloft, he said with feeling
unction: "God bless you, young man! God bless you! for you
have done that for me which is beyond all praise. For year I
have suffered from an incurable disease, and knowing my doom
was sealed, and that I must die, I have striven with all my power
to resign myself to my fate, but in vain--the love of life was too
strong within me. But heaven bless you, my benefactor! For since
I heard you play that tune and those variations, I do not want to
live any longer--I am willing to die--in fact, I am anxious to die."
And then the old man fell upon my neck and wept a flood of happy
tears. I was surprised at these things, but I could not help giving the
old gentleman a parting blast, in the way of some peculiarly lacerating
variations, as he went out of the door. They doubled him up like a
jackknife, and the next time he left his bed of pain and suffering he
was all right, in a metallic coffin.
***
At last Twain gave up the instrument, and from then on gave amateur musicians a wide berth. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 72b, pg. 30. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 189, pg. 244. Stewart-Robertson (Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 1.
T:Auld Lang Syne
L:1/8
M:C
N:"As arranged by John McAlpin, Killen"
B:The Athole Collection
S:Strathspey
K:A
E|A2A>c B>AB>c|AAA>a f2f>a|e<cc>A B>AB>c|A>FE>F A2A:|
|:a|e<cc>A B>AB>c|e<cc>e f>ga>f|e>cc>A B>AB>c|A>FE>F A2A:|

AULD SPRINGS (TUNES) GEES NAE PRICE. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AAB. Spring is a Scots term for tune. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 7. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 11.
T:Auld Springs Gees Nae Price
L:1/8
M:C
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:G
G2{G}g>e (e/d/)c/B/ d2|GA/B/ gB A>GAB|G2 {f}g>e e/d/c/B/ d2|(g>a/2b/2) ag e>deg:|
(gb)(eg) de {c}B2|de/f/ gB A>GAB|gbeg de {c}B2|de/f/ gd e>deg|(gb)(eg) de/d/ (c<B)|
de/f/ gB A>GAB|G2{G}g>e (e/d/)c/B/ d2|(g>a/2b/2) ag e>deg||

AULD STEWART'S/STUART'S BACK AGAIN. AKA and see "Old Stewart's Back Again." Scottish, Reel. D Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Gow, Vickers): AABB' (Athole). According to John Glen the piece was first published in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 23), however, the tune appears to be popularly known somewhat earlier than that, as evidenced by this excerpt from a letter written by Ralph Bigland in 1749 of an entertainment on the London stage (quoted by Emmerson, 1972):
***
I have since I came here [London] been lately two or three times at the play
and what invited me most was to see a new dance called the Scots Dance
consisting of about 20 lads and lasses dress'd after the Highland fashion. The
scene represents a very romantic, rocky, or mountainous country seemingly,
at the most distant view you behold a glorious pair (which far surpass all the
other actors) sitting among the rocks, while the rest are dancing below among
groves of trees. Some are also representing with their wheels a spinning; all
the while the music plays either Prince Charlie's minuet or the Auld Stewarts
Back Again. At last descends from the mountains the glorious pair which to
appearance is a prince and princess. Then all the actors retire on each side
while the royal youth and his favourite dance so fine, in a word that the
whole audience clap their hands for joy. Then in a moment the spinning
wheels are thrown aside and every lad and lass join in the dance and jerk
it away as quick as possible while the music briskly plays--Over the Water
to Charlie, a bagpipe being in the band. In short it was so ravishing seemingly
to the whole audience that the people to express their joy clap their hands in a
most extraordinary manner indeed.
***
Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 525. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 37. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 3; No. 516. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 102.
T:Auld Stewart's Back Again, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
=c|BGAG F>GA=c|BGAF BEE=c|BGAG F>GAg|fdec dDD:|
|:g|f>gaf gabg|f>gaf beeg|1 f>gaf gabg|fdec dDD:|2 fgaf gabg|faef dDD||

AULD STEWARTS OF FORTHERGILL. Scottish, Cape Breton; Reel. USA, New Hampshire. C Major. Standard. AAB. Source for notated version: Cape Breton style fiddler Harvey Tolman (Nelson, New Hampshire) [Little]. Little (Scottish and Cape Breton Fiddle Music in New Hampshire), 1984; pg. 2. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884.
T:Auld Stewarts of Forthergill
L:1/8
M:C|
C:James Stewart-Robertson
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
E|C2EG c2eg|agec dAAc|C2EG c2eg|gede c/c/c ~c:|
g|agec dcAc|GcEc Addg|agec dcAc|GEDE CC/C/ C3g|
agec dcAc|GcEc Adde|C2EG c2ea|gede c/c/c ~c||

AULD TOUN/TOON O' AYR, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB (Hunter): AA'B (Kerr). Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 88. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 161, pg. 19. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 111.
T:Auld Toun o' Ayr, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
F|D<DF<A d3c|B/A/B/c/ d>B A<F F>d|D<DF<A d3f|(3efg (3gfe d<B B>d|
D<DF<A d3c|B/A/B/c/ d>B A<F F>A|B/A/B/c/ d>B A<F F>d|A<F F>D ~E2E:|
F|D>dF>d A<F F>A|B/A/B/c/ d>B A<F F>d|D>dF>d A<F F>A|d>B A<F ~E3F|
D>dF>d A<F F>A|B>AB>c d3f|(3efg (3gfe d<B B>d|A<F F>D ~E2E||

AULD WHEEL, THE. AKA and see "Mill O' Hirn, Cathes." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Hunter notes it was one of the "birling" reels which so pleased Scott Skinner. The birl is an accent in Scottish music, much like a short drum roll. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 205. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 7. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 67.
T:Auld Wheel, The
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
A|d/d/d AG FG Ac|B/B/B ed cAAc|d/d/d AF GA Bd|cdec dDDA|d/d/d AG FG Ad|
B/B/B ed cAAc|d/d/d AF GA Bg|fedc dDD||g|fDFA dfaf|eEGB efge|fDFA dfaf|
Efga fddg|fDFA dfaf|eEGB efga|bagf edcB|AGFE DABc||

AULD WIFE AYOND/AHUNT THE FIRE, THE. AKA and see "Aald Wife Ahunt the Fire," "Old Wife Beyond the Fire." Scottish, Reel, Slow Strathspey or Country Dance Tune (4/4 time); Shetland, Reel. G Major (Cranford, Gow, Kerr): F Major (Hunter). Standard. One part (Hunter): AAB (Gow): AABB (Kerr): AA'BB (Cranford). Known also throughout the Shetlands. According to Glen the tune was first published by Bremner (1757, pg. 90) and Stewart (1761, pg. 12), however, the melody appears earliest in the Drummond Castle Manuscript (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of Country dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 8. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 164, pg. 47. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 14. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 6 (slow strathspey). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 43. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 115, pg. 14. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - "A Session with Jerry Holland" (1990).
X:1
T:Auld wife ayont the Fire, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Gow - 1st Repository
K:G
c|{c}B2 AG E/E/E cA|{c}B2 AG G/G/G gd|{c}B2 AG E/E/E (cA)|(B/c/d) A>B G2G:|
c|B(dd)e c>dcB|Bddg (g/f/e/f/) g>d|B(dd>)e c>dcA|(B/c/d) (AB) G2 Gc|B(dd>)e c>dcA|
Bddg (g/f/e/f/) g>d|B>cde c>dcA|B<d A>B {F}G3||
X:2
T:Auld wife ayont the Fire
L:1/8
M:C
R:"Very Slow" Strathspey
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:G
d|{c}B2 ~A>G FGA{B}c|{c}B2 ~A>G Gg g>d|(cB) ~AG F>GAc|(B<d) A>B {F}G2G:|
c|B>cde ~c>dcA|(Bc)de de/f/ gd|B>cde c>dcA|(B<d) A>B {F}G2 G>c|B>cde ~c>dcA|
B>c de/f/ (g/f/)g/a/ g>d|B>cde ~c>d cA|(B<d) A>B G2G||

AUSTIN TIERNEY'S (Ríl Aibhistin Uí Thiarnaigh). AKA and see "Farewell to Erin," "The Cherry Tree," "Down with the Tea Tacklings," "The Flags of Dublin." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. The tune appears as "Maid in the Cherry Tree" in Bernard Flaherty's "Trip to Sligo." Michael Coleman recorded this tune for Columbia in 1921 in a medley with "Farewell to Ireland" (see "Farewell to Erin" [2]) although the label reads only "Farewell to Ireland." Source for notated version: fiddler Franke Gavin (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 111, pg. 55. Shanachie 29008, Frankie Gavin - "Traditional Music of Ireland" (1977).

AUTUMN WOODS (Coillte an Fogmair). Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 199. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1709, pg. 318. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 900, pg. 154.
T:Autumn Woods
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (900)
K:G
Bc|dedc BcBA|GFGD EDB,D|cBce dBgB|AGAB A2 Bc|
dedc BcBA|GFGD EDB,D|Ggfe dcBA|G2G2G2:|
|:cB|ABAG FGAB|cBce defg|afge fdec|dcde dcBc|dcBd cBAc|
BAGF GABc|dgfe dcBA|G2G2G2:|

AVIMORE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by Joseph Lowe. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 21.
T:Avimore
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:A
e|c>A c/d/e f>d e<c|B>=gd>g B<G G>B|c>A c/d/e f>de>c|e>agb aAA:|
g|a>e c<A c<e a>f|=g>fg>d B<G G>B|e<a g/a/b a2 eg|a>f e<d c<A A>g|
a>e c<A c<e a>f|=g>fg>d B<G G>B|(3a=gf (3gfe (3fed (3edc|d>c B<e cAA||

AVONMORE, THE (Abainn-mor). AKA and see "Blackwater Foot," "The Banks of Avonmore." Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. The name Avonmore means 'great river' (as opposed to the nearby Avonbeg, or 'little river'). AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB (O'Neill/Krassen). O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 94. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1189, pg. 224. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 468, pg. 90.
T:Avonmore, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (468)
K:G
Dc|BG (3GGG G2G2|BGBd gdec|BG (3GGG G2 cB|AGFG ABcA|
BG (3GGG G2G2|BGBd g2 fg|afge fdec|AGFG ABcA||Bd (3ddd d2 dc|
BGBd gdec|Be (3ddd d2 cB|AGFG ABcA|Bd (3ddd d2 dc|BGBd g2 fg|
afge fdec|AGFG ABcA||

AYE, MARRY, AND THANK YE TOO. English, Air (6/8 time). E Minor. Standard. One part. This air appears in Youth's Delight on the Flagelet (1697) and the ballad operas "Silvia" (1731), and Robin Hood (1730). Chappell could find nothing of the original ballad (the title was the burden), except the first line: "I live in the town of Lynn", though a variation appeared in the 1707 edition of Pills to purge Melacholy. Several other ballads were sung to the tune, including "'The May Morning Ramble' or 'Robin and Kate' (Pepys Collection), "'Nells Humble Petition' or 'The Maiden's kink and courteous Courtship to honest John the Joyner, whose love she earnestly desired'" (Pepys Collection), "'The London Lass's Lamentation' or "Her fear she should never be married'" (Roxburghe Collection/ Evans Collection). Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times), Vol. 2, 1859; pg. 70.
T:Aye, Marry, and Thank Ye Too
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Chappell - Popular Music of the Olden Times
K:E Minor
B,|EFG AGF|(E3 E2)A|Bed c2A|(B3 B2)A|Bed c2B|AGF ^D3|G3 EcB|AGF E2||

AYRSHIRE LASSES [2]. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by Hugh Montgomerie, the twelfth Earl of Eglinton, who added yet another tune title extolling the "beauties" of one region or another. Perhaps there was some merit to his particular affection, however, for Robert Burns mentioned the town of Ayr in "Tam o'Shanter:"
(Auld Ayr, wham ne'er a town surpasses
For honest men and bonny lasses.)
Montgomerie fought in the American wars of the latter 18th century and was a Member of Parliament for Ayrshire, besides being a fine fiddler and exponent of the national music (Emmerson, 1971). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 31. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 74, pg. 11. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 112. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection).
T:Ayrshire Lasses
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
c|G<c E>c d>c d<e|c<c e>d c<A A>c|G>cE>c d>c d<e|c>A G<c E<CC:|
f|g>ec>g e<g c>g|f>ec>g d<D D>f|gece d<f e>d|c<AG>F E<C C>f|
g>e c<g e<g c>g|g>ec>g d<D De/f/|g>ef>d e>cd>B|c<A G>c E<CC||

BABA, MY BABY (Baba Mo Leanabh). Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). F Major. Standard. ABB. "The editor has often listened (to this charming lullaby) with delight to his father singing this air; it is so far preferable to the set of it now bandied over the country, as not to admit of the smallest comparison" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 79, pg. 29.
T:Ba-ba my Baby
T:Babà mo leanabh
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Fraser Collection
K:D Minor
F/G/|A2d d>ef|A2G F2 z/F/4G/4|AAA fed|c<A~c d2 d/e/|f>ef g2B|
A>BG A<F z/F/4G/4|A>Bc B<Gc|A2F G2||
|:A|f>ef g2^g|a>b/a/^g/ a2 z/A/|
f>ef g2^g|a>b/a/^g/ a2 z/a/4=g/4|f>ef g2 z/B/|A>BA A<F z/F/4G/4|
A>Bc B<Gc|A2F G2:|

BABES IN THE WOODS [2]. Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard. AABB. Old Hat Music OH!02, "The Old Hat Dance Band" (1992. Learned from Kerry fiddle player Julia Clifford, who has lived in Norfolk for some years).
X:1
T:Babes in the Woods
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:125
S:Castle Ceili Band
R:polka
Z:by m euritt
K:D
A2BA F2A2| d2e2f4|g4 f2e2|d2f2A4|
A2BA F2A2| d2e2f4|g4 f2e2|d4d4:|
e4e2d2|c2e2a4|e4e2f2|g2e2 c2A2|
e4e2d2|c2e2a4|g4 f2e2|d4d4:|
X:2
T:Babes in the Woods
M:2/4
D:Beginish
K:D
B2|: ABAg F2A2 | d2e2 f2ef | g2 gg f2e2 | d2f2 A2B2 |
ABAg F2A2 | d2e2 f2ef | g2 gg f2e2 |1 d6 B2 :|2 d6 cd ||
c2d2 e2f2 | g2gg g2g2 | f2ff f2a2 | e4 e2d2 |
c2d2 e2f2 | g2gg g2g2 | f2a2 g2e2 |1 d2dd d2cd :|2 d6 ||

BACCA PIPES JIG (GREENSLEEVES). AKA and see "Greensleeves". English, Morris Dance. A Dorian (Bacon {Bampton, Hinton}, Karpeles, Raven): G Major (Bacon {Ascot-Under-Wychwood}). Standard. AB (Bacon {Ascot}): AAB (Bacon {Hinton}): AABB (Karpeles, Raven): ABA'B'A''B''A'''B'''(Bacon {Headington}). From the Ascot-under-Wychwood, Bampton, and Headington areas of England's Cotswolds. 'Bacca' pipes refers to the long-stemmed clay tobacco pipes (sometimes called 'churchwarden' pipes), which were crossed and placed on the ground (in the manner of some sword dances) whilst a solo jig was danced between them. Although not related to the tune it is interesting to note that the term 'bacca-pipes' in lower class English slang of the early 19th century referred to whiskers curled in small close ringlets. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pgs. 26, 197, & 204. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 36. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 74. EFDSS CD03, William Kimber - "Absolutely Classic: The Music of William Kimber." Topic 12T249, William Kimber - "The Art of William Kimber" (William Kimber played the anglo concertina for Headington Quarry Morris on Boxing Day, 1899, when Cecil Sharp first encountered them, which led to a morris dance revival).
T:Bacca Pipes Jig (Greensleeves)
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:A Dorian
c3 c2e|d2c B3|c2B A3|B2A G3|(c3 c2)e|d2c B3|c2A B2G|A3 A3||
g2f g2e|d2B G3|g2f g2e|a2f d3|g2f g2e|d2c B3|c2d e2d|A3 A3||

BACK OF THE CHANGE HOUSE, THE. Scottish, Reel and Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB (Athole, Gow, Skye): AB (Honeyman). A change house was a structure for changing horses on coaches or wagons, for example, as at an inn. Not "Back of the Change" as printed in the Roche Collection. John Glen finds the tune first printed in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 93). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 33. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 11. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 39. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 101. Rounder 7021, Natalie MacMaster - "A Compilation" (1998).
T:Back of the Change House, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
B|AFAf edBd|AFAB dedB|AFAf edBg|f/g/a e>c d2d:|
g|fedf edBg|fefg agag|fdgf edBg|f/g/a e>c d2 dg|fedf edBg|
fefg abag|fdgf edBg|afge dedB||

BACK OF THE GRAMPIANS. AKA - "Back of the Grampian Hills." AKA and see "North Side of the Grampians." English, Country Dance. England, Northumberland. D Major. AAB. Originally a Scottish tune appearing in Captain Simon Fraser's collection as "North Side of the Grampian's." Hall & Stafford (Charleton Memorial Tune Book), 1974; pg 57. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 187.
T:Back of the Grampians
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
F>GA>B AFFd|A>dF>A df e2|F>GA>B A>BA>G|G>EC>A, (3CDE G2:|
||g|fd (3fga fddg|fddg (3fga (3gab|fd (3fga fddf|gecA (3cde g2|
fd (3fga fddg|fddg (3fga (3gab|(3agf (3edc (3dcB (3AGF|GECA, (3BDE G2||

BACK OF THE HAGGARD (Taob Iar De'n Iotlann). AKA and see "Dan O'Leary's," "Johnny O'Leary's," "Kershaw's Hornpipe," "Lady Flashdash Hornpipe," "Let's Have a Ceilidh," "Sliabh Mhachaire," "The Tournmore," "The Toormore," "Tuar Mor Polka" [2], "Wallace's Cross." Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB (O'Neill {4 editions}): One part (Williamson; his version uses irregular measures). The melody can be found in English collections under the alternate titles above. Ceol, Vol. 5, No. 1. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 325, pg. 161. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 206. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1742, pg. 324. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 918, pg. 157. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 82-83.
T:Back of the Haggard
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (918)
K:D
(3ABc|dfdf ecAc|dcdB AFDF|GFGB Afed|c2A2 A2Bc|
d>A (3AAA e>A(3AAA|fefg afdc|BdcB AGFE|D2D2D2:|
|:(3ABc|dcdA FADF|BGFG BGFG|gefd ecdB|cdec dcBc|
A>d (3ddd c>e (3eee|d>f (3fff e>g (3ggg|fafd egec|d2d2d2:|

BACK TO GWEEDORE. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. G Major. Standard. AAB. Source for notated version: collected from the playing of County Donegal musicians by Dave Abe [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 135, pg. 70.
T: Back to Gweedore
S: Dave Abe
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
A | BcdB GABG | AD (3FED dcBA | BcdB GABG | ADFA G3 :|
A | B3 d gdBd | cBce agfe | fgaf defd | ed^ce d2 ef |
gfed (3efg a2 | agfe dcBA | BcdB GABG | ADFA G3 :|

BAFFLED KNIGHT, THE. English, Country Dance Tune and Air (6/8 time). E Flat Major. Standard. One part (Chappell): AABB (Barnes). The air appears in "Youth's Delight on the Flagelet" (9th and 11th editions, 1697), and, as was common in the period the tune was written, is the vehicle for other songs of the early 17th century.
***
It was a Knight was drunk with wine,
A riding along the way, Sir;
And there he met with a lady fine,
Among the cocks of hay, Sir.
***
Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986. Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times), Vol. 2, 1859; pg. 69.
T:Baffled Knight, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Chappell - Popular Music of the Olden Time
K:E_
E|E2B B>cB|G2F E2d|e2d c>de|d3 c2d|e>dc _B>AG|c2F F>GA|B>AG E2D|E3B2||

BAG OF POTATOES, THE [2] (An Mála Fataí). AKA and see "The Bag of Spuds," "Eddie Dunne's Favorite," "The Sligo Dandy." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AB (Mulvihill): AABB (Sullivan): AABB' (Breathnach). The tune was called "Eddie Dunne's Favourite" on a 1926 78 RPM recording by Frank Quinn, according to Philippe Varlet, who says it was "a very popular and oft recorded tune in the 1920s." Sources for notated versions: piper Matthew Tiernan/Maitiu Mac Tighearnain (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Frank McCollan (Ballycastle, County Antrim) [Mulvihill]; Festy Conlan and Tim Lyons [Sullivan]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 111, pg. 46. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 109, pg. 29 (appears as "The Bag of Spuds"). Sullivan (Session Tunes, Vol. 3); No. 62, pg. 25 (appears as "The Bag of Spuds"). Intrepid Records, Michael Coleman - "The Heyday of Michael Coleman" (1973). Topic Records, Festy Conlon & Tim Lyons - "The Breeze from Erin."
T:Bag of Potatoes, The
M:4/4
L:1/8
S:Session tape Augusta 2000, James Kelly, Tony Smith, Mick O'Connor
R:Reel
Z:Transcribed by Steve Bennett
K:G
A2eA A2eA|ABcd ecdB|G2BG AGBG|GB (3BBB GBdB|
A2eA A2eA|ABcd ecdB|ABcd efge|dBGA BAGB:||
|:a2ea ageg|agbg agef|gedc BGBd|gfga bgeg|a2ea ageg|
agbg ageg|dBde gage|dBGB BAA2:||

BAILE NAN GRANNDACH. Scottish, Slow Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AABBCCDDEE. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 119.
T:Baile Nan Granndach
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Slow Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
B|A<D A>F A<D A>F|A<D A>F B<E E>F|A<D A>F d>ef>e|
d>B A/B/d/F/ A<DD:|
|:f|d>BA>F d>ef>e|d>BA>F e<E E>e|d>BA>F d>ef>e|d>B A/B/d/F/ A>DD:|
|:B|A<D AG/F/ A<D AG/F/|A<D AG/F/ B<E E>F|A<D AG/F/ d>ef>e|
d>B A/B/d/F/ A<D D:|
|:f|d>fA>f d>fA>f|d>fA>f e<E E>e|d>fA>f d>ef>e|d>B A/B/d/F/ A>DD:|
|:F|A,>D FE/D/ A<D FE/D/|A,>D FE/D/ B<E E>F|A,>D FE/D/ A>D FE/D/|
d>B A/B/d/F/ A<D D:|
|:f/g/|a>ba>f d>ef>d|e<f d>f e<E E>f|a>b a/b/a/f/ d>ef>e|d>B A/B/d/F/ A<D D:|

BAKER'S REEL, THE (Ríl an Bháicéara). Irish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Breatnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 137, pg. 67.

BALANCE ALL. Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard. AABBCC. The title comes from a square dance direction. Source for notated version: fiddler Howdy Forrester from his Uncle Bob [Devil's Box]. Devil's Box, Vol. 23, No. 1, Spring 1989; pg. 22.
T:Balance All
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, learned from his Uncle Bob; transcribed by John Hartford
K:C
G|e2 e/g/e/d/|c/A/G/c/ A/c/c|e2 e/g/e/d/|ca g/a/g|e2 e>d|c/A/G/c/ A/G/c|
Ba g/a/g/e/|c>d c:|
|:G,/A,/|C/D/E/C/ D/C/E/C/|D(C CC)/D/|E/C/E/C/ D/C/E|G>A GA|
B/G/B/G/ Bd|B(G G2)|A/c/B/G/ AB|c>d c:|
|:e|g/g/a/g/ e/g/e/d/|c(G G>)(c|c/)e/g/e/ ga|g>a g(g|g/)g/a/g/ e/g/e/d/|
c(G G2)|A/c/B/G/ AB|c>d c:|

BALENDALLOCH'S DREAM. Scottish, Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. One of the 'lost tunes' of William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript, called by him "Balemdilaks Dream." Glen finds the tune first published in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 33). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 495. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 2, 1802; pg. 28.
T:Balendallochs Dream
L:1/8
M:C
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:A
e|c2 A>c (ef/g/) af|=g2 gB GB/c/ dB|c2 Ac (ef/g/) af|=gefd ~e2A:|
^g|a2 ea cAaf|=g2 dg BGdB|a2 ea cAaf|=gefd e2 A^g|a2 ea cAaf|=g2 dg BGdB|cedf e=gfa|=gefd ~e2A||

BALGENY'S BOWLING GREEN. AKA - "Bargenny/Balgener's/Balginie's Bowling Green." Scottish, English; Jig. England, Northumberland. D Aeolian. Standard. AABBCCDD (Glen, Gow): AABB (Vickers). Composition of the melody is credited to Joseph/John Riddel (1718-95) of Ayr by Glen, Gow, Seatle and others. Seatle (1987) notes Riddell's (or sometimes, Riddle's) best known tune is "Dumfries House," and was alive at the time the Northumbrian editor William Vickers was compiling his collection. Glen finds the tune earliest in print in the collections of Riddel (1766, pg. 46) and Bremner (1757, pg. 39), and it also appears in the Gillespie Manuscript, 1768. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 514. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), Vol. I, 1891; pg. 21. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 33 (appears as "Bargenny Bowling Green"). Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 230.
T:Bargenny's Bowling Green
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Glen Collection
K:D Minor
E|(DED D2)c|GEC C2E|(DED) D2f|e2 d ecA|(fgf) e2f|cAc CDE|(DED) D2f|(e/f/g)e d2:|
|:A|(ded) d2a|gec c2e|(ded) d2a|g2f gec|(fgf) e2d|cAc CDE|(DED D2)f|(e/f/g)e d2:|
|:A/4B/4c/|dAd cAc|GEC C2c|dAd cAc|dAd cAc|fed cBA|GEC C2E|(DED D2)f|e/f/ge d2:|
|:^f/g/|a^fd afd|gec c2 (^f/g/)|a^fd afd|a^fd e=fg|fgf e2d|cAc CDE|(DED D2)f|(e/f/g)e d2:|

BALL AT THE HOP, THE. Irish, Jig. G Mixolydian. Standard. AB. "Taken down about 1850 from John Hickey of Ballyorgan Co. Limerick" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 29, pg. 17.
T:Ball at the Hop, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
DGG DGG|A>BA/G/ =F3|DGG DGG|A>BA/G/ FDC|DGG DGG|
A>BA/G/=F2G|Add cAG|AGG G3||dcB cBA|BAG AFD|DDD =F3|
DDD =FDC|DGG DGG|A>BA/G/ =F2G|Add cAG|AGG G3||

BALLECHIN RANT. Scottish, Rant. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by William MacLeish. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 96.
T:Ballechin Rant
L:1/8
M:C|
C:William MacLeish
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
A|F2DF G2EG|F2DF Afec|dD D/D/D G2EG|FABc dcdA|
F2DF G2EG|F2DF Afec|dAFA G2EG|FABc d3||
g|fddc d2Ag|fddB ceeg|fddc d2AF|GBAF Addg|fddc d2Ag|fddB ceeg|
fdcd BgAf|GBAF Add||

BALLENDALLOCH CASTLE. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 8.
T:Ballendalloch Castle
L:1/8
M:C
S:Marshall - 1822 Collection
K:B_
d/c/|B>c B<F d<(B B)d/c/|B>c B<F d>(c c)d/c/|B>cBF (dc) (ed)|f>g f/g/f/e/ dB B:|
d/e/|~f>gfd (ed) (gf)|~B>dfd (g/f/)(e/d/) c(d/e/)|~f>gfd c>Bd>c|
B>G (F/G/)(B/c/) d>(B B)d/e/|~f>gfd (ed)(gf)|B/c/d/e/ f/g/a/b/ g/f/e/d/ c/d/e/f/|
~(gf)(ed)~(cB)(dc)|B>G F/G/B/c/ d>B B||

BALLINAMONA. AKA and see "Ballinamona Oro," "Balin a mone," "The Wedding of Ballyporeen," "The Wedding of Ballinamona," "You Know I'm Your Priest." Irish, Air (6/8 time). Ireland, Munster. G Major. Standard. One part. Clinto calls it "The Wedding of Ballinamona." Flood (1906) notes the air was mentioned as being popular in a 1665 account by Archbishop Talbot. It appeared later in Brouke's 1748 Jack the Giant Queller (Killer) and O'Keffe's 1783 Poor Soldier operas, and Burke Thumath's Collection. Joyce (1909) says his air was familiarly known all over Munster, and was in often the vehicle for songs (frequently of a satiric and comic character) whose choruses were always something like this:-
***
With my Ballinamona Oro, Ballinamona Oro,
Ballinamona Oro, the girl of sweet Cullen for me.
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 49, pg. 27 (appears as "Ballinamona Oro"). O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 52, pg. 35.
T:Ballinamona Oro
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:The chorus begins with the pick-up notes at the end of measure eight.
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
D|GAG =fef|gag =f2d|gdd dcB|cBc A2F|GBd =fef|gag =f2 e/f/|gdd dcB|cBc A2 B/c/|
ded dBc|d3B2d/B/|cAG FGA/B/|c3 A2 B/c/|dBG GBd|g3 d2c|BGB cAF|(G3 G2)||

BALLINASLOE JIG. AKA and see "The Lilting Banshee," ""Boholla Jig" [1]. Irish, Jig.
T:Ballinasloe Jig
T:Lilting Banshee, The
T:Miller of Glenmire, The
T:Boholla Jig [1]
M:6/8
L:1/8
C:Trad
S:Bridget Delaney, Athy, Co. Kildare, Ireland
R:Jig
K:Em
EAA EAA|BAB G>A|Bee edB|dBA GED|EAA EAA|BAB G>A|Bee edB|dBA A>d:|
eaa age|dBA G>A|Bee edB|def gfg|eaa age|dBA G>A|Bee edB|dBA A>d:|

BALLINCOLLIG IN THE MORNING (Baile-an-Cullaig Ar Maidin). Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 195. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1691, pg. 314. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 890, pg. 153.
T:Ballincollig in the Morning
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (890)
K:G
Bc|dBAB G2 AB|cBAG F2 Bc|dBge dBGA|B2A2 A2Bc|
dBAB G2 AB|cBAG F2 Bc|dBge dBAB|G2 GG G2:|
|:Bc|dBge dBGB|dBge d2 Bc|dBge dBGA|B2A2 A2ge|
dcBA G2 AB|cBAG F2 Bc|dBge dBAB|G2 GG G2:|

BALLINDALLOCH'S DREAM. Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABB'. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 51.
T:Ballindalloch's Dream
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:Aminor
e|~c2 A>c e^f/g/ af|g2 gB GB/c/ dB|~c2Ac e^f/g/ af|ge^fd e2A:|
|:^g|a2ea cAa^f|g2dg BGdB|1 a2 ea cAa^f|gefd e2A:|2 cedf egfa|
gefd e2A||

BALLINDOWN BRAES. Irish, Air (3/4 time). Ireland, Ulster. G Minor. Standard. AB. "I have known this air and part of the song from boyhood days, when I learned them from an Ulster girl. But Mr. McKenzie's setting is better than mine" (Joyce).
***
Being young like myself-O, he said he would be
Both father and mother and all things to me;
He would dress me in silks and in satins so fine,
And the bright gold and silver in my tartan should shine.
Cho:
But false was his heart-O, and false were his ways;
He decoyed me far far from sweet Ballindown Braes.
***
Source for notated version: "Mr. J. McKenzie of Newtownards, a great lover of Irish Music and of the corresponding folk songs, sent me the (air) about 30 years ago" (i.e. 1875). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 322, pg. 150.
T:Ballindown Braes
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G Minor
GA|B2B2G2|F2F2G2|B2B2c2|d4 Bc|d2f2c2|d3 cBG|c3B G2|G4 GA|
B2B2G2|F2F2G2|B2B2c2|d4 Bc|d2g2c2|d3 cBG|c3B G2|G4||
GA|B2D2D2|F2D2D2|B2B2c2|d4 Bc|d2f2c2|d3 cBG|c3B G2|G4||

BALLOON, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 32.
T:Bolloon (sic), The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:A
A<EA<c B>A B<c|e<c B>A B>A F2|A<EA<c B>AB>c|e<c B>c A/A/A A2:|
A/a/g/a/ f/e/d/c/ d/e/f/e/ d/c/B/A/|B/c/d/c/ d/c/B/A/ B>G F2|
A/a/g/a/ f/e/d/c/ d/e/f/g/ ac|B>ABc A/A/A A2|A/a/g/a/ f/e/d/c/ d/e/f/e/ d/c/B/A/|
B/c/d/c/ d/c/B/A/ B>A F2|A<EA<c B>ABc|e<c B>c A/A/A A2||

BALLYDESMOND POLKA [1]. AKA and see "Donncha Lynch's," "Johnny O'Leary's." Irish, Polka. Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Miller & Perron, Moylan): AABB (Cowdery): AABB' (Mallinson). The "Ballydesmond Polkas", numbers 1-3, are usually played as a group and are known collectively as "The Ballydesmond Polkas." Cowdery (1990) finds this first melody is a form of the A and A' sections of the old ballad "The Boyne Water." Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region), recorded in recital at Na Píobairí Uilleann, February, 1981 [Moylan]. Cowdery (Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 43, pg. 116. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 41, pg. 16. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 6. Flying Fish FF-009, Red Clay Ramblers - "Stolen Love" (1975. Learned from Irish fiddler Denis Murphy). Claddagh CC5, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford (both from Sliabh Luachra region) - "The Star Above the Garter" (1973). Topic 12T310, John, Julia and Billy Clifford - "The Star of Munster Trio."
T:Ballydesmond Polka No. 1
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:D
A>B AG|EF GE|A>B AG|Ad d/e/d/c/|A>B AG|EF G2|AB cE|ED D2:|
Ad d>d|ed c>d|ed cd|ea a/b/a/g/|ed c>d|ed c2|A>B cd|ef g>f|
ed ^cd|eA B/^c/d|ed ^cd|ea a/b/a/g/|e/f/g d>B|ce dB|AB cE|ED D2||

BALLYDESMOND POLKA [3]. AKA and see "Gneevequilla Polka," "Tom Billy's Polka." Irish, Polka. Ireland, Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. A Mixolydian: A Dorian (Mallinson). Standard. AABB. The last of the trio of tunes known as "The Ballydesmond Polkas." Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region), recorded in recital at Na Píobairí Uilleann, February, 1981 [Moylan]. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 36, pg. 139. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 43, pg. 17. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978, No. 8. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 59, pg. 34. Claddagh CC5, Denis Murphy and Julia Clifford - "The Star Above the Garter" (1973). RTE CD174, "The Sliabh Luachra Fiddle Master Padraig O'Keeffe" (appears as "Tom Billy's").
T:Ballydesmond Polka #3
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:A Mixolydian
cd/c/ Bc/B/|AB/A/ G>A|Bd ed|ga/g/ ed|ea g>e|dB GA/B/|ce dB|A2 A2:|
|:ea ag/e/|dg gd|ea ab|ga/g/ ed|ea g>e|dB GA/B/|ce dB|A2 A2:|

BALLYGAR HERMITAGE. Irish, Jig. G Minor ('A' and 'B' parts) & G Major/Mixolydian ('C' part). Standard. AABB'CC. Composed by Joe Kelly. Ballygar, explains Bill Black, is in the western part of Roscommon, close to the Galway border. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 285, pg. 153.
T: Ballygar Hermitage
S: Joe & Willie Kelly
Q: 325
R: jig
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gdor
A | BAG FDC | DGG DGG | BAG ABc | d^cd gd=c |
BAG FDC | DGG GAB | AGF DCA,- | A,G,G, G,2 :|
A | BGd BGd | BAB dcB | AFc fcB | AFA cBA |
BGd BGd | BAB dcB |1 AFA cBc | AG^F G2 :|
|2 AGF DCA,- | A,G,G, G,2 ||
K: G
B | dgg dgg | gfg bag | c=ff c=ff | cBc ag=f |
dgg dgg | gfg bag | afd cAF | AGF G2 :|

BALLYGOUGHLIN JIG, THE. Irish, Jig. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Composed by the late County Limerick/Bronx, N.Y., fiddler Martin Mulvihill. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 338, pg. 180.
T: Ballygoughlin
S: M. Mulvihill
Q: 325
R: jig
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
A/G/ | FEF GE=C | Ddc Ade | fed cAG | FAF GE=C |
FEF GFG | Adc d2 e | fed cAG | Adc d2 :|
A | def gfg | aba ged | fef gfg | agf g2 e |
fef gfg | afd cAG | FEF GFG | Adc d2 :|

BALLYHOOLEY (Baile-Ata Hubla). AKA and see "Hooly and Fairly." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 877, pg. 163. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 130, pg. 36.
T:Ballyhooley
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (130)
K:G
GAG Bcd|ABA cde|GAG dBD|gfe dcB|cec BdB|AGA cde|dBG cAF|G3 G2:|
|:gfe dBd|edB GBd|gfe dBd|ecA A2 e/f/|gbg afd|ege dBG|BdB cAF|G3 G2:|

BALLYVOURNIE POLKA. AKA and see "The Ballinaderreen Polka," "Cuil Aodha," "Lackagh Cross." Irish, Polka. D Dorian. Standard. AA'BB'. Ballyvourney is in the west County Cork gaeltacht. The accompaniment begins on the dominent seventh chord. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 47, pg. 18. Taylor (Where's the Crack?), 1989; pg. 29.
T:Ballyvourney Polka, The
R:polka
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:Edor
EF/G/ FE|FD F/G/A|EF/G/ FE|F2 A2|
EF/G/ FE|FD F/G/A|B>A B/c/d|1 e2 e2:|2 e2 eB/c/||
|:dA FA|DA FA|B>A GB|A2 AB/c/|dA FA|DA FA|B>A B/c/d|1 e2 f>e:|2 e2
e2||

BALMORAL CASTLE [2] Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AABB'. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 168.
T:Balmoral Castle
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B|G<G g2 d<gB<g|d<B g>a b/a/g/f/ g<e|d<B g2 d<fB<b|
D<B B>G A3:|
|:B|G>DB,>G, D>G,B,>G,|C>A,B,>G B,/C/D G>B|1 G>DB,>G D>G,B,>G,|
c>A c/B/A/G/ A2 A>B:|2 G<G B2 d<B B>g|B<B B>G A2A||


BALQUHIDDER. AKA - "Bochuidear." Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard. AAB. "As performed by Major Logan." "The dancing set alone of this air has as yet been handed to the public. It was performed with peculiar tatste by Major Logan, whose set of it the editor was at pains to acquire, but scarcely differing from a song to the same air, sung by the editor's father, composed by Mrs. Fraser of Belladrum, expressing her regret at his continuing too long a bachelor, and intimating, that if he waited till she became a widow, she would by at his service" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 77, pg. 28.
T:Balquhidder, As performed by Major Logan
T:Bochuidear
L:1/8
M:C
S:Fraser Collection
K:F
c|d2 F>c A2 A>c|d2 F>c AGG>c|d2 F>c A2 Ac|d>ef>d cA A:|
~c|d>ef>d c<A a>g|f>c d/c/B/A/ AGG~c|d>ef>d c<A a>G|
f<d f>d c>AA~c|d>ef>d c<A a>g|f>c d/c/B/A/ AGG A/G/|
F>ED>E F>GA>c|d>ef>d cAA||

BALTER SVENS PARAPOLKETT. Swedish.
T:Balter Svens Parapolkett
S:Eliza Carthy \&Nancy Kerr
D:Shape of Scrape
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:Dm 0&2
z4&A3^c|:(F4F)E & d3efa|~E3FED&g2gefd|\
^C2E2E2&^c2A2A2|E4A2&A4F2|G2&G2&&A2&GF&&A2&GA|\
A3AAD&B3dcB|E3FED&(A6|DDE2&A4)&&A2&^c2|\
F3&d3&&FFD&efa|DE&g2&&EFED&gefg|A2AGFE&a3gfe|\
EF2&d3&&ED^C&cBA|FGG2AG&B3dcB|AGF2E2&cBA2G2|1\
(D6&(F6|D4)&F4)&&E2&A2:|2D4E2&F6|A6&A4A^c|:\
A4(A2&e3e(3eee|A2)&e^c&&A2(A2&defg|\
A2)A2A2&a2afdf|A4&e2^c2&&A2&A2|A2A2(A2&e3~eed|\
A3)AAA&e^cdefg|A2A4&a2afdf|A4A2&e2e^cAG|\
D3FFD&F2dAFD|E2cAFD&E2ecA2|F2dAF2&F2afd2|\
A3EDE&A3GFG|A2FEDA&A2AGFB|A2FEDE&A2AGFE|\
F2FAGF&D2DFED|1A2A4&D4A^c:|2A3zA2&D3ED2|]
A4E2&D4A2|:D3^cdf&d3efa|e2e^cdA&g2gefd|\
A2E2(3AB^c&^c2A2A2|E4D2&A4F2|A2AGBc&G2GFGA|\
G4G2&B3dcB|A2E3F&(A6|EDE2&A4)&&(D2&A2|D3)cdf&d3efa|\
e2e^cde&g2gefg|d6&a2agfe|[D3A3]AGF&d3cBA|\
D3BAG&B3dcB|AGF2A2&cBA2G2|1c6&F6|c4E2&F4A2:|2\
c6&F6|c4E2&E4A^c|:A3A(3AAA&e3ge^c|\
^cADAde&e^cdefg|A2A2dA&a2afdf|\
^c2A2G2&e2^c2A2|E3^ccA&e3~eed|\
^cADAde & e^cdefg|A2A2dA&a2afdf|\
A2AGFE&e2e^cAG|D2A2D2&F2dAFD|E2A2&E2ec&&E2&A2|\
D2A4&F2afd2|c4A2&A3GFG|ABAGAB&A2AGFB|ABABAG&A2AGFE|\
A3BAG&D3FED|1A4E2&D4A2:|2A3zA2&D3ED2|]A4E2&D4A2|]

BALTIMORE SALUTE, THE. Irish, Reel. Composed by County Roscommon flute player Josie McDermott. Shanachie 29020, Seamus Egan - (1985).
T:The Baltimore Salute
R:reel
C:Josie McDermott
S:Tionol
A:Co. Sligo
D:Seamus Egan, SHA 29020
M:C|
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Jeff Myers
Q:250
K:G
GA|B2eB dBGA|B2GB ABGE|DGGF GABd|e2dB A2GA|\
B2ge dBGA|B2GB ABGE |DGGF GABd|e2dB G2:||:
GA|BG~G2 gG~G2|gdeg dG~G2|GFGA BABd|eaag e2ga|\
b2ab gdde|g2eg dGGD|G2EG Dgge|dBAB G2:||

copyright (c) 1997-1999 C.Garner & P.Wright (www.darkisle.com)
Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 10.
T:Balvenie Castle
L:1/8
M:C
S:Marshall - 1822 Collection
K:B_
B>GF>E D>CB,>d|e<c f>d c/c/c c2|c/B/_A/G/ A/G/F/E/ D>CB,>d|
E<c f>d B/B/B ~B2|B>GF>E D>CB,>d|e<c f>d c/c/c c2|c/B/_A/G/ A/G/F/E/ D>CB,>d|
e<c f>d B/B/B ~B2||B>fd>f B>fd>f|e>gd>f c/c/c ~c2|B>fd>f B>fd>f|e<g f>d B/B/B ~B2|
B>fd>f B>fd>f|e>gd>f c/c/c cg/a/|bgaf gefd|e<g f>d B/B/B ~B2||

BANANE A NONE' ADAM, LA. (Uncle Adam's Banana). AKA - "Seventy-Three Special." Cajun, Two-Step. USA, Louisiana. A Mixolydian/Major. Standard. AB. Related songs are Nathan Abshire's "L'Acadian Two-Step" and the Rambling Aces "Seventy-Three Special." The alternate title, "Seventy-Three Special" comes from alternate words to the melody by Rodney LeJeune and the Rambling Aces regarding a nightclub in Texas on Highway 73. Source for notated version: Elton "Bee" Cormier, Rodney LeJeune, Nathan Abshire (La.) [Francois]. Francois (Yé Yaille, Chère!), 1990; pgs. 28-30.

BANFF CASTLE. Scottish, Reel. F Major. Standard. AB. The name Banff comes from the Gaelic word Banba, literally 'little pig,' a term of endearment applied by the Irish to their own country. In Scotland the term, eventually modified to Banff, was used first for a stream and then for the village that grew on its banks (Matthews, 1972). Composed by Issac Cooper of Banff (b. 1755) -- "A good tune" opines Collinson (1966). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 23.
T:Banff Castle
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Gow - 4th Repository
K:F
F>GAF CFAF|G>ABc {Bc)d2 df|c f2 a gefc|dfcA G>FDG|F>GAF CFAF|
GABc {Bc}d2 df|c f2 a gefc|dfcA F/F/F F2||fcfa gefc|dcdf g/g/g g2|
Fcfa gefc|dfcA GABd|cAfa gefc|~dcdf g/g/g g>a|f(aa)f e(gg)e|f(dc)A F/F/F F2||

BANISH MISFORTUNE [1] ("Dibir an Mio-ad" or "Ruaig an Mí-ádh). AKA and see "The (Little) Bag of Meal," "Humours of Mullinafauna," "Máire Ní Eidhinn," "Nancy Hines," "Nancy Hynes," "Parish Girl," "Round the Cart House." Irish, Double Jig. D Mixolydian/Major (Breathnach, Brody, Mitchell, Moylan): D Major (O'Neill/1850 & 1001). Standard. ABC (Moylan, Mitchell): AABBCC (Breathnach, Brody, Mallinson, O'Neill/Krassen): AABB'CC (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): ABBCCDEEFF (Mitchell). O'Neill (1001 Gems) prints the tune under the titles "Banish Misfortune," "The Humours of Mullinafauna" and "Nancy Hines," while Roche has it as "The Humours of Mullinafauna" and "The Little Bag of Meal." P.W. Joyce gives it as "The Bag of Meal" and was the first to print it (in his Ancient Irish Music, 1873), according to Brendan Breathnach. "Máire Ní Eidhinn" is the title in Petrie's 1905 Complete Collection of Irish Music, though O'Neill thought the 3-part version he collected from Cronin to be "much superior." Petrie takes his title from the poem "Máire Ni Éidhin" by Raftery, the blind poet of Connacht, which he wrote in honour of one thought the loveliest girl in Ireland, and which is still sung to this tune. Sources for notated versions: elderly fiddler Edward Cronin, originally from Limerick Junction, County Tipperary [O'Neill]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), who first heard it from fiddler Denis Murphy-- "Himself and (piper) Willie Clancy often played it together" [Moylan]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; piper Seán Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 38, pg. 16. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 33. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 99, pg. 43. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 137, pg. 108 & No. 148, pgs. 116-117. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 286, pg. 165. O'Neill (Krassen), 1903/1976; pg. 22. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 776, pg. 145. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 53, pg. 25. Claddagh TA4, "Chieftains #2." Front Hall 009, How To Change a Flat Tire- "A Point of Departure." GR705, Paul Brady, Peter Browne, Andy Irvine, Donal Lunny, Matt Molloy & Tommy Potts - "The Gathering" (1981). GTD Heritage Trad. HCD 008, Tommy Peoples - "Traditional Irish Music Played on the Fiddle." Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). Kells Music KM9505, Tommy Keane & Jacqueline McCarthy - "The Wind Among The Reeds." Rounder 0113, Trapezoid- "Three Forks of Cheat" (1979). Festy Conlan - "Breeze from Erin" (1969). Shanachie 79022, Chieftains - "Chieftains 2" (1969).
T:Banish Misfortune [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (53)
K:D
A/G/|F2D DED|DEF GFG|A3 cAG|ABc d/c/AG|
F2D DED|DEF GFG|AdB cde|d3 d2:|
|:d/e/|fdd dcd|dfa agf|e2 c/c/ cBc|e/d/ef gfe|1 f2 d/d/ dcd|
dfa agf|g/f/ed cde|d3 d2:|2 fga fga|afd ecA|fed cde|d3 d2||
|:d/e/|f/e/df e/d/ce|d/c/AB cAG|F2D DED|DEF GFG|
A/G/AB cAG|AdB cde|fed cde|d3 d2:|

BANJO TRAMP. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Ky., W.Va. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Source for notated version: Via Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) from Ohio fiddler Ward Jarvis, who learned the tune from the legendary blind fiddler Ed Haley (eastern Ky.). Kuntz, Private MS. Heritage Records XXXIII, Ward Jarvis, Dana Loomis & Grey Larsen - "Visits" (1981).
T:Banjo Tramp
L:1/8
M:2/4
Z:Andrew Kuntz
K:D
(f/g/|a/)(f/a/)a/ b/e/a|[df]>[df] [d/f/][d/e/][d/f/]f|e/A/d/A/ c/(A/B)|[AA]>[A(B] [AA)]|1
(3e/f/g/|a/f/a/a/ b/e/a|d/[df]d [d/f/][d/e/][d/f]f/|e/(A/d/)(A/ c/)c/d|[ee]>[ef] [ee]:|2
(3A/B/c/|d/)B/d/A/ B/A/A/c/|d/B/d/A/ B/A/A/c/|d/B/d/d/ e/A/c|[d/e/][df]e/ [df]||
|:(D|A/)(D/F/)F/ Ad|[d/e/][df]e/ f/e/f/A/|e/A/d/A/ c/A/B|[AA]>[AB] (A/B/)A/(D/|1
A/)(D/F) A/(A/d)|[d/e/][df]g/ f/e/f/f/|e/A/c/A/ cd|[ee]>[e/f] [ee]:|2 (3A/B/c/|
D/B/d/A/ c/A/A/c/|d/B/d/A/ B/A/A/c/|d/B/d/d/ ec|[d/e/][df][d/f/] [df]||

BANK OF IRELAND, THE (Bannc Na h-Eireann). Irish, Reel. A Dorian or Mixolydian ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AB (Miller): AA'B (O'Neill/1850, 1001 & 1915): AABB (Mallinson, O'Neill/Krassen, Taylor). The 'A' part begins on a C Major chord at the beginning of each four bar phrase, but resolves to a D Major Chord at the end of each. See also "Reidy's Reel"?? Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 60, pg. 26. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 19. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 266, pg. 136. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 93. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 465, pg. 90. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1186, pg. 224. Taylor (Through the Half-Door), 1992; No. 27, pg. 20. Comhaltas Ceoltoiri CL13, Tommy Peoples. Wild Asparagus WA 003, Wild Asparagus - "Tone Roads" (1990).
T:Bank of Ireland, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (465)
K:D
ed|:=cAAB cABG|EGDG EGDB|=cAAB cABG|1 Addc dfed:|2 Addc d2||
de|f2 fd e2 ec|dfed cAAg|f2 fd e2 ed|eaag eddz|fgaf efge|dfed cAAG|Addc defg|afge dfed||

BANKS HORNPIPE. AKA- "Banks of the River." AKA and see "Kinloch's Grand Hornpipe," "Mrs. Taff," "Souvenir of Venice." Scottish, Canadian, Irish; Hornpipe. Canada, Nova Scotia. E Flat Major (Scottish versions): G Major (Black). Standard. AAB (Black, Honeyman): AABB (Brody, Hardie, Hunter). "Composed by Parazotti" is an ascription often found attached to this tune, sometimes called a 'descriptive hornpipe'. The composer's origins were somewhat obscure. Alburger (1983) stated she could find no composer by that name and suggested it could possibly be a set of a piece which was danced to by Mme Pariot, who retired from the London stage to marry in 1809. Alastair Hardie (1992), however, reports that Parazotti did exist and was actually the grandson of an Italian violinist who settled in Glasgow. The tune was inspired by the sights and sounds of a river in spate. The melody appears first in print in 1881 in Kohlers' Violin Repository (Bk. 1) under the title "Mrs. Taff" (whom Hardie explains was a person who resided on the West coast of Scotland and was Parazotti's patron for a time. It is said she was the owner of the house in which Parazotti composed his tune). The piece is similar to the tune "Souvinir De Venice Hornpipe" in the 1883 Ryan's Mammoth Collection. " This tune is credited to L. Ostinelli, an Italian who arrived in Boston in the year 1818. Michael Broyles references this musician in his book Music of the Highest Class: Elitism and Populism in Antebellum Boston:
***
He was keenly aware of the reputation the violin had as a
vernacular instrument in New England. According to several
anecdotes, he was furious when his violin was referred to as a
fiddle or when he was requested to play dance music. Once
when asked by a lady if he was to play for a dance following
a concert, he deliberately cut his violin strings and said 'Veree
story, veree story, madam, you see I can no play.'
***
Ostinelli, of whom little is known, was mentioned in Dwight's Journal of Music in 1859. His lasting cliam to fame is his variation which is often used as a finale today by fiddler's playing "The Banks" (Cranford, 1997). The present title, "Banks," is actually the shortened form of the composer's alternate title "Banks of the River" (according to the late Shetland fiddler, collector, teacher and composer Tom Anderson). Scottish fiddler Charles Hardie (1849-1893) was praised by one of the greatest Scottish violinists of his time, J. Scott Skinner, for his rendition of this tune. "The Banks" is one of the tunes sometimes requested of Shetland fiddlers because it is popularly known that "anything composed in a flat key is considered to be a real test of a fiddler's ability" (Cooke, 1986). Skinner himself recorded the tune in the 1920's as part of his "Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. It is also popular in Nova Scotia. In Scotland it is traditionally preceded by the slow strathspey "The Dean Brig o' Edinburgh." Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 136, pg. 71. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 34. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 39, pg. 14. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 55. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 128. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 340. Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1903. Fiddler FRLP001 Tom Doucet (Nova Scotia/eastern Mass.) - "The Down East Star." Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968) {third tune of 'Bank'}. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Andy McGann and Paddy Reynolds - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Outlet 1031, Sean McGuire- "Ireland's Champion Traditional Fiddler." Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (third tune of 'Banks Medley'). Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow". Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady" (McGann learned the tune from Lad O'Beirne). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
X:1
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
B:The Caledonian Companion, Alastair J. Hardie
N:as played by J. Scott Skinner
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G4 (3BGE D2 F4 (3AFD|A,2 c4 de =ABcB _AGFE|
G,2 B4 c2 A,2 c4 de|DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|:{a}g>^f|
g2[G,2E2][G,2E2] (3gbg f2[B,2D2][B,2D2] (3fgf|
e2 c4 fe dcB=A {A}B2{=e}f2|
(3DBf (3fBD (3DBf (3fBD (3EBg (3gBE (3EBg (3gBE|
=ABcd ecAc BABc B_AGF|[EG,]GBG eGFE DFBF dFED|
CEAE cBAG FGFE DCB,A,|
(3G,EB (3BEG, (3G,EB (3BEG, (3A,Ec (3cEA, (3A,Ec (3cEA,|
DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|
X:2
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
N:transposed from Eb
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:G
(3DEF|G2 B4 (3dBG F2 A4 (3cAF|E2 e4 fg ^cded =cBAG|
B,2 d4 e2 C2 e4 fg|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|:b>^a|
b2 G2 G2 (3bc'b a2 F2 F2 (3aba|g2 e4 ag fed^c d4|
dfaf dfaf dgbg dgbg|^cdef gece dcde d=cBA|
Bded bgdB Adfd afdA|EGcG edcB (3ABA (3GFE D2C2|
B,DGD B,DGD CEGE CEGE|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|
X:3
T: The Banks
S: McGann / Conway
Q: 300
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
(3DEF|G2 B2 B2 (3dBG|F2 A2 A2 (3cAF | C2 e2 e2 fg | ^cded =cBAG |
B,2 d2 d2 ef | C2 e2 e2 fg | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
ba | b2 g2 g2 (3bab | a2 f2 f2 (3aba | g2 e2 e2 ag | fed^c d2 D2 |
Fdad Fdad | Gdgd Gdgd | ^cdef gece | d^cde d=cBA |
GBdB gdAG | FAdA fAGF | EGBG edcB | ABAG FEDC |
B,GdG B,GdG | CGeG CGeG | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
W:
P: original key Eb
K: Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G2 G2 (3BGE|D2 F2 F2 (3AFD|A,2 c2 c2 de| =ABcB _AGFE |
G,2 B2 B2 cd | A,2 c2 c2 de | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|
gf| g2 e2 e2 (3gfg | f2 d2 d2 (3fgf | e2 c2 c2 fe | dcB=A B2 B,2 |
DBfB DBfB | EBeB EBeB | =ABcd ecAc | B=ABc B_AGF |
EGBG eBFE | DFBF dFED | CEGE cBAG | FGFE DCB,A, |
G,EBE G,EBE | A,EcE A,EcE | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|

BANKS OF ALLAN, THE. AKA - "Banks of the Allan." Scottish, Country Dance Tune (6/8) or Jig. D Major. Standard. ABB (Sharp): AABB (Gow, Karpeles, Kerr, Raven). "This tune is also suitable as an accompaniment to Rapper Sword Dance" (Karpeles). See also the Irish variant "The Tailor's Thimble." Source for notated version: the tune was popularized in the mid-1980's in the Portland, Oregon, dance community by accordion player Dennis Rothrock, then with the band Fiddle Head Rock; Rothrock learned it from the Battlefield band recording [Songer]. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 530. Gow (Complete Repository), Book 2, 1802; pg. 38. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 26-27. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 7, pg. 31. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 75. Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 59. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 22. Topic 2052, Battlefield Band - "Stand Easy" (1979). Topic TSCD468, Battlefield Band - "Opening Moves" (compilation CD).
T:Banks of Allan, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:D Major
DE|FGF FED|FAA A2 d|Bdd Add|Bdd Add|
FGF FED|FAA A2 d|BdB AFD|FEE E2 :||
de|fgf fed|faa a2 g|fgf fed|gbb b2 a|
fga efg|def fed|BdB AFD|FEE E2:||

BANKS OF (THE) CLAUDY, THE (Bruach an Chladaigh). AKA and see "An Cailin Donn," "Plain of Boccarough," "The Portaferry Boys." Irish, Air (2/4 or 4/4 time). F Major (O'Sullivan/Bunting): D Dorian (O'Neill, Stanford/Petrie): D Major (Stanford/Petrie). Standard. One part (O'Neill, Stanford/Petrie): AABBC (O'Sullivan/Bunting). Claudy is a village on the right bank of a small stream called the Faughan, which rises in the Sperrin mountains and flows into the River Foyle just before it enters Lough Foyle in County Londonderry. O'Sullivan (1983) notes that old collections record tune was a once popular Irish ballad, known throughout the island and beyond, for, according to A.L. Lloyd, the song has turned up "in Sussex and Scotland, Virginia, USA, and Victoria, Australia, practically word-for-word the same and we have to presume that these versions have probably come from, and been more or less fixed by, some printed original on a broadside or in a popular songster." O'Neill (1913) classifies the melody in a group with "Willy Reilly" et al (see note for "Willy Reilly" [2]). O'Neill relates hearing a memorable rendition by a Chicago piper named John K. Beatty, a native of County Meath who was a genial man and a good musician, though with an inflated opinion of his own abilities ("execution he had-too much of it-but neither time nor rhythm"):
***
An American lady, of wealth and social distinction, proud of her Irish
ancestry, once appealed to us for aid in getting out a suitable programme.
The best Irish talent obtainable was engaged. But how about Mr. Beatty?
It was contended that he could play The Banks of the Claudy with trills
and variations in acceptable style, yet no one could guarantee that he
would confine himself within limits. In any event he was the typical
bard in appearance. His confident air and florid face, adorned with a
heavy white mustache, and a head crowned with an abundance of long
white hair, would naturally appeal to an Irish audience, so his name was
placed on the programme, well towards the end, to minimize the effect
of his possible disregard of instructions.]
When his time came to execute The Banks of Claudy he met all ex-
pectations-and much more. Intoxicated by the applause, all was for-
gotten but the mad desire to get more of it, so he broke loose with
rhapsodical jigs and reels, his head on high, nostrils distended like a
race-horse on the home stretch, while both feet pounded the platform
in unison. He evidently 'had it in' for the regulators, for he clouted the
keys unmercifully, regardless of concord or effect, and when he quit,
from sheer exhaustion, it is safe to say that no such deafening laughter
and handclapping ever greeted an Irish piper before or since. (Irish Folk Music, pg. 26)
***
Sources for notated versions: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody from the harper Charles Byrne, probably at the end of the 18th century; . O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 430, pg. 75. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 43, pgs. 67-68. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; Nos. 422 & 423, pg. 107.

BANKS OF CLYDE, THE [1]. Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard. ABB'. Pipe tune from Ross's collection. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 11.
T:Banks of Clyde, The [1]
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:A Mix
a|c>AA>c A>AA>d|c>AA>e a>fe>d|c>AA>c A>AA>d|B>GG>B g>Bd>B|
c>AA>c A>AA>d|c>AA>e a/g/f/e/ a>e|c>AA>c c<ece|B>GG>B g>Bd>B||
=c<e g>e a>eg>e|=c>eg>e daa>e|1 =c<e g>e a>eg>f|e>Ag>d B<Gd>B:|2
=c<e g>a g>ef>d|e>Ag>d BG d||

BANKS OF GARRY/GARY. AKA and see "Banks of Gray." Scottish, Strathspey or Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB (Athole, McGlashan, Skye): AABB (Huntington). Probably "The Banks of the Garry" composed by John Crerar (1750-1840), a fiddler and head gamekeeper on the Atholl estate in Perthshire, who "seems to have had lessons from Niel Gow, who may have encouraged him to compose" (Alburger, 1983). The tune appears in McGlashan's second collection (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels..., pg. 32) in 1786. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 21 (appears as "Banks of Gray"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 71. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 32. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 113.
T:Banks of Garry, The
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
F/G/|A>BA>F A>Bd>f|A>BA>F E/E/E ~EF/G/|A>B A<F A>Bd>f|
F>DE>F D/D/D D:|
f/g/|a>fd>f A<d f>d|e>df>d e/e/e ef/g/|a>f d<f e<df<d|B>AB>d F/F/F Ff/g/|
a>g d<f A<d f>d|e<d f>d e/e/e e2|f>de>d B>Ad>F|E>DE>F D/D/D D||

BANKS OF GLENOE, THE. AKA and see "Con Carthy's," "The Rooms of Dooah." Irish, Jig. C Major. Standard. ABB.
***
Tune up your fiddle and rosin your bow,
And play us a tune of the banks of Glenoe. (Joyce)
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 78, pg. 42.
T:Banks of Glenloe, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:C
A|GEE cEE|GEE G2A|GEE cBc|Add dcA|GEE cEE|cde eag|fef ded|cAA A2||
d|e3 g^fg|ABA c2d|eaa aga|edd dcd|eg^f ged|cAA cde|fef ded|cAA A2:|

BANKS OF INVERNESS, THE. AKA - "The Banks of Enverness." AKA and see "Croppies March," "The Croppy's Retreat," "Farewell to Limerick," "Fisherman's Lilt," "Freedom for Ireland," "Heather on the Hill," "Lark's Nest," "Molly, What Ails You," "You're Right My Love" (related tune). Scottish; Reel or Strathspey. Irish, Polka. C Major (Carlin): D Major (Cole). Standard. AABB. The melody can also be found within the set dance piece called both "Seige of Ennis" and "Walls of Limerick." Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 86 (#142). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 11 (appears as "The Banks of Enverness"). Gael Linn CEF 146, Seamus McGuire and John Lee - "The Missing Reel."
T:Banks of Inverness, The
L:1/8
M:2/4
K:G
D>D DB,|DE GA|Bd AB/A/|GE EG/E/|D>D DB,|DE GA|Bd AB/A/|G2G2:|
|:Bd dB|ce ed/c/|Bd AB/A/|GE EG/A/|Bd dB|ce e>f|ge (3fed|e2 e>f|
ge (3fed|ed B>A|Bd/B/ AB/A/|GE E2|D>D DB,|DE GA|Bd/B/ AB/A/|G2 G2:|

BANKS OF KILLALOE, THE. Irish, Air ("lively" 6/8 time). F Major. Standard. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 278, pg. 132.
T:Banks of Killaloe, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Lively"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:F
C|F2E F2G|Ad2 c2B|A2F G2F|D3 C2C|F2EF2G|Ad2 c2B|A2F G2E|(F3F2)||c|
d2c d2e|f3 e2e|d2c d2e|d2c A2c|d2c d2e|f3 e2e|d2c d2e|(d3d2)e|f2e d2c|
df2 e2d|c2B A2G|A2D D2E|F2E F2G|Ad2 c2B|A2F G2E|(F3 F2)||

BANKS OF LOCH NESS (Bruachan Loch Nis). Scottish, Slow Strathspey or Air. G Minor. Standard. AB (Cole): AAB (Athole, Fraser, Hunter). Also a song. "The words and music of the Banks of Loch Ness are the composition of a very obscure individual, whom the editor remembers, and are descriptive of the natural beauties which adorn that part of the country, forming a very interesting subject for the genuine poet or landscape painter" (Fraser). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 128. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 16, pg. 6. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 164. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 189.
T:Banks of Loch Ness, The
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Minor
F|D<G G>A B>c d2|F<F F>D F2 F>A|G<G G>A B>c d<f|d/c/B/A/ d>^F G2G:|
f|d>Bf>B g>Bd>f|F<F F>D F2 F>f|d>fB>d c>B c<d|G<G G>^F G2 G>f|
d>Bf>B g>Bf>e|d>Bc>A ~B>GF>D|b>ag>f d<b f>B|A>ed>^F G2G||

BANKS OF LOUGH GOWNA, THE (Bruaca Loca Gamna). AKA and see "The Ball (Humours) of Ballynafeidh," "The Clare Jig," "Delaney's Drummers," "John Naughton's," "The Jug of Brown Ale," "The Kitten and the Frog," "Kitty in the Fog," "The Mug of Brown Ale," "Old Man Dillon," "One Bottle More," "Paddy in London" [2], "Paddy O'Brien's," "The Raffle Jig," "The Rambler From Clare," "Shores of Lough Gowna," "The Slopes of Sliabh Luachra," "The Stonecutter's Jig," "Tom Billy's Jig," "Winter Apples," "Young Tom Ennis." Irish, Double Jig. B Minor (DeMarco & Krassen, O'Neill/Krassen): A Minor (Cranitch, Mitchell, O'Neill/1850 & 1001, Taylor). Standard. AABB (Cranitch, DeMarco & Krassen, O'Neill, Taylor): AA'BB (Mitchell). Sources for notated versions: "a composite based on the old duet recording by Paddy Killoran and Paddy Sweeny and also on the recent recording by John Vesey (DeMarco & Krassen, 1978); piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]. Cotter, No. 17. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 8, pg. 127. DeMarco & Krassen (A Trip to Sligo), 1978; pgs. 30,44, 58. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 113, pg. 96. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 63. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1060, pg. 200. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 264, pg. 58. Taylor (Behind the Half-Door), 1992; No. 55, pg. 39. Shaskeen Records OS-360, Andy McGann, Joe Burke, Felix Dolan - "A Tribute to Michael Coleman," c. 1965 (appears as "Banks of Lough Gamhna"). Shaskeen - "The Joys of Life."
T:Banks of Lough Gowna, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (264)
K:A Minor
ABA AGE|EDE G3|ABA AGE|c2d ecA|ABA AGE|EDE G3|cde ged|cAA A2:|
|:cde g2a|gea ged|cde g2a|geg a3|cde g2a|gea ged|cde fed|ecA A2:|

BANKS OF SPEY, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Minor. Standard. AB (Hardie, Marshall): AAB (Gow): AABB (Gatherer). Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). The Spey is the swiftest-flowing river in Scotland, famous for its firshng and salmon runs. Marshall himself was not only a composer, mathematician and fiddler, but also a keen angler who fashioned beautiful flies (Moyra Cowie, The Life and Times of William Marshall, 1999). Hardie (1992) reminds us that the strathspey form is commonly believed to have originated in the valley of the Spey in north-eastern Scotland. Poet Robert Tannahill wrote verses which fit Marshall's tune:
***
The Banks of Spey
***
Scenes of my childhood, your wanderer hails you,
Wing'd with rude storm, though the winter assails you,
Bleak and dreary as ye are, ye yet hae charms to cheer me,
For here, amidst my native hills, my bonnie lassie's near me.
***
'Tis sad to see the wither'd lea, the drumly flooded fountain,
The angry storm in awful form, that sweeps the moor and mountain;
But frae the surly swelling blast, dear lassie, I'll defend her,
And frae the bonnie banks o' Spey I never more shall wander.
***
Gatherer (Gatherer's Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 38. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 27. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 88. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 48. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 3. Oswald (Caledonian Companion), Book 2.
T:Banks of Spey
L:1/8
M:C
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:A Minor
A2 A>B A>Bc>e|d<c B>A G2 G2|A2 A>B A>B c>d|e>cde g2 g2|
a>ge>c d<ega|e<gg>B G2 GB|A<E A>B c>de>g|e<d c>B A2A:|
|:c|A<E A>c A<E A>c|B>cdB G2 GB|A<E A>c A<E c>d|e>cde g2g2|
a>g e<c d<eg<a|e<g g>B G2 GB|A<E A>B c>d e<g|e<d c>B A2 A2:|

BANKS OF THE ILEN, THE. AKA and see "Banks of the Ilen," "The Barrack St. Boys," "Birnie-boozle," "Braes of Tullymet," "Brides Away," "The Bride to Bed," "Brides to Bed," "The British Naggon," "Caledonean Hunt," "Cheese It," "Corney is Coming," "Crawford's Reel," "Crockett's Honeymoon," "D. Dick's Favourite," "Fahy's Reel" [4], "The Honeymoon," "I saw her," "Kelly's Reel," "The Lumberjack," "Miss Grant of Grant," "Miss Wilson," "Merry Bits of Timber," "My Love is in America," "My Love is in the House," "Shannon Breeze," "Six Mile Bridge." Irish, Reel or Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill prints the tune as a hornpipe, though it is most often heard now-a-days as a reel. It is known in the Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork/Kerry border as "Seanbhean na gCartaí" or "Tom Billy's." Rendered as a double jig, the tune appears under the title "Humours of Drinagh." O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 334, pg. 165. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 90 (reel). O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1592, pg. 295 (hornpipe). O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 837, pg. 144. Paddy Taylor - "The Boy in the Gap" (reel version). Denis Murphy and Julia Clifford - "The Star Above the Garter." Shanachie 79044, Tommy Peoples - "The Iron Man."
T:Banks of the Ilen
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (837)
K:D
AG|FDFA d2 fe|d2 fd ecAG|FDFA d2 fd|ecAF GBAG|
FDFA d2 fe|d2 fd ecAG|FDFA d2 fd|ecAF G2:|
|:de|f2 fd g2 ge|abag fdde|f2 fd g2 ge|abaf g2 fg|abaf gage|
fgfd ecAG|FDFA defd|ecAF G2:|

BANKS OF THE ROSES, THE. AKA - "Banks of the Daisies." Irish, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard. One part. "There is a setting in Stanford-Petrie with the name, 'The Banks of the Daisies.' The version I give here is different.
***
If ever I get married it's in the month of May,
When the fields they are green and the meadows they are gay,
When my truelove and I can sit sport and play
All alone on the banks of the roses (Joyce)
***
Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 128, pg. 65.
T:Banks of the Roses, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:F
AG|FEFG A2 AG|FEFG A2 (3cde|f2 ge fdcA|FEFA c2 de|
f2 ge fdcA|F2 FG A2 FA|c2 fc dcAF|G4F2||

BANKS OF SULLANE, THE (Bruacha an tSúlán). Irish, Air. An Súlán (The Sullane) is a river in County Cork which flows through Cúl Aodha, in the heart of the Cork Gaeltacht, and is a tributary of the Lee. Globestyle Irish CDORBD 085, Jackie Daly - "The Rushy Mountain" (1994. Reissue of Topic recordings).
T:The Banks of tSulán
S:Noel Hill
D:The Irish Folk Festival - Back to the Future
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/8
M:3/4
K:D
E3F G2|d6|d2F4|E3F E2|D6|B2 {cB}AF3|ED3 B,D|\
E3F E2|E6:|E>F G3A|B>c d(e3|e)fe>d (d2|d6)|\
E>F G3A|B>c d(e3|e)fe (e3|e6)|e>fe (d3|d4) EF|\
E3F E2|D6|B2 {cB}AF3|ED3 B,D|E3F E2|E6|]

BANNOCK BURN. Bannochburn was the battle in which Robert Bruce won independence for Scotland. Publisher Riley was originally a composer, music engraver and publisher who worked in London as late as 1805, but removed before 1814 to New York city.
T:Bannock Burn
S:Riley's Flute Melodies, II, #8 (1818)
Q:60
L:1/4
M:C
K:D
F3/4G/4|A3/4B/4 A/F/ A3/4B/4 A/f/|e3/4d/4 e/f/ Bd3/4B/4|\
A3/4B/4 A/F/ D/d/c/B/|A/4F3/4 E/4F3/4D3/2A/|\
=f3/4g/4f/e/d/A/d/e/|=f3/4g/4f/e/de3/4e/4|\
=f3/4e/4f/d/ =c/=F/F/G/|A3/4=B/4 G3/4A/ =F3/2A/|\
A/d/d3/4=c/4 c/B/B/B/|B/e/e/(d/ d/)^~c/ A3/4G/4|\
F/A/B/c/ .d/ {e/}{d/4e/4}.f/ .D/ B/|A/4F3/4 E3/4F/4 D3/2 A/|\
f3/4g/ a/4f/4e/4c/4 d3/4e/4 f/4d/4c/4A/4|\
B3/4c/4 (d/4B/4)(A/4F/4) (G/4F/4)(G/4A/4) (B/4c/4)(d/4B/4)|\
A/4F3/4 E3/4F/4D|]

BANTRY BAY HORNPIPE (Cuain Beantraige). AKA and see "Union Hornpipe." Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. ABB (Miller & Perron, Moylan): AABB (Allan's, O'Neill {4 versions}, Tubridy). Collector and compiler Captain Francis O'Neill was quite taken by the tune, calling it "one of the most delightful traditional hornpipes in existence." The name Bantry is derived from the Gaelic ben, meaning 'horn' and refers to mountains. Thus Bantry is 'the peaks by the sea shore.' Sources for notated versions: learned off an old 78 RPM recording of Michael Hanafin by accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; Source for notated version: O'Neill learned the tune from an accomplished West Clare flute player (and Chicago police patrolman) named Patrick "Big Pat" O'Mahony, a man of prodigious physique of whom he said: "the 'swing' of his execution was perfect, but instead of 'beating time' with his foot on the floor like most musicians he was never so much at ease as when seated in a chair tilted back against a wall, while both feet swung rhythmically like a double pendulum" [O'Neill, Irish Folk Music]. Allan's Irish Fiddler; No. 108, pg. 27. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 66. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 290, pg. 168. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 309, pg. 153 {an altered version to that which appears in O'Neill/Krassen}. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 168. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1573, pg. 292. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 823, pg. 142. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 10. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 25. Cottey Light Industries CLI-903, Dexter et al - "Over the Water" (1993). Flying Fish FF70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969). Revonah Records RS-932, the West Orrtanna String Band (Pa.) - "An Orrtanna Home Companion" (1978. Learned from Martin Byrnes and Kevin Burke).
T:Bantry Bay
L:1/8
M:4/4
R:Hornpipe
K:G
A|BGAG EGDE|G2 GF GBAG|EAAB cBAG|A/B/A GB A3B|
cece BdBd|ABAG E/G/E D2|BGAG EGDE|G2 GF G3:|
|:B|d2 eB dBGB|e2 ed e3f|gfed BGBd|g/a/g fa g2 ef|gbgf eged|
BGAG E/G/E D2|BGAG EGDE|G2 GF G3:|

BANTRY HORNPIPE, THE (Crannciuil Beantraige). Irish, Hornpipe. G Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. Not the "Bantry Bay Hornpipe." The name Bantry is derived from the Gaelic ben, meaning 'horn' and refers to mountains. Thus Bantry is 'the peaks by the sea shore.' O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 330, pg. 163. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 217. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1779, pg. 332. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 937, pg. 160.
T:Bantry Hornpipe, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (937)
K:G
dc|BAGB cBcA|dbge dedB|cecA (3Bcd BG|FGAG FDEG|
BABG cBcA|dbge dedB|cedc (3BAG (3AGF|G2B2G2:|
|:cB|AGAB cBce|dfge dcdB|cecA (3Bcd BG|FGAG FDEF|
GFGA BGFD|GABG ABcA|dgfe (3ded (3cBA|G2B2G2:|
|:Bc|dgBg dgBg|(3gfg bg fdef|gage dedc|(3BAG (3AGF GDB,D|
Ggge dBGB|cBcd efge|dgfe (3ded (3cBA|G2B2G2:|
|:dc|BGGF GDB,D|(3GFG BG ABcA|dcde fedc|(3ded cA d2 cA|
BGGF GDB,D|(3GFG (3BAG ABcA|dgfe (3ded (3cBA|G2B2G2:|

BANTRY LASSES, THE [2] (Cailini Beantraige). Irish, Reel. G Major (O'Neill): D Major (Cranitch). Standard. AAB (O'Neill): AABB (Cranitch). Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 74, pg. 153. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1190, pg. 224. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 469, pg. 90.
T:Bantry Lasses, The [2]
L:1/8
M"C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (469)
K:G
F|A2 FD DFAF|G2FG EFGE|FGFE DFAB|cAGE FDDF|
A2 FD DFAF|G2 FG EFGE|FGFE DFAd|cAGE FDD||
F|Addc dfed|cdef gefd|Addc dfed|cAGE FDDG|
Addc dfed|cdef g2 ag|fgfd efed|cAGE FDD||

BARBARY BELL. AKA - "St. Patrick's Day (in the Morning)." English, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), 1951, Vol. 1; pg. 39. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 106.
T:Barbary Bell
T:St. Patrick's Day
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
D|GAG GBc|ded dBG|ABc BAG|EFE E2D|GAG GBc|
ded dBG|ABc BAG|E2F G2:|
|:f|e2f g2e|fed d2f|e2f g2a|bge e2g/a/|bgb afa|geg dBG|
A2B c2A|BGE E2:|

BAREFOOT BOY, THE ("Bouchaleen Oge" or "An Buacaill Lomcosac"). Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB' (O'Neill/Krassen, 1001 & 1850): AAB (O'Neill/1915). O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 175, pg. 96. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 66. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1074, pg. 202. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 276, pg. 60.
T:Barefoot Boy, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (276)
K:G
E|DGG A2G|FDD FEF|DGG A2G|Add cAF|DGG A2G|FDD FGA|BdB cAF|AGG G2:|
|:c|B2B cAA|BAG FGA|BdB cAc|BGB c2A|1 B2B cAA|BAG FGA|BdB cAF|AGG G2:|2
GBd gfe|dec Bcd|ecA FGA|BGG G2||

BARLEY CAKES [2]. AKA and see "Barley Sugar." Scottish, Jig. G Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. John Glen finds the tune first published in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 68). The tune is suggested by the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society (in RSCDS Book 13) as the accompaniment for the dance Barley Bree, a dance in which one turn last 40 bars rather than the usual 32, the whole dance being four turns long. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 389. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 17.
T:Barley Cakes [2]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Gow - 3rd Repository
K:G
c|B2G (B/c/dB)|A2=F (A/B/cA)|B2G (B/c/dB)|~d3g3|B2G (B/c/dB)|A2=F ABc|
dcB cBA|G3G,2:|
|:d|gag fgf|{f}e2d B3|gag f2g|a3d3|c2a B2g|ABG F>ED|G>AB AGF|G3G2:|

BARLEY MALT, THE. Irish, "Song Air: not a Jig" (6/8 time, "with spirit"). A Dorian. Standard. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 260, pg. 125.
T:Barley Malt, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"With spirit"
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:A Minor
D2|E2A A2A|B2B G2B|c2A B2G|(E3 E2)d|e2e de^f|g2G GAB|c2A B2G|(A3 A2)||
E2A A3|BAB GBd|e2e d2e|(c3 c2)d|e2e de^f|g2G GAB|c2A B2G|(A3 A2)||

BARLOW KNIFE [1]. AKA and see "Cabin Creek." Old-Time Breakdown and Song. USA, Virginia, West Virginia. G Major (also played in the key of D). Standard. AABB: AABBCC (Phillips). A barlow knife is a type of folding pocket knife that features double or single blades that open at one end only. Sources for notated versions: music from Henry Reed (Glen Lyn, Va., who called the tune "Cabin Creek) and words from Oscar Wright (Appalachin, W.Va.) via the Fuzzy Mountain String Band (N.C.) [Kuntz]; Danny Gardella [Phillips].
***
I been livin' here all my life,
All I got is a Barlow Knife;
Buck horn handle and a barlow blade,
Best dang knife that ever was made.
***
Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 35. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 25-26. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 297-298. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 19. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 30. Biograph 6007, Ebenezer- "Tell It to Me." Rounder Records 0035, The Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973).
T:Barlow Knife
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Kuntz - Ragged But Right
K:G
ef|g2 gg fgaf|g2 g2 d2 (g2|g2) bg f2 af|efge d2 ef|g2 gg fgaf g2 g2 d2 (g2|
g2) bg f2 af|efge d2 (3Bcd||
|:e2 d2 BABd|e2 dB G2 g2|efed BAGB|A2 G2 G2 (e2|e)fed BABd|e2 dB G2g2|
efed BAGB|A2 G2 G2 (A2|A2) Ad BA G2|A2 d2 G2 (A2|A2) Ad BAGB|
A2 G2 G2 (A2|A2) Ad BA G2|A2 d2 G2 (A2|A2) Ad BAGB|A2 G2 G2||

BARN DANCE SCHOTTISCHE. American, Schottische. USA, Arizona. C Major. Standard. AB. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 93, pg. 32.
T:Barn Dance Schottische
L:1/8
M:4/4
S: Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:C
c>d|e2c2 cGcd|e2d2d2 de|f2B2 BABc|d2c2c2cd|e2c2 cBcd|e2d2d2e2|
f2B2 BdBA|G2c2 c4||{(D/}E2)C2 CCDE|F2D2D2A2|c2 BA GABc|
d2c2c2 BA|{(D/}E2)C2 CCDE|F2 FE D4|{(^A/}B)dBA GABc|d2c2c2||

BARNEY BRALLAGHAN (Bernard Ua Brolcain). AKA and see "Blewitt's Jig," "Mrs. Barney Brallaghan," "'Twas on a windy night." Irish, English; Hop or Slip Jig (9/8 time). D Major. Standard. One part (Raven): AABBC (Roche, O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABBCC (Cole, Kerr, Tubridy): AABBCC' (O'Neill/Krassen). The tune was set to the words "Barney B(r)allaghan's Courtship" by Hudson, c. 1850. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 57. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 69, pg. 155. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 229, pg. 26. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 83. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1145, pg. 216. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 429, pg. 84. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 131. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. II, pg. 26, #259. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 42. Cottey Light Industries CLI-903, Dexter et al - "Over the Water" (1993).
T:Barney Brallaghan
L:1/8
M:9/8
K:D
F2A ABA ABA|F2A ABA Bcd|F2A ABA ABA|B2e e2d cBA:|
|:f2a f2a fed|f2a f2a gfe|f2a f2a fed|g2f e2d cBA:|
|:f3a3d3|g2f e2d cBA|f2f efe d2A|Bcd A2G FED:|

BARNEY O'NEILL (Brian Ua Neill). Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 71. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1106, pg. 208. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 296, pg. 64. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 28.
T:Barney O'Neill
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (296)
K:D
d/B/|AFD DFA|B2d F2A|AFD DEF|GFG EFG|AFD DFA|B2d F2A|Bdd F2E|FDD D2:|
|:g|fed dAd|efe efg|fed faa|agf eag|fed B2d|A2d F2A|Bdd F2E|FDD D2:|

BARNS OF CLYDE, THE. Scottish, Reel. D Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by Joseph Campbell. Glen finds the tune first published in Joshua Campbell's 1778 collection (pg. 77). Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), Vol. 1, 1891; pg. 22.
T:Barns of Clyde, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Glen Collection
K:D Minor
^c|d2 DE FGA=B|c>dcG ECGE|F>EDE FGAe|fde^c dDD:|
e|f>gag f>ede|c/c/c ec Gceg|f>ga>g f>efd|gece dDDe|f>gag fgab|
agfe gedc|d^cdA =cGAE|CEcE D/D/D D||

BARONY JIG, THE [2] (Port An Baruntact). Irish, Long Dance (9/8 time). A Minor. Standared. AABB. No apparent relationship to Roche's "Barony Jig" [1]. Carlin (English Concertina), 1977; pg. 51. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 970, pg. 166.
T:Barony Jig, The [2]
L:1/8
M:9/8
R:Set Dance
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (970)
K:A Minor
B|c2A c2A AGE|c2A ABd e2d|c2A c2A AGE|GED DEG A2B|
c2A c2A AGE|c2A ABd e2d|c2A efd cBA|GED DEG A2:|
|:B|c2d ecA AGE|c2d e/f/ed e2d|c2d ecA AGE|GED DEG A2B|
c2d ecA AGE|c2d e/f/ed e2e|cde ged ecA|GED DEG A2:|

BARRACK HILL [1] (Cnoc An t-Sluaigteac). Irish, English; Single Jig or Slide (12/8 time). Ireland, Munster. A Dorian. Standard. AAB (Moylan, Sharp): AABB (Karpeles, O'Neill, Raven, Roche, Stanford/Petrie). A slide-time version of the melody known as "Haughs o' Cromdale," "O'Neill's March" and "Tralee Gaol." Editor Moylan notes the melody has also been known as "The cat jumped into the mouse's hole and didn't come down till morning." Petrie (1855) identifies the melody as "a Munster jig" and remarks that "it had a peculiar kind of dance." He also adds "Same as a Scotch tune." Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 25. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 320, pg. 183. O'Neill (1001), 1907/1986; No. 410, pg. 81. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 178. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. II; No. 250, pg. 23. Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 57.
T:Barrack Hill [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
R:Single Jig
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (410)
K:A Dorian
e2A A2f|e2d Bcd|e2A A2B|G2A Bcd|e2A A2f|e2d Bcd|e2d g2B|A3 A3:|
|:e2d efg|a2b g2e|d2e d2B|d2e dcB|1 e2d efg|a2b g2e|d2B g2B|A3 A2:|2
e2d e2f|g2a b2a|g2e d2B|A2a agf||

BARREL RAFFERTY'S (JIG). Irish, Jig. A Minor. Standard. AABB. The title comes from the nickname of the flute-playing father of East Galway/New York flute player Mike Rafferty, whose lung capacity would fill a barrel. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 321, pg. 172.
T: Barrel Rafferty's
S: M. Rafferty
Q: 325
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Ador
D | E2 A AGE | A2 B c2 E | EDE GFG | A2 A GED |
E2 A AGE | A2 B c2 d | ege dBG | A3 A2 :|
d | e2 a aga | b2 a g2 e | ede g2 g | a2 e ged |
e2 a aga | b2 a g2 e | age dBG | A3 A2 :|

BARRINGTON HORNPIPE. English, Hornpipe. England, Northumberland. G Major. Standard. AABB. From A Tutor for the Northumbrian Small-pipes by J.W. Fenwick, published in the late 1800's; composed by Thomas Todd. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 98.
T:Barrington Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
Bc|d>bg>d B>gd>B|G>ec>A F>dB>G|D>EF>G ABcd|ed^cd A2Bc|
d>bg>d B>gd>B|G>ec>A F>dB>G|DEFG A>ed>F|G2B2G2:|
|:Bc|d^cdB G>Bd>g|e^de=c A>ce>g|dbca BgAG|F>ed>^c d2Bc|
d/e/d/^c/dB G>Bd>g|e^de=c Aceg|dgfe (3ded (3cBA|(3GBd (3gdB G2:|

BARRONSTOWN RACES, THE (Coimleanga Baile-Barroin). Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 59. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1038, pg. 194. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 248, pg. 55.
T:Barronstown Races, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (248)
K:G
F|DGG GFG|BGc BAF|DFE FEF|A2d cAF|DGA GFG|BAG Bcd|fed cAF|AGG G2:|
|:d|dgg gfg|abg fed|cBc fef|abg fed|dgg gdc|BAG Bcd|fed cAF|AGG G2:|
|:F|DGA BAG|d/c/Bd cAG|FGA cAF|c/B/Ac BAF|GFG BAB|cBc dbg|fed cAF|AGG G2:|
|:d|gdg gbg|fdf f/g/af|ede e/f/ge|dBG Gac|BAB cBc|dcd eag|fed cAF|GGG G2:|

BARROWBURN. AKA - "Barrow Burn Reel." Scottish, Irish; Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by Addie Harper of Wick, Scotland. 'Burn' is a Scots word for stream. The tune is identified as a traditional Shetland reel on Sharon Shannon's album, who was apparently unaware that it is a modern composition. Taylor (Where's the Crack?), 1989; pg. 14. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "Bag of Cats" medley).
T:The Barrowburn reel
C:Addie Harper
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=150
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:D
A2|:D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA BddB|A2 AB d2 de|fedB AFEF|
D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA Bdde|f2 af egfe|1dBAB d2 D2 :|
2 dBAB d2|:cd |
e2 ef ecBA|f2 fg fdBA|g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|
g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|g2 ag f2 ed|BAAB d2 :|

BÁSAÍTEAR NA LACHAIN LÁ NOLLAG. AKA and see "The Ducks Die on Christmas Day."

BASHFUL MAID, THE (An Og-bean Cutail). Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; Pg. 59. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1037, pg. 194. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 247, pg. 55.
T:Bashful Maid, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S: O'Neill - 1001 Gems (247)
K:D
A|FAA AFA|AFA d2B|GBB FAA|EFE E2A|FAA AFA|AFA d2B|ABc dcB|AFD D2:|
|:d|ecA ABA|ecA d2A|GBB FAA|EFE E2d|ecA ABA|edc d2B|ABc dcB AFD D2:|

BASKET OF TURF (An Cliaban/Cliabh Móna). "Bundle and Go" [1], "The Creel of Turf," "The Disconsolate Buck," "The Lass from Collegeland," "The Unfortunate Rake," "The Wandering Harper," "The Wee Wee Man." Irish, Double Jig. E Minor. Standard. AABB. Some versions are set in the dorian mode, and it is sometimes played with the parts reversed in the order given in Breathnach's CRE II (1976). The song "The Wandering Harper" is set to this air. Holden (Collection of the most esteemed old Irish Melodies, Dublin, 1807) gives it as "The Unfortunate Rake." The melody compares with "Winter Garden Quadrille" in O'Neill's Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (No. 97). Sources for notated versions: accordion player Bill Harte, 1968 (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Frank McCollam (Ballycastle, County Antrim) [Mulvihill]; fiddler Con Cassidy (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 52, pg. 28. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 152 (appears as 1st "Untitled Jig"). Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 12, pg. 67. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 735, pg. 137. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 32, pg. 22.
T:Basket of Turf, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (32)
K:E Minor
E|EBB BAG|FDF AGF|EBB Bcd|AGF E2E|EGB BAG|FDF AGF|GAB Bcd|AGF E2:|
|:B|Bee efg|dcB AGF|Eee efg|f^df e2e|Eee efg|dcB AGF|GAB Bcd|AGF E2:|

BASS RIVER. Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 80.
T: Bass River
C: (c) B. Black
Q: 325
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: D
A | dcdA (3Bcd AF | GFGB AFDB, | A,DFA dcdA | (3Bcd AF E3 A |
dfec dAFA | GBAF EDB,E | DF (3FFF EAce | dBAF D3 :|
A | fdfa gB (3BAB | cBce dF F2 | GBAc Bdce | dfaf e3 g |
fdfa gB (3BAB | cBce dF F2 | GB (3BBB Acec | dBAF D3 :|

BASTRINGUE, LA. Canadian (originally), American; Air and Reel. Canada; Quebec, Prince Edward Island. USA, New England. D Major ('A' part) & D Mixolydian ('B' part). Standard. AABB (Miller & Perron, Perlman, Sweet): AABB' (Brody). "La Bastringue" has its origins in an old French tune from the 17th or 18th century. In French Canada it became a "party song" which tells of an older man who wants to dance "La Bastringue" with a girl. He soon finds he isn't up to the pace, however, and to save face tries to beg off by feigning concern for the woman's stamina. She proves equal to the task, though, and he finally just has to give up. The first verse goes:
***
Mademoiselle, voulez-vous danser La Bastringue,
Mademoiselle, voulez-vous danser,
La Bastringue est commencee.
***
The song has become as close to being an unofficial French-Canadian national folk anthem as any, though it is perhaps better known now as a dance tune. Transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.) recalled it as one of the first dance tunes he learned, and related that his father played it for the first tune of the evening, to get everyone moving in the house. Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]; Omer Marcoux (Concord, N.H.) [Miskoe & Paul]; Louise Arsenault (b. 1956, Mont Carmel, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Wellington) [Perlman]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 36. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 141. Miskoe & Paul (Omer Marcoux), 1994; pg. 37. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 152. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 59. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), pg. 12. Folkways FG 3532, "Alan Mills and Jean Carignan." Green Linnet SIF-1051, Jackie Daly, Seamus & Manus McGuire - "Buttons and Bows" (1984). Legacy 120l, Jean Carignan- "French Canadian Fiddle Songs." Philo 2002, "Beaudoin Family." Varrick VR-038, Yankee Ingenuity - "Heatin' Up the Hall" (1989). Voyager 320-S, Frank Ferrel- "Fiddle Tunes."
T:La Bastringue
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
f2ff f2gf|e2c2d3d|c2d2efec|d2e2f2d2|f2ff f2gf|e2c2d2A2|
g3fe2d2|B2c2d2A2:|
|:d2fd ad fd|=c2ec gc ec|d2fd ad fd|bg ec dc BA|
d2fd ad fd|=c2ec gc ec|d2fd ad fa|bg ec d2 (3ABc:|

BATCHELDER'S (REEL). AKA and see "Atlanta Hornpipe," "Quigley's Reel." American, Canadian; Reel. F Major. Standard. AABB. The tune has sometimes been credited to the fiddler of the title, Alvah Batchelder, but is also associated with Albert Quigly under a title with his name; they were both noted New England fiddlers. It appears in Ryan's Mamouth Collection (1884) and Coles 1001 (1940) as the "Atlanta Hornpipe." The tune is a popular number among North American contra dance circles and can be found in the Pacific Northwest as well as New England. Sources for notated versions: Jane McBride with Strathspey [Phillips]; accordion player Laurie Andres (Seattle) [Songer]. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 130. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 19. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 24. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 9. Alcazar Dance Series FR 203, "New England Chestnuts" (1980). Kicking Mule KM216, Strathspey - "New England Contra Dance Music" (1977).
T:Batchelder's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
K:F
f2af ef ge|f2c2c2=Bc|dc BA BA GF|EF GA Bc de|
f2af ef ge|f2c2 (3cdc =Bc|dc BA BA GF|EF GE F4:|
|:A2cA cA cA|B2dB dB dB|A2cA cA cA|BA GF EF GB|
A2cA cA cA|B2dB dB dB|Ac fa bg eg|f2a2f2c2:|

BATTERING RAM, THE [1]. Irish, Double Jig. Ireland, Co. Sligo. G Major. Standard. ABC (Flaherty): AABBCC (Brody, Mallinson, Mulvihill, Russell, Sullivan. Tubridy): ABCD (Miller). Doolin, north County Clare, tin whistle player Micho Russell saw the melody as a programmatic piece which reminded him of the battering ram which the English used to evict poor people in Ireland in the 19th century. Each succeeding part represented the increasing force of the ram as it demolished the house. Ciaran Carson, in his book Last Night's Fun (1996) describes flute player Seamus Tansey's rendition:
***
He soars into 'The Battering Ram'-not the standard version, but the
one he got from Jim Donoghue, the great Sligo tin-whistle-player who
perversely played a 'C' whistle ('D' is standard) out of the side of his
mouth, and produced a great strong flute-like tone full of wood and
embouchure and breath, jumping octaves; and he put a funny twist
into this jig; reversing it and generally standing phrases on their
heads. Tansy imputes many of his stylistic traits to Donoghue, and
this tune is a tribute, an hommage, a dedication, Tansey playing it
beautifully as he can because he loves the playing of Jim Donoghue,
and he is beholden to him. (pgs. 60-61)
***
Sources for notated versions: 'Clarke's whistle' {i.e. a conical whistle} player Jim Donoghue, 1910-1990 (Drimacoo, Monasteraden, Co. Sligo, Ireland) [Flaherty]; the Tulla Ceili Band [Mulvihill]; sessions in the Regent Hotel, Leeds, England [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 36. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 54. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 178. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 95, pg. 41. Miller & Perron (Traditional Irish Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 32. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 77, pg. 81. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989; pg. 12. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 29, pg. 12. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 35. Front Hall, How To Change a Flat Tire- "A Point of Departure." Shanachie 79021, "Chieftains #1."
T:Battering Ram, The [1]
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
B|dBG BAG|dBG G2B|dBG AGE|GED D2B|
dBG BAG|B/c/dG BAG|A3 BAB|GED D2:|
|:B|deg aga|bge edB|deg aga|bge e2b|bag age|ged e/f/ge|dBG AGE|GED D2:|
|:d|B/c/BG A/B/AG|B/c/BD D2B|BAG AGE|GED ded|
B/c/BG A/B/AG|B/c/dG BAG|AGA BAB|GED D2:|

BATTLE OF AUGHRIM, THE (Cath Eachroma). AKA and see "Lament for the Battle of Aughrim," "Loch Torridon," "The Return from Fingal." Irish, March (2/4 time), Polka or Lament. E Aeolian (Brody): A Dorian (Breathnach, Cowdery, Mallinson, Miller & Perron, Mitchell, O'Neill, Sullivan, Tubridy). Standard. One part (Brody, O'Neill): AABB (Cowdery, Mallinson, Mitchell, Sullivan, Tubridy): AA'BB (Breathnach, Miller & Perron). The piece is descriptive of the last great defeat of the native Gaelic army in Ireland, in 1691, following the Battle of the Boyne. Aughrim itself is located about 30 miles from Galway city and is a small village. Russell (1989) related a bit of folklore which had the battle seeming to go one for days and days. There is a hollow or small valley on the road outside the village which Russell maintained was "filled up with blood from the people that were killed, and ever since then it is known as Bloody Valley."
***
Cowdery (1990) finds the melody another expansion/contraction of the central musical motifs of the old ballad air "The Boyne Water." "Lament for the Battle of Aughrim" was printed in the appendix to Walker's Historical Memoirs of the Irish Bards (1786). In 19th century Ireland the piece was a piper's tour-de-force (along with a programmatic tune called "The Fox Chase"), and notable renditions were played by such famous musicians as County Galway's Martin O'Reilly. Breathnach (1985) says the tune was played for the last figure of the (County Clare polka) set. Sources for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Brody]; a Clare version from flute and whistle player Micko Russell (Doolin, Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]; piper Leo Rowsome [Cowdery]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Martin Byrnes [Sullivan]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 188, pg. 64 (appears as "Cath Eachroma"). Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 37. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 68. Cowdery (The Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 52, pg. 121. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 32, pg. 13. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 65. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; no. 119, pg. 98. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1845, pg. 347. Russell (The Piper's Chair), 1989; pg. 20. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 37, pg. 15. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Book Two), 1999; pg. 4. Claddagh CC 1, Leo Rowsome - "Ri na bPiobairi" (1969). Claddagh CC14, "Chieftains 4" (1974). Leader LEACD 2004, "Martin Byrnes" (1969). Shanachie 79024, "Chieftains 4" (1974/1983).
T:Battle of Aughrim, The
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:A Dorian
G|E2 A2A2 Bd|e2d2c2A2|B2G2 GF GA|BG AG E2D2|E2A2A2 Bd|
e2 ed e2 ag|e2d2 Be dB|A4 A3:|
|:e|a2 ag e2 e/f/g|a2 ag e2 fg|a2 af g2 ge|de dB G4|a2 ag e2 e/f/g|
a2 ag e2d2|B2 e/f/e d2B2|A4 A3:|

BATTLE OF KINLOCH LOCHY, THE. AKA - "Blar Leine." Scottish, Slow Air. G Minor. Standard. AABB. The event at Kinlochlochy (the head of Loch Lochy) in 1544 was a fierce clan conflict between the MacDonalds of Lochaber and Glengarry (aided by the Camerons) against the Clan Fraser, aided by the Grants and Clan Chattan. It arose from a dispute regarding the chieftanship of the Clanranald; the MacDonalds supported one Ian Moideartach (John Moydartach or John of Moidart), while the Frasers promoted Ranad Gallda or Galda (Ronald Gualda), the grandson of the chief of the Clan Fraser, Lord Lovat. The King's agent in the north of Scotland, the Earl of Huntly, took the opporunity to punish Clanranald for their plundering of the lands of the Grants, and marched north with his army, joining with the Frasers, Grants, Clan Chatten and others. This alliance succeeded in placing Ronald Gallda in charge of Moidart, but on the return journey Huntly, who now led the force, divided them at a stream flowing into Loch Lochy. One part of this divided force, comprised of the Frasers under Gallda, along with men of Urquhart and Glen Morrison, was set upon by Ian Moideartach and his men as they came to a narrow pass the the south end of the Loch. A great defeat was dealt to the Frasers and Gallda was slain, along with Lord Lovat and many of the clan gentry. Neil (1991) says "it was probably one of the fiercest battles that has ever been fought by the clans involved and many of the traditions regarding it still persist in Highland song and story." Captain Simon Fraser, who composed the tune, erroneously translated the alternate title as having to do shirts, but Neil maintains the name "Blar Leine" came from the ground the battle was fought on--the Gaelic 'blar' being a plain or field, and 'leine' signifying a wet plain, and, in fact, he says there are several place names in the area of the battle such as Lianachan and Lianda which refer to marshy ground. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 8, pg. 3. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 153, pg. 197.
T:Battle of Kinloch Lochy
T:Blar Leine
L:1/8
M:3/4
S:Fraser Collection
K:C Minor
G>^F|G2 B2 c>=B|c2 d2 e>c|d2 g2 fg|c2 BG e>c|d2 g2 b>d|c2 BG e>g|
d2 c2 d/c/=B/c/|G4:|
|:E/F/G/B/|e4 f/e/d/c/|d2 c2 (3cdf|g4 g/f/e/d/|e2 G2 f/e/d/c/|d2 g2 b>d|
c2 BG e>g|d2 c2 d/c/=B/c/|G4:|

BATTLE OF SHERIFFMUIR, THE. Scottish, Pibroch. This pipe pibroch was composed after the Jacobite rising of 1715. Collinson (1975) maintains this piece gave the "Sherramuir March" its name. The march was a previously existing melody identified with the Stewart clan as their march tune. Not only was it played at Sheriffmuir, says Collinson, but it had previously been heard at Pinkie (1547) and Inverlochy (1645), and again post-Sheriffmuir at Prestonpans 1745 during the last Jacobite rebellion.
T:The Battle of Sherrifmuir
T:Here's a Health To Them Far Awa'
D:Billy Jackson & John Martin: The Braes of Lochiel
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:A
E|A>GF FEF|A3 A2B|c>BA dcd|e3 e2a|c'ba agf|e>dc def|
edc BAB|A3 A2::c|edc BAB|A3 A2c|edc def|e3 e2a|
c'ba agf|e>dc def|edc BAB|A3 A2::e|a>ec a>ec|e3 efg|
agf edc|B3 B2a|c'ba agf|e>dc def|edc BAB|A3 A2:|

BATTLE OF THE SOMME, THE. Scottish, Retreat March (9/8 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. This pipe tune, a retreat from Army Manual (Book 2) and composed by William Laurie (1882-1916) commemorates one of the greatest and most terrible battles of World War I. Jack Campin communicates that Laurie "just lived to see it become an immediate success before dying of his wounds a few months later." Gatherer (Gatherer's Musicial Museum), 1987; pg. 20. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 39. Front Hall FHR-024, Fennig's All-Star String Band - "Fennigmania" (1981. Learned from the Albion Country Band).
T:The Battle of the Somme
C:Willie Laurie
S:Forgotten
R:march
M:9/8
L:1/8
Z:Nigel Gatherer
K:D
A|f<af d3 d>cd|e>dG B3 A3| B<GB A3 d3|f<af e3 e2 A|f<af d3 d>cd|
e>dG B3 A3|B<GB A3 f3|e>fe d3 d2::z|d>cd e3 A3|e>fg f<af d3|\
f>ef g3 A3|
f<af e3 e2 A|f<af d3 d>cd|e>dG B3 A3|B<GB A3 f3|e>fe d3 d2:|]

BAY AND THE GREY, THE. Irish, Jig and Air. G Major. Standard. AB. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 146, pg. 74.
T:Bay and the Grey, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
GBd g3|agf g3|d2g fdc|B3A3|GBd =f2|g=fe f3|d2g fdc|B3G3||
BGB ded/c/|BGB ded/c/|Bcd edc|B3 dcB|AFG cec|AFA cec|Bcd edc|B3G3||

BAY OF FUNDY. Canadian, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by fiddler Bill Guest, originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, but lately a resident of Goodlettsville, Tennessee, who has composed a number of traditional sounding tunes and published several collections. The Bay of Fundy is located between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and is the location of some of the most dramatic tides in the world. Source for notated version: John Roberts (Eng./Vt.) [Spandaro]. Guest, A Hundred Favorite Fiddle Tunes. Johnson, No. 1, 1991; pg. 5. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 15. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 24. Audat 477-3002, Bill Guest - "50 Great Fiddle Hits" (c. 1970's). Dorian Discovery DIS-80103, Helicon - "Horizons" (1992). Rooster Records RSTR 117, "Swallowtail."
T:Bay of Fundy
C:Bill Guest
L:1/8
M:2/2
Q:420
K:D
fg |"D"a2 ab afdf |afbf a2 ef |"C"gfga ge=ce |geae g2 fg |"D"a2 ab afdf |
afbf a2 ef |"A"gfeg "D"fedf |"A"ecAc "D"d2 :: cB |"D"Adfd edfd |
"G"Bdgd Bdgd |"D"Adfd Adfd |"A"cAcd efec |"D"Adfd edfd |"G"Bdgd Bdgd |
"D"fedf "A"edce |"D"d2 f2 d2 :|

BE EASY, YOU ROGUE (Fan Go Socair A Roguire). AKA and see "Phelim O'Neill," "Priest With the Collar," "Sheelah in Sorrow," "Stop, You Rogue, Stop!" Irish, Double Jig. A Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. "Be Easy, You Rogue" is O'Neill's 'free translation' of the Irish title "Stadh a Rogaire Stadh!" O'Neill also remarks that his is a "florid setting of an old jig or march in four strains. Its relationship to 'The Priest with the Collar' in the Petrie collections is plainly evident." Source for notated version: from the manuscript collection of retired businessman and Irish music enthusiast John Gillan, collected from musicians in his home county of Longford and the adjoining Leitrim [O'Neill]. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 165, pg. 92. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1109, pg. 209. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 299, pg. 64.
T:Be Easy, You Rogue
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill
K:A
E|A<cA BAF|d3 d2z|A?B/cA BAF|B3 B2z|AcA BAF|ded dfa|ecA BAF|A3 A2:|
|:c/d/|ecA ecA|d3 dfa|ecA ecA|B3 B2z|AcA BAF| DFA dfa|ecA BAF|A3 A2:|
|:d|cAA BFF|AEE dfa|ecA BAF|B2z B2d|cA/B/c/A/ BG/A/B/G/|AE/F/G/E/ dfa|
ecA BAF|A3 A2:|
|:e|aga f/e/d/c/B/A/|ddd d2f|aga f/e/d/c/B/A/|BBB B2f/g/|aga f/e/d/c/B/A/|
DFA dfa|ecA BAF|A3 A2:|

BÉAL BOCHT, AN (The Poor Mouth). Irish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AABB. An early composition by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 83, pg. 43.
T: An Béal Bocht
C: (c) B. Black
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Em
D | E3 B GFGA | BABd e2 ef | gefd efdB | AcBA GFED |
E3 B GFGA | BABd e2 ef | gbge fafd | ABGF E3 :|
e | eBBe gBBg | fddf a2 ga | b2 ge b2 ge | AcBA GE E2 |
eBBe gBBg | fddf a2 ga | bagf egfe | AcBG E3 :|

BEAMISH'S GOAT (Gabar Beamais). Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AB. Collected by O'Neill from Beamish himself who was from an adjoining parish from the one Captain Francis O'Neill was from in County Cork. Despite this, and that they were contemporaries in age, the two men learned substantially different musical repertoires from their respective birthplaces (see O'Neill, Irish Folk Music). The tune is a two-part version of the tune family which includes "The Jolly Tinker" and the "Timpan Reel." O'Neill corrected the version he printed in 1850 for his later 1001 Gems collection. Source for notated version: Abram Beamish, originally from County Cork [O'Neill]. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 120. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1332, pg. 244. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 589, pg. 108.
T:Beamish's Goat
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (589)
K:A Dorian
dB|A2 AB GFGB|AGAB e2 dB|A2 AB GFGB|dBGB d2 dB|
A2 AB GFGB|AGAB cBcd|edef gfge|dBGB A2||
Bd|e2 ef gfgf|edcd efgf|e2 ef gfge|dBGB d2 Bd|e2 ef gfgf|
efge a2 ef|gaba gfef|gedB A2||

BEAN A TI AR LÁR. See "Bean an Tighe ar Lár."

BEAN AN TIGHE AR LÁR [1] (Woman of the House). AKA and see "Bean a' Tigh Faoi Chlair" (The Woman of the House in the Closed Coffin). "Woman of the House." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major. Standard. AA'BBC. The 'A' part is the same as "Bummer's Reel." A popular reel in County Donegal. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) relates that the the name "Bean a' Tigh Faoi Chlair" was said by Francie Dearg O'Byrne to have come from the time that Bidi a' Mhuc Ros, a renowned lilter from Muckros Head near Kilcar, Donegal, died and was waked in an open coffin in her cottage, as was the custom in the county. Toward dawn the lid was placed on her coffin and at that instant the door flew open and two fairy fiddlers came in to pay their respects. They walked up to the coffin, produced their instruments, and proceeded to play the reel now known as "The Woman of the House" enough times through so that the musicians in attendance could pick it up, then they walked over to the fireplace and were whisked up the chimney, never to be seen again. Sources for notated versions: fiddlers Micky and John Doherty (Stranorlar, Co. Donegal, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Donegal fiddler Tommy Peoples [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 133, pg. 72. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 39 (appears as "Bean A'Tí Ar Lar").

BEAN DUBH A' GHLEANNA (The Dark Woman of the Glen). AKA and see "The Maiden," "Moll Dubh an Gleanna," "The Dark Maiden of the Valley." Irish, Slow Air (3/4 time). Ireland, Connemara. G Major. Standard. One part. The Irish is pronounced 'Ban dhuv an glanna'. This Connemara melody is a variant of "Seamas Og Pluincead" (Young James Plunkett). "The Maiden" and "The Dark Maiden of the Valley" are simpler forms of the tune. Source for notated version: fiddler "Daniel Sullivan of Boston, a native of Millstreet, County Cork," via 'the celebrated Irish piper' Patrick Touhey [O'Neill]. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 96, pg. 82. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 6, pg. 2. Green Linnet SIF 1045, Joe Burke - "The Tailor's Choice."
T:Bean Dubh An Ghleanna
T:Dark Woman of the Glen
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:70
S:Seamus Ennis
R:Air
Z:Paul Kinder
K:G
D|G>AB>c d>>B G3 B/2d/2|g4 a/2g/2e/2f/2 d3 c/2A/2 B4|!
G3 A/2B/2 cB A4 A/2G/2F/2A/2 G6:|(3def g4 (3feg a4|!
(3bba g4 (3aag f/2 d2 c/2A/2 B4|G3 B/2d/2 g4 (3efg a4|!
bc' b2 a2 g4|(3aag f/2 d2 c/2A/2 B>cAF G4|!
(3ABd|g4 a/2g/2e/2f/2 d4 c/2A/2 B4|!
G4 A/2B/2 cB A4|A/2G/2F/2A/2|G6||!

BEAN SETTING [1]. English, Morris Dance Tune ('A' part - 12/16, 'B' part- 6/8 and 9/8 [Bacon, Raven]). G Major. Standard. AABB (Bacon, Raven): AB, x4 (Mallinson). From the area of Headington in England's Cotswolds. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 175. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 32-33. Mallinson (Mally's Cotswold Morris Book), Vol 2, 1988; No. 56, pg, 27. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 74. Carthage CGLP 4406, Hutchings et al. - "Morris On" (1983/1972).
T:Bean Setting [1]
L:1/16
M:12/16
K:G
G3 G2A B3 B3|A2B cBA G2A B3|G3 G2A B3B3|A2B cBA G6:|
L:1/8
M:6/8
|:B>AG B>AG|B<dd d2B|A>BA A2B|c2d e>dc|B>AG B<dB|
L:1/8
M:9/8
A>Bc def g3:|

BEANS IN THE POT. Irish, Polka. C Major. Standard. ABB. Composed by Falmouth, Massachusetts, musician and writer Bill Black. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 198, pg. 105.
T: Beans in the Pot
C: (c) B. Black
Q: 300
R: polka
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: C
cGGB c>ded | cGcG ED D2 | cGGB c>def | g>ecA AG G2 |
cGGB c>ded | cGcG EDDB | cFGF EcAF | E>FGE DC C2 ||
e>cea g>dgb | abag ed g2 | affe eddc | Bcde cB A2 :|

BEAR ISLAND REEL (Ríl Bheara). Irish, Reel. E Dorian. Standard. Composed by accordion Finbar Dwyer, though it has sometimes been credited to Paddy Fahy. The tune is named for Beara Island, which lies just off the coast of Castletownbere, connected to the mainland by ferry. The island itself takes its name from the O'Sullivan-Beara clan, ancient masters of that part of the country until the late 1600's, when they were routed in battle by the English.
T:Bear Island
K:E Dorian
EB^GB A^GEc|dBcA Beec|d2fd AFDF|GEFD EDB,A,|
B,EEF GFGA|BdAd (3Bcd ef|g2fg efge|1 dBAF E2ED:|2 dBAF E4||
|:Be~e2 gefd|(3Bcd AG FDD2|Be~e2 gefd|(3efe df e2ef|
edBc dBed|BcdB AFDF|GB~B2 AGFA|1 GEFD E4:|2 GEFD E2ED||

BEAR WITH THE SORE HEAD, THE. Scottish, Jig. A modern tune composed by traditional musician, collector, editior and teacher Nigel Gatherer.
T:The Bear With a Sore Head
C:Nigel Gatherer
N:for Bracha
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:Em
E>EE G2 B|AFD AFD|E>EE G2 B|e2 f edB|d2 e dBG|E>EE G2 B|A>FD E2:|]
e>ee gee|bee gee|f>dd AdA|FAF DEF|e>ee gee|bee gee|fdB AFA|BGE E3|
e>ee gee|bee gee|f>dd AdA|FAF DEF|G>BB F>AA|E2 e g>fe|fdB AFA|BGE E3|]

BEARDANCE. German.
T:Beardance
T:Bärentanz
N:an old (mediveal?) German dance tune
S:Bernd Unstaedt
Z:Hauke Steinberg
M:4/4
L:1/16
Q:160
K:Em
EFG2 EFG2|F2D2D4|EFG2 EFG2|A4A2GA|
B2B2A2F2|G2G2F2D2|EFG2 F2D2|E4E4:||
B2G2EFGA|B2G2E4|D3EF2A2|d2d2B2A2|
B2G2EFGA|B2G2E4|EFG2 F2D2|E4E4:||

BEARE ISLAND REEL. See "Ríl Bheara."

BEAUFORT CASTLE. AKA - "Caisteal Dùnaidh." Scottish, Reel and Air. A Major. Standard. AA'B (Fraser): AA'BB' (Kerr). "Beaufort Castle, since General Fraser's death, in 1872, has not been the scene of much festivity, though perfectly the reverse upon any occasion of his residence there. Every memorial of so estimable a public character should by preserved" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 103, pg. 39. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 36, pg. 7.
T:Beaufort Castle
T:Caisteal Dùnaidh
L:1/8
M:C
S:Fraser Collection
K:A
C|A,CCE cAAc|BAGF ECCE|1 ACCE cAAe|eAEC (B,2 B,):|2 A,CCE cAeA|
cAEC (B,2 B,)||f|ecaf eccb|agaf eccf|ecaf eccb|agac B2 Bf|ecaf eccb|agaf efce|
cABG AcBc|AFEC (B,2 B,)||

BEAUTIES OF IRELAND, THE (Ailne Na h-Eireann). Irish, Single or Double Jig (12/8 time). D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 210, pg. 112 (listed as a single jig). O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 384, pg. 77 (listed as a single jig). O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 980, pg. 182 (listed as a double jig).
T:Beauties of Ireland, The
L:1/8
M:12/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (384)
K:D
F2 D DFD DFD DFD|E2A, A,CA, A,CA, A,CA,|F2D DFD DFD DFD|1
Bcd edc d2B A2G:|2 Bcd edc d2z d2z||
|:A|f2d def gag fgf|ecA AcA ecA AcA|f2d def gbg faf|1 ecA ABc d2z d2z:|2
ecA ABc d2B A2G||

BEAUTIFUL GORTREE. Irish, Reel. E Major/Mixoydian. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by Donegal fiddler Tommy Peoples.
T:Tommy Peoples'
T:Beautiful Gortree
M:4/4
L:1/8
C:Tommy Peoples
Z:transcribed by Ted Hastings
S:Alistair McCulloch (GFW)
R:reel
K:E
e-c|BE (3EEE E2 F(B|~cB)GB {f}g2 b-g|f-e(gf e)c-Be|(~fgf)e c(BGF)|!
{D}E3-F G-FEG|(3BBB G-B g2 b-g|f3-e (gfe)c(|1 B)(GFG) E2:|2 B(GFG)
E(e~fe)||!
{f}g ~f-e b(e~ge)|e(f~fe) ceBe|(~fgf)e b(e~ge)|(Bc-c)(B- -Bc)e(f-|-fg)(~fe
b)(e~ge)|!
e(f~fe) ceBe|(~fgf)e cee(c|1 BG)FG E(e~fe):|2 B-GFG E2||

BEAUTIFUL LITTLE VALE OF ARAGLIN, THE (Glounthaun Araglin Eeving). Irish, Air (6/8 time). A Minor. Standard. AB. "The Araglin is a small river in the Co. Waterford flowing through a very pretty glen, the subject of an Irish song to this air, of which I have a full copy: written by a Waterford man living in England" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 92, pg. 48 (Joyce includes one verse in both Gaelic and English).
T:Beautiful Little Vale of Araglin, The
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:"Moderate"
Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:A Minor
E|A2A AGA|c3 d2d|ede dcA|(G3 G2)E|A2A AGA|c3 d2d|ede d2c|A3 A2||
e|ged ceg|a3 g2 a/g/|eee dcA|(G3 G2)E|A2A AGA|c3 d2d|ede d2c|(A3 A2)||

BEAUTY, CHARMING, FAIR AND YOUNG (Ribhinn àlainn eibhinn og). Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AB. This tune "is the air of Robert Donn, the Sutherland's poet's song, to Miss Sally Grant, and is in his printed volumes of Gaelic songs and poems; the air is given as sung by the editor's father" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 170, pg. 69.
T:Beauty, charming, fair and young
T:Ribhinn àlainn eibhinn og
L:1/8
M:C
S:Fraser Collection
K:B Minor
d2 (cd) (fe)dc|f2B2^A2 GF|E2E2F2^A2|B2 B^A [D4B4]|d2 (cd) fedc|
f2B2^A2 (GF)|E2E2F2^A2|B2 B^A [D4B4]||d2dd e2ee|f2 f^e f2F2|
(Fd)(cd) (fe)dc|f2B2^A2^GF|f>edf e>dce|f2B2^A2 (GF)|E2E2F2^A2|
B2 B^A [D4B4]||

BEAUTY OF THE NORTH, THE (Mais' An Taobh Tuath). Scottish, Slow Strathepey. E Flat Major. Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (Athole, Fraser, Hunter, Skye). The melody, composed by Captain Simon Fraser, first appeared in his collection published about 1816, also known as the "Fraser Knockie" collection. It was a great favorite of Scottish violinist James F. Dickie (1886-1983) of New Deer, Buchan, reknowned for his skill at slow strathspey playing. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 181, pg. 74. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 45. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 179. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 195. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 267. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Olympic 6151, Angus Cameron - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).
T:Beauty of the North, The
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:E_
E|G,<E E>F G>A B<c|C<C F>E D<B, ~B,2|G,<E E>F G>A B<g|
f>d e/d/c/B/ e2e:|
g|e>g B<g e<g b>g|a>gf>e d<BB<g|e<g B>g e/f/g/a/ b<g|a>f e/d/c/B/ e2 e>f|
g<eB<G e<BG<E|A>GF>E D<B, ~B,2|G,<EE<A G<eB<g|f>d e/d/c/B/ e2e||

BEAUTY SPOT, THE (An Ball Seirce). AKA and see "Colonel Taylor's." Irish, Reel. D Mixolydian (Breathnach, Feldman & O'Doherty): D Dorian (Mulvihill). Standard. AB (Breathnach, Mulvihill): AA'B (Feldman & O'Doherty). The tune was recorded by piper Bernard Delaney on cylinder recordings for Edison. Delaney was the brother-in-law of Captain Francis O'Neill, and O'Neill found him a job on the Chicago police force. O'Neill was critical of Delaney, however, not for his piping ability, which he respected, but for his miserliness with tunes which O'Neill feared would by lost when Delaney died. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Tommy Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]; L. Donnelly [Mulvihill]; fiddler Simon Doherty (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 135, pg. 54. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 105 (appears as "Untitled Reel"). Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 152, pg. 41. Piping Pig Productions PPPCD001, Jimmy O'Brien-Moran - "Seán Reid's Favourite" (1996).
T:The Beauty Spot
R:Reel
Z:Adrian Scahill
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
A2GB A2dB|c3G EFGB|A2GB A2dB|c3G EDEG|\ A2GB A2dB|c3G EFGB|
A3c B3d|c3G EDD2||\ edd2 ed(3Bcd|edd2 egg2|edd2 edcB|ABcd edd2|\
e2dg ed(3Bcd|edd2 egg2|afge fded|ABcd edd2||

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