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The Fiddler's Companion

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Result of search for "Shetland Reel":

AA THE SHIPS ARE SAILING. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Nesting.

AALD REEL O WHALSAY, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. ADAE. One part. "During a symposium at the School of Scottish Studies in the mid-1960's on Scottish, Shetland and Scandinavian music, the Norwegian Hardanger fiddler Magne Manheim pointed out that the Aald Reel o Whalsay closely resembled part of a Norwegian Halling, and it is likely that all the Muckle Reels were of Norwegian derivation" (Anderson & Georgeson, 1970). See also note for "Muckle Reel o Finnigirt." Source for notated version: John Irvine (Saltness, Whalsay, Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 10.

AALD WIFE O NIDDISTER, DA. AKA and see "Taste Da Green." Shetland, Shetland Reel.

AANDOWIN AT DA BOW(E). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, widely known in the islands. G Major. Standard. AAB (Hunter): AABB' (Cooke). A good example of an indigenous Shetland reel, states Peter Cooke, identified by Anderson & Georgeson (1970) as supposed to have been composed by a fiddler from Muckle Row, Shetland. Tom Anderson (1978) explains the title refers to the action of keeping a fishing boat steady in one place by means of "iddling" with the oars while the lines are out. The 'bow' referred to in the title is a marker buoy. Cooke (1986) prints the following text sung with this dance tune, of more recent composition than the tune and in oral tradition in the Shetlands in the 1970's:
No gaen forward, no gaen trow
Bidin aboot ae place, Aandowin at da bow.
Source for notated version: A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1991; pg. 24. Anderson & Swing, (Hand Me Doon Da Fiddle); No. 25. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 15, pg. 65. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 194. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).
T:Aandowin at da bow
R:Reel
M:4/4
K:G
A|\BGAG E2D2|BGAG BGAd|BGAG E2D2|GABA G3:|\g|gdB AGE2|egdg egdg|egdB AGE2|g2gg afg2|gdg egdg|egdB AGED|GABG E2D2|GABA G3||

AHUNT THE DECKS O'VOE. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. One part. Flett and Flett identify the tune as "an old family version of Mr. (Tom) Anderson's." Source for notated version: the late fiddler, composer and teacher Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Flett & Flett]. Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 218.

AI VIST LOU LOUP. French, Bouree D'Auvergne ((3/8 time). D Dorian. Standard. AABB. Stevens (Massif Central), 1988; No. 43.

ALAMOOTIE, DA. 'Alamootie' is the Shetland name for the Stormy Petrel (a bird). Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the late Shetland teacher, composer, fiddler and collector Tom Anderson (1981). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 43.

ALL HANDS UPON DECK. AKA and see "Jimmy at the Helm" (Shetland). English, Scottish; Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AAB. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 160.
T:All Hands Upon Deck
L:1/8
M:C
S:Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:D
d2 fg a2 fd|cecA Aeef|defg ^gafd|edcB Ad d2:|
F2 ED DddF|G2 FE EeeG|GFED Dddf|ebag fd d2|
F2 ED DddF|G2 FE Eeeg|fagf gbag|faea fd d2||

ALL THE SHIPS ARE SAILING. AKA- "A' da Ships ir Sailin." Anderson: Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. "...composed sometime about the first of the (20th) century, depicting the herring fleet sailing out to the fishing grounds." Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 84. Boys of the Lough, 1977, pg. 17. Topic 12TS379, Tom Anderson & Aly Bain - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough, "Lochaber No More."

ANDREW POLSON'S. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Named for the fiddler who played it. Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland."

ANDY BROWN'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. A modern composition by Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, composed for the christening of a friend's son. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

ANNALESE BAIN. Shetland, Reel. Composed by Shetland fiddler Aly Bain for his daughter Annalese "who, when she was young, ran around at high speed." Green Linnet GLCD3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

ANT(H)ONY MURRAY('S REEL). AKA and see "Hills of Cape Mabou" (Cnuic Rudha Mhabou), "Lord Murray Strathspey," "Port 'ic Artair" (MacArthur's Tune), "Tilly Plump" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel; Cape Breton, Strathspey. A Major. AEAE. AB. The tune was commonly played in scordatura tuning in Scotland in the 19th century and earlier, and is currently played on Cape Breton in AEAE tuning. "Anthony Murray's Reel" first appears in McGlashan's collection. On Cape Breton the tune is sometimes known as "Christie's Sister" because it was often played following "Christie Cambpell." John Shaw, in the booklet for Topic 12TS354 writes: "According to tradition in the Inverness-Mabou area (the tune) was associated with the family of MacArtair Mor (Big MacArthur) of Mabou Coal Mines, whose father ws born on the Isle of Canna, Inner Hebrides Scotland." Source for notated version: Buddy MacMaster and Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 125. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), c. 1780/81; pg 15. ACR4-12940, Buddy MacMaster (Appears as "Traditional Strathspey"). EMI E4 80683, John Morris Rankin - "North Country"(1993. Appears as "Lord Murray Strathspey"). Overton 1829-I-LM 88, Dwayne Cote - "Introduction" (1992. Appears as "Cnuic Rudha Mhabou"). RLP 107, Joe MacLean - "And his Old Time Scottish Fiddle" (c. 1967). Rounder 7009, Doug MacPhee - "Cape Breton Piano"(1977. Appears as "Hills of Cape Mabou"). Topic 12TS354, John Willie Campbell - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (1978. Appears as "Port 'ic Artair"). WRC1-1548, Carl MacKenzie - "And his Sound is Cape Breton"(1981. Appears as "Strathspey").
T:Anthony Murray's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Strathspey Reels (pg. 15)
K:A
E|C>E A2 C>E A2|AFEB B,/B,/B, B,2|CD/E/AE FEAE|F>AEC A,/A,/A, A2:|
c/d/|e>cAe c<A e>c|d>fe>c B/B/B Bc/d/|e>cAe c<A e>c|d>fe>c A/A/A Ac/d/|
e>cAe c<A e>c|egdf c/c/c c>B|FAEF DFCE|A/G/F/E/ Ac, A,/A,/A, A||

ANVIL, THE. Shetland, Reel. Similar to the Irish reel "Tam Lin" (Howling Wind) and "The Glasgow Reel."
T:The Anvil
L:1/8
M:C|
K:Am
E2AE EAAE|E2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|
|:edcB ABcd|edcB ABAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|
|:eaed cBAe|eaed cBAE|F2AB cBAE|F2AB cBAF|
G2Bc dcBc|dcBc dcBd|cBAB cBAB|cBAB cBA2:|

APPIN HOUSE [1]. AKA and see "Fit da Gutters" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB'CCDD. There are two turnings of "Appin House" which correspond to two turnings of "Fid da Gutters," from the Shetland island of Whalsay and the playing of the Shetland Fiddle Band. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 94.
T:Appin House [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
E|(D<B,) DE G<D D2|D<B, DE G<B, A2|D<B, DE G<D D2|DE DE FG G:|
|:c<B G/G/G BG G2|BA D/D/D (AD) D2|cB G/G/G BG G2|1 BA D/D/D G2G2:|2
BA DE FG G2||
|:e<d B<g B<d B<g|B<A a<a g<A a<a|e<d B<g B<d B<g|de de fg g2:|
|:e>d e>d c>B G<G|BA DD BA DD|de dc B<G G2|BA DE FG G2:|

AULD FOULA REEL, DA. AKA and see "Foula Reel," "Da Auld Reel," "Shaalds o' Foula." Shetland, Reel. A Major. AEAE. AAB. The melody is the traditional accompaniment for a special dance from the Island of Foula, in the Shetlands. On the Island of Yell, also in the Shetlands, the tune in known as "Da Auld Reel," according to Alastair Hardie. Flett & Flett (1964) state that The Auld Reel was a Shetland dance for three couples (in Whalsay) traditional to the isles which, by 1900, had almost disappeared as a separate dance and survived in combination only with the Shetland Reel, having been supplanted by dances from the mainland of Scotland. The traditional Shetland wedding incorporated the Auld Reel and was performed into the last decade of the 19th century; these first Auld Reels were known as the Bride's Reels and were performed by the womenfolk present who danced them in turn. These were followed by the Bridegroom's Reels, with the men taking the place of the women and danced again in turn. "At the end of each of the Bride's Reels, the 'married woman' collected the 'fiddler's money' from the dancers. The bride and the other dancers in the first Reel usually gave a shilling, those in the next Reel gave a sixpence, and so on, descending to threepence from the last dancers of all...in the same way the 'married man' collected...from the men at the end of each of the Bridegroom's Reels. This 'fiddler's money' was the only payment which the fiddler received in those days, but with a big company it was a more than sufficient reward" (Flett & Flett, 1964). The whole series of dances could take up to two hours. In later years the Auld Reel was supplanted by Shetland Reels for most of the ritual, though it still was featured for a portion of the dancing. For an extensive and thorough treatise on the subject see Flett & Flett pgs. 70-74. Source for notated version: Tom Anderson (Shetland) [Hunter]. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 123.

AULD STOER'S BACK AGAIN, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. A 'stoer' was a copper coin. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 53.

AULD WIFE AYOND/AHUNT THE FIRE, THE. AKA and see "Aald Wife Ahunt the Fire," "Old Wife Beyond the Fire." Scottish, Reel, Slow Strathspey or Country Dance Tune (4/4 time); Shetland, Reel. G Major (Cranford, Gow, Kerr): F Major (Hunter). Standard. One part (Hunter): AAB (Gow): AABB (Kerr): AA'BB (Cranford). Known also throughout the Shetlands. According to Glen the tune was first published by Bremner (1757, pg. 90) and Stewart (1761, pg. 12), however, the melody appears earliest in the Drummond Castle Manuscript (in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle), inscribed "A Collection of Country dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 8. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 164, pg. 47. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 14. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 6 (slow strathspey). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 43. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 115, pg. 14. Fiddlesticks cass., Jerry Holland - "A Session with Jerry Holland" (1990).
X:1
T:Auld wife ayont the Fire, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Gow - 1st Repository
K:G
c|{c}B2 AG E/E/E cA|{c}B2 AG G/G/G gd|{c}B2 AG E/E/E (cA)|(B/c/d) A>B G2G:|
c|B(dd)e c>dcB|Bddg (g/f/e/f/) g>d|B(dd>)e c>dcA|(B/c/d) (AB) G2 Gc|B(dd>)e c>dcA|
Bddg (g/f/e/f/) g>d|B>cde c>dcA|B<d A>B {F}G3||
X:2
T:Auld wife ayont the Fire
L:1/8
M:C
R:"Very Slow" Strathspey
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:G
d|{c}B2 ~A>G FGA{B}c|{c}B2 ~A>G Gg g>d|(cB) ~AG F>GAc|(B<d) A>B {F}G2G:|
c|B>cde ~c>dcA|(Bc)de de/f/ gd|B>cde c>dcA|(B<d) A>B {F}G2 G>c|B>cde ~c>dcA|
B>c de/f/ (g/f/)g/a/ g>d|B>cde ~c>d cA|(B<d) A>B G2G||

BACK REEL, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Walls. D Mixolydian. Standard. AB. A quick reel danced at the conclusion of "Da Muckle Reel," note Anderson & Georgeson. Source for notated version: Peter Fraser (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 21. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 17.

BANKS HORNPIPE. AKA- "Banks of the River." AKA and see "Kinloch's Grand Hornpipe," "Mrs. Taff," "Souvenir of Venice." Scottish, Canadian, Irish; Hornpipe. Canada, Nova Scotia. E Flat Major (Scottish versions): G Major (Black). Standard. AAB (Black, Honeyman): AABB (Brody, Hardie, Hunter). "Composed by Parazotti" is an ascription often found attached to this tune, sometimes called a 'descriptive hornpipe'. The composer's origins were somewhat obscure. Alburger (1983) stated she could find no composer by that name and suggested it could possibly be a set of a piece which was danced to by Mme Pariot, who retired from the London stage to marry in 1809. Alastair Hardie (1992), however, reports that Parazotti did exist and was actually the grandson of an Italian violinist who settled in Glasgow. The tune was inspired by the sights and sounds of a river in spate. The melody appears first in print in 1881 in Kohlers' Violin Repository (Bk. 1) under the title "Mrs. Taff" (whom Hardie explains was a person who resided on the West coast of Scotland and was Parazotti's patron for a time. It is said she was the owner of the house in which Parazotti composed his tune). The piece is similar to the tune "Souvinir De Venice Hornpipe" in the 1883 Ryan's Mammoth Collection. " This tune is credited to L. Ostinelli, an Italian who arrived in Boston in the year 1818. Michael Broyles references this musician in his book Music of the Highest Class: Elitism and Populism in Antebellum Boston:
***
He was keenly aware of the reputation the violin had as a
vernacular instrument in New England. According to several
anecdotes, he was furious when his violin was referred to as a
fiddle or when he was requested to play dance music. Once
when asked by a lady if he was to play for a dance following
a concert, he deliberately cut his violin strings and said 'Veree
story, veree story, madam, you see I can no play.'
***
Ostinelli, of whom little is known, was mentioned in Dwight's Journal of Music in 1859. His lasting cliam to fame is his variation which is often used as a finale today by fiddler's playing "The Banks" (Cranford, 1997). The present title, "Banks," is actually the shortened form of the composer's alternate title "Banks of the River" (according to the late Shetland fiddler, collector, teacher and composer Tom Anderson). Scottish fiddler Charles Hardie (1849-1893) was praised by one of the greatest Scottish violinists of his time, J. Scott Skinner, for his rendition of this tune. "The Banks" is one of the tunes sometimes requested of Shetland fiddlers because it is popularly known that "anything composed in a flat key is considered to be a real test of a fiddler's ability" (Cooke, 1986). Skinner himself recorded the tune in the 1920's as part of his "Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. It is also popular in Nova Scotia. In Scotland it is traditionally preceded by the slow strathspey "The Dean Brig o' Edinburgh." Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 136, pg. 71. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 34. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 39, pg. 14. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 55. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 128. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 340. Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1903. Fiddler FRLP001 Tom Doucet (Nova Scotia/eastern Mass.) - "The Down East Star." Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968) {third tune of 'Bank'}. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Andy McGann and Paddy Reynolds - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Outlet 1031, Sean McGuire- "Ireland's Champion Traditional Fiddler." Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (third tune of 'Banks Medley'). Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow". Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady" (McGann learned the tune from Lad O'Beirne). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
X:1
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
B:The Caledonian Companion, Alastair J. Hardie
N:as played by J. Scott Skinner
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G4 (3BGE D2 F4 (3AFD|A,2 c4 de =ABcB _AGFE|
G,2 B4 c2 A,2 c4 de|DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|:{a}g>^f|
g2[G,2E2][G,2E2] (3gbg f2[B,2D2][B,2D2] (3fgf|
e2 c4 fe dcB=A {A}B2{=e}f2|
(3DBf (3fBD (3DBf (3fBD (3EBg (3gBE (3EBg (3gBE|
=ABcd ecAc BABc B_AGF|[EG,]GBG eGFE DFBF dFED|
CEAE cBAG FGFE DCB,A,|
(3G,EB (3BEG, (3G,EB (3BEG, (3A,Ec (3cEA, (3A,Ec (3cEA,|
DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|
X:2
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
N:transposed from Eb
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:G
(3DEF|G2 B4 (3dBG F2 A4 (3cAF|E2 e4 fg ^cded =cBAG|
B,2 d4 e2 C2 e4 fg|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|:b>^a|
b2 G2 G2 (3bc'b a2 F2 F2 (3aba|g2 e4 ag fed^c d4|
dfaf dfaf dgbg dgbg|^cdef gece dcde d=cBA|
Bded bgdB Adfd afdA|EGcG edcB (3ABA (3GFE D2C2|
B,DGD B,DGD CEGE CEGE|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|
X:3
T: The Banks
S: McGann / Conway
Q: 300
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
(3DEF|G2 B2 B2 (3dBG|F2 A2 A2 (3cAF | C2 e2 e2 fg | ^cded =cBAG |
B,2 d2 d2 ef | C2 e2 e2 fg | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
ba | b2 g2 g2 (3bab | a2 f2 f2 (3aba | g2 e2 e2 ag | fed^c d2 D2 |
Fdad Fdad | Gdgd Gdgd | ^cdef gece | d^cde d=cBA |
GBdB gdAG | FAdA fAGF | EGBG edcB | ABAG FEDC |
B,GdG B,GdG | CGeG CGeG | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
W:
P: original key Eb
K: Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G2 G2 (3BGE|D2 F2 F2 (3AFD|A,2 c2 c2 de| =ABcB _AGFE |
G,2 B2 B2 cd | A,2 c2 c2 de | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|
gf| g2 e2 e2 (3gfg | f2 d2 d2 (3fgf | e2 c2 c2 fe | dcB=A B2 B,2 |
DBfB DBfB | EBeB EBeB | =ABcd ecAc | B=ABc B_AGF |
EGBG eBFE | DFBF dFED | CEGE cBAG | FGFE DCB,A, |
G,EBE G,EBE | A,EcE A,EcE | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|

BARROWBURN. AKA - "Barrow Burn Reel." Scottish, Irish; Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by Addie Harper of Wick, Scotland. 'Burn' is a Scots word for stream. The tune is identified as a traditional Shetland reel on Sharon Shannon's album, who was apparently unaware that it is a modern composition. Taylor (Where's the Crack?), 1989; pg. 14. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as first tune of "Bag of Cats" medley).
T:The Barrowburn reel
C:Addie Harper
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=150
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
K:D
A2|:D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA BddB|A2 AB d2 de|fedB AFEF|
D2 DE FAAd|B2 BA Bdde|f2 af egfe|1dBAB d2 D2 :|
2 dBAB d2|:cd |
e2 ef ecBA|f2 fg fdBA|g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|
g2 ga gecA|a2 ag f2 ef|g2 ag f2 ed|BAAB d2 :|

BECAUSE HE/I WAS A BONNIE/BONNY LAD (she bid him aye come back). AKA and See "Boney (Bonny) Lad(s)," "Jack's Favourwright (Favorite)." Scottish, Shetland, English, Cape Breton; Country Dance (cut time) or Reel. England, Northumbria. Shetland, Whalsay. G Major (Cole, Raven): A Major (Athole, Gow, Hunter, Kerr, Skye). Standard. AB (Cole, Hunter, McGlashan): AAB (Athole, Gow, Kerr, Skye): AABB (Raven). A popular country dance dating back to at least 1752, according to Alburger (1983), when fiddler and dancing master John McGill of Girvan wrote down the instructions for his pupils. Glen finds its earliest appearence in print in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 14). The tune appears, however, in the somewhat earlier Drummond Castle Manuscript, which is inscribed "A Collection of Country Dances written for the use of his Grace the Duke of Perth by Dav. Young, 1734." Young's MS was in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle in the early 1970's, and hence its present-day title. It retained its popularity through that century and into the next, for the title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes, which he wrote c. 1800./ The tune, attached to an alternate 'B' parts, turns up in southwestern Pa. as 1) a fife tune (4/4 time) in the repertory of Hiram Horner (1944) who had the tune from a Scots fifer, and known simply as "Old Bagpipe Air" [Bayard, 1981; No. 252, pg. 216], and 2) as a jig called "Nancy Fat" played by fifers in Greene County, Pa., and by one "crippled Jack Anderson" in particular [Bayard, 1981; No. 566, pg. 503]. Bruce & Stokoe (Northumbrian Minstrelsy), 1882; pg. 155. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 46. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 1, 1799; pg. 23. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 118. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 10, pg. 4. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 9. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), 1786; pg. 44. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 183. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 13. Rounder 7011, "The Beatons of Mabou: Scottish Violin Musci from Cape Breton" (1978).
X:1
T:Because He Was a Bonny Lad
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
e|c>BA>a (f/g/a (ec|d>fe>c B/B/B ~B>e|c>BA>a (f/g/a (e>c|dfec A/A/A A:|
e|cBAc defd|cAec B/B/B (Bd|cBAc defg|agac A/A/A (Ae|cAeA fA eA|
cAec B/B/B (Bg|afge efec|dfec A/A/A A||
X:2
T:Because He Was a Bonny Lad
L:1/8
M:C
S: Bruce & Stokoe - Northumbrian Minstrelsy
K:G
d|B>Agg e/f/g d>B|c>edB cAAc|B>Agg e/f/g d>B|c>edc BGG:|
|:d|BGdG eGdG|c>edB cAAc|BGdB eGdG|c>edc BGG:|

BENORT DA DAECKS O VOE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

BERE MEAL IS CHEAP AGAIN, THE/DA. AKA and see "Through the Wood of Fyvie." Shetlands, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. Cooke (1986) gives the following text to this dance tune, in oral tradition in the Shetlands in the 1970's:
**
Da bere meal is cheap again,
Eight pence a peck again.

BILLIACLETT. AKA and see "Robbie Tampson's Smithy," "Robbie Thompson's Strathspey." Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Fetlar. The tune, "'Billiaclett' (or 'Baljaclett', after a place on Ronas Hill in Mainland Shetland), turns out to be a variant of the Scottish tune 'Robbie Thompson's Strathspey'" (Cooke, 1986). From the island of Fetlar in the Shetlands, and the playing of octogenerian (in the 1980's) John Robertson.

BLIND MAUNSIE. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Blind Maunsie was a noted fiddler from the area about Delting, Shetland. The tune, however, note Anderson & Georgeson, may have been composed in his honor by their source, James Goudie. Source for notated version: James Goudie (Shetlands) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 27.

BLUE YOWE, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. Bain and Anderson say the tune is a descriptive piece by Fredamann Stickle of a quarrel between two women about who owned a uniquely colored female sheep. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

BLUEMEL SOOND. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by the late Shetland fiddler, composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 116, pgs. 207-208.

BLACK AND THE BROWN, THE/DA [1]. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. AEAE (tuning). One of the tunes played by Shetland fiddler John Irvine for the "bedding of the bride" ceremony in the islands around the turn of the century (see also "Grieg's Pipes" and "But the House, Ben the House"). Cooke (1986) prints the following text to this dance tune, in oral tradition in the Shetlands in the 1970's:
The black and the brown gaed oot o the town
and John Paterson's mare gaed foremost.

BLACK HAT, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. D Major. Standard. AAB. A traditional tune from the Tingwall area of the Shetlands, and named for the fiddler who played it who always donned a black hat when he played the instument. Source for notated version: W. Manson and A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 23. Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Tom Anderson). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

BONNIE ISLE O' WHALSAY. Shetland, Reel. A. Standard. AAB. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 52. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow."

BONNIE LASS O' BEKKAHILL, DA. AKA and see "Da Boannie Lass O Bekkahill." Shetland, Reel. Shetland, West side. D Major. Standard. AABB. A traditional slow reel from the West side of the Shetlands, note Anderson & Georgeson, who give these words set to the tune:
***
If I had anidder sixpence
I wid buy anidder gill
I wid aks da fiddler ta play
Da Boannie Lass o Bekkahill.
***
Cooke (1986) prints a similar text to this dance tune, which he remarks was in oral tradition in the Shetlands in the 1970's:
***
If I had another tuppence I would buy another gill
I would let the fiddler play the boanie lass o' Bekkahill.
***
Similar words and a version of the tune can be found in many folk-song collections as "The Bonnie Lads of Byker Hill" or "Byker Hill," whose refrain goes:
***
Byker Hill and Walker Shore
Collier lads for ever-more (x2)
***
Source for notated version: Peter Fraser (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 21. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 34.

BOOTS AND AA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

BOTHY BURN, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Yell.

BOTTOM OF THE PUNCH BOWL, THE [2]. AKA and see "The Fairy Reel." Shetland, Whalsay.

BOANIE ISLE O' WHALSAY, DA [1]. AKA - "Qualsay." Shetland, Shetland Reel. A Minor. Standard. AABBCC. Whalsay is one of the islands in the Shetland group. The tune is known throughout the Shetlands and is generally played as a reel today, though there have been 6/8 versions in the past (see [2]). In the 1950's "at least one fiddler, the late Jimmy Scollay of Burravoe, played it in 6/8 time, his version being noted down by Shuldham-Shaw in the key of G" (Cooke, 1986). Cooke's 'b' version is from J. Hoseason's MS., Mid Yell (Shetland), 1863. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 27b., pg. 77.

BOANIE ISLE O' WHALSAY, DA [2]. Shetland, Jig. A Minor. Standard. AA'BB'. Cooke's 'a' version is from A.W. Johnston's "Old Lore Miscellany" ("Four Shetland Airs"), Vol. 5, No. 2, 1912, pg. 80. Cooke theorizes that jig time, while popular in the Shetlands today, was a relatively recent import and addition to the repertoire. "There may once have been a dance genre of which only the tunes have survived--in the 'ambiguous' rhythm which is neither 2/4 nor 6/80--and this finds parallels in the dance repertory of western Norway, but during the past 100 years their tunes have been modernized or 'rationalized', most into reel time, but some into jig time. One should not discount the possibility that some never were dance tunes at all. Twelve of the twenty-one tunes in this category were recorded from one source, John Stickle of Unst, and he, having received most of them as 'listening' tunes from his grandfather, played them rather slowly. However, those which have been taken up and popularized by the Shetland Folk Society are played today as true jigs at a brisk tempo and are frequently used for any dance today requiring music in jig time" (Cooke, 1986). Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 27a., pg. 77.

BOANIE TAMMIE SCOLLAY. AKA and see "Da Foula Reel," "Da Shaalds o' Foula.'" Shetland, Air and Reel. "Boanie Tammie Scollay" is a song sung to essentially the same tune as "Da Foula Reel" and is sometimes played as a reel by that name (Cooke, 1986). Cooke prints the following text to this dance tune, in oral tradition in the Shetlands in the 1970's:
***
Where has due been aa the day, boanie Tammie, pretty Tammie,
Where has due been aa the day, boanie Tammie Scollay?
I'm been a coortin, bonnie maiden, minnie maiden
I'm been a coortin, bonnie minnie maiden
What's due gaan to gie taw us, bonnie maiden etc.
Bread and cheese upon a plate...etc.

BOB McQUILLAN'S. American, Reel. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Although the tune has been credited to Peterborough, New Hampshire, composer, piano and accordion player Bob McQuillan, the tune was actually composed in his honor by Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, perhaps to return the favor for McQuillan's tune "Aly Bain." It appears as "Maud McQuillan's" in Tommy Walshe's book Irish Tin Whistle Legends, where it is transcribed from Míchéal Ó hAlmhain's playing ("Maud McQuillen's" will be recognized as a corruption of the composer's name, Bob McQuillen). The tune has gained some currency in Ireland, played by fiddler Maire O'Keeffe and recorded by the band Arcady. Shanachie Records, Arcady.
T:Bob McQuillan's
R:reel
C:Aly Bain
D:Arcady
Z:id:hn-reel-425
M:C|
K:G
~B3c dcBA|GABG D2DB|c2cd edcB|AGFE D2dc|
~B3c dcBA|GABG D2ED|C2CD EDEG|1 FDEF G2GA:|2 FDEF G2Bc||
|:d2Bd gagf|eccB c2AB|cAAc ~a3g|fdd^c d2B=c|
d2Bd gagf|eccB cege|dBGB cAFG|1 AGGF G2Bc:|2 AGGF G2GA||

BOB OF FETTERCAIRN, THE. AKA and see "Newburn Lads/Lasses," "Kail and Knockit Corn" (Shetland), "Come Kiss With Me, Come Clap With Me," "Mrs. Reneau's Reel" (Canada), "Had I the Wight." Scottish (orig.), Canadian; Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. The tune is often played in Scotland in a medley with "Caber Feidh/Fey." In Northumbria the tune has been embroidered with arpeggi and retitled "Newburn Lasses." Fettercairn, Aberdeenshire, is a village north of Brechin approached by a wooded valley along which MacBeth is believed to have retreated after his defeat at Dunsinane. It was the site of Kincardine Castle, whose history goes back to the 10th century. A turreted arch commemorating the 1861 visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert survives at the entrance to the village. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 236. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 13. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 3, pg. 24. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 99. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 163. Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan."
T:Bob of Fettercairn, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B/c/|dBGB dBGB|dBdg f2df|ecAc ecAc|edef gage|dBGB dBGB|
DBdg f2df|aefd edBg|A/A/A Bd e2g2||dgBg dgBg|dgBg f2df|
ea^ca eaca|edef gage|dgBg dgBg|dgBg f2 df|aefd edBg|A/A/A Bd e2g2||

BRIDE'S REEL, A [2]. Shetland, Slow Air (9/8 time). D Dorian. Standard. ABB. "...It is interesting that so many of the Shetland and Scottish wedding tunes are in slow jig time. One could hazard the guess that such tunes derive from old Scottish dance-songs used for circle dancers (or possibly dances of the Faroese chain type) and that, as in the case of bride's reels today, their close attachment to the wedding rite ensured their survival into the present century" (Cooke, 1986). Source for notated version: John Fraser (Papa Stour {Island}, Shetlands) [Cooke] {Fraser learned the tune from his father, but did not know the name}. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 35, pg. 88.

BUSH BELOW DA GARDEN. AKA and see "Behind the Bush in the Garden." Shetland, Reel. From the Tingwell district of Mainland, Shetland (Anderson). D Major. Standard. AABB. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 79.

BUSTA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Source for notated version: A. Peterson via Larry Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 19.

CAULD RAIN. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

CAALD NIGHTS O WINTER. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland; Nesting, Whalsay. A Mixolydian/D Major. Standard. AB. A popular tune from Whalsay, notes Tom Anderson (1970). Source for notated version: A. Hutchinson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 25.
T:Da Caald Nights O Winter
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
R:reel
Z:Chris Hoseaso
K:D
e|eaaf gefd|BBge d2 dd|eaaf gafd|efdf e2 e:|!
A|AAcA eAcA|BBge d2 df|eAcA eAce|efdf e2 e:|!

CABER FEIDH (Deer's Antlers). AKA - "Caber/Caper Fey/Fei/Feigh," "Caberfei," "The Cameronian Rant," "The Copperplate," "The Deer's Horn," "Jack Smith's Favorite," "Rakish Paddy." Scottish, Canadian, Shetland; March, Reel and Country Dance. Canada, Cape Breton. C Major (most versions): D Major (Jean Carignan). Standard. AB (most versions): AABB (Begin). A particularly popular reel that has long been a mainstay of Scottish tradition and has been subsumed into the Irish. The earliest record of the tune is in Scottish musician David Young's MS. of 1734, called the Drummond Castle MS (because it was in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle) or The Duke of Perth MS, where it is set with variations. The MS is inscribed 'A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant." The melody also appears in Young's Bodlein MS (1740, named for the Bodlein Library, Oxford, where it is kept), the McLean Collection (published by James Johnson in Edinburgh in 1772), and in the McFarland MS of 1740 (where it is credited to David Young). In Robert Bremner's 2nd Collection (1768) it is printed in four parts in the key of C (with both f sharp and f natural accidentals). Cooke prints the following words to the tune, collected in the Shetland islands:
***
Mary made away being good luck wi' Teddie
All grown doss (toss?) makin me a dock an piddie.
***
The piece is often played in Scotland as a medley with "The Bob of Fettercairn," and is the tune for the famous Highland Dance called the "Caber Feidh," in which the dancers symbolically simulate the shape of deer's antlers with arms and fingers. From time immemorial a march version has been the clan march and insignia of the MacKenzie clan, "and in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries it was the official march used to signal the charge of Highland troops" (Cowdery). Pipers generally consider the strathspey, reel and even jig versions of the tune to be relatively recent adaptations; in point of fact, the strathspey version is by Pipe Major W. Ross (a member of the Scots Guards from 1896 to 1918) while the jig is by a modern musician, D. Johnstone. Cape Breton fiddler and editor Paul Stwart Cranford (1995), however, suspects that Bremner's 1768 variations may have been a strathspey setting due to his particular grouping of sixteeth notes.
***
With adaptations made necessary (according to Paul Stewart Cranford) by the scale available to 19th century Irish pipes, the tune also entered into Irish tradition. Despite its Scottish origins, it is a member of the tune family Cowdery (1990) classifies under the Irish reel "Rakish Paddy." See also "Rakish Paddy," "Padraig Reice," "Glastertown's Downfall," "The Castle Street Reel," "Copperplate," "Sporting Pat," "Cameronian Rant." Jean Carignan, taxi driver and famous Canadian fiddler from Montreal Canada, played the tune in the relatively rare (for this tune) key of D Major. Source for notated version: Mike MacDougal (Ingonish, Cape Breton, 1928-1982) via Jerry Holland (Invernesss, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 25, pg. 38. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 20, pg. 6. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 117, pg. 48. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 186. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 23, No. 4, pg. 14. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 117. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 60. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 10. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 40).
T:Cabar Féidh
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C Major
G|~c2ed ~c2GB|~c2GF ECCE|Ddd^c d2Ac|d2AG FDDB|
~c2ed ~c2GB|cGAF ECCE|DEFG ABcA|d2 AG FDD||
f|ecgc acgc|ecgc ecce|fdad bdad|fgag fddf|ecgc acgc|GAcd eccg|
afge fdf^c|d2AG FDD||

CAM YOU HERE TO COORT/KISS AND CLAP HER. AKA and see "Kiss and Come Again" (?). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.
**
Cam you here to kiss and clap or cam you here to scorn,
Or cam you here to kiss a lass and marry in the morn. (Cooke)
**
Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Andrew Poleson (Whalsey, Shetlands) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993).

CAPE BRETON FIDDLERS' WELCOME TO THE SHETLAND ISLANDS. Scottish, Reel. Scotland, Shetland Islands. A Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by the late fiddler Willie Hunter of Lerwick, Shetland. Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Chris Stout - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).
T:Cape Breton Fiddlers Welcome to the Shetland Islands
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
C:Willie Hunter
K:A
AE~E2 dcBc|~A3e fece|fBBA ~B3A|B2fe fBge|acef eA~A2|
cBAF eAce|~f3d eaaf|1 ecdB ~A3B:|2 ecdB ~A3e||
|:aee^d efe=d|ce~e2 fece|bffe f2ef|defd Befe|aee^d efe=d|
ce~e2 fece|1 ~f3e afed|cABc ~A3e:|2 ~f3e afec|Bagf edcB||

CLEAN PEA(SE) STRAW/STRAE. AKA and see "Pea Straw," "Pease Strae," "Pease Straw," "What'll All the Lasses Do" (Shetland). English, Scottish, Shetland; Hornpipe or Reel. England, Northumberland. D Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Glen (1891) finds the tune earliest in print in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 65). Hall & Stafford (Charlton Memorial Tune Book), 1974; pg. 21. Honeyman (Stathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 12. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 6, pg. 10. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 72. Mooney (Choicest Tunes/Lowland Pipes), pg. 25. Raven, 1984; pg. 184. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 203. "Fiddle Me Jig" (c. 1978).

CLEVER KATIE. AKA and see "Crippled Kattie," "Who'll Dance Wi Wattie." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

COCK O' THE NORTH [1]. AKA and see "Auntie Mary" {Irish}, "Joan's Placket (Is Torn)" {English}, "Jumping John/Joan," "We Must All Wait Till My Lady Comes Hone." Scottish, English, Canadian; Jig, 6/8 March, and Morris Dance Tune. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major (Hunter, Johnson, Kennedy, Miller & Perron, Perlman, Raven): G Major (Bayard, Bullen, Kerr, Sweet, Wade). Standard. AB (Bullen): AAB (Bayard, Hunter): AABB (Johnson, Kennedy, Miller & Perron, Raven, Sweet, Wade): AA'BB' (Kerr, Perlman). The 'Cock o' the North' was an honorary title of the (fifth and last) Duke of Gordon, who held sway over the northern part of the Scottish Highlands (from a note in a monograph on William Mashall printed in his 1845 Collection). Chappell alleges the earliest reference to the tune (under the title "Joan's Placket") is in an entry in Pepys' diary for June 1667. Bayard (1981) and Kidson (1915) both trace the tune to the 17th century, where they find the titles for this tune were "Jumping John/Joan" and "Joan's Placket (Is Torn)." It was published by Oswald (Vol. 10) c. 1758, by Feuillet in Recueil de Contredanses (1706) in Paris, and by Playford in the 1674 and 1686 editions (and all subsequent editions) of his Dancing Master, each time under the title "Jumping Joan." In fact, a Shetland reel version of the tune from the island of Whalsay collected in modern times still goes by the name "Jumping John" (Cooke, 1986).
***
The dance and ballad air was assumed into martial repertory, and it has been recorded that the melody helped win Gordon Highlander Piper George Findlater the Victoria Cross in 1897. It seems that while leading the charge storming Dargai Heights with other pipers, he was shot through both legs; "undaunted, he propped himself against a boulder, and continued to play" the stirring air to encourage the successful action (Winstock, 1970; pg. 212). Kidson (1915) relates another military story of its earlier use in the seige of Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny of 1857. The British were initially hard pressed and were for some time beseiged in various locations in the city by native Indians. Signals had been regularly sent between the forces defending parts of the beseiged town, and those under attack in the Residency quarters. A drummer boy named Ross, after the signalling was over, climbed to the high dome from which signals were sent and despite harrassing fire from the Sepoys he sounded "Cock o' the North" in defiance, rallying the English with his bravery (though being a drummer, exactly how he 'sounded' the tune remains a mystery, ed.)
***
In England, Andrew Bullen (Country Dance and Song, May 1987, Vol. 17, pg. 11). suggests there is some evidence to think that "Cock of the North" was the tune traditionally used in the famous horn dance of Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire (currently performed in most Christmas Revels pagents). "This standard version," he states, "taken from Pruw Boswell's 'Morris Dancing of the Lancashire Plain', is used in the Wigan St. John's Dance." Wade records that the tune is still used for a single step dance in the North-West Morris tradition.
***
Perlman (1996) notes that this tune was remembered by many Prince Edward Island fiddlers as the very first tune they tried to play.
***
Miscellaneous notes: The tune was used by the Scots poet Robert Burns for his song "Her Daddie Forbad and Her Minnie Forbad." In America, it was given to Bayard that there was an obscene New England song to the tune called "Chase Me, Charlie," but he did not hear it. It has been asserted that a trumpet version of the tune was played at the execution of Mary Queen of Scots in 1587, but this cannot be substantiated and it is not credited. It is not, as has been proposed by Johnson-Stenhouse, the progenitor of "Lillibulero." Sara Lee Johnson (1986-87) says the tune is often heard at the Old Michegan Fiddler's Association gatherings. Sources for notated versions: Hiram Horner (fifer from Fayette and Westmoreland Counties, Pa., 1960) [Bayard]; Elliot Wright (b. 1925, Flat River, Queens County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of North River) [Perlman]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 580, pg. 513. Bullen, Country Dance and Song, May 1987, Vol. 17, pg. 11. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 299. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No. or pg. 19. Jarman, 1951; pg. 66. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 7: Michigan Tunes), Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 6. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 36. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 311, pg. 34. McDonald (Gesto), 1895; pg. 135. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddler's Repertoire), 1983; No. 43. Page, Heritage Dances of Early America; No. or pg. 41. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 141. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 105. Ross, 1934, Army Manuel of Bagpipe Tunes; Book 1, pg. 10. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 21. Wade (Mally's North West Morris Book), 1988; pg. 14.-
T:Cock o' the North
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:A
cdc cBA|cde f2e|cdc cBA|B3 e2d|cdc cBA|Ace B=GB|A3 A3:|
|:a2e f2e|a2e f2e|cdc cBA|BcB B2e|a2e f2e|a2e f2e|cAc B=GB|A3 A3:|

COIL AWAY THE HAWSER. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

COME AGEN YE'RE WELCOME. AKA and see "You're Welcome Johnnie Stewart" (?). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Source for notated version: J.J. Stickle (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 23. Topic 12TS379, "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

COME AWA' IN. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Shetland fiddler, composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson (1980). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 76.

CORBIE AND 'DA CRAW, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major/D Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Shetland fiddler and collector Tom Anderson said the tune is a traditional Shetland reel, known throughout the islands, depicting a fight between a raven and a crow. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 100. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

COW'S TIT, THE. Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed (in the key of B Flat Major) by New York accordion player Luke O'Malley. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 238, pg. 127.
T: The Cow's Tit
C: Luke O'Malley
Q: 325
R: jig
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: G
G,B,D GBd | gag fed | ece dBG | cdc A2 G |
G,B,D GBd | A,CE Ace | fed cBA | FDF G3 :|
EGB eBG | BcB AGF | GEG F^DF | EFE =D2 B, |
G,B,D GBd | A,CE Ace | fed cBA | FDF G3 :|
W:
K: Bb %(original key)
B,DF Bdf | bc'b agf | geg fdB | efe c2 B |
B,DF Bdf | CEG ceg | agf edc | AFA B3 :|
GBd gdB | ded cBA | BGB A_GA | GAG F2 D |
B,DF Bdf | CEG ceg | agf edc | AFA B3 :|

CRAB AND THE CAPSTAN. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, North Yell and Unst.

CRAW DANG PUSSY, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. The late Shetland fiddler, composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson identified the tune as a traditional reel describing a tame crow and a kitten playing. It was in the repertory of Anderson's Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known in the islands. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 47.

CRIPPLE(D) KITTY. AKA and see "Clever Katie," "Who'll Dance Wi' Wattie." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

CROSS REEL(, DA). AKA and see "Cross Rig," "General Howe," "The Lasses of Stewarton." Shetland, Reel. D Major/G Major. Standard. AABCDAA (Brody): AABB (Anderson). According to Cooke (1986) the tune is a counsin to the Scottish tune "The Lasses of Stewarton" (Stewartown, Stewingtown) {also the name of a country dance first published c. 1794}, though the Shetland versions are usually asymmetrical and the Scottish not. "One Shetland version is shown in Ex. 12 and it is likely that it is derived from the Scottish tune but that fiddlers and dancers modified it in early days so that it fitted their preference for asymmetrical structures. The tune was danced in Whalsay (the tune is also known on that island as "General Howe") during this century, where I was told that to perform it they had to do a 'double dancing turn' (i.e. dance for twice as long)" (Cooke, 1986). Source for notated versions: Tom Anderson (Shetland) [Brody], Bobbie Peterson (Tingwall Mainland, Shetland) [Cooke]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983, pg. 61. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 80. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 12, pg. 62. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow."
T:Cross Reel
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
"D"fage f2 f2|"D"ABAF D3 f|"D"gfed "C"=c2 c2|1"C"EDEF "G"G2 e2:|2
"C"EDEF "G"G3 A||
K:G
"G"B2 BG "D"AFAF|"G"B2 BG "D"A3 A|"G"B2 BG "D"AFAD|"D"EDEF "G"G3 D||
K:G
"D"FGAc "G"BGBG|"D"AFAF d4|"D"FGAc "G"BGBG|"D"AFAF "G"G3 A||
K:D
"D"defg afde|"D"fdfg a2 fe|"D"defg afdf|"C"e=cef g2 ge|"D"defg afde|"D"fdfg a2 ag||

DAINTY DAVIE (WAS A LAD). Scottish (Originally), Shetlands; Strathspey: Irish, March or Air (4/4 time). F Major (Athole, Honeyman, Skye): G Major (Joyce, Kerr, O'Neill). Standard. AB (Honeyman, Joyce): AAB (Kerr): AABB' (Athole): AABCCD (Gow, Skye): AABBCCDDEE (O'Neill). "This spirited tune was developed from a simple Scottish strain about the end of the 18th century, by O'Farrell, a famous Irish piper well known on the London stage" (O'Neill). "I know nothing about this, farther than that the air and a bit of the song remain in a remote corner of my memory from dim old times" (Joyce). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes, which he published c. 1800. Purser (1992) believes Robert Burns wrecked the words of "Dainty Davie" with successive revisions, attempting to clean them up for George Thompson's publications.
**
Dainty Davy was a lad;
He sold the shirt upon his back,
To buy his wife a looking-glass,
To see how nice her beauty was:
So there was Dainty Davy! (Joyce).
**
Cooke prints the following words, collected on the island of Whalsay, in Shetland:
**
Wis du what I'm telling dee
Boanie Davie, daintie Davie
Wis du what I'm telling dee
Boanie daintie Davie. (Cooke)
**
Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 27. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 24. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 91, pg. 47. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 2, No. 5, pg. 4. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 143. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 116, pg. 65. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 209.
X:1
T:Dainty Davie
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
d|c>BA>G F<D F2|F>c A/B/c/A/ f>cA>f|c>BA>G F<D F2|f>g a/g/f/e/ d>ef:|
|:c|f<af<a f<a ag/f/|e<g c>g e<g gf/e/|1 f<af<a f<a ag/f/|e>c a/g/f/e/ d>ef:|2
f>ga>g g>fe>c|d>e a/g/f/e/ d>ef||
X:2
T:Dainty Davy was a Lad
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:G
d>cBA GEE>D|GBBd GBB>d|d>cBA GEE>D|GBBd GBB>f|gefd e2d2||
gbef gbba/g/|fbd>e faa g/f/|gbbg faaf|gefd e2e2||

DAVY, (DAVY,) KNICK-KNACK/KNICK-KNOCK. AKA and see "Bonnell's Quickstep" (Pa.), "Bonnell's March" (Pa.), "The Dancing Mustang" (Pa.), "Hoe Cake," "Major Crichton's Delight," "Viginia Quickstep" (Pa.). English, Scottish, Shetland; Country Dance, Reel and Morris Dance Tune (2/4 or 4/4 time). Shetland, Unst and Mainland districts. G Major. Standard. AABB. Bayard (1981) notes that the tune is known internationally, occurring in publications from America, the British Isles, the Netherlands, and Holland. He quotes the Dutch authority Florimond van Duyse who said the tune was a fife or flagolet tune dating from the latter 18th or early 19th centuries, and indeed, it was still well-known in the early and mid-20th century to southwestern Pa. fife and drum bands by local titles. "Davy, Davy, Knick Knack" has a tradition of being used as a vehicle for a polka step in the English North-West morris tradition. See also "Major Duff's Favourite Quickstep" for a possible precursor. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 61, pg. 30. Page, Heritage Dances of Early America; No. or pg. 21. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 146. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 58. Wade (Mally's North West Morris Book), 1988; pg. 10. Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).

DAWN'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the late Shetland fiddler, composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson (1982). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 87.

DE'IL STICK THE/DA MINISTER. See "Deal/Devil Stick the Minister." AKA and see "This is no my ain Hoose," "This is no my ain Lassie," "Sean Triubhas." Scotland, Country Dance or Reel; Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is known throughout Scotland and the Shetlands, although in different versions, and is a very old melody from the days when covenenting ministers tried to stop fiddling as a "disruputable practice." A story goes that in one district the minister broke up all the fiddles except for one which a man, who could not bear to see his instrument destroyed, had hidden under a haystack. It was this unknown fiddler who supposedly composed the tune in protest of the destruction. The melody appears (as "Stick the Minister") in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodleian Library, Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740." "Deil Stick" is a relative of "This is no my ain Lassie," as is "Sean Truibhas," and a similar melodic theme appears in "This is no my ain Hoose." Emmerson (1972) confirms that "Sean Truibhas," or "Seann Triubhas Willighan," is a set of "Deil Stick." Source for notated version: A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 22. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 210.
T:De'il Stick the Minister
M:C|
L:1/8
Z:Andrew Kuntz
K:D
|:Adfd e/e3/2ce|fdfd g2eg|fdfd e2ce|d2ed cAA2 :|
|:fgaf gagf |e=cgc ecgc|fgaf gece|d2ed cAA2:|

DEVIL IN THE KITCHEN, THE [1]. AKA and see "Calum Crubach," "Devil Shake the Half-Breed," "Gurren's Castle," "Miss Sarah Drummond of Perth," "Miss Drummond of Perth," "Mountain Reel" [4], "Our Highland Cousins," "The Prince of Wales Jig," "The Titanic Highland," "Yorkshire Bite" [2]. Scottish, Shetland, Canadian, Irish; (Pipe) Reel, Fling or Strathspey. Ireland, County Donegal. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Hunter): AABB (Martin): AABBA'A'BB (Perlman): AABCCD (Skinner). Composed (according to Skinner) as a pipe tune by William Ross, the Queen's Piper, the melody was arranged (and popularized) by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) and appears as a two part tune in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner later expanded the melody to four parts (variations) in his Scottish Violinist. In pipe collections the tune set as a strathspey is attributed to one John MacPherson and once to a Donald McPhedran (in his own collection). "Devil in the Kitchen" is popular reel in County Donegal. In Scotland it is often used to accompany the Highland Fling. Source for notated version: Gus Longphie (b. 1914, Little Harbor, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Souris) [Perlman]. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 120. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 50 (strathspey setting). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 192 (strathspey). Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1903/4. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 11. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Culburnie COL 113D, Aladair Fraser & Tony McManus - "Return to Kintail" (1999). Rodeo Banff RBS 1066, Dan Joe MacInnis - "The Cape Breton Fiddle of..." (1962). Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974. Strathspey setting). Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996).

DONALD BLUE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Mainland district (also Papa Stour and Fetlar). D Major. Standard. AB (Flett & Flett): AABB (Anderson, Brody, Hunter). The melody was collected under a different name by Pat Shuldham-Shaw. Source for notated version: Tom Anderson and Aly Bain (Shetlands) [Brody]; Fraser Hughson (Aith, Shetland) via Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 25. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 87. Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 220. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 211. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow."

DONALD CAMERON'S POLKA. AKA and see "Donald Cameron's Reel." Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. G Major. Standard. AABB. Despite the polka appelation Brody identifies the tune as a reel coming from the Shetland Islands. Source for notated version: Joseph Cormier (Cape Breton & Massachusetts) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 87. Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier- "The Dances Back Home" (1977). Rounder 7006, Theresa and Marie MacLellan- "A Trip to Mabou Ridge."

DONALD CAMERON'S REEL. AKA and see "Donald Cameron's Polka." Canadian, Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. G Major. Standard. AABB. Perlman (1996) identifies the tune as coming from Cape Breton, though Brody (1983) prints the source originally as the Shetland Islands. Source for notated version: Sterling Baker (b. Mid-1940's, Montague, Northeast King's County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 47.

DONALD'S SPRING. AKA and see "Bonnie Ower the Hills at Night" (?). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

DUKE OF PERTH. AKA and see "Love in a Village" [3], "Da Fashion o da Delting Lasses" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB (Athole, Gow): AABB (Emmerson, Johnson, Kerr, Sweet). Johnson (1983) finds an early version of this famous piece in Stewart's Reels (1761) and believed it to have been written in the mid-18th century. Glen (1891) states the earliest printing to be in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection, however, Emmerson (1971) finds the earliest written record in David Young's 1734 Drummond Castle Manuscript (also called the "Duke of Perth Manuscript"). Another early version is to be found in the 1768 Gillespie Manuscript of Perth. Although called a reel the tune meets the criteria for a rant, however, it is now mostly played at a condisderably slower tempo as a Scottish measure or country dance in 2/4 time. The Scottish country dance performed to the tune was also called Duke of Perth and was very popular around Angus, East Fife and Perthshire, note Flett & Flett (1964), to the extent that it was a feature at various hunt balls in the region. The dance The Duke of Perth is also called Brown's Reel and both these names were used in Perthshire, East Fife and Angus. The same steps went by different names elsewhere in Scotland, to which other tunes were played; in the upper parts of Ettrick it was called Keep the Country, Bonny Lassie, and in Lanarkshire, Ayrshire, Arran and Galloway it was known as Pease Strae. Source for notated version: Stewart's Reels (c. 1761-5) [Johnson]. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 41, pg. 136. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 15. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 72, pg. 223. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 16, No. 4, pg. 11. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 171. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 56. Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).
T:Duke of Perth
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B|G>B dB gBdB|gBdB aAAB|G>B dB gBdB|cAdc BGG:|
f|gage abaf|gage beef|gage abaf|gdec BGGf|gage abaf|
gage beef|gage abaf|gdec BGG||

DUNCAN DAVI(D)SON. AKA and see "Duncan Davie," "1812" (USA), "1812 Quickstep" (USA), "The 1812 March," "Gentle Ann," "Handy Andy's Highland Fling," "Maggy's Weame Is Fu I Trow," "Shakkin Trews," "Welcome Here Again," "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" (Shetland), "Ye'll Aye Be Welcome Back Again." Scottish, Strathspey. E Major (Gow, Hunter): D Major (Athole, Cole, Gow, Honeyman, Kerr). Standard. AB (Cole, Honeyman). AAB (Gow): AABB and variations (Gow, Hunter): AABB' (Athole, Kerr). Variations from the 18th century in the then-fashionable Haydenesque style (which Hunter identifies as "Italianate") appear in Carlin and Hunter's editions, composed by Nathaniel Gow (not Niel Gow, as is sometimes asserted). The confusion stems from the fact that the tune was published in Niel Gow's 1784 Strathspey Reels -- the collection was edited and published by his son Nathaniel however, who added the variations). Glen (1891) believes its ancestral tune to have been "Strick Upon a Strogin" in the Leyden MS of 1692 (Bayard {1981} remarks, "he may be right, but I see no special reason for thinking so."). The most common names for the tune have been "Duncan Davidson" and "Ye'll Aye Be Welcome Back Again," of which the latter, according to Glen, is the older form (he also thinks Burns composed the David title). Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearences of the tune in print in Alexander M'Glashan's 1780 collection (pg. 14), and, as "Duncan Davie," in Joshua Campbell's 1778 collection (pg. 31). See note for "Ye'll Aye be Welcome Back Again" for more information. Carlin (Gow Collection), 1986; No. 46. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 128. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 1, 1799; pg. 34. Graham (Popular Songs of Scotland), 1908; pg. 205. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 11. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 39. Johnson (Scots Musical Museum), Vol. 2; No. 149. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 28, No. 3, pg. 17. Scot (Scottish Country Dance Book), Book 7, No. 4a (with references). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884' pg. 94. Wilson (A Companion to the Ballroom), 1840; pg. 45.
T:Duncan Davidson
L:1/8
M:C
S:Honeyman - Tutor
K:D
D>FA>B A<F A2|D>Fd>B A<F E2|D>FA>B A<FA<g|f>de>f d<d d2|D>FA>B A<F A2|
D>Fd>B A<F E2|D>FA>B A<F A>g|f>de>f d<d dg||f>e d/ef/ g>fe>d|c>Ae>A f>Ae>g|
f>e de/f/ g>fe>d|c>de>f d<d dg|f>e de/f/ g>fe>d|c<A e>A f>Ae>g|
(3fga (3def (3gfg (3Bcd|(3efe (3dcB (3ABA (3GFE||

DUNTROON CASTLE. Scottish, Bagpipe Reel. A Major. Standard. ABCD. Source for notated version: Arthur S. Robertson (Shetland) [Hunter]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 233. Green Linnet SIF 3031, The Tannahill Weavers - "Passage" (1984). Olympic 6151, Arthur S. Robertson - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

DU'S BON LANG AWA AND A'M TOCHT LAND TO SEE DEE. Shetland, Wedding Tune (3/4 time). Shetland, West side. D Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. One of the five tunes required in the old wedding rituals of the island of Papa Stour, Shetland, according to local fiddler Peter Fraser. This tune was played by the fiddler as the groom's party walked to the bride's house, upon arrival. "The alternations between C and D tonality in the tune could belong equally to Scandinavian or Scottish musical styles, though the large skips involving rapid string crossing is somewhat suggestive of the Aald Reel structures. The tune is known nowhere else in Shetland" (Cooke, 1986). Purser (1992) notes "The melodic outline could as easily be from the mainland as from Shetland, but the rhythm and phrase lengths are much less regular in effect than the bar lines suggest and it could as well be notated with two as opposed to three beats in the bar. The effect is one of an odd jauntiness." Source for notated version: Peter Fraser (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 11. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 28, pg. 82. Purser (Scotland's Music), 1992; Ex. 3, pg. 230.

EAST NEUK OF FIFE. AKA and see "She Gripped At the Greatest On't," "Green Grow the Rushes" (Bayard, 1981;No. 206H-M). Scottish (originally), Shetland, Canadian; March, Country Dance, Scots Measure or Reel. Scotland, Lowlands region. Canada, Prince Edward Island. G Major (double tonic, G and A). Standard. AB (Skye): AABB (Athole, Brody, Emmerson, Hardie, Hunter, Kerr, Perlman, Skinner, Williamson): AA'BB' (Cooke {Thomson}). Composed by James Oswald (c. 1711-1769) and included in his Caledonian Pocket Companion (Bk. 4, 1752) as "She gripped at the greatest o't." It first appears under the above title in William McGibbon's (c. 1690-1756) Third Collection (1755) and Bremner's 1759 Scots Tunes (Bremner negotiates the double tonic by using G and A Major in even numbered strains and G and A Minor in odd numbered strains"). It is still a popular Scots tune today, including the variations which uncharacteristically have survived in the popular repertory (variations were published by Nathaniel Gow in 1823-the first three were recorded by J. Scott Skinner in the first part of the 20th century). The East Neuk of Fife is that part of Scotland's county of Fife that juts into the North Sea and contains the town of St. Andrews, the ancestral home of the game of golf. In the eighteenth century Fife sported a profusion of decaying architectural marvels, a trade in thread, the making of calico, and the shooting of porpoises in the firth for their blubber-oil" (Williamson, 1976). The tune has become associated with a Robert Burns song, though it was not his choice of an air for the words, but rather an editor's substitution (Alburger). Bayard (1981) collected versions of the tune "Green Grow the Rushes" or by the floating title (in America) "Over the Hills and Far Away." Johnson (1984) retells an anecdote about the tune which was first published in Murdoch's Fiddle in Scotland, pg. 59 (Murdoch learned it from Baillie's grandson): "One day in about 1805, the fiddler Peter (Pate) Baillie of Loanhead, near Edinburgh, was on his way to play at a ball in Fife. The journey involved crossing the Firth of Forth by ferry, and when Baillie boarded the boat at Leith the other passengers noticed the violin he was carrying. As everyone had an hour to kill before the boat reached Burntisland, Baillie was soon holding an impromptu musical session on deck, with the other passengers calling out requests for tunes:
***
A gentleman asked Pate if he could play the 'East Neuk of Fife'
with ten variations, to which the minstrel replied in his homely
way: 'Weel, sir, I'll try it'. Off Pate set at a brisk pace with both
theme and variations, till the number bargained for was completed.
But Pate did not stop here. He dashed into fresh variations of his
own improvising, more wonderful than the first, and went on,
and on, and on, the gentleman looking at him with astonishment,
till at last the fiddler did make a halt. 'Well I declare!' said the
gentleman. 'Every one of the variations must have turned out
twins since I last heard them!' (pgs. 66-67).
***
Sources for notated versions: Henry Thomson (Vidlin, Mainland, Shetland) and George Sutherland (Bressay, Shetland) [Cooke], Bremner's (Scots Tunes), pg. 17 [Johnson, 1983]; George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Aird (Selections), 1778, Vol. 1; No. 57. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 97. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 251. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex's. 52 and 53, pgs. 110-111. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 89, pg. 164. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 31. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935 (includes the traditional set of variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 309. Johnson, (The Scots Musical Museum) 1787-1803; Vol. 3; No. 277. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1983; No. 34, pg. 92-93 (with variations). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 23. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 170. McGibbon CST, pg. 89. McGibbon Scot, Vol. 3; pg. 17. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), 177?; pg. 8. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 61. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with 5 of his variations), pg. 22-23. Smith (The Scottish Minstrel), 1820-24; Vol. 2; pg. 42. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 147. Thompson (Original Scottish Airs for the Voice, 1805; Vol. 4; No. 165. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 53. Olympic 6151, The Scottish Fiddle Festival Orchestra- "Scottish Traditonal Fiddle Music" (1978). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
T:East Neuk of Fife
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
D|G2G2G2Bc|dBGB dBGB|A2A2A2gf|edef g2fe|dcBA GABc|
dBGB d2cB|ABcd BcAB|B2E2E2:|
|:dc|B2G2G2dc|B2G2G2ed|c2A2A2 eg|a2A2A2dc|B2G2d2G2|
g2G2d2cB|ABcd BcAB|G2E2E2:|

EENIE'S SPRING. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

ELLENORA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

FAROE RUM. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. The tune was in the repertory of the locally infulential Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore has a wide currancy in those Islands. Tom Anderson (1978) identifies it as a reel from the time when a thriving Cod fishing industry was extent on Faroe Island, and tobacco and rum were smuggled to the Island for "home consumption." Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

FASHION O DA DELTING LASSES, DA. AKA and see "The Duke of Perth." Shetland, Reel. Shetlands, Mainland district. D Major. Standard. AAB. Aly Bain states "it must have been composed in honour of some new fashion in the Delting area." Source for notated version: A. Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 22. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

FAST TO THE MOORINGS. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. Cooke (1986) says it is like the "Morris Rant."

FERRIE REEL (Fairy Reel). Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Island of Yell. D Major. Standard. AABB. According to Tom Anderson (1978) the tune was one of the Yell tunes that were revived and played by Bobbie Jamieson and Willie Barclay Henderson. He identifies it as a trowie (troll) tune which tradition has it as heard emanating from a hole in the ground by a fiddler returning from performing at a wedding. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 112, pg. 73. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

FETLAR FOXTROT, THE. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AA'BCC'. From the island of Fetlar in the northern Shetlands. The foxtrot had been assimilated on Fetlar during the WWII era, but "only the name and the grosser features of the dance had been incorporated into the lacal dance tradition: it had been thoroughly 'Fetlarized'" (Cooke). Source for notated version: Sonny Bruce (Scalloway, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 1, pg. 38.

FAERY REEL. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Traditional. Some few similarities to "The Fairy Dance." Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 26.

FAIR FIELD HOUSE. AKA and see "The/Da Scalloway Lasses" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel. A Minor. Standard. AABB. According to John Glen (1891), the melody was first published in John Riddell's Collection (1st Ed., c. 1766). Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 18(a), pg. 68. Glen (The Glen Collection of Scottish Dance Music), Vol. 1, 1891; pg. 24.
T:Fair Field House
L:1/8
M:C
S:Glen Collection
K:A Minor
g|eaag fedc|cdef gecg|eaag fedc|dcde A/A/A A:|
|:d|cAGA cdec|dcde defd|eagf ecde|cABG A/A/A A:|

FAIRY REEL, THE [2]. AKA and see "Loddie" (Shetlands), "The Bottom of the Punch Bowl" (Shetlands). Shetlands, Reel. Known throughout the Shetland Islands.

FAR FROM HOME ("Slan Beo Leat" or "Fad Ua Baile"). Irish, English, Shetland, American; Reel. USA; New England, Northwest. G Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AABB (Cranitch, Frets Magazine, Miller & Perron, O'Neill/Krassen, Raven). Bayard (1981) collected in Pennsylvania a tune that is a version, "The Butcher's Row." Many have pointed out the similarity to the popular hornpipe "Off to California," especially in the 'B' parts which are nearly identical. Source for notated version: Francis O'Neill learned his version of the tune in the San Joaquin Valley, California, when he was aged 19 in the 1870's "from the whistling of a companion while herding a flock of 3,000 sheep on the plains at the foot of the Sierra Nevada range"-presumably the title appealed to the young O'Neill, who left Ireland in his mid-teens [O'Neill/Irish Folk Music]. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 59, pg. 148. Frets Magazine, "Boys of the Lough," October 1980; pg. 31. Kennedy (Fiddler's Tune Book), Vol. 2; pg. 11. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddler's Repertoire), 1983; No. 86. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 107. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1261, pg. 237. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 530, pg. 99. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 188. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 76. Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough--"Good Friends, Good Music" (1977).
T:Far from Home
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
|:GE DE G3A|B2 BA Bc d2|GE DE G3B|AG AB AG E2|
GE DE G3A|B2 BA Bc d2|ed ef ge dc|BG AF G4:|
|:g3eg3d|ed ef ed B2|ge dB G2 GB|AG AB AG E2|
GE DE G2 GA|B3A Bc d2|ed ef ge dc|BG AF G4:|

FIDDLER OF FERRYHILL, THE. English, Scottish; Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by the English musicologist, composer and collector Patrick Shuldham Shaw (1917-1977) for Scottish fiddler Bill Hardie (who lived for most of his life in or near the Ferryhill district of Aberdeen for much of his life). Pat Shaw was a moving force behind the English Folk Song and Dance Society for several decades, and recorded a large body of Shetland folk and dance music in the late 1940's. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 41.

FIELDS OF FOULA. AKA and see "Flowers of May" (Shetland). Shetland, Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB.
X:1
T:Fields O' Foula, Da
D:The Boys of the Lough, Da Day Dawn
N:A 6/8 tune from Foula, used for the
N:dance 'The Foula Reel'
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:D
g|f2 g afd|g2 f e2 g|f2 g afd|fga f2 d|f2 g afd|
g2 f e2 A|ABA def|d3 d2::B|ABA F2 A|d2 f|ecA|def ecA|
dAF DEF|EEE F2 A|d2 f ecA|def ecA|d3 d2:|]
X:2
T:Fields o' Foula, Da
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Tom Anderson
Z:Transcribed by Mike McGeary
K:D
g|f2-g afd|g2-f e2 g|f2 g afd|f2-a f2 d|!
f2-g afd|g2 (f e2 A)|A2 A def|d2 d d2:|]!
(B|A2) A F2 A|d2 f ecA|def ecA|BAF D2 F/F/|!
E2 E F2 A|d2 f ecA|def ecA|1 d3 d2 g:|2 d3 d3||

FIONA'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. "Written for a very hard working pupil of Tom (Anderson's), and one of Shetland's Young Heritage group" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 101.

FISHER'S HORNPIPE (Crannciuil {Ui} Fishuir). AKA "The Fisher's," "Fisherman's Hornpipe." AKA and see "The Blacksmith's Hornpipe" (Ireland {Joyce}), "China Orange Hornpipe," "Egg Hornpipe," "Fisherman's Lilt," "The First of May," "Kelly's Hornpipe" [3], "Lord Howe's Hornpipe," "O'Dwyer's Hornpipe," "Peckhover Walk Hornpipe," "Roger MacMum" (Irish), "Sailor's Hornpipe," "Wigs on the Green" (Ireland {Roche}). English, Irish, Scottish, Shetlands, Canadian, Old-Time, Texas Style, Bluegrass; Hornpipe, Reel, Breakdown. USA & Canada, widely known. D Major {most modern versions}: G Major {often in the Galax, Va. area, also Bayard's version collected in Prince Edward Island}: A Major (Mississippi fiddler Charles Long): F Major {Burchenal, Cranford, Honeyman, Linscott, Miller & Perron, Miskoe & Paul, Perlman, Raven, Phillips/1995, Welling}. Standard or ADAD. AABB (most versions): AA'BB (Perlman): AA'BB' (Miskoe & Paul). On the subject of the title, several writers have posited various speculations on who the 'Fisher' might have been. Charles Wolfe, among others, believes it was originally a classical composition by German composer Johann Christian Fischer (1733-1800), a friend of Mozart's, which thought Samuel Bayard (1981) concurs, noting the tune goes back to latter 18th century England where it was composed by "J. Fishar" and "published in 1780" (Most of the alternate titles he gives {and which appear above} are "floaters"). Van Cleef and Keller (1980) identify the composer as probably one James A. Fishar, a musical director and ballet master at Covent Garden during the 1770's, and note it is included as "Hornpipe #1" in J. Fishar's (presumably James A. Fishar's) Sixteen Cotillons Sixteen Minuets Twelve Allemands and Twelve Hornpipes (John Rutherford, London, 1778). A few years later the melody appeared in England under the title "Lord Howe's Hornpipe" in Longman and Broderip's 5th Selection of the Most Admired Dances, Reels, Minuets and Cotillions (London, c. 1784). McGlashan printed it about the same time in his Collection of Scots Measures (c. 1780, pg. 34) under the title "Danc'd by Aldridge," a reference to the famous stage dancer and pantomimist Robert Aldridge, a popular performer in the 1760's and 1770's. Although it is known in Europe as a hornpipe, it has also been played as a reel for dancing the Shetland Reel in Scotland's Shetland Islands. Linscott (1939) thinks the melody resembles an "ancient" Irish folk tune known as "Roger MacMum," implying it might have been derived from that source.
***
The tune became widely popular in a short span of time. It was already known as "Fisher's Hornpipe" in both England and the newly independent United States when it was written out by the American John Greenwood in his copybook for the German flute of c. 1783. Another 18th century American publication, a 1796 collection entitled An Evening Amusement for German Flute and Violin, was printed in Philadelphia by Carr and contains the hornpipe set in 'D' Major. An American country dance was composed to the tune and first appeared in this country in John Griffith's Collection, a Rhode Island publication of 1788. Both dance and tune became American classics and entered traditional repertory throughout the county. A fiddler with the Moses Cleaveland surveying party (the city of Cleveland, Ohio, is named after him) is recorded as having played "Fisher's" during an impromptu dance on the first evening the party camped on the banks of the Cuyahoga river, as recorded in the diary of a surveyor with the party. It was one of the most widely known fiddle tunes and, along with "Rickett's Hornpipe," the most popular hornpipe played in the Southern Appalachians (although as time went on hornpipes were not generally dropped from the repertoire, certainly as an accompaniment for dancing, but "Fishers" remained in the repertoire as a fiddler's tune which was frequently played when a few musicians would get together for their own enjoyment). The tune retained its popularity, and Jim Kimball states that both "Fishers" and "Ricketts" (along with "Devil's Dream" and "Soldier's Joy") were favorite tunes for the last figure of square dances in western New York state into the early 20th century.
***
Around the Galax, Va., region quite a few fiddlers, like Charlie Higgins and John Rector, play 'Fisher's' in the key of 'G' Major. Tommy Jarrell, of nearby Mt. Airy, N.C., plays the tune in 'D' Major, as did his father, Ben Jarrell, though the tune usually appears in 'F' Major in early collections (the earliest American appearance, John Greenwood's flute MS of 1783, has the tune in 'G,' however). 'F' Major renditions are still common (along with 'D' Major versions) among fiddlers in central and north Missouri-- though relatively rare in the Ozarks region of the state--perhaps because of the because of the influence of the old town orchestras or brass bands (with flat-keyd wind instruments), radio broadcasts from Canadian fiddlers, and local classically trained music professors. Despite the seeming prevalence of the hornpipe set in 'F' major in early publications, Jim Kimball finds that the John Carroll manuscript collection, copied before 1804, gives "Fisher's" in the key of D Major, as does the John Studderd manuscript, c. 1808-1815, and the John Seely manuscript, c. 1819-1830 (Carroll was an Irish-American military musician stationed at Fort Niagara at the time he wrote his manuscript who apparently played both fife and fiddle; Studderd was a native of England prior to emigrating to western New York state in the 1820's; Seely, according to family history, was a fiddler who lived in western New York state for whom "Fishers" was a favorite tune).
***
The title "Fisher's Hornpipe" has been mentioned frequently in periodicals and other printed sources in America over the years. For example, it was recorded as having been one of the catagory tunes at the 1899 Gallatin, Tenn., fiddlers contest; each fiddler would play his version of the tune, with the best rendition winning a prize (C. Wolfe, The Devil's Box, Vol. 14, No. 4, 12/1/80). Similarly, it was listed in the Fayette Northwest Alabamian of 8/29/1929 as one of the tunes likely to be played by local fiddlers at an upcoming convention (Cauthen, 1990). Moving north, another citation stated it had commonly been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), while Burchenal (1918) printed a dance from New England of the same name to the tune. A Report of the Celebration Held in August 1914 for the 150th Anniversary of the Town of Lancaster (N.H.) gives the title as one of the tunes and dances performed at a cotillion that month. The title appears in a list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham's repertoire (Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's) and Gibbons (1982) notes it has been "a traditional dance melody familiar to fiddlers throughout Canada." Perlman (1996) notes it has status as one of the "good old tunes" played by Prince Edward Island fiddlers. In the South and Midwest the tune was recorded for the Library of Congress from the playing of Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, and (by Herbert Halpert) from the playing of Mississippi fiddlers Charles Long and Stephen B. Tucker in 1939. The Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner related that it, in modern times, it was "played often at (the) Weiser (Idaho) annual (fiddle) contest" (Shumway), to which Louie Attebery (1979) concurs, calling it part of the "standard fare" of many fiddlers at that festival and contest.
***
In the repertiore of Uncle Jimmy Thompson (1848-1931) {Texas, Tenn.}, and Buffalo Valley, Pa. dance fiddler Harry Daddario. See also "Miss Thompson's Reel," which particularly resembles the "Fisher's" in it's second section.
***
Sources for notated versions: Edson Cole (Freedom, N.H.) [Linscott]: Frank George (W.Va.) [Krassen]; Frank Lowery (Prince George, British Columbia) [Gibbons]; Lorin Simmonds (Prince Edward Island, 1944) [Bayard, 1981]; transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.), who learned the tune when young in Quebec [Miskoe & Paul]; 6 southwestern Pa. fiddlers and fifers [Bayard, 1981]; Ruthie Dornfeld and Major Franklin (Texas) [Phillips/1995 {two different versions}]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded in recital at Na Piobairi Uilleann, February, 1981 [Moylan]; Dennis Pitre (b. 1941, St. Felix, West Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, in the 1980's [Taylor]. Allan's (Allan's Irish Fiddler), No. 105, pg. 27. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 345, pgs. 332-334 and Appendix No. 3, pg. 573. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 107. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 47. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 57. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 45, pg. 17. Ford (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 39. Gibbons (As It Comes: Folk Fiddling From Prince George, British Columbia), 1982; No. 6, pgs. 18-19. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 40 (two versions, one in Newcastle and Sand Dance style, on in Sailor's style). Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. 20, pg. 67. Johnson & Luken (Twenty-Eight Country Dances as Done at the New Boston Fair), Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 4. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 103. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 79. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 3, pg. 42. Linscott (Folk Music of Old New England), 1939; pg. 77. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 117. Miskoe & Paul (Omer Marcoux), 1994; pg. 31. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 63, pg. 36. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 351, pg. 171. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 168. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; Nos. 1575 & 1576, pg. 292. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 825, pg. 143. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 117. Phillips, 1989 (Fiddlecase Tunebook: Old-Time); pg. 19. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pgs. 1992-193. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 163. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 26. Roche Collection, Vol. 3, No. 181. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 23, pg. 10. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 10. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 297. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 42. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 14. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 20. Alcazar Dance Series FR 204, "New England Chestnuts" (1981). Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 17). Caney Mountain CEP 212 (privately issued extended play album), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), 1965-66. Claddagh CC5, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford - "The Star Above the Garter" (appears as "Fisherman's Hornpipe"). County 405, "The Hill-Billies." County 707, Major Franklin- "Texas Fiddle Favorites." County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1986. The only time Tommy's famous fiddling father, Ben Jarrell {who took no active part in his musical education and rarely commented on his son's efforts}, praised his playing in front of him was after hearing the younger fiddler play the tune, remarking "By gawd, that's the best I've ever heard "Fisher's Hornpipe" played"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" F&W Records 4, "The Canterbury Country Orchestra Meets the F&W String Band." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways FG 3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968). Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family: Champion Fiddlers." Gourd Music 110, Barry Phillips - "The World Turned Upside Down" (1992). North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." Rounder 0035, Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier- "The Dances Down Home" (1977). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Northern Spy - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Topic 12T309, Padraig O'Keeffe, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford - "Kerry Fiddles" (appears as "Fisherman's Hornpipe").
X:1
T:Fisher's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:F
|:c2|fc Ac Bd cB|Ac Ac Bd cB|Ac Fc Bd Gd|Ac FA G2 (3cde|
fc Ac Bd cB|Ac Fc Bd cB|AB cd ef ge|f2a2f2:|
|:ef|ge ce ge bg|af cf af ba|ge ce ga ba|gf ed c2 Bc|
dB FB dB fd|cA FA cA fc|df ed cB AG|F2A2F2:|
X:2
T:Fishers
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
B:The Athole Colletion
K:D
dc|dAFA GBAG|FAFA GBAG|FDFD GEGE|FDFD E2 dc|dAFA GBAG|
FAFA GBAG|FAdf gedc|d2 d2 d2:||:cd|ecAc ecge|fdAd fdaf|ecAc ecgf|
edcB A3A|BGDG BGdB|AFDF AFdA|BdcB AGFE|D2 D2 D2:|

FLOWERS OF EDINBURGH [1] (Blata Duin-Eudain). AKA - "Flooers o' Edinburgh." AKA and see "Cois Lasadh/Leasa" (Beside a Rath), "Flowers of Donnybrook," "My Love's Bonny When She Smiles On Me," "My Love was Once a Bonny Lad," "Rossaviel," "To the Battle Men of Erin," "Old Virginia." Scottish (originally), Shetland, Canadian, American; Scots Measure, Country Dance Tune or Reel: English, Reel, Country or Morris Dance Tune (4/4, cut or 2/2 time); Irish, Reel or Hornpipe. Originally from Scotland, Lowlands region. USA; New England, southwestern Pa., Missouri, New York, Arizona. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. G Major (most versions): Morris version in D Major (Mallinson). Standard. AB (Bacon, Kerr): AAB (Bain, Mitchell): AABB (most versions): AA'BB (Phillips). Gow and others credit composition of the melody to James Oswald (Gow). Its earliest appearance in print is in Oswald's c. 1742 collection of Curious Collection of Scots Tunes (II), which appeared in London and contained the "Flowers" tune as a "crude" song entitled "My Love's bonny when she smiles on me." He printed the melody again in 1750 with the words "My love was once a bonny lad." The first version of the song and tune with the title "The Flower of Edinburgh" appeared in The Universal Magazine, April, 1749. That same year it was printed in John Johnson's Twelve Country Dances for the Harpsichord. Oswald himself republished it in 1751 in his volume Caledonian Pocket Companion under the title "The Flower of Edinburgh."
***
As regards the title, the convention "Flower of..." usually referenced a woman, although in the case of "Edinburgh" the plural form was appended at some point and stuck. The plural title appears in Herd's Scots Songs (without music) and in The Scots Musical Museum (1787, No. 13). Gow notes parenthetically in his Complete Repository (Part 4, 1817) that the 'flowers' of Edinburgh did not refer to comely females but in fact referenced the magistrates of the town. Some say the 'flowers' were female, although the females in question were prostitutes. It has also been suggested that the title refers to the stench of the old, overcrowded urban Edinburgh-a city fondly referred to as "Auld Reekie", which does not bespeak of a putrid, reeking smell, but rather comes from the Norwegian word røyk, meaning smoke. Thus 'Auld Reekie' refers to the pall of smoke that once hovered over the city, having been constantly spewed forth by its hearths. Finally, the 'flowers of Edinburgh' has been taken to refer to the contents of chamber pots which were, in the days before modern sewage systems, once disposed of by being thrown into the city streets (with or without the shouted warning "Gardez l'eau!" or "Mind yourself!"). Paul de Grae finds this latter interpretation in modern times incorporated by novelist Ian Rankin in one of his Inspector Rebus crime novels. Rebus, an Edinburgh detective, is being addressed by an "hard man" whose warning narrowly averted the Inspector's stepping in canine excrement. It will help to know human waste is called keech or keach in Ulster and Scotland (similar to the French caca, Italian cacca, Finnish and Icelandic kakku, and German kaka):
:***
"Know what 'flowers of Edinburgh' are?"
"A rock band?"
"Keech. They used to chuck all their keech out of the
windows and onto the street. There was so much of it
lying around, the locals called it the flowers of Edinburgh.
I read that in a book."
***
The renowned County Donegal fiddler, John Doherty (1895-1980) had his own idiosyncratic take on the title. In the notes for the album "The Floating Bow," Alun Evans writes of Doherty:
***
I can only say that I never found him to be other than exhilarating
company. Yet he was hard to pin down on detail, for in his mind fact and
fantasy were so tightly interwoven as to be indivisible - at least he led
you to believe so. He would tell how James Scott Skinner had composed the
tune 'The Flowers of Edinburgh' after a Miss Flowers with whom he was
besotted at the time. John must have known that this didn't ring true but a
story was a story, perhaps an example of the 'true Celtic madness' which is
said to be 'not psychotic but merely a poetic confusion of the real and the
imagined.'
***
English morris versions are from the Bampton area of England's Cotswolds and the North-West (England) tradition (where it is used as the tune for a polka step). Editor Seattle remarks of William Vickers' Northumbrian country dance version that it is "A fine setting with some distinctive 18th century touches."
***
In America the melody has also been used for country dances for over two hundred and twenty years. It was included by Greenland, New Hampshire, dancer Clement Weeks in his MS dance collection of 1783, and by Giles Gibbs (East Windsor, Ellington Parish, Connecticut) in his 1777 fife manuscript (Van Cleef & Keller, 1980). In the latter MS it is also called "Darling Swain." As "Old Virginia (Reel)" it was printed by George P. Knauff in Virginia Reels, volume II (Baltimore, 1839). Much later it was cited as having commonly been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), and was in the repertoire of Arizona dance fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner in the early twentieth century. The title also appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Howard Marshall writes that Art Galbraith (d. 1992) of Springfield, Missouri, "had the most famous version in his area which was handed down through his family from at least 1840. Art's version is distinctive for its retention of the old 'extra beat' that has been lost in other versions." This famous Scottish reel is as well known to Pennsylvania fiddlers as it is to country players everywhere in the area of British folk music tradition, says Bayard (1944), and is one tune to which a single title has been transmitted intact through the generations of folk process.
***
In Ireland "Flowers of Edinburgh" is most common rendered as a hornpipe. The Irish "Cois Leasa" (Beside a Rath) is a version of this tune, maintains O'Neill (Dance Music of Ireland), who perhaps found it in Haverty's 100 Irish Airs, 2nd series, 1859, where "The Flowers of Edinburgh" is given in parenthesis as an alternate title for the "Rath" tune. Bayard (1981) agrees with O'Neill, though Sullivan (Bunting Collection) and Alfred Moffat do not, and the connection is not addressed in the Fleischmann index (Sources of Irish Traditional Music, 1998). Stanford/Petrie notes his Arranmore-collected Irish tune "Rossaveel" is "the old form of 'Flowers of Edinburgh.'" Finally, a version is played under the title of "The Flower of Donneybrook" in Ireland.
***
Sources for notated versions: Fennigs All Stars (New York) [Brody]; John Kubina, (near) Davistown, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1943 (learned from traditional players in Pittsburgh) [Bayard]; Gilpin, Yaugher, Hall, Wright, Shape (all southwestern Pa. fiddlers whose versions were collected in the 1940's) [Bayard]; Arnold Woodley (Bampton, England) via Roy Dommett [Bacon]; Art Stamper (Mo.) [Phillips]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Elliot Wright (b. 1935, North River, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pgs. 46, 57, 81. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 33. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 54. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 340A=E, pgs. 326-327. Begin (Fiddle Music from the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 46, pg. 55. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 109. Burchenal (Rinnce na h-Eireann), p. 24. Calliope, pg. 28. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 256. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 16. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 32 (includes variations by Bill Hardie). Harding's Orig. Coll., No. 177. Hogg (Jacobite Relics), II, p. 129. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935 (includes sets of variations). Howe's School for the Violin, p. 34. Howe's Diamond School for the Violin (1861); pg. 44. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 310. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No. or pg. 6. JEFDSS, I, 82, second half of 'Birds-a-Building' equals the second half of No. 54. Jigs and Reels, p. 12. Johnson (Scots Musical Museum, edition of 1853), Vol. I, No. 13. Johnson, S.L. (Twenty-Eight Country Dances as Done at the New Boston Fair), Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 5. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 1, pg. 23. Lerwick (Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 19. Levey, No. 4. Mallinson (Mally's Cotswold Morris Book), 1988, Vol. 2; No. 30, pg. 16. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 19, pg. 8. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertorie), 1983; No. 122. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 88, pg. 79. Neal (Esperance Morris Book), pt. II, p. 29. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 350, pg. 171. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 208. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 920, pg. 157. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1746, pg. 325. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island) 1996; pg. 61. Petrie, No. 372. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 90. Reavy (The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy), No. 86. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1979; pg. 52. Robbins, Nos. 28 & 152. Saar, No. 29. Seattle (William Vickers), 1770/1987, Part 2; No. 384. Sharp and Macilwaine (Morris Dance Tunes), Set V, pp. 2,3 (same version printed in other Sharp folk dance books). Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 6. Smith (Scottish Minstrel), III, 25. Calliope (4th edition, 1788), p. 28. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 146. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 59. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 12. Wade (Mally's North West Morris Book), 1988; pg. 22. White's Unique Coll., No. 71. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 53. Breakwater 1002, Rufus Guinchard- "Newfoundland Fiddler." Edison 52313 (78 RPM), John Baltzell (Mt. Vernon, Ohio), 1928 {appears as "Flowers at Edingurgh"} [Baltzell was taught to play the fiddle by minstrel Dan Emmett]. Front Hall 01, Fennigs All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Glencoe 001, Cape Breton Symphony- "Fiddle." Kicking Mule 209, Ken Perlman- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." Olympic 6151, The Scottish Festival Orchestra- "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). Philo 1008, "Kenny Hall." Sonet 764, Dave Swarbrick and Friends- "The Ceiledh Album." Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from the playing of Missouri fiddler Art Galbraith).
X:1
T:Flowers of Edinburgh
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
GE|D3E G3A|BGdG cBAG|FGFE DEFG|AFdF E3F|
D3E G3A|BGBd efge|dcBA GFGA|B2G G2:|
|:d|gfga gbag|fdfg fagf|edef gfed|B2 e>f efge|dBGB B/c/d cB|
egfa g2fe|dcBA GFGA|B2G2G2:|
X:2
T:Flowers of Edinburgggg
M:2/4
L:1/8
S:Bruce Molskey
R:Old-time
Z:M. Reid 27-Jan-199
K:G
D2|G3 D|ED B,D|G2 G2|BA Bd|cB AG|FG FE|DE FG|A4|A,4|ED EF|G3 A| BA Bc|d2
ef|ga ge|dB GB|A2 Ac|B2 F2 |1 G4-|G2:|2 G4-|G4 |:g3 a|b2 ag|fe fg|a2
A2|e3 f|gf ed|B2 e2|e2 ef|g2 e2|dB GB| Bd- dB|d2 ef|gf ef|ga ge|dB GB|A2
Ac|B2 F2|1 G4-|G4:|2 G4-|G2|]
X:3
T:Flower of Edinburgh
S:Twelve Country Dances for the Harpsichord, 1749.
Q:60
Z:Transcribed by Bruce Olson
L:1/4
M:C|
K:G
(3 G/F/E/|D3/2E/G3/2A/|B/G/ B/d/{c/}BA/G/|{G/}F3/2E/ D/E/ F/G/|\
A/F/ d/F/EF/E/|D/E/ F/D/G3/2A/|(3B/A/G/ (3 B/c/d/ e3/2g/|\
d/B/ A/G/EG/A/|BG/A/G||d|g/f/ g3/4a/4 f/4a/4b/ a/g/|\
f/e/ f3/4g/4 f/4g/4a/ g/f/|e/d/ e/f/ g/f/ e/d/|\
Bee3/2 g/8f/8e/4|d/B/ A/G/dc/B/|e/d/ e/f/ g3/2g/8a/8b/4|\
c/B/ A/G/ EG/A/|BGG|]
X:4
T:Flowers of Edinburgh
S:Scots Musical Museum, #13 (1787)
Q:60
Z:Transcribed by Bruce Olson
L:1/4
M:C
K:F
C/|C3/2 D/F3/2G/|(A/F/) (c/F/) {B/}AG/F/|\
~E3/2D/ C3/4D/4 E3/4F/4|G/E/ c/E/ ~D3/2E/|\
C3/2D/F3/2G/|~(A3/4G/4A/) c/d (d/4e/4f/)|\
(B/A/) (G/F/) {A}/G (F/G/)|A~G3/4F/4F||(c/4d/4e/)|\
(f3/4e/4f/) g/ (f/4g/4a/) ~(g/f/)|\
~(e3/4d/4e/) f/ (e/4f/4g/) ~(f/e/)|\
(d3/4c/4d/) e/ (f/e/) (d/c/)|Ad3/4e/4 d(d/4e/4) f/|\
{c/}A G/F/c(B/A/)|d/c/d/e/ .g3/2 {g/a/} A/|\
(B/A/) G/ F/ GF/G/|A~G3/4F/4F|]
X:5
T:Flowers of Edinburgh
S:from the playing of Dave Swarbrick,
S:from "The Ceilidh Album" (?)
Z:Transcribed by Nigel Gatherer
N:An English morris version?
M:2/4
K:G
L:1/8
D|GG BG/B/|dB g>e|dB B/A/G/A/|BG ED|
GG BG/B/|dB g>e|dB B/A/G/A/|BG G:|]
d|g2 f>e|Be e>f|g2 f/g/f/e/|Be eg/e/|
d/B/G/B/ dd|e/d/e/f/ gg/e/|dB B/A/G/A/|BG G:|]

FLOWERS OF MAY. AKA and see "Fields of Foula." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Delting (?).

FLUGGA [1]. Shetland, Dance Tune (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. One part. "One of the tunes for the dance 'Da Flugga', which used to be danced in the little village of Collafirth, in the Delting area" (Anderson). The Flugga dance accually used tunes that crisply changed from jig time to reel time; see also "Doon the Burn Davie" and "Saw Ye Nae My Peggie." Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 68.

FOOSTRA, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known.

FOREFIT O' DA SHIP, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Boys/Lough): AABB (Anderson & Georgeson, Cooke, Hunter, Phillips). In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known in the islands. Tom Anderson (1970, 1978) states the tune is supposed to be one of the tunes composed by an unknown fiddler-whaler, inspired by the sound of the sea breaking on the bows of a sailing ship. Robin Morton (1976) believes there is Scandinavian influence apparent in the melody. Sources for notated versions: Tom Anderson (Shetland) [Phillips]; J.C. Smith (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 24. Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 20. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 46, pg. 104. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 212. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 20. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Thule Records 214, Tom Anderson. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough, "The Piper's Broken Finger."

FOREHEID OF THE SIXEREEN, DA. AKA and see "Andrew's Spring." Shetland, Shetland Reel (asymmetrical reel). Shetland, Whalsay (?). C Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Refers to the bow of a boat. Source for notated version: Andrew Poleson (Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 9, pg. 60.

FORTH BRIG, THE. AKA and see "Captain Hay" (?). Scottish, Canadian, Shetland; Reel. Shetland, Mainland district. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard. AABB'. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 88, pg. 26. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982).

FOULA REEL. AKA and see "Da Auld Foula Reel," "Da Shaalds O Foula," "The Aald Reel." Shetland, Jig. E Minor. Standard. AABB. Hunter (1979) states the tune popularly used for country dances is known today as "Da Shaalds O Foula" or "Da Foula Shalds," but "The Foula Reel" is another tune altogther whose dance has been lost. Anderson & Georgeson (1970), however, assert there are many variations of both melody and dance (though most versions are in jig time, with only a few in reel time) which go by all four titles. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 15. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 288.

FOUR POSTER BED, THE. AKA and see "Four Corners of St. Malo," "Four Corners Reel," "Four Posts of the Bed," "Les Quatre Coins du Lit," "Les Quat' Coins de St Malo." English, Scottish, Irish, Shetlands; Polka, Reel or 'Programme Piece'. Ireland, Donegal. D Major. Standard. ABB (Phillips): AABB (Martin). This tune's 'B' part dramatizes the four poster bed by giving four taps with the frog-end of the bow on the each of the four quarters of the belly of the fiddle, interspersed by a right-hand pizzicato. The melody is popular in the Shetlands, though probably not of Shetland origin admits Cooke. On an early recording made for Comhaltas, Donegal fiddler John Doherty relates the story of "The Fours Posts of the Bed" and then plays the tune. His story tells of an itinerant fiddle player who finds refuge for the night in a cottage which lacks a bed for him. Not wanting to be inhospitable, the man of the house fashions a bed, and in return the fiddler composes a tune to thank him. Under the title "The Four Corners of St. Malo" the melody was recorded for Philo by French-Canadian fiddler Henri Landry. As has been noted by any fiddler who attempts to play this tune in the traditional manner, tapping the metal end of the frog on the belly of the violin often produces nicks and dings in the wood. To prevent this damage fiddlers in Donegal shout in Gaelic "Aon, do, tri, ceathair" (one, two, three, four) as the tap the four corners of the violin with their bow in the vertical but with the fleshy part of their middle finger covering the end of the frog. Source for notated version: Dave Swarbrick (England). Jordan (Whistle and Sing!), Vol. 1. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 42. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 21. Polydor Special 236-514, Dave Swarbrick.
T:Four Posts of the Bed, The
M:C|
L:1/8
Q:220
S:John Doherty
R:polka
Z:Philippe Varlet
K:D
e2 ef e2 ef | edcB A2 E2 | A2 e2 f2 fe | g2 fe f2 a2 |
e2 ef e2 ef | edcB A2 g2 | f2 g2 e2 c2 |1 d4 g3 f :|2 d4 d2 Ad ||:
f2 gf e2 fg | abag fAde | f2 gf e2 fg | a2 ^gb a2 Ad |
f2 gf e2 fg | abag fAde | f2 gf e2 a2 |1 d4 d2 Ad :|2 d4 g3 f ||:
e2 ef e2 ef | edcB A2 E2 | A2 e2 z2 e2 | z2 e2 z2 e2 |
z2 e2 e3 f | edcB e2 eg | f2 g2 e2 c2 | d4 g3 f :||

FREELY SHOT OWER. AKA and see "Fairly Shot of Her" (Scottish). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

FULL RIGGED SHIP, DA [1]. Shetland, Reel. A Dorian ('A' and 'C' parts) & A Major or Mixolydian ('B' part). Standard. ABC (Bain). Scots fiddlers generally play this tune in a medley with the similarly titled "New Rigged Ship." Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 43. Martin & Hughes (Ho-ro-gheallaidh: Sessions Tunes for Scottish Fiddlers), 1990. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991).

FULL RIGGED SHIP, DA [2]. Shetland, Listening Piece (triple meter). A Dorian. Standard. AABB'CC' (Cooke). Popularized by Tom Anderson, who explains the little hesitations and sudden melodic turns as the motion when a fine sailing ship mounts the ocean swell, pauses and dips its bow again. It is often followed without a break by the reel "The New Rigged Ship" (Cooke). Source for notated version: Peter Fraser (Walls, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 39, pg. 92. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).
T:Da Full Rigged Ship
S:Sessions etc
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:Am
e2a aea|aea aba|e2^f g2g|gag ^f2d|
e2a aea|aea aba|g2e edB|A3 E3::efe edB|
A2B c3|B2G B2G|Bcd E3|efe edB|A2B c2d|
efe dBG|A3 A3::EGE EGE|EGE c3|
EGE E2D|E2FGEC|EGE EGE|EGEc2d|efe dBG|A3 A3:|]

GALLEY WATCH, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. ABB (Bain): AABB (Anderson & Georgeson, Brody). A typical Shetland reel, known throughout the islands, but collected and preserved by the Shetland Folk Society. Anderson & Georgeson (1970) note there were many versions of this traditional tune, some known by other titles. Sources for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Scotland) [Brody]; John Stickle (Unst, Shetland) [Cooke]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 21. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 38. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 115. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 14, pg. 64. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow." Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough- "Second Album" (1974).
T:Da Galley Watch
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
R:reel
B:Fiddler's Fake Book
K:D
A2|:"D"defg afdf|"A"(3efe ce Aece|"D"defg afdf|[1"A"egfe "D"fddA:|[2"A"e
gfe "D"fddB||!
"D"AD (3FED ADDB|"D"ADFD "A"EA A2|"D"DEFG EGFG|[1"A"egfe "D"fddB:|[2"A"e
gfe "D"d2 z2||!

GENERAL HOWE. AKA and see "Cross Reel." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

GIBBIE GREY'S. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Named for the Shetlandman who played the tune. Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland.

GILL CAN, THE. AKA and see "Loch Leven Castle," "Miss Lyle's Reel." Shetland.

GOLD FOR THE BONNY/BOANIE LASSES. Scottish, Shetland; Reel and Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay and Papa Stour. Popular in Scotland in the 18th century.

GORDON'S FAVOURITE. Shetland, Reel. A modern composition by pianist and piano-accordianist Ronnie Cooper. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976).

GRAVEL WALK(S), THE. AKA and see "Gravel Walks to Granie," "The Gravelled Walks to Granny," "The Cavan Reel," "The Cottage in the Grove," "Jenny Lace your Tight," "Down with the Mail," "The Faraway Wedding," "Highland Man Who Kissed His Grannie," "In and Out the Harbour," "Jenny Tie your Bonnet," "The Jolly Seven," "Lassie/Lassies tie your Bonnet(s)," "Lizzie's Bonnet," "The Rambler's Rest," "Stenson's No. 1," "The Tailor's Thimble," "Tie the Bonnet," "Upstairs in a Tent." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Donegal. A Dorian (most versions): A Dorian/Mixolydian (Feldman & O'Doherty). Standard. ABCDD' (Songer): AABCCD (Mulvihill): AABCCDD (Mallinson): ABBCDD (Feldman & O'Doherty): AABCCDD' (Boys of the Lough): AABBCCDD'(Brody): AABB'CCDD' (Alewine). A favorite reel in County Donegal. "In Donegal, as in Shetland, the fiddle is the favourite instrument and this tune is one of those often played in octaves, that is two fiddles playing the tune an octave apart. This is a tradition that seems to belong mainly to Donegal and Kerry" (Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 14). Caoimhin Mac Aoidh explains that Granny is a remote glen between Ardara and Glencomcille, County Donegal, where locals from the villages of Ardara, Kilcar and Glen used to summer their sheep. When they went to gather them in Autumn they would access Granny by climbing up the gravel paths, thus the name. He states that in Donegal the first two parts are played once, while the latter two are doubled. Susan Songer, in The Portland Collection (1997), states "Gravel Walks" is a good change tune for the contra dance Chorus Jig (the first tune played being the four-part "Chorus Jig"). For the dance each part is played only once. Sources for notated versions: the late Donegal fiddler Mickey Docherty [Boys of the Lough]; Jerry Keane [Mulvihill]; Paddy Ryan [Bulmer & Sharpley]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 124. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 29. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 161 (appears as "The Gravel Walks to Granie"). Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 19, pg. 8. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 102, pg. 27. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 89. Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Green Linnet 1009, Patricia Conway and Mick Maloney- "Irish Music: The Living Tradition." Nimbus NI5320, Ciaran Tourish & Dermot McLaughlin - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991). Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough- "Second Album" (1974). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Connaillaigh - "Heat the Hoose" (1998. Appears as "Gravel Walks to Grannie").
T:Gravel Walk, The
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:A Dorian
A2 eA BA eA|A2 eA BA GB|\
A2 eA Bd ef|ge dc BA GB:|\
A2 aA gA fA|A2 eA BA GB|\
A2 aA gA ef|gf ge dB GB|\
A2 aA gA fA|A2 eA BA GB|\
AB cd ef ga|ge dc BA GB||
cA AG A2 AB|cA (3AAA BG Bd|\
cA AG A2 ef|gf ge dB GB:|\
c2 gc ac gc|c2 gc BA GB|\
c2 gc ac ga|ge dc BA GB|\
c2 gc ac gc|c2 gc BA GB |1\
AB cd eg fa|ge dc BA GB :|2\
Aa (3aaa ag ea|af ge dB GB||

GREASY WEBSTER [1]. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

GREEN GROW THE RUSHES O. AKA - "Green Grow the Rashes." AKA and see "The East Neuk of Fife," "Grant's Rant," "Irish Whiskey," "Over the Hills and Far Away," "Paddy Caught/Got a Rat," "Paddy Killed the/a Rat," "Paddy Run the/a Rat." Scottish (originally), Irish, English, American; Strathspey, Hornpipe, Barndance, Highland, Highland Schottische, Fling, Slide (12/8 time), March or Reel. G Major. Standard. AB (Cole, Moylan, Tubridy): AAB (Athole, Ford, Gow): AABB (Ashman, Bayard, Hardings, Johnson, Kerr, Miller & Perron, Raven, Sullivan, Taylor): AABB' (Skye): AA'BB' (Flaherty). The air first appears in early lute manuscripts of the 17th century; a note in Graham (1908) claims the first strain of the tune occurs twice in the Straloch Manuscript of 1627. It appears in the Panmure Collection of c. 1705, a fiddler's MS repertory book. Johnson (1984) states the whole tune was recorded in fiddle manuscripts from the 1680's and was already ancient when printed in Stewart's Reels (1761-5, pg. 13) and the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). The present title is from Robert Burns's reworking of the poem sung to a tune called "Grant's Rant"--in the transition the rant form was dropped and a strathspey rhythm was substituted, a not uncommon fate of rants. Burns' version is somewhat more polite, states Robin Williamson, for the tune seems originally to have been linked to lyrics satirizing the proflicacy of priests. Johnson (1984) confirms the Scottish song (first mentioned in The Complaint of Scotland in 1549) originally was a rude or risque text.
***
The American collector Ford (1940) relates the following tale, a superficially plausible and thus repeated yarn, though unfortunately completely untrue: "'Green Grow the Rushes O' was a popular melody of American soldiers at the time of the Mexican war, to which they set many verses. The following verse is descriptive of their associations in the land of the senorita:
***
Green grow the rushes, O!
Red are the roses, O!
Kiss her quick and let her go,
Before you get the mitten, O!
***
The deviltry of the American soldier boys was very much resented by the Mexicans. Any American who attempted to kiss a senorita was certain to have his face slapped by her. They called this to 'get the mitten.' Whereever Americans were would also be heard verses of 'Green Grow the Rushes, O.' The Mexicans, in mockery, gave the name 'green grow' to their tormenters, their pronunciation being 'gingo.' After the war 'Gringo' became the sobriquet for all Americans." Another source gives the similar assertion that the song which gives rise to the word "gringo" is "Green Grow the Lilacs." Ford, at any rate, has a poor reputation for veracity.
***
Accordion player Johnny O'Leary, of the Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border, plays the tune as a 12/8 time slide. In other parts of Ireland the tune is played as a barndace, highland and/or hornpipe.
***
Bayard's thirteen Pennsylvania collected versions of the tune are divided into two groups, corresponding with two main British Isles variants. One is called in America the "Over the Hills and Far Away" (a floating title) group, corresponding to "The East Neuk of Fife" in the British Isles; the other retains the British "Green Grow the Rushes" title. One of Bayard's sources (1981, Appendix No. 11, pg. 576) was a Massachusetts Irish-American born near Cork, a Mrs. Anastasia Corkery, who knew in the 1930's the following quatrain to the first strain:
***
Green grow the rushes O,
Blackbirds and thrushes O,
The piper kissed the fiddler's wife
Behind the bunch of rushes O.
***
Sources for notated versions: Chieftains (Ireland) [Miller & Perron]; Johnny O'Leary (Slibah Luachra, Co. Kerry), recorded at Ballydesmond in February, 1973 [Moylan]; 13 southwestern Pa. fiddlers, fifers and manuscripts [Bayard]; Gillespie MS. [Johnson]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; flute player Noel Tansey (b. 1940, Cuilmore, County Sligo) [Flaherty]; Castle Ceili Band [Sullivan]. Aird (Selections), Vol. 6, 1903?; No. 37. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 74b, pg. 31. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 206A-M, pgs. 158-162. Breathnach, 1971; No. 4. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 21 (Reel). Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin String), 1971; Nos. 30 & 31, pgs. 130-131. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 72. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 95. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 12. Graham, 1908; pg. 37. Hardings All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 86, pg. 27. Jarman, 1951; pg. 76. JEFDSS, Vol. 9; pg. 147 (Shetland variant). Johnson, Vol. 1, 1787-1803; No. 77. D. Johnson, 1984; No. 70, pg. 223. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 17. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 5, pg. 19. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 117, pg. 14. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 80. McGibbon (A Collection of Scots Tunes), c. 1795; Vol. 1; pg. 12. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 15 (hornpipe version). Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 25, pg. 16. Oswald (The Caledonian Pocket Companion), Vol. 1, 1780?; pg. 18. Petrie-Stanford (Complete Collection), 1903-06; No. 1427. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 173. Saar, 1932; No. 18. Scottish Country Dance Book, Book 12, 1930; No. 2. Sharp (Sword Dance Tunes), Book 2, 1911-13; pg. 3. Smith (The Scottish Minstrel), Vol 4, 1820-24; pg. 91. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 157. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 3; No. 30, pg. 12. Taylor (Where's the Crack), 1989; pg. 4. Thompson (A Select Collection...Scottish Airs), 1, Vol. 4, 1805; No. 155. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 12. Walsh (Caledonian Country Dances), Vol. 2, 1737; pg. 25. White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 72. Flying Fish, Robin Williamson - "Legacy of the Scottish Harpers, Vol. 2". Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music From Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Kathleen Collins). Green Linnet GLCD 1175, Cherish the Ladies - "New Day Dawning." Green Linnet GLCD 1187, Cherish the Ladies - "One and All: the best of Cherish the Ladies" (1998). Island ILPS9432, The Chieftains - "Bonaparte's Retreat" (1976).
T:Green Grow the Rashes O!
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
D|G2 BA BGGB|A/A/A ed eAAB|c2 ce dBGB|A/B/c BA GEE:|
A|G/G/G gf gddg|eaa^g aeef|gage dcBG|A/B/c BA GEEA|
Gggf gddg|eaa^g aeef|gbeg dgBG|A/B/c BA GEE||

GREEN ISLE, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Shetland fiddler Willie Hunter, Sr. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 33.

GREENLAND MAN'S TUNE, DA. Shetland, "Listening Tune" or Shetland Reel (4/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. A tune from the days when Shetland islanders would go whaling off the coast of Greenland. Robin Morton (1976) notes a Scandinavian influence in the tune, while Anderson & Georgeson (1970) state that this "best known of all the Sheltland Reels" bears a strong resemblance to a country dance tune from Jutland, Denmark. There are many variants to the tune. Source for notated version: Willie Hunter (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 16. Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 20. Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough - "The Piper's Broken Finger."

GREIG'S PIPES (Píopaí Greig). AKA and see "Cobbler's Hornpipe," "Connolly's Reel," "Craig's Pipes," "The Fiddler is Drunk," "The Foxhunters," "Greg's Pipe Tune," "Gregg's Pipes," "Gun Do Dhuit Am Bodach Fodar Dhomh" (The Old Man Wouldn't Give Me Straw), "The Kerry Huntsman," "Kregg's Pipes," "The Manchester," "Píopaí Greig," "Willy Wink(ie)'s Testament," "Willy Wilky." Scottish, Shetland, Canadian, Irish; Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. G Major (Breathnach, Mulvihill, Taylor, Tubridy): A Major (Athole, Cranford, Hardie, Perlman). Standard, AEAE or AEAC#. AABB (Taylor): ABC (Feldman & O'Doherty, Tubridy): ABBC (Mulvihill): AABBCC' (Perlman): ABBCCDD (Cranford/Fitzgerald): AABBCCDD (Athole, Gow, Hardie): AABB'CDE (Breathnach). AEAC# tuning was preferred for "Greig's Pipes" in the 18th century (Johnson, 1983) as it is set, for example in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection, but it is also played in ADAE tuning. Played in AEAE tuning, the tune was employed on the island of Whalsay, Shetland, by fiddlers John Irvine and Andrew Polson as one of the tunes for the "bedding the bride" ritual (Cooke, 1986). AEAE is also a common tuning for the piece on Cape Breton Island, especially with the early-mid 20th century generations of fiddlers, such as Mary Hughie MacDonald and Donald MacLellan (Paul Cranford, 1997) {Winston Fitzgerald, however, played it in standard tuning}. "Greig's Pipes" is a double-tonic tune that is also in the pentatonic scale; a characteristic now-a-days recognized as Scottish, but the double-tonic was also common in English music prior to 1700 when it dropped out of favor in that part of the island. To avoid the need to tune up and retune after playing the piece, it was, according to Charles Milne of Dufftown, the last item of an evening's program (Collinson, 1966). The melody appears in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth, 1768, and Joshua Campbell's 1778 Collection of Newest and Best Reels (pg.11), though John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 44). A Cape Breton bagpipe setting was printed by Barry Shears in his Gathering of the Clans Collection (1991) under the title "Gun Do Dhuit Am Bodach Fodar Dhomh" (The Old Man Wouldn't Give Me Straw), and Perlman (1996) adds that another Cape Breton title is "Greg's Pipe Tune." A dorian setting of the tune also goes by the name "Gregg's Pipes" in Kerr's 4th. Several Irish versions are found as "Craig's Pipes."
***
In Ireland the tune appears in print in O'Farrell's Pocket Companion, a setting reprinted by O'Neill in Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (288, 1922). O'Neill printed the tune elsewhere under the title "Limber Elbow" (a poor version, says Breathnach), and the first part of the tune appears in his "Edenderry Reel." Other Irish names include "The Kerry Huntsman" and "Connolly's Reel."
***
Sources for notated versions: accordionist Sonny Brogan (County Sligo/Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Mary MacDonald (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]; John Clancy (Bronx, New York) [Mulvihill]; Hughie McPhee (b. 1924, Elmira, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Priest Pond) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]; fiddlers Francie and Mickey Byrne (County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 96, pg. 41. J. Campbell, Newest and Best Reels (c. 1778). Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 100, pg. 42. Dunlay & Greenberg (Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 136. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 169. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 24. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 122. Lowe, Collection of Reels and Strathspeys, 1844. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 6, pg. 2. O'Neill (Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody); No. 288. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 104. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 16. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 20. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 24. Celtic SCX 57, Dan R. MacDonald et al - "The Fiddlers of Cape Breton." Green Linnet GLCD 1128, Brendan Mulvihill & Donna Long - "The Morning Dew" (1993). Rodeo RLP 107, Joe MacLean - "And His Old Time Scottish Fiddle" (c. 1967. Appears as "Athole Reel"). Rodeo RLP 59, Dan R. MacDonald - "Fiddling to Fortune with..." Rounder 7009, Doug MacPhee - "Cape Breton Piano" (1977).
X:1
T:Greig's Pipes
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
f|eAcA eAAf|eAcA BFFf|eAcA eAcA|B/B/B (cA BFF:|
|:B|cAcA cAAB|cAcA BFFB|cAcA EacA|B/B/B (cA BFF:|
|:A|EA,CA, EA,A,F|EA,CA, FB,B,F|EA,CA, EA,CA,|B,/B,/B, (CE FB,B,:|
|:G|A2 A>E CA,A,E|A2 (AE FB,B,G|A2 A>E CA,EC|B,/B,/B, (CE FB,B,:|
X:2
T:Greig's Pipes
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
B3 B BAGA|B2 GB AGEG|B3 B BAGB|A2BG AGEG|B3B BAGA|
B2 dB AGEG|B~d3 eBdB|AcBG AGEG||DG G2 DGBG|DGBG AGEG|
DG G2 DGBG|dBAc BGGE|DG G2 DGBG|DGBG AGEG|DG G2 DGBG|
DBAc BGGB||d2 Bd egge|d2 BG AGEG|d2 Bd eg g2|agbg ageg|
D2 Bd egge|d2 BG AGEG|d2 Bd eg g2|a2 bg aged||

GREY MARE'S GONE TO SNARRAVOE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore known throughout the islands.

GROCER, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by Shetland fiddler and composer Tom Anderson in June, 1952, and dedicated to Mr. Willie Birnie, an accomplished piper and traditional music enthusiast. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 76.

GUIZER'S/GUISER'S REEL, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. ADAE. AABB. "...From a manuscript given to Tom Anderson by the late Pete Fraser (d. 1982). There were different variants played on the West side of Shetland. It was always played when the Guizers came visiting a wedding or houses at Christmas time" (Anderson). The tune has the same features as a Shetland "Muckle Reel," and was "played by Peter Fraser in Walls and by two Papa Stour (Island) fiddlers, Fraser Hughson and John Fraser. It was said to be played at weddings for the dancing of the guisers, the group of univited masked men who paid a brief visit to the wedding dance" (Cooke, 1986). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 55.

GUTTERS O SKELD. AKA and see "Sleep Soond in da Mornin.'" Shetland, Shetland Reel. Known throughout the Shetland islands.

HAA, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by Tom Anderson, 1969. Tom Anderson remarks that this tune was named for the house where his paternal grandfather stayed, probably a Laird's house at one time. Anderson composed it on a visit to the old house in 1969. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 63.

HAAD DEE TONGUE, BONNIE LASS. AKA and see "Da Tief On Da Lum" [1]. Shetland, Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Reminiscent in its tonal structure to "The Reel of Tulloch" (Cooke). Source for notated version: Gilber Gray (Unst, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 43, pg. 102.

HAAND ME DOON DA TACKLE. See "Hand Me Down the Tackle." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Tingwell.

HA'D THE TING TAE GIBBY. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Yell.

HAMAR OWER DA TAING. Shetland, Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. "A fisherman's meid from the days of the handline or line fishing" (Anderson & Georgeson). Source for notated version: Arthur Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 27.

HAME FARERS, DA. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed in 1960 by Shetland fiddler Tom Anderson and used at the time for the festival of Hamefarin. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 32.

HAND ME DOWN THE TACKLE. AKA and see "Drogheda Lasses," "The Drogheda Reel," "The Dangerous Reel," "Hielanman's Kneebuckle," "The Pure Drop," "Reidy Johnson's" [2], "The Road to Drogheda," "Tom Steele." Irish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB'. "Haand Me Doon the Tackle," as it is called, is also played in the Shetland Isles. Paddy Glackin identifies it as a tune from the Donegal tradition, and that his is "an interesting version of a well-known reel which is a favorite with pipers." O'Neill calls the tune "Tom Steele," and this was the title used by the Flanagan brothers when they recorded the melody in the 1928. Source for notated version: Dublin piano accordion player/piper Seamus Meehan [Tweed]; set dance session music at Na Píobairí Uilleann, recorded in the 1980's [Taylor].Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 3. BERCD 001, Arty McGlynn - "McGlynn's Fancy." CC 47, Ronan Browne (with O'Loughlin) - "The Southwest Wind." CK 01, Conor Keane - "Cooley's House." Green Linnet SIF 3051, Frankie Gavin - "Frankie's Goes to Town." Franie Gavin - "Tribute to Joe Cooley." Gael-Linn CEF 137, Sean Maguire - "Portraid." Gael-Linn CEF 145, Various - "Ceol Tigh Neachtain." Gael-Linn CEF 153, Paddy Glackin - "In Full Spate" (1991). NPU 002, Templehouse Ceili Band - "Music for the Sets, Vol. 1." WW 004, Grianan - "Maid of Erin." Floating Bow - John Doherty
Humors of Lissadell - Seamus & Manus McGuire. The Long Mile - Seamus Thompson
Drops of Springwater - Karen Tweed. Return from Fingal - Seamus Ennis
The Jenny C - Oisin.
T:Hand me Down the Tackle
B:Karen Tweed's Irish Choice
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Juergen Gier
K:D
"D"dD~D2 FDFA|"D"dfaf "A7"gfec|"D"dD~D2 FDFA|"G"BGEF "A7"GABc|\
"D"dD~D2 FDFA|"D"dfaf "Em"gfec|"D"d2cd BdAF|"G"GBEF "A7"GABc:|\
"D"d2fd Adfd|"D"~d2fd "A7"BAFA|"D"dafd Adfd|"G"BGEF "A7"GABc|\
"D"d2fd Adfd|(3B"G"cd ef "Em"g3^g|"A7"afge fded|"A7"BGEF GABc|\
"D"d2fd Adfd|"D"~d2fd "A7"BAFA|"D"dafd Adfd|"G"BGEF "A7"GABd|\
"D"a2 (3ba^g afdf|"G"gfed "Em"cbag|"A7"faec dBAF|"A7"GBEF GABc|]

HAWK HORNPIPE, THE. English, Scottish; Hornpipe. E Major. Standard. AABB. A 19th century hornpipe composed by James Hill (Gateshead, Northumberland, near Newcastle), perhaps (as were some of his tunes) named after a Tyneside pub called The Hawk where Hill made his living for a time as a fiddler. Hill was originally born in Dundee, Scotland. See the pipe reel The Shetland Fiddler for a related tune. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 42, pg. 16. Hill (The Lads Like Beer). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 333 (arranged by James Hunter). Olympic 6151, Florence Burns - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).
T:Hawk, The
C:James Hill
M:C|
K:E Major
e2ge Begf|egfa gbag|f2af cfag|fedc BcdB|\
e2ge Begf|egfa gbag|fefg aBcd|eBgf e3::\
(3B/B/B/|\
Bbge Bafd|Bged edcB|cBdc edfe|gfag f2fg|\
abga fgef|dbca BgAf|defg aBcd|eBgf (e2[ee']):|

HEAD HER IN FOR BASTAVOE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. A tune whose reference is a boat coming into port.

HELEN M. ROBERTSON. Scottish, Air (3/4 time). G Major. Standard. AB. The first composition of Shetland fiddler and composer Arthur S. Robertson (b. 1911), named for his wife of over 40 years. Neil (1991) says: "The composition was inspired to some extent by listening to evangelical music and also by memories of his mother at the church organ. It is perhaps the most celebrated of his compositions and is currently played throughout Scotland by many strathspey and reel societies." Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 169, pg. 219.

HIGH ROAD TO LINTON (An Bóthar Mór go Linton). AKA and see "Cuddle in a Boasie" (Shetland), "High Road to Lynn," "High Way to Linton," "Highway to Linton," "Jenny's Gone to Linton," "Kitty Got a Clinking coming from the Races," "The Leinster Highroad." Scottish, Shetland, Irish, English, Canadian; Reel. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. Scotland, Lowlands. England, Northumberland. A Major (Breathnach, Cranitch): A Major/Mixolydian (Perlman, Songer): A Mixolydian (Mallinson). Standard. AB (Breathnach, Cranitch): ABB (Gow, Carlin): AABB (Athole, Gow/Repository, Honeyman, Hunter, Kerr, Lowe, Neil, Skye, Williamson): AABBCC (Mallinson): AABBCCDD (Martin, Perlman, Songer). Linton is a small town in the Borders region of Scotland and England, strategically located in the center of lowland Scotland. It was a major hub for the old drove-road network that fed Highland cattle to the lucrative English markets, and was as much a "cattle town" as any in the American wild west. Despite recent assertions that the title is a corruption of "The High Road to London," Several think (Gordon Mooney, Stuart Eydmann) that the Linton title is correct and that the 'high road' refers to an old drove road (also known as "The Thieves Road" due to the numerous reivers and bandits which often plagued those who travelled it). This road crossed the Pentlands from West Linton to the Catslacksburn, and was at one time the main route for cattle droving from the Scottish Highlands through the Borders to the English markets. The introduction of the improved "Linton" breed of sheep from the border uplands to the Highlands helped hasten the end of the cattle trade and was a factor which led to the infamous Highland clearances. The October, 1999, issue of the Scottish periodical Box and Fiddle (the magazine of the National Association of Accordion and Fiddle Clubs) printed a piece about the Dickson family of West Linton, residents of the town since the mid-18th century with quite a few musician members since the 19th century. Dickson family lore has it that "High Road to Linton" was composed by a James Dickson (1827-1908), under the title "Ower the Garle" (the Garle was the road from Medwynbank/Garvald to West Linton). However, it would appear that there are versions of the tune older than Dickson's dates.
***
The melody is known as a (Scottish) Lowlands tune, despite the fact that Gaelic words are sometimes sung to it (see below). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. English titles include "Jenny's Gone to Linton," and, in Norfolk, "The High Road to Lynn." Neil (1991) notes there are several versions of the tune extent. Perlman (1996) remarks that the 'A' and 'B' parts appear in older Scottish publications, but that the 'C' and 'D' parts are from modern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, playing. The 'C' and 'D' parts were composed (copyright 1957) by the late Scottish dance bandleader and piano accordion player Bobby MacLeod of Tobermory. In fact, MacLeod wrote four parts to follow the original two, although only his 'C' and 'F' parts were absorbed into tradition.
***
There are several sets of Gaelic words to the tune, one from Scotland which begins "Bodachan a mhill Anna" (which can be found in Margaret Fay Shaw's South Uist collection) and another found in both Scotland and Cape Breton which commences "Bodachan a'Mhirein." A third set is from the Isle of Lewis and goes:
***
Domhnull beag an t-siúcair, an t-siúcair, an t-siúcair
Domhnull beag an t-siúcair, is dúil aige pósadh
Cha ghabh a' chlann-nighean e, chlann-nighean e, chlann-nighean e
Cha ghabh a' chlann-nighean e, bho nach 'eil e boidheach
***
Sources for notated versions: fiddler Paddy Glackin (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Paul MacDonald (b. 1974, Charlottetown, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; David Reich (Madras, Oregon) [Songer]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 166, pg. 76. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 482. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 62, pg. 149. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 24. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 19. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 234. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 8, No. 4, pg. 7. Lowe, Book 3, 1844-45. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 22. Mallinson (Enduring), 1995; No. 10, pg. 4. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 45. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 17, pg. 23. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 97. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 96. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 33. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 51. CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Culburnie COL 113D, Aladair Fraser & Tony McManus - "Return to Kintail" (1999). Gael-Linn Records CEF 018, Paddy Glackin - "Ceol ar an bhFidil" (1977). Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Andrew Poleson (Whalsey, Shetland) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993). Temple Records 2044, "Fiddlers 5: Fiddle Music from Scotland" (1991). Fife Strathspey and Reel Society - "The Fiddle Sounds of Fife" (1980). Ron Gonnella - "Scottish Violin Music" (1966). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975).
T:High Road to Linton
L:1/8
M:C|
B:The Athole Collection
R:Reel
K:A
e|ceeg a2a>e|fefg a2 ae|ceeg a2 ae|faec B2A:|
|:d|ceea fddf|ecce fBBd|ceea fddf|ecac B2A:|

HILL O FINNIGIRT, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Shetland fiddler Peter Fraser. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 30.

HIRPLE TAE MA MARY GRAY. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. Cooke says this is a Scottish title.

HIUDAI GALLAGHER'S MARCH. AKA and see "Murphy's Delight." Irish, Jig. Ireland, Co. Donegal. A Mixolydian/Major. Standard. ABB'. A popular march and double jig in County Donegal. Hugh (Hiudi) Gallagher was a Donegal warpiper born in 1876, son of piper Donal Gallagher (born c. 1840). Source for notated version: fiddler John Doherty (1895-1980, County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 85. Green Linnet SIF 3077, John Doherty - "Bundle and Go." Green Linnet SIF-1109, Altan - "The Red Crow" (1990).

HJOGROVOLTAR. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Fetlar. D Major. Standard. AB. An assymetrical Shetland reel with a Scandinavian name indigenous to the island of Fetlar, which was still used for dancing there in the 1970's. Source for notated version: Joe Jamieson (Fetlar, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 10, pg. 61.

HOOLEHAN, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

IF I GET A BOANIE/BONNIE LASS. AKA and see "Gin you Meet a Bonny Lass." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Mainland and Whalsay districts. G Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. "These were favourite dancing tunes in Vidlin for the dance 'The Shetland Reel'" (Anderson). Source for notated version: 'the late' Henry Thomson of Vidlin (Shetland) [Anderson]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 41. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 16. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 120, pg. 76. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

HUXTER IN DA SOOND. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Papa Stour.

IRISH SHILLING. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay.

JACK BROKE DOWN THE PRISON DOOR. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. G Major. Standard. AABB. G.M. Nelson (in Anderson & Georgeson, 1970) relates the story behind the tune which was written by one John Gaudie, born in Levenwick, Shetland, in the 19th century. John was a young man of uncommon strength and a good fiddler who worked in the Sandwick copper mines until he met with an unfortunate accident. It seems he was ascending the mine shaft after his shift one night when a man above him (some say it was John's rival for the affections of a young woman) dropped a proving hammer which struck John on the head. He survived the resulting severe concussion but was ever after plagued with serious neurological problems which manifested generally as "spasms of violent madness," but which, luckily, left his musical abilities intact. In fact, though he could find little employment due to his disability, he had plenty of time to spend with his fiddle and, still a young man, he was acknowledged to be the best fiddler in Shetland at that particular time. Unfortunately, his disability hampered him to the extent that when he visited town he sometimes became belligerent. On one occasion when he visited Lerwick he committed a breach of the peace and was seized upon by special constables and local citizenry, to be placed in "Nicol's Hotel," or the local jail, run by an old soldier named Sergeant Nicol.
***
When Johnnie realised where he was his fury increased still further
and, during the evening, with hand and foot, for there is no record
of his possessing any other implement, he broke down the door and,
once outside, set course for Clickimin and thence for home as hast
as he could go. Everybody was glad to see him go and no attempt
was made to restrain him. Johnnie, however, when he got home attributed
his escape not only to his strength but to his subtle diplomacy in avoiding
the authorities after he had broken goal. This amused him greatly, and as
he enjoyed it to the full he took down his fiddle and composed that lively
Shetland reel entitled "Johnnie Brood da Prison Door," or "Jack Brook
da Prison." (Nelson)
***
The melody is in repertory of Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore is now widely known in the islands. Similar in parts to the Irish "Roving Bachelor." Sources for notated versions: Aly Bain (Shetland) [Brody, Miller & Perron], Willer Hunter (Shetland) [Cooke]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 141. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 41, pg. 99. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 23. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow." Leader LER 2022, "Aly Bain & Mike Whellans."
T:Jack Broke Da Prison Door
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
R:reel
K:G
"G"G2 BG "(Em)"BdBG|"(Am)"cBAB "D"dBAB|"G"G2 BG "(Em)"BdBG|[1"D(Am)"ABAG
E2 DE/2F/2:|[2"D"ABAG E2 DG||!
"G"g2 gd edBG|"G"g2 gd "D"eaaf|"G"g2 gd "(Em)"edBG|[1"(Am)"ABAG "(D)"E2
DG:|[2"(Am)"ABAG "(D)"E2 D2||!

JACK IS YET ALIVE. Scottish, Shetland; Reel. Shetland, Mainland district. G Major. Standard. One part. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 197.

JEAN(N)IE CHOCK/SHOKE (Shocked) DA BAIRN. AKA and see "Da Bride's Welcome Hame." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst and North Mainland districts. G Major/A Dorian. Standard. One part (Bain): AABB (Anderson). Traditional, but origin of title is unknown. Source for notated version: from the playing of "the late" Henry Thomson (Vidlin, Shetland, who moved to Ollaberry) [Anderson]; the late Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Flett & Flett]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 41. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 39. Flett & Flett, 1964; pg. 219 (appears as "Jeannie Shock da Bairn"). Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (learned from Tom Anderson. Mistitled as "Jeannie Choke da Bairn"). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

JENNY DANG(ED) THE WEAVER (Planc Sinead an Fiodoir). AKA and see "Jenny Bang the Weaver," "Jemmy Dang the Weaver," "Jenny Beguil'd the Webster." Scottish (origially), Shetland, Irish, Canadian, American; Air, Reel or "Solo Strathspey." USA, New England. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major. Standard. AB (Athole, Gow, Skye): AAB (Honeyman, Hunter): AA'B (Perlman): ABC (Breathnach): AABB (Cole): AA'BB' (Kerr). Composition of the tune has been credited to the Rev. Alexander Garden (1688-1778), minister of Birse, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Hunter (1988) relates that around 1746 "the minister's 'handy-man,' and ex-weaver from Mary well called Jock, hotly refused to clean the parson's boots when requested to do so by Mrs. Garden. The enraged minister's wife gave him such a beating with her 'tattie-beetle' that he soon performed the task." It was first published in the 2nd edition of William Thompson's Orpheus Caledonius (1733), where it appeared as "Jenny Beguil'd the Webster." John Glen (1891), though, finds it earliest in print in Robert Bremner's 1757 Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances (pg. 54), and it was also printed in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). It is reported to be in Rutherford's 200 Country Dances of c. 1756. It became a favorite early 19th century song (at least in Lowland centers, says Emmerson {1971}), with lyrics by Sir Alexander Boswell set to the tune. The song tells of a weaver who makes unwanted advances toward Jenny, who turns him down flatly, or 'dangs' him:
***
Jenny dang, and Jenny dang, and Jenny dang the weaver,
Soon the fool his folly kent and Jenny dang the weaver.
***
The popular melody was known in the American colonies where it appeared in the MS copybooks of violinist Whittier Perkins (Massachusetts, 1790) as "Jemmy dang the weaver" and Clement Weeks (Greenland, New Hampshire, 1783) as "Jenny Dangs." It has been observed that there is some similarity between this tune and the Irish "Longford Tinker." Sources for notated versions: fiddler Seán Keane (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Peter Chaisson (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 19, pgs. 39-40 (a reprint of the Skye version). Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 139, pg. 65 (appears as "Planc Sinéad an Fíodóir/Jennie Bang the Weaver". Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 5. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 34. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 13 (reel). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 216. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 10: Airs & Melodies of Scotland's Past), Vol. 10, 1992; pg. 7. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 6, No. 4, pg. 6. Lowe's Collection, 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 35 (appears as a "Solo Strathspey"). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 77. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 83. Surenne, Dance Music of Scotland, 1852, Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Claddagh Records CC17, Sean Keane - "Gusty's Frolics" (1975). Culburnie Records CUL102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Green Linnet GL1108, The Tannahil Weavers - "Cullen Bay." Green Linnet SIF 1077, Capercaillie - "Crosswinds" (1987). Green Linnett GLCD 1119, Cherish the Ladies - "The Back Door" (1992). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Dun Creagan in Paradise."
T:Jenny Dang the Weaver
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
f/e/|d>A A/A/A AFAB|d>A A/A/A f2 ef|d>B B/B/B BABd|ABde faef|
d>A A/A/A AFAB|d>A A/A/A f2 ef|dB B/B/B BABd|ABde f2e||
f|d2fd efge|d2fd e2cA|d2fd efge|aA A/A/A f2ef|d2fd efge|defd e2cA|
defd efge|abag faef||

JENNY NETTLES [1]. AKA - "Jenny Nettle," "Johnnie Nittle." Scottish, English, Shetland; Country Dance Tune (cut time) and Air. England, Northumberland. A Dorian. Standard. AABB (Kerr, Williamson): AABC (Gow, Honeyman): AABBC (Athole): AABBCC (Skye). Jenny Nettles was a comely and fetching maiden of the village of Strathmiglo, who fell deeply in love with a Highland Officer attached to the command of the Rob Roy. The famous outlaw chief had invaded the countryside for a time but was forced to retreat to the mountains for safety, and when the clansmen marched off Jenny was deserted by her lover. In bitterness and pain from her lost love, Jenny hung herself by a roadside tree. As a suicide, Jenny Nettles could not be buried in hallowed ground, nor could a coffin be fashioned for her eternal rest. She was buried in the middle of the night in an unmarked grave. Her final resting place is at a crossroads of two forest paths on the north side of the Lomond Hills in Fife, a few minutes' walk out of Strathmiglo. Local lore has it that Jennie's ghost wanders the muir on bright moonlit nights, looking for her lost Highland love.
***
The tune appears earliest in the Scottish Skene Manuscript (c. 1615-20) and later in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 80). It was popular in mainland Scotland in the early 18th century (Allan Ramsay, for example, mentioned the song in his 1725 ballad opera The Gentle Shepherd along with other popular Scottish airs of the day), and was imported to the Shetland Islands {where it is sometimes called "Johnnie Nittle"} (Cooke, 1986). It is known in those islands as a "tricky fiddle reel" today. A Shetland version (an example of which is sung and played by Shetland fiddler Andrew Polson on the CD "The Fiddler and his Art") of the song to the tune goes:
***
O saw du me Johnnie, Johnnie Nittle, Johnnie Nittle,
Saw you me Jaanie, gain til the market,
A peck o meal upon her back, a peck o meal upon her back
A peck o meal upon her back, a baby in her blanket.
[another verse]
Red socks, red sheen and red camel hair
A bunch o ribbons on her back and all the rest was bare. (Cooke)
***
Jenny Nettles is a nickname for the harmless and familiar "daddy longlegs" spider.
***
In England, the title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tune ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800, and was one of the "missing tunes" of Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 259. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 18. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 12, No. 6, pg. 9. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 115. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 143. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 52. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Andrew Poleson (Whalsey, Shetland)- "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993). Maggie's Music 109, Maggie Sansone - "Dance Upon the Shore." Topic 12TS381, The Battlefield Band - "At the Front" (1978).
T:Jenny Nettles
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:A Minor
A/B/|c2B2A2a2|e^fge dBGB|cdBc A2a2|ge^fd e2A:|
|:B|cdeA cdec|BAGd BGdB|cdeA cdea|ge^fd e2A:|
B|cde^f gage|gage dBGB|cde^f gage|aba^g a2 AB|
cde^f gage|gage dBGB|cde^f gagf|ea^gb a2A||

JUMPING JOHN. AKA and see "Jumping Joan," "Joan's Placket is Torn," "Cock of the North," "Jean Qui Saut." English, Scottish, Shetlands; Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. England, Northumberland. A Major. Standard. AA'B. Title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. It is one of the "missing tunes" of William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian manuscript. Popular in mainland Scotland in the early 18th century, and imported to the Shetland islands. The melody was published in Playford's Dancing Master (1674) as "Jumping Joan," and by Oswald in this tenth collection in Scotland (in A Flat Major) and by Feuillet in his Recueil de Contredanses (1706) in Paris. "It was also prescribed by Burns for the song 'Her Daddie forbad and her Minnie forbad' in Johnson's Musical Museum and under another name, 'Cock o' the North', it is a popular Scottish jig or 6/8 march" (Cooke, 1986)./ Bayard (1981) dates the tune from the 1600's. Under the title "Joan's Placket Is Torn" the tune was mentioned in Pepys' diary for June 1667, and was printed in Playford's Dancing Master from the edition of 1686 and all later ones. There is an unsubstantiated story that a trumpet version of the tune was played at the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1587. Source for notated version: Andrew Poleson (Whalsay, Shetland) [Cooke]. Callcott. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 20, pg. 70. Johnson (Musical Museum), 1787-1803, Vol. 2; No. 138. Johnson-Stenhouse, 1853; pg. 129. Oswald (The Caledonian Pocket Companion), 1750?, Vol. 2; pg. 72. Smith (Scottish Minstrel), 1820-24, Vol. 2; pg. 54.

JOHN PATERSON'S MARE. AKA and see "The Horseman's Port," "The Black and the Brown" (Northumbria). Scottish, Jig and Air. F Major. Standard. One part. "John Paterson's Mare" is a conscious adaptation in jig time by Donald MacLeod of the melody "The Cameronian Rant" (Cowdery, 1990). Other writers have noted that the tune straddles meters, and has been recorded as being known in the form of a reel on the island of Whalsay, in the Shetlands, for example. Lyrics were evidently attached to the tune, beginning:
"The black and the brown..."
As "John Peterson's Mare" the tune was in the repertoire of John Stickle, a famous Shetland fiddler. In 1983 singer/guitarist Martin Carthy adapted Stickle's version for a song called "Fable of the Wings" (Topic 12TS431). Gatherer (Gatherer's Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 16. "Hamilton's Universal Tunebook" (Glasgow) {includes a set of variations, at "gallop-time"}.

JIMMY RITCHIE OF DELGATIE. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. "The man who kept Delgatie Castle in repair. A man of many trades who could always be relied on to find a solution to most problems. 1950 was one of the years when the Islesburgh Band played at the Clan Hay Gathering at Dalgatie Castle and the tune was composed (by Tom Anderson) at that time" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 47.

KEVIN MACGANN. Shetland, Reel? Hornpipe? Air?. F Major. Standard. AAB. "An Irish Doctor friend of Tom's who in the early days of tape recording introduced him to many Irish fiddlers. Composed (by Tom Anderson) in 1962" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 71.

KILLARNEY BOYS OF PLEASURE, THE (Gaigíní Chill Áirne). AKA and see "Docherty's Reel," "Doherty's Reel," "The Gwebarra Bridge Reel," "Johnny Doherty's Reel," "The New Fashioned Habit." Irish, Reel. A Dorian (Brody/Boys of the Lough): E Dorian (Breathnach, Miller). Standard. AABB (Brody, Mallinson, Miller & Perron): AA'BB' (Breathnach). The town of Killarney can be found in west Kerry, southern Ireland, and its name means 'the cell among the sloe trees' (referring to a monastary or other religious site). Sources for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Shetland) [Brody]; fiddler Seán Keane (Ireland) [Breathnach]; Donegal fiddler Tommy Peoples [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 141, pg. 66. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 158. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 40. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 65, pg. 28. Miller & Perron (Traditional Irish Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 22. Claddagh Records CC17, Sean Keane - "Gusty's Frolics" (1975). Trailer 2086 or Leader Ler 2086, "Boys of the Lough" (appears as "Docherty's Reel").

KISS HER SWEETLY. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst (Island of). D Major. Standard. AABB. "A rather attractive little reel collected many years ago from the playing of the late Albert Thomson of Unst" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 44.

LADIES BRIEST/BREAST KNOT(S). AKA and see "The (Bonny) Breast Knot(s)." Scotland, Shetland, America; Country Dance Tune, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay and Unst districts. USA, New England. A very popular in mainland Scotland in the early 18th century, from whence it spread throughout the British Empire and the colonies. The familiar English tune "Bobby Shaftoe" uses the second strain for its melody. In America the tune is best known as "Jay Bird" and the play-party song "Skip to My Lou," though as "Ladies Breast Knot" it had been known in New England from the last half of the 18th century. It was included in the 1777, fife manuscript of Giles Gibbs (East Windsor, Ellington Parish, Connecticut), and dance directions appear in Clement Weeks' copybook of 1783 (Greenland, New Hampshire). John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in print in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 31).

LADY MARY RAMSAY('S) [1]. AKA and see "Sailor Ower da Raft Trees" (Shetland), "The Auld Toon O' Edinburgh." Scottish, Shetland, Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major (Athole, Coles, Cooke, Hunter, Kerr, Skye): G Major (Huntington): E Flat Major (Athole, Gow). Standard or ADAE (in the Shetlands). AB (Cole, Honeyman): AAB (Hunter, Kerr): AABB (Huntington): AABB' (Athole): AABB'CCD (Skye). Composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831). "This tune...(appears) in James Porteous's Collection and having his initials attached it is possible he may have been the composer of it" (Skye). Renamed in the Shetlands (as "Mary Ramsay") and played as a reel, for when the tune first circulated via [J. Scott Skinner's] gramaphone records which played at a higher speed than the original performance, it was assumed a reel, as the Shetlanders had no knowledge of strathspeys in the country districts (Alburger {1983} quoting the late Shetland collector and fiddler Tom Anderson). The tune was printed in Lowe's First Collection (1844). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 127. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 19a, pg. 69. Gow, Fourth Collection of Strathspey Reels, 1822; pg. 15. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 31. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 106. Huntington (William Litton's), 1977; pg. 22. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 1, pg. 10. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 34. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 88. Beltona 2103 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978). Ron Gonella - "A Tribute to Niel Gow."
T:Lady Mary Ramsay
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
N:"Original key."
K:D
A,|D3B A<F F>B|A>FB>G A<FF<d|D3B A<F F>A|d>BA>F E/E/E E:|
g|f<d d>f e<c c>e|d<B d>B A<F F>e|f<d d>f e>dc>A|d>BA>F E/E/E Ee|
f>dd>f ecce|d<B d>B A<F F>A|d>fc>e B>dA>F|d>BA>F E/E/E E||
N:last two bars at end of tune go: (3def (edc (3dcB (3AGF|(3GAB (3AGF F<E E>F||
T:Lady Mary Ramsay
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:E_
G|E3c B<G G>c|B<G c>A B<G G>e|E3c B<G G>B|c>EB>G F/F/F F:|
e/f/|g<e e>g f<d d>f|e<c c>e B<G Ge/f/|g<e e>g f>de>B|c<e B>G F/F/F Fe/f/|
g<e e>g f<d d>f|e<g c>e B<G G>B|e<g d>f c<e B>c|G<e B>G F/F/F F||

LAIRD OF GULBERWICH, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AA'B. A modern composition by the great fiddler and teacher Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland), in honor of his old friend in Gulberwich, Andrew Ridland. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 31.

LAND TO LEA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst. May be a pipe march tune.

LASS THAT MADE THE BED TAE ME, THE. AKA and see "The Bonnie Lass That Made the Bed To Me." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

LASSES LOOK BEFORE YOU. AKA and see "Lassie Look Before You," "Look Before You." Scotland, Shetland; Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

LASSES O DA MILL. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Delting.

LASSES/LASSIES OF STEWARTON, THE. AKA - "Lasses of Stewartown/Stewington." AKA and see "The Cross Reel" (Shetland). Scottish, Reel. D Mixolydian. Standard. AABBCCD (Athole, Gow): AABBCCDD' (Kerr, Skye). Another tune commemorating an area's local girls. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in print in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 46). It was published in several collections from 1775 onwards, but is not to be confused with a country dance of the same name. See also the related Shetland tune "Cross Reel." Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 35. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 24, pg. 5. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 37. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 94. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - "In Jig Time!" (1995).
T:Lasses of Stewarton
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Skye Collection
K:D
g|fdec dA d2|FDDF A3g|fde=c BG c2|E=CCE G2G:|
|:=c|Bd (BG) AFD=c|Bd AF A3=c|Bd AF AB=cA|GE=CE G2G:|
|:=c|BGAF BGAG|FDDF A3=c|BGAF AB=cA|GE=(CE) G2G:|
e|defg afdf|afdf a2 (fe)|defg afdf|ge=ce g2 fe|defg afdf|afdf a2 fe|
defg abaf|ge=ce gbeg||

LASSES TRUST IN PROVIDENCE. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore widely known in the islands. Source for notated version: Tom Anderson (Shetland) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 165. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook: British Isles), 1989; pg. 34. Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow." Thule 214, Tom Anderson.
T:Lasses Trust in Providence
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
"D"d2 de fdef|"G"d2 fd "A"edBA|"D"d2 de fdef|[1"A"dBAF E2 A2:|[2"A"dBAF
E2 FG||"D"A2 AB ADFA|"G"d2 d2 BABd|"D"A2 AB ADFA|[1"A"GFEC "D"D3 F:|[2"A"GFEC "D"D2 z2||

LAY DEE AT DEE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, North Yell. D Major. Standard. AAB (Carlin): AABB (Bain). Tom Anderson (1978) relates that when Shetland fisherman returned to land from fishing the farther reaches (the Far Haaf) they would sleep in a shared bed in a stone hut called a lodge. "If one took up too much room in the bed he was told to 'lay dee at dee' or 'shift up.'" Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 39. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 125, pg. 78. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).
T:Lay Dee at Dee
S:Tom Anderson \& Aly Bain
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
AB|defe d2d2|ABAG FED2|d2ef gfed|efed cBA2|\
defe d2d2|ABAG FED2|d2ef gfec|e2d2 d3:|
|:e|f2df afdf|afdf g3f|e2Ae ecAc|edcB A3e|\
f2df afdf|afdf g3f|efgf edcB|A2d2d2:|

LERWICK LASSES, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB (Brody): AABB' (Anderson & Georgeson): AA'BB' (Bain). Lerwick is the capital of the Shetland Islands, and lies on the main island. Its name is Norse, stemming from the time of the Vikings, and means 'muddy bay'. The tune, originally collected on the island of Unst under the auspices of the Shetland Folk Society, is in the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band, and therefore has been disseminated throughout the islands. Anderson & Georgeson note that the second turning (measures 2 and 4) of this tune should have a "stop-go" effect, called a 'lag' in Vidlin, which practice stemmed from the fiddler's following of the dancer's steps in the old days, which were sometimes erratic in rhythm. Source for notated version: J.C. Smith (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 20. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 35. Brody (Fiddler's Fake Book), 1983; pg. 167. Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough- "Second Album" (1974).
T:Lerwick Lasses, Da
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
dc|:"G"BG G2 "D"AFAc|"G"BG (3GGG g2 dc|"G"BG G2 "D"AFAc|[1"G"BG"D"AF "G"
G2 dc:|[2"G"BG"D"AF "G"G2 Bd||"G"g2 ge "D"fafe|"D"(3ddd fd fafd|"G"g2 gf "C"ege^c|
[1"D"eaaf gede:|[2"D"eaaf ge||

LESLIE'S REEL. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. G Major. Standard. AA'B. From the playing of the Leslie brothers, Pat and Mick, who were contemporaries of John Byrne of Glencolmcille, Donegal, who passed it on to his son, James Byrne. Donegal fiddlers often pair it with "The Shetland Fiddler." See also the related tunes "The Blacksmith's Reel," "The Blacksmith's Daughter," and "The Green Garters." Source for notated version: set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor ]. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 26. Green Linnet SIF 1078, "Altan." Sean Potts, Paul McGrattan, "Face the Hob." Gael-Linn CEF 140, Kevin Glackin - "Na Saighneáin/Northern Lights."
T:Leslie's Reel
T:Shetlander (LL)
N:Alternate title added; default note length changed to 1/8 (LL)
M:C|
L:1/8
R:reel
Z:id:hn-reel-503
K:A
ec~c2 ecfc|ec~c2 Bcdf|ec~c2 ecea|1 fdBc defa:|2 fdBc defg||
|:a2ea gbeg|a2ga fB~B2|1 a2ea gbec|dcBc defg:|2 agfe fedc|Bcde fgaf||

LEVENEEP HEAD. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AA'BB'. A modern composition (1960's) by Frank Jamieson, named for a good fishing place where he used to fish as a young man. Source for notated version: Frank Jamieson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson, Cooke]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 35. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 17, pg. 66.

LEXY/LEXIE McASKILL. Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABBCCDD. Composed by Dr. John McAskill. Identified as a "traditional Shetland Islands" tune on Sharon Shannon's CD. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 44. Green Linnet SIF 1047, John Cunningham - "Fair Warning" (1983). Green Linnet SIF-1986, John & Phil Cunningham - "Silly Wizard- Live in America" (1986). Green Linnet SIF-104, John & Phil Cunningham - "The Celts Rise Again" (1990). Green Linnet GLCD 3127, Sharon Shannon - "The Best of Sharon Shannon: Spellbound" (1999. Appears as second tune of "Bag of Cats" medley).

LODDIE. AKA and see "The Fairy Reel." Shetland, Shetland Reel. In the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band and widely known reel in the Shetlands, also called "The Fairy Reel."

LORD MACDONALD('S REEL) [4] ("Cor an Tigearna Mic Domnaill" or "An Tiarna Mac Dónaill). AKA and see "Lady McDonald's," "Le Petit Bucheuxl," "Little Peggy," "Little Peggy's Love," "Lord McDonald," "MacDonald's Reel," "McDonald's Reel," "John MacDonald's Reel," "Miss Jackson's," "Morag Nighean Domhnuill Duinn (Marion, Brown Donald's Daughter)," "Slanty Gart," "Virginia Reel" (Ford). Scottish, Canadian; Reel. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. G Major (most versions): A Mixolydian (Cranford). Standard. AB (O'Neill/1001): AAB (Breathnach, Honeyman, Hunter, Kerr): ABB (Cranford): ABC (Miller): ABCD (Taylor): AABB (Brody, Huntington): AABCCD (Athole, Skye, Gow): ABB'CC' (O'Neill): AA'BB'CC'D (Perlman). One of the most famous folk fiddle melodies, composed by Sir Alexander Macdonald (according to some, a few days before his death). From that beginning the tune was quickly assimilated into Scottish tradition and disseminated wherever the Scots emigrated. It can be found in many North American traditions; for example, see the closely related tunes and notes for the American "Leather Breeches" and the French Canadian "Reel de l'Enfant." Ken Perlman, who researched the fiddle music of Prince Edward Island, Canada, notes that it was in the old days the most requested tune of fiddlers by stepdancers throughout much of the island, attesting to its popularity there. He calls it "the most played 'good old tune' on PEI and states that it was at one time the benchmark by which fiddlers were measured. Cape Breton fiddler Jerry Holland's version, in A Mixolydian, is a pipe setting learned from his father. An American variant is "Leather Britches/Breeches." Sources for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Scotland) [Brody]; Jerry Holland Sr. (Mass.) via his son Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Peter Chaisson, Sr. (B. 1929, Bear River, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; the mid-20th century collection of Jack Wade (County Monaghan) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 184, pg. 85. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 176. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 271. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 6, pg. 2. Gow (Strathspey Reels), Vol. 3, pg. 9. Gow (Beauties of Niel Gow), Vol. 1, pg. 29. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 14. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; pg. 41. Howe (School for the Violin), 1851; pg. 29. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 200. Huntingdon (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 16 (two settings). Jarman (The Cornhuskers Book of Square Dance Tunes), 1944; pg. 15 (appears as "MacDonald's Reel"). Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 13. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 15, No. 4, pg. 10. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 86. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 2, No. 47. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 133. O'Neill (1850), 1979; Nos. 1289 & 1408. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 649, pg. 116. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 45. Riley's Flute Melodies, Vol. 1, No. 123. Smith (Scottish Minstrel), 1820-24, Vol. 4, pg. 16. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 164. Surenne, 1852; pg. 84. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; No. or pg. 69. Taylor (Through the Half-door), 1992; No. 33, pg. 24. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 2. Wilson (Companion to the Ballroom), 1840; pg. 61. County 725, The Riendeau Family- "Old-Time Fiddling." Cranford Publications CP-R2, "Jerry Holland Solo" (1988). Folkways FG 3531, Jean Carignan (Monteal, Canada) - "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968). Folkways FG 3532, Alan Mills and Jean Carignan - "Songs, Fiddle Tunes and a Folk-Tale from Canada" (learned from a fiddler on Québec's Gaspé Peninsula). Green Linnet SIF-1110, "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Intrepid Records, Michael Colemen - "Heyday of Michael Coleman" (1973). Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society- "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (appears as "MacDonald's Reel"). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier- "The Dances Down Home." Shanachie 33006, Michael Coleman- "The Classic Recordings of Michael Coleman." Shaskeen - "Atlantic Breeze" & "Shaskeen Live." Trailer 2086, "Boys of the Lough" (appears as "Slanty Gart").
T:Lord MacDonald
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B/c/|d3e dBg2|dBg2 aAAB|d^cde dBgB|A/B/c BA BGG:|
B|DGBG AGBG|DGBG AGEA|DGBG AGBG|DEDC B,G,G,G|
DGBG AGBG|DGBG AGEB|cBAG GFED|EFGA BGG||
|:B/c/|d3e dBg2|g2fg aAAB|d^cde dBgB|A/B/c BA BGG:|
g|dgbg agbg|dgbg aeeg|dgbg agbg|dedc BGGg|dgbg agbg|
dgbg aeea|bagf gfed|efga bgg||

LUCKY CAN YOU LINK ONY. AKA and see "Ca the Stirks." Shetland, Reel. Shetlands, Unst Island. F Major. Standard. ABB. The late Lerwick fiddler, composer and collector Tom Anderson (1978) explained the title as meaning an invitation to dance in the Shetlands - i.e. "Lassie can you dance." Source for notated version: "collected by F.R. and T.F. from James Scollay of Burravoe, Yell" [Flett & Flett]. Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 221. Topic 12TS370, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

MACDONALD'S REEL. See "Lord MacDonald's Reel." Canadian, Shetland; Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. This reel was originally Scottish and imported to other areas, where the "Lord" part of the title was often dropped. Jarman (The Cornhuskers Book of Square Dance Tunes), 1944; pg. 15. Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier - "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

MAGGIE CAMERON. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. A fiddle arrangement of a pipe tune. Jack Campin finds that it was earlier called "Willie Roy's
Loomhouse," and that a related reel goes by the title "The Old Men at the Loom." The latter is quite a bit simpler and, presumably, he says, is a still earlier version. Pipe settings appear in the Scots Guards Standard Settings of Pipe Tunes and Donald McPhedran's collection (pg. 6), but it is an often-printed tune appearing in at least a dozen other pipe collections. Source for notated version: Arthur S. Robertson (Shetland) [Hunter]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 139. Olympic 6151, Arthur S. Robertson - "Scottish Traditional Fiffle Music" (1978).

MAK A KISHIE NEEDLE, DYE/DIE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. "'Dye' was an affectionate term for Grandfather on the West side of Shetland. A Kishie is a form of straw basket which was woven using a wooden needle very similar to a fishing-net needle. So, the title can be interpreted as -- 'Make a Kishie Needle, Grandad'" (Anderson). The tune is in the repertory of the Shetland Fiddle Band and is widely known in the Shetlands. Source for notated version: "the late" Peter Fraser (Shetlands) [Anderson]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 85. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

MARTIN YULE. Shetland, Reel. F Major. Standard. AAB. "Marin Yule is a young Surgeon who visited Tom (Anderson) in 1972. He is a brilliant fiddler and is the son of Dr. Bobbie Yule from Shetland who used to play guitar with Willie Johnson, and who was Tom's Doctor for some years in Lerwick" (Anderson). Composed by the late Shetland fiddler, composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson in 1972. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 69.

MARY RAMSAY. Shetland Reel. A reel version of the Scottish tune "Lady Mary Ramsay," used for the dance The Shetland Reel. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

MEG MERRILIES/MERRILEES'. Scottish, Shetland; Country Dance Tune, Hornpipe or Reel. G Major (Hardings): A Major (Athole, Honeyman, Hunter, Kerr). Standard. AB (Athole): AAB (Kerr): AABB (Honeyman, Hunter): AABB' (Hardings). The Shetland variant has a distinct character that distinguishes it from the Scottish (Cooke). Meg Merrilies is also the name of a Scottish country dance, commonly taught by dancing masters in the 19th century. Hardings All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 74, pg. 23. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 45 (appears as "Meg Merrilees' Hornpipe"). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 315. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 1, pg. 23. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 142.
T:Meg Merriliees
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
cd|edcd eagf|feee e2cd|efec efec|cBBB B2cd|edcd eagf|
feee e2cd|efec BABc|A2AA A2||e|^defe =deBe|ceAe BeGe|
^defe =dcdB|BAAA A2e2|^defe =ceBe|ceAe BeGe|BABc defg|
agag a2||

MERRY BOYS O' GREENLAND. Shetland, Reel. Just speculating, the tune may commemorate the greenland whale or fishing fleets that put out from the Shetland Islands. Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

METEOR, THE. Shetland, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. "Written (by Tom Anderson) to commemorate a memorable visit to the good ship 'Meteor' of the Bergen Line, in 1961" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 77.

MICKIE AINSWORTH. Shetland, Reel. Composed by Shetland fiddler and composer Ronnie Cooper (d. 1982). Topic 12TS381, The Battlefield Band - "At the Front" (1978).

MIDNIGHT [2]. Shetlands, A Shetland Reel/Jig? Shetlands, Island of Yell? F Major. Standard. AABB'. A tune from the early Shetland dance tradition when older tunes were played and danced in a rhythm that is neither duple or triple. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 25, pg. 76.

MILLBRAE. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed by the late Shetland fiddler Ronald Cooper of Lerwick, Shetland. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 134. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall." Philo 1031, Boys of the Lough - "Lochaber No More" (1976).

MILLY GOODGER. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Shetland, Cullivoe (North Yell Island). Some Cullivoe fiddlers think the title to be a corruption of "Mill of Gutcher," the neighboring town to Cullivoe (Cooke, 1986). An assymetrical tune not used for dancing. Source for notated version: Bobbie Jamieson (North Yell, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 11, pg. 62.

MIMIE'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. "Written for the wife of a very good fiddler friend of Tom (Anderson's) who has always been an inspiration to many of the young fiddlers" (Anderson). Composed by Shetland collector, teacher, fiddler and composer Tom Anderson, 1981. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 96.

MIND WHAT YOU DO. AKA and see "Up and Waur Them Aa." Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Island of Whalsay and Mainland Shetland. Cooke (1986) prints the following text to this dance tune:
***
Mind what you do, mind what you do,
Never let the old men come to bed with you
They kiss you and cuddle you and say they'll be true,
And then in the morning they bid you adieu. (Cooke)

MIRRIE BOYS O' GREENLAND, DA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. A traditional Shetland reel known throughout the islands, said to have originated from Shetland whalers. It is the best known of the Shetland reels and is to be found in many variants. Anderson & Georgeson (1970) say it bears a strong resemblance to a country dance tune from Jutland, Denmark. Purser (1992) notes that the reel as a dance, and with a tune similar to "Mirrie Boys", seems to have spread from Shetland to the Netherlands. Sources for notated versions: Willie Hunter (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]; fiddler Gilbert Gray [Purser]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 16. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 21. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 217. Purser (Scotland's Music), 1992; Ex. 2, pg. 229.

MISS SPENCE'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. D Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Original from the Hoseason Manuscript (1862), with the note "Composed by John Anderson, Voe, (in 1759) and played by him in the late Mr. Neven of Windhouse's family at Reafirth at a Christmas party, the majority of Ladies, Miss Spences, and the Reel got their name" (Cooke, 1986). With so many Miss Spence's, how could he miss? Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 25. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 41. County CO-CD-2729, Art Stamper - "Goodbye Girls, I'm Going to Boston" (2000).

MISS SUSAN COOPER. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Shetland musician Ronnie Cooper (d. 1982), and known by fiddlers throughout Britain; it has been popular with Scottish dance bands. It can be heard as part of the "Flatback Caper" set, played on duelling mandolins, on Fairport Covention's album "Full House." Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 36. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 218.
T:Miss Susan Cooper
R:reel
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:180
K:A
A2 |\
"D"dfed "G"B2 dB |"D"A2 FA "D"DAFA |"D"ABde "D"faga |"A"=g2 f2 "A"eAce |\
"D"dfed "G"B2 dB |"D"A2 FA "D"DAFA |"D"ABde "D"fa=gf |"A"eABc "D"d2 :: dc |\
"Bm"Bcde "Bm"fBBc |"Bm"defg "Bm"a2 gf |"A"e2 ce "A"Aeca |"A"=g2 f2 "A"eAce|\
"D"dfed "G"B2 dB |"D"A2 FA "D"DAFA |"D"ABde "D"fa=gf |"A"eABc "D"d2 :|

MITHER PIT ME TO THE WELL [1]. AKA and see "Ca the Stirks," "Wat Ye Wha I Saw Yestreen." Shetlands, Reel. Shetland, Island of Whalsay. Cooke (1986) prints the following text to one version of this dance tune, collected in the Shetlands:
***
My mither pit me to the well
Rather she would ging hersel
The bottom o the pitcher fell
Whistle oer the lave o it.
***
Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Andrew Poleson (Whalsey, Shetlands) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993).

MISS BETTY HENDERSON. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. "A very fine lady fiddler from Ayr, of Shetland origin. Written (by Tom Anderson) for her in 1958" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 50.

MORE GROG COMING. Shetlands, Shetlands Reel. Shetlands, Unst. D Major. Standard. AAB. From the island of Unst, Shetland. The term 'grog', referring to an alcoholic drink, stems from the British navy of the mid-18th century. Admiral Vernon, who was called "Old Grog" after the stiff wool grogram coats he wore, decided to water down the Navy's rum, a turn of events not at all pleasing to the average Jack Tar, who began to refer to the diluted drink as 'grog' after the responsible admiral. One who managed to get drunk on the concoction became 'groggy.' Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 123, pg. 77.

MORRIS RANT. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. From the islands of Whalsay and Fetlar, Shetlands.

MRS. MACLEOD (OF) RAASAY. AKA and see "Miss McLeod of Raasay," "Miss McCloud," "Miss McLeod('s Reel)," "Miss Macleod of Ayr," "Da Broon Coo" (Shetland), "Hop High Ladies," "Enterprising Boxer." Scottish, Reel or Scottish Measure. Scotland, Isle of Skye. A Major. Standard. One part (Gow): AB (Honeyman): AABB (Perlman): AA'BB' (Athole, Skye). Composed by Sir Alexander MacDonald, according to Keith Norman MacDonald, editor of the Skye Collection. When played as a jig the melody is "The Campbells are Coming." The piece was published in Niel Gow's Fifth Collection, 1809, and is the obvious ancestor to the famous American fiddle tune known variously as "Hop High Ladies," "Hop Light Ladies" or other titles. Gow said he had the tune from Mr. McLeod of Raasay who described it as an original Isle of Skey reel. Source for notated version: "Communicated (composed?) by Mr. McLeod of Raasay. An original Isle of Skye reel" (Gow). Source for notated version: Elmer Robinson (b. 1910, Mount Pleasant, West Prince County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Woodstock) [Perlman]. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 304 (appears as "Mrs. McLeod of Rasay"). Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 52, pgs. 141-142. Gow, 5th Collection. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 18. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 249. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 5, No. 2, pg. 5 (appears as "Mrs. McLeod"). Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 8. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 98. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 6. "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Melodeon Greats" (1978). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Ideal Music" (1977). "Fiddlers Three Plus Two."

MUCKLE A SKERRY IN THREE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the districts of Whalsay and Nesting, Shetland. The title makes reference to a fishing mead (Cooke).

MUCKLE REEL O' FINNIGIRT(H, DA). Shetland, Aald Reel (2/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part. At one time the Muckle Reel, or Aald/Auld Reel, was danced throughout Shetland though it varied from district to district. This particular tune accompanied a dance whose steps have been lost, though it has been remembered that they were walking steps that matched the irregular rhythm of this piece, and that the piece itself was played and danced as a break from the more strenuous reels. The Muckle Reel may have been derived from the figures of a Scandinavian long dance or could have some connection with a song dance from the Faro islands, note Anderson & Georgeson (1970), who believe that it is likely that all the Muckle Reels were of Norwegian derivation. "The Muckle Reel o Finnigirt" is the most complete version that has survived. Flett & Flett (1964) give that the distinguishing characteristic of the dance is that the dancers are constantly moving, and there is no setting figure so common to most of Scottish reels. See also "Aald Reel o Whalsay." Source for notated version: Peter Fraser (Walls, West Mainland, Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson, Cooke]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 9. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 4, pg. 56. Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (1978).

MUCKLE REEL O' PAPA [1]. Shetland, Aald Reel (duple/triple time). A Major. Standard. Irregular form. Source for notated version: Fraser Hughson (Papa Stour {Island}, Shetlands) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 2, pg. 56.

MUCKLE REEL O' PAPA [2]. Shetland, Aald Reel (duple/triple time). A Major. Standard. Irregular form. Source for notated version: John Fraser playing J. Umphray's version (Papa Stour Island, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 3, pg. 56.

MUCKLE REEL O' PAPA [3]. Shetland, Aald Reel (duple/triple time). D Major. Standard. Irregular form. Known by the informant as an older version. Source for notated version: John Fraser (Papa Stour {Island}, Shetland) [Cooke]. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 5, pg. 57.

MY WIFE'S A DRUNKARD. Shetland, Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Arthur Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 24.
T:My Wife's a Drunkard
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
R:reel
Z:Chris Hoseaso
K:D
a>e e/2e/2e a2 ef|gede g2 g2|a>e e/2e/2e a2 e2|dBGB A3 z:|!
eAcA e2 ge|dBGB d2 d2|eAcA e2 ge|dBGB A3 z:|!

NAANIE AN' BETTY. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. C Major. Standard. AABB. "A traditional reel from Whalsay, learned from the late John Irvine who said it was a very old reel. Naanie and Betty were apparently two very good dancers " (Anderson). Anderson, 1983; pg. 88. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

NANNY AND ANDREW. Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Quarff area. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Magnie Smith (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 26.

NEIL DOHERTY. Scottish, Reel. Scotland, Shetland Isles. Composed by Ronny Cooper. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall."

NEW COINED GUINEA, DA. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. The tune, note Anderson & Georgeson (1970), was known in Papa Stour and the West side as well as Hillswick. Source for notated version: Arthur Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 26.

NEW RIGGED SHIP, DA [2]. AKA - "The New Riggit Ship." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, (island of) Walls. A Mixolydian. Standard. One part. "A traditional reel from the playing of the late Peter Fraser of Finnigarth, Waas. The tune celebrates the rigging out with new sails and mast of a fishing boat, which the owner proudly calls a ship" (Anderson, 1983). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 59. Green Linnett SIF 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (appears after the song "Donal agus Morag"). Dervish - "The Boys of Sligo." Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).
T:Da New Rigged Ship
C:Traditional Shetland
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:reel
K:AMix
eg |: a2 ab ageg | a2 ab ageg |g2 gg fgag |1 f2d2 d2 eg :|2 f2d2 d2 ed ||
|: cAcA B2 ed | cAcA E2 ed | cAcA B2 ed |1 c2 A2 A2 ed :|2 c2 A2 A2 AB ||
|: =cdec BcdB | ABAF GFE2 | =cdec BcdB |1 =c2 A2 A2 AB :|2 =c2A2 A4||

NIEL GOW. AKA - "Neil Gow." AKA and see "Irish Jig", "Keep Your Country Bonnie Lasses" (Shetland) {?}. Scottish (originally), English; Strathspey. England, Northumberland. A Major. Standard. AAB (Athole): AABB (Gow, Honeyman, Kerr, Peacock). Composed by Niel Gow. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 482. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 34. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 9, pg. 4. Peacock (Peacock's Tunes), c. 1805/1980; No. 7, pg. 2. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 15.
T:Neil Gow
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
f|e<c a>e f<B B>f|e<c a>e f2 f>g|a/g/f/e/ a>e f<B B>g|a>fe>c A2A:|
E|A<A c>A B<F F>B|A<A c>e a>ef>a|e>a c<a B<F F>f|a>fe>c A2 A>E|
A<A c>A B<F F>B|A<A c>e a>ef>g|a/g/f/e/ a>e f<B B>g|a>fe>c A2A||

NINE POINTS OF ROGUERY, THE (Naoi nArda na Rógaireachta). AKA and see "The Black Fanad Mare," "The Black Mare of Fanad." Irish, Reel. D Major ('A' and 'C' parts) & D Mixolydian ('B' part) {Brody, Mallinson}: D Mixolydian ('A' and 'B' parts) & D Major ('C' part) {Breathnach}. Standard. AA'BB'CC'BB' (Brody): AABBCCAABB (Breathnach): AABBA'A'BB (Mallinson). The title remains somewhat of a mystery. According to chivalry the nine points of knightly virtue were honor, loyalty, liberality, pride, good faith, bravery, glory, unselfishness and courtesy, and it may be surmised that the nine points of roguery were the opposite. The way the Boys of the Lough play the tune, after the three parts of the tune are played through once, the 'B' part is repeated, and only then the 'A' part is played again. One of the parts is often an octave transposition of another, as is occasionally the custom in Donegal fiddle tradition; for example Breathnach's transcription of Doherty's version has the 'C' part that is simply the 'A' part an octave higher. In County Donegal the tune is known as "The Black Mare of Fanad" (see note for this tune for a story of the origins of the title). Source for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Shetland), who had the tune from the Castle Ceili band (Dublin) [Brody]: fiddler John Doherty, 1965 (Co. Donegal, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 264, pg. 137. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 202. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 26. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 50, pg. 22. Folkways FTS 31098, Ken Perlman - "Clawhammer Banjo and Fingerstyle Guitar Solos." Philo 1026, Boys of the Lough- "Live." Shanachie 29003, Tommy Peoples and Paul Brady- "The High Part of the Road." Shanachie 79002, "The Boys of the Lough" (1973). Trailer 2086, "Boys of the Lough."

NIPPIN GRUND, DA (The Nipping Ground). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, (islands of) Unst and Yell. G Major. Standard. AABB. "This tune is attributed to Fredamann Stickle, The Nippin Grund is a Fishermans Meathe" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 72.

NORT RODD, DA (The North Road). Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'B. Composed by Shetland fiddler Willie Hunter, Jr. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 33. Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

OAK TREE, THE (An Crann Darach). AKA and see "Mary Hold the Candle Steady While I Shave the Chicken's Lip," "Na Saighean," "The Northern Lights," "The Old Oak Tree." Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major ('A' and 'C' parts), B Dorian ('B' part). Standard. AABBCC (Brody): ABBC (Breathnach). A popular reel in County Donegal. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) lists this as one of the Donegal tunes played with long bowed double stops, reminiscent of piping. A close County Tyrone variation is "The Grand Turk's March," while the Scots reel "Miss Montgomery" is quite similar to the version played by Donegal fiddler John Doherty. Sources for notated versions: Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Shetland) [Brody]: fiddler Tommy Peoples, 1968 (Co. Donnegal and Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 193, pgs. 100-101. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 204. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), Vol. 1, No. 50. CCE CL13, Tommy Peoples. Philo 1026, Boys of the Lough- "Live." Shanachie 29003, Tommy Peoples and Paul Brady- "The High Part of the Road." Green Linnet SIF 3051, Frankie Gavin - "Frankie Goes to Town."

OLLEFJORD JACK. Shetland, Shetland Reel. In the repertory of Shetland fiddle band, and therefore widely known.

OOT BE EST (East) DA VONG. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Mainland Shetland. D Major. Standard. AA'B (Anderson): AABB (Bain). One of "three traditional reels from the playing of the late Henry Thomson of Vidlin. These were favourite dancing tunes in Vidlin for the dance 'The Shetland Reel'" (Anderson). The title refers to a fishing landmark, or meathe. Source for notated version: learned by the late composer, teacher and collector Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Flett & Flett]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 41. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 16. Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 219. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

ORANGE FLOWER, THE. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland.

OUT AND IN THE HARBOUR. AKA and see "Muckle a Skerry in Three." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Known throughout the Shetlands.

OWER DA HILLS TAE AMERICA. Shetland, Shetland Reel. May be the same tune as "Ower the Highland Hills."

OWER THE HIGHLAND HILLS. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland.

OYSTER. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland. Title may be a corruption of "Da Oye Stuir."

PADDY FAHY'S NO. 1. Irish, Reel. D Dorian. Standard. AABB. A modern composition of East Galway fiddler Paddy Fahy that has gained wide currency. Source for notated version: fiddler Ruthie Dornfeld (Seattle, Washington) [Songer]. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 32. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 154. Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland" (1978). Wild Asparagus 003, Wild Asparagus - "Tone Roads" (1990).

PAM'S HOUSE. Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. "Composed (by Tom Anderson) in 1979, in Austin, Texas, when visiting Pam Swing's house" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 94.

PAM'S PEERIE TUNE (Pam's Little Tune). Shetland, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. "A tune for Pam Swing who studied with Tom (Anderson) for a year and who helped him with the book Haand me Doon Da Fiddle. Pam was the first American student to study with Tom" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 91.

PAM'S TUNE. American, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB'. Composed (on the guitar) by Larry Unger in honor of Shetland-style fiddler Pam Swing. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 156. Unger (The Curvey Road to Corinth).

PAPA STOUR SWORD DANCE. Shetland, Sword Dance (4/4 and 3/2 time). A Major. Standard. ABCC'. The island of Papa Stour, Shetland, had its own team of dancers performing throughout the 19th century up until 1892; the dance was revived on the island in 1922 until 1968-9, and again on the Mainland in the 1970's and 1980's. Cooke says the island now has too few people to support a musical tradition. The 'A' part is "a short snatch of melody played as each of the seven dancers--the Seven Champions of Christendom--is introduced in turn tot he audience by the leader (St. George), reciting the traditional text...The second piece is for the dance proper. It should perhaps be classed as a Muckle Reel, so similar is its structure and its function, for it is repeated continuously for as long as the dancers are 'running' the dance. Great use is made in this piece of what Shetlanders call 'the shivers', i.e. the rapid reiteration of a note or chord to strengthen the accent and enliven the general effect" (Cooke, 1986). Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 7, pg. 59.

PEERIE HOOSE AHINT/AHUNT THE BURN, DA (The Little House Behind/By the Stream). AKA and see "Fey's Hornpipe" (English). Shetland Islands, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. The title is Shetland dialect for "The Little House by the Stream," in other words, the out-house. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 46. BBC Records REB 84M, Tom Anderson's Shetland Fiddle Band - "Scottish Fiddlers to the Fore." Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

PEERIE HOOSE UNDER DA HILL, DA (The Little House Under the Hill). Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Nesting (district of Mainland Shetland). G Major. Standard. AABB. A traditional reel, "well known over the most of the country districts of Shetland" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 92.

PIDDLE AND CRAIGIE. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. Shetland, (island of) Whalsay. Cooke (1986) prints the following text to this dance tune, collected in the Shetlands:
**
They caa'd me this, they caa'd me that,
They caa'd my wife the staigie,
An every een that I cam by
They caa'd me Piddling Craigie

PINCH OF SNUFF, THE/A [1] (An Pinsín Snaoisín). AKA and see "The Humours of Swanlinbar," "The Wise Maid." Irish, Reel. Ireland, Donegal. D Mixolydian. Standard or AEAE. ABCDEC (Breathnach/Doherty): AABBCCDDEEFF (Sullivan): AABBCCDDEEFFGGHHII (Mallinson). Known as a northern Irish reel, and especially one from County Donegal where it is particularly popular. Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) recounts the origins of the tune in the faerie folklore of Donegal. It seems that the fairies were trying to abduct a bride at a wedding in the Teelin, southwest Donegal, area by trying to trick her into uttering the magic words which would bind her to them and seal her fate. As luck would have it, hiding in the rafters was a young man who had been her suitor, but whom had lost in the bid for her hand. He saw what was about to happen to his still-beloved (who was dancing below), and from his high hiding place he thought to shake down some snuff upon her. The bride breathed it in, sneezed, and was greeted with a polite chorus of "Dia agus Muire dhuit" (God and Mary bless you) from members of the wedding party. This was anathema to the fairies, who took flight. The tune the fiddlers were playing while the bride was dancing at the time of her rescue was dubbed "The Pinch of Snuff." Sliabh Luachra regional(County Kerry, south Ireland) fiddler Patrick O'Keeffe played a tune he called simply "A Pipe Reel" whose two parts correspond to the first two of "A Pinch of Snuff." According to Mac Aoidh, he played the tune in AEAE tuning with the first four bars on a single double stopping down bow and the second four bars on a double stopping up bow; this pattern in repeated on the 'B' part. In some versions a part is/parts are an octave transposition of another part; for example, John Doherty's 'D' and 'E' parts are the 'A' and 'B' parts played an octave higher. Sources Sources for notated versions: fiddlers Micky and John Doherty, 1965 (Stranorlar, Co. Donnegal, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 182, pg. 95. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 2, No. 8. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 37, pg. 17. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 2, pg. 2. Front Hall 018, How To Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland." Gael-Linn CEF060, "Paddy Glackin." Green Linnet GLCD 3009, Kevin Burke - "If the Cap Fits" (1978). Island ILPS 9501, "The Chieftains Live" (1977). Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Touish, Dermot McLaughlin, Seamus Glackin, Kevin Glackin - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991).

PIT HAME DA BORROWED CLAES. Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Vidlin. G Major. Standard. AB (Brody): AAB (Anderson, Flett & Flett). "A lively traditional reel from Vidlin. This was a favourite reel for dancing at weddings. Clothes were sometimes borrowed for weddings, hence the title, 'Put Home the Borrowed Clothes'" (Anderson). Sources for notated versions: The Boys of the Lough (Ireland/Shetland) [Brody]; "Mr. Henry Thomson of Vidlin, now living in Ollaberry," via the late Tom Anderson (Lerwick, Shetland) [Flett & Flett]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 79. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 219. Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 219. Philo 1026, The Boys of the Lough- "Live." Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow." Front Hall 015, Jake Walton and Roger Nicholson- "Bygone Days."
T:Pit Hame Da Borrowed Claes
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
"G"D G2 A BABd|"G"edBd "D"gdBA|"G"DGBG (3cBA Bd|"G"edgB "D"BAAB|!
"G"D G2 A BABd|"G"edBd "D"gdBA|"G"D G2 A BABd|"G"edgB "D"A2 AB||!
"G"dBgd ed B2|"G"dBgB "D"BAAB|"G"dBgd ed B2|"G"gfgB "D"BAAB|!
"G"dBgd ed B2|"G"dBgB "D"BA A2|"G"dBgB defg|"G"afge "D"BA A2||!

POTTINGER'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. F Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Tom Anderson (1910-1991?), originally from Eshaness (Nor' West Mainland, Sheltand), for the late Willie Pottinger, a musician and traditional fiddling enthusiast. Anderson was awarded the M.B.E. in 1977 for his efforts on behalf of preserving traditional music of the Shetlands. Aly Bain calls the melody "one of (Anderson's) finest reels." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 263. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).
T:Pottinger's Reel
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:F
|:F3 c AFF3/2e/|fgfc AFF3/2 G/|GFGA BABd|{e }gfed ec ~c2|F3 c AFF3/2e/|
fgfc AFF3/2|A/2|BcdB ABcA|cBAG AF F2:|
|:{e}f2 cf Afcf|faga fc c2|cg {gag}f2 g a|bagf ec c2|{e}f2 cf Afcf|faga fc c2|
{A}BcdB ABcA|cBAG AF F2:|

PRESIDENT'S HORNPIPE, THE. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. "Written (by Tom Anderson) in 1965 for the late Mr. L.H. Mathewson, President of the Shetland Fiddlers Society from its formation in 1960 until his death in 1972. His enthusiasm for the Fiddlers Society was a lesson to everyone, and he seldom missed a meeting. He was Procurator Fiscal for Shetland" (Anderson).

PRIMROSE MAID. Shetlands, Shetland Reel. From the district of Delting, Shetland.

PUT HAME DA BORRAED CLAES. Shetland, (Shetland) Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. From the districts of Mainland, Unst and Whalsay, Shetland. Carlin (Master Collection), 1987; No. 122, pg. 77.

QUALSAY. AKA and see "Boanie Isle o' Whalsay, Da." Shetland, Reel. Shetland, Mid Yell. A Minor. Standard. AABB'. From J. Hoseason's manuscript, 1863. The tune has been played in reel and jig time, but is generally played in reel time today. Cooke speculates that such tunes were originally played in an ambiguous time between duple and triple. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 27b, pg. 77.

QUEENOBURN, THE. AKA "Wheenaburn." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, (Island of) Unst.

REESTIT MUTTON. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Gideon Stove. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 29.

RESCUE MAN, THE. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. "Composed for Malcolm Green at the first Heritage of Scotland Summer School at Stirling University in 1978. Malcolm managed to find a laundry when things were becoming desperate for Tom (Anderson). Malcolm presented him with clean laundry the next day" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 95.

RICHARD DWYER'S [1]. Irish, Reel. Played by Paddy Carty, the Galway flute player, but it is the namesake of the composer who in modern times moved from County Cork, Ireland, to the United States. Front Hall 018, How to Change a Flat Tire - "Traditional Music of Ireland and Shetland." Green Linnett GLCD 1087, Seamus Connolly - "Notes From My Mind" (1988).

RING, THE. Shetland, Scottish; Reel or Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in Neil Stewart's 1761 collection (pg. 32).

RISE EARLY IN DA MOARNING. AKA and see "Fair Field House." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Unst.

ROBERTSON'S REEL. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the late Shetland fiddler, teacher, collector and composer Tom Anderson. The tune apparently has been quite popular among Portland, Oregon, contra dance musicians. Source for notated version: Portland contra dance musicians Christy Keevil via George Penk via Dennis Rothrock [Songer]. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 168. Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977).

ROCKET, THE. Scottish, Hornpipe. D Major (Kerr): F Major (Cranford/Holland). Standard. AABB. A 19th century hornpipe written in the 'Newcastle' style, according to Nigel Gatherer, with similarities to "The Newcastle Hornpipe" written by the main promulgator of the style, James Hill. Gatherer thinks the tune likely named in honor of Stephenson's Rocket, an early steam locomotive of 1829-30. It was recorded by Shetland fiddler Arthur Scott Robertson (preceeded by "The College Hornpipe"). Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 147, pg. 42. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 50. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1, c. 1870's; pg 30 (appears as untitled hornpipe in D Major). Kerr (Collection of Merry Melodies Arranged for the Pianoforte), c. 1870's; pg. 27 (appears as untitled hornpipe in D Major). Rounder Records, "Jerry Holland" (1976).
T:Rocket Hornpipe, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Honeyman - Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor
K:F
cde|f2 F2 F2 g^f|g2 G2 G2 ga|bagf efga|ge c2 c2 de|f2 F2 F2 g^f|g2 G2 G2 ga|
bagf efge|f2 a2 f2:|
|:cB|Afcf afcA|Bfdf bfdB|Afcf afcB|A2 G2 G2 cB|Afcf afcA|Bfdf bfdB|
bagf afge|f2 f2 f2 :|

RODD TA HOULL, DA. AKA - "Da Road to Houll." Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Major. Standard. AA'B. Composed by Shetland fiddler and teacher Tom Anderson in 1936 for a school prize-giving in Haroldswick. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 31. Olympic 6151, The Shetland Fiddlers' Society - Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music (1978). Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977).

ROY'S WIFE OF ALDIVALLOCH. AKA and see "Ruffian's Rant," "Lady Francis Wemys' Reel," "Coig na Scalan," "I'm Owre Young to Marry Yet," "Ben Nevis," "Old Virginia," "The Kilt is My Delight." Scottish, English; Air, Strathspey or Reel. England, Northumberland. G Major (Cole): D Major (Bayard, Cole). Standard. AB (Bayard, Cole): AABB (Cole). "Roy's Wife of Aldivalloch" is the title of the song to the tune known as "Ruffian's Rant;" the song was one of the favorite songs of the early 19th century, at least in Lowland centers, as mentioned by Peter Mackenzie, the "genial reminiscer of Glasgow" (Emmerson, 1971). It was composed by Robert Bremner (c. 1713-89), famous for publishing the first collection of specifically Scottish dance music (1757-61). Other 18th century titles (and dates of publication) are "Lady Francis Wemys' Reel" (1742), "The Ruffian's Rant (1759), and "Coig na Scalan" (1780). Samuel Bayard (1981) states there is some indication that the "Roy's Wife of Aldivalloch" group of airs belongs to an extended tune-family, which collectively "have considerably more than a passing resemblance to the first strain of 'Moniemusk.'" The fact that the tune has been a reel, fling, strathspey, vocal air, and march indicates to him it has "some respectable antiquity." The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. The tune was known in America in the 19th century and played as an accompaniment for dances, as attested in a diary found by New York researcher Jim Kimball of one Hod Case, a Bristol, N.Y., fiddler and journalist who maintained diaries from about 1868 to 1940. In his entry for October 8, 1878, Case noted:
**
...Ike Benson and I played to a dance [at Hank Trafton's] Irish Trot
danced for first time in the state I think. Mrs. Trafton called it. "Roy's
wife" an old Scotch ballad is the tune we played.
**
Source for notated version: Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 308, pg. 260 (appears as an untitled march). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pgs. 26 and 123 ("As performed by Niel (sic) Gow").

R. P. CUMMINGS WELCOME. Shetland, Pipe March. A Major. Standard. AABB'CCDD'. Anderson (1983) states this four-part pipe march was written for Ronnie Cumming, Surgeon Consultant for Shetland, when he was made President of the Shetland Fiddler Society. "Ronnie comes from a long tradition of piping, and is an excellent piper himself." Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 83.

RUIDHLEADH NAN COILEACH DUBHA (Reel of the Blackcocks). Shetland, Reel. D Dorian. Standard. AABB. Each section of the tune consists of only four measures, repeated. Two different two-couple dances called Ruidhleadh nan Coileach Dubha were collected from the Shetland Islands. One was learned in 1956 in South Uist from one Mrs. Margaret MacAskill, then aged 80, who used to perform the reel at gatherings in the crofts in Smerclett, southern South Uist; the second is from Neil MacNeil and is from Barra. Both are performed to the same tune, which also is the vehicle for a Gaelic dance-song which begins:
Ruidhleadh nan coileadch dubha Reeled the blackcocks
's dannsaidh na tunnagan, And danced the ducks,
Ruidhleadh nan coileach dubha Reeled the blackcocks
Air a' bhruthaich shios ud. On the banks up there.
Flett and Flett (1964) remark: "A number of the older Gaelic dances contained a certain amount of miming, and we believe that this miming was largely determined by the words of the appropriate dance-song. The dance Ruidhleadh nan Coileach Dubha is a case in point--here the kneeling couple represent the ducks, while the dancing couple are the blackcocks." Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964; pg. 169.

SAANDIE BURN REEL. Shetland, Reel. A Major. Standard. AA'BBCCDD. Composed by Shetland fiddler Frank Jamieson and named after his birthplace in the Shetland Islands. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 34.

SAIL HER OWER DA RAFT TREES. AKA and see "Sailor Ower da Raft Trees." Shetland, Shetland Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. A traditional reel which Anderson (1970) notes is a "different version from the one played by the Shetland Fiddlers Society." Source for notated version: Arthur Peterson (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 26. Anderson and Swift, Haand Me Doon the Fiddle; No. 41. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 60, pg. 119.

SAILOR OWER DA RAFT TREES. AKA and see "Sail Her Ower Da Raft Trees/Rough Trees/Rofftree," "Lady Mary Ramsay." Shetland, Shetland Reel. Shetland, Whalsay. D Major. ADAE. AABB. "Lady Mary Ramsay" was originally a Scottish strathspey, moulded in the Shetlands to "the faster vigorous and choppy bowing action common to Shetland reel playing" (Cooke). There is more than one tune by this title. Source for notated version: Andrew Poleson (Whalsay, Shetland) [Cooke].

SAILOR'S WIFE [2]. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland.

SANDWICK LASSES. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Perhaps from Mainland Shetland district.

SANDY O'ER THE LEA. English, Shetland; Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AABBCC (Vickers): ABCB (Kerr). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 9. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 211.
T:Sandy O'er the Lea
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
A,|DEFG AFFB|AFED E2EF|DEFG AFFB|AGFE D2D:|
|:g|faef defa|AFED E2Eg|faef defa|AGFE D2D:|
|:A|FADA FADB|AFED E2EG|FADA FADB|AGFE D2D:|
|:g|faef defa|AFED E2Eg|faef defa|AGFE D2D:|

SANDIE O'ER THE LEA. Scottish, Shetland; Reel. D Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. Popular in the early 18th century in Scotland. Known on Mainland Shetland as "Sandie Ower da Lea". Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 13, No. 4, pg. 9. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 98.

SATURDAY NIGHT [4]. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland.

SCALLOWA(Y) LASSES, DA. AKA and see "Fair Field House." Shetland, Reel. A Dorian or A Minor. Standard. AABB (Brody, Cooke): AA'BB' (Bain). The town of Scalloway is on the main island of the Shetlands and was the former capitol of the isles. The tune exists in many versions, but was popularized by Willie Bairnson, and 18th century Shetland fiddler born in 1740. Willie was taught to play by his step-father, Mr. Laing, a gentleman from the mainland of Scotland who was a student of music, a composer and teacher. G.M. Nelson (1970) believes the tune may have perhaps been composed by either Willie or his stepfather for it differs from many of the old Shetland fiddle tunes and sounds as if it was composed by someone with a Scottish background. Willie was employed as a post runner, carrying letters to the lairds and businessmen of the Shetlands, and, since he often took his fiddle with him on his travels, "perhaps no fiddler was so widely heard as Daa Willie, as he was affectionately called by the younger generation" (Nelson). In the early years of the 20th century the melody was played regularly for Foursome Reels and Highland Schottisches. Sources for notated versions: Peter Fraser (Shetland) [Cooke, version 18c., Anderson & Georgeson], J. Hoseason's MS (1862) (Shetland) [Cooke, version 18b.]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 20. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 35. Brody (Fiddler's Fake Book), 1983; pg. 252. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 18, pg. 68 (three versions). Rounder 3006, Boys of the Lough- "Second Album" (1974. Learned from Tom Anderson who had the tune from Peter Fraser who lived on the west side of the Shetland's main island).
T:Da Scalloway Lasses
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
S:From the playing of Dave Moss
R:reel
O:Shetland
K:A Aeolian
"Am"eaag egeB|"C"c2 ec gcec|"Am"eaag egeB|[1cA
"Em"BG "Am" A2 A2:|[2 cA
"Em"BG "Am"A2 Ac||!
"Em"BE (3EEE "C"c2 ce|"G"d^cde gfed|"Am"eaag egeB|[1 cA
"Em"BG "Am" A2Ac:|[2cA
"Em"BG "Am"A4||!

SHAALDS O' FOULA, DA [1]. AKA and see "The Foula Shaalds." Shetland, Jig. A Major. AEAE. AABB. Anderson says his two versions of the tune are very old, both featuring "raised strings" (scordatura tuning) similar in some ways to the tunings of the Hardingfele in Norway (the Shetlands were a possessin of Norway for some time). The title means 'fields of Foula', but the 'shaalds' are in fact hidden reefs at the north end of the Island of Foula, which lies off the west coast of the main island of the Shetlands. The Boys of the Lough remark that it was on these shallows that many ships have been lost, including the Oceanic in World War I, so many so that "the possibility of salvage is celebrated in this piece of local doggeral:
***
Up wi' a light but and linka the wa' boys,
The shaalds will pay for a'."
***
The tunes are sometimes incorrectly called "The Foulla Reel" which is really the name for the dance the "Shaalds of Foula" is played for. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 38.

SHAALDS O' FOULA, DA [2]. AKA - "The Foula Shaalds," "Da Foula Reel," "Boanie Tammie Scollay," "The Aald/Auld Reel." Shetland, Jig. Shetland, Yell. A Major (Anderson): G Major (Anderson & Georgeson, Songer). AEAE or Standard. AABB. See note for version #1. "It is still popular today and is occasionally still danced, but as a country dance in jig time, not as a Shetland reel. An earlier version of this tune appears in Hibbert (1822), but in the key of G and in 6/8 time throughout. Hibbert also gives words associated with the tune. Today it is Hibbert's version which is most commonly played and it is this version which appears in the folk Society's collection, Da Mirrie Dancers (Anderson & Georgeson). However, in the district known as the Herra in Yell it is still played by members of the Robertson family in the key of A and with the AEAE tuning..." (Cooke, 1986). The collector Patrick Shuldham-Shaw found elsewhere in Shetland "Da Foula Reel" both reel time and jig time variants. The melody, slightly altered, also appears married to words in a well-known Shetland song called "Boanie Tammie Scollay," printed by Hibbert, which is occasionally played by fiddlers under that name as a reel. Cooke also says that the dance to the tune is the best known of the 'Shetland jigs' (a country dance), and Flett & Flett record it was danced in the Wester Skeld district at least since 1870. Flett, in The Shetland Folk Book, Vol. 6 (1976), concluded that it was possibly brought to Shetland from Sweden via England, as it was similar to the Swedish folk dance 'Vava Vadmal,' which was introduced to Britain under the name 'Norwegian Country Dance.' Tom Anderson says "Fields of Foulla" is published in Holburn's Airs from the Far North. Source for notated version: Mike Richardson (Seattle) via Sue Songer & Lanny Martin (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 38. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 15. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 13, pg. 63. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 180. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978) {appears as "Da Foula Shaalds"}. Laurie Andres - "Fantastic Hornpipe: Fiddle Tunes on Accordion and Piano" (1991).

SHAALDS O FOULA, DA [3]. Shetland, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: James Goudie (Shetland) [Anderson & Georgeson]. Anderson & Georgeson (Da Mirrie Dancers), 1970; pg. 15.

SHELDER/SHELDOR/SHALDER GEO. Shetland; Shetland Reel. Shetland, district of Nesting. D Mixolydian. Standard. ABB. "A 'shelder' is the local name for an oyster catcher, and 'geo' is the name for an inlet" (Boys of the Lough). "A traditional reel describing the sound of the Oyster Catcher called 'Shelders' in Shetland. Shelder Geo is a place in the North of Shetland where the Shelders nest" (Anderson). Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 85. Boys of the Lough, 1977; pg. 17. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 118, pg. 76. Topic 12TS379, Tom Anderson & Aly Bain - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978). Transatlantic TRA 311, Boys of the Lough - "Lochaber No More."

SHETLAND FIDDLER, THE. Scottish (originally), Irish; Pipe Reel. Scotland, Shetland Islands. D Major. Standard. AABB. Published for the pipes in Donald Shaw Ramsay's The Edcath Collection (Vol. 4, 1954). Paul Stewart Cranford (1995) finds this tune related to (derivative of) a 19th century hornpipe called "The Hawk," by Tyneside fiddler and composer James Hill. Popularized by the group Altan, the melody has gained some currency throughout Ireland. It is usually paired with "Leslie's Reel" in Donegal. Source for notated version: Altan via fiddler Jerry Holland (Inverness, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 118, pg. 34. Green Linnet SIF-1095, Altan - "Horse with a Heart" (1989. Learned from Derry fiddler Dermot McLaughlin, who brought it home after a trip to the Shetlands). Nimbus NI 5320, Paula Doohan, Liz Doherty - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991).
T:Shetland Fiddler, The
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
d2fd Adfe|defg afdf|e2ge Beed|cdef {a}gece|d2fd Adfe|defg afde|(3fga fd
(3fga fd|1 Bgec d2 Ac:|
2 Bgec d2 cd||:eAfA gAaA|fa{b}af gfed|A2BA cAdA|efed cABc|dAeA fAgA|fa{b
}af gefd|
(3fga fd (3fga fd|1 Bgec d2 cd:|2 Bgec d2 Ac||

SHIELS OWER DA BAR. Shetland, Shetland Reel. Cooke thinks the title is also an English song title.

SHIVER THE TOPSAILS. Shetland, Shetland Reel. From the island of Whalsay, Shetland.

SHUTTER'S HUMOURS. English, Reel. England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AAB. See note for "Shuter's Hornpipe." Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 359.

SI BHEAG, SI MHOR. AKA - "Sidh Beag Agus Sidh Mor," "Sheebag, Sheemore," "Sheebeg and Sheemore," "Shebeg, Shemore," "Shi Bheag, She Mhor." AKA and see "The Hills of Haversham," "The Bonny Cuckoo." Irish, Air (3/4 time). D Major. Standard. One part (Ó Canainn): AB (Cranitch): AABB (most versions). The air, according to O'Sullivan (1958) and tradition, was probably the first composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738). The title of the air often appears as "Sheebag, Sheemore," an Englished version of the original Gaelic "Si Bheag, Si Mhor" which means "so big, so little," but it has been suggested that "Si" is derived from the medieval Irish "Siod," meaning "fairy hill" or "fairy mound;" thus the title may also refer to "big fairy hill, little fairy hill." It seems that the young Carolan first found favor at the house of his first patron, George Reynolds at Letterfain, Co. Leitrim (himself a harper and poet), who told the harper the legend of the two nearby hills and the fairy bands who lived inside. These fairies had a great battle with much shooting, and Reynolds encouraged Carolan to write a song about the event. Some versions of the legend have the mounds being topped by ancient ruins, with fairy castles underneath in which were entombed heros from the battle between the two rivals. O'Sullivan believes the air to be an adaptation of an older piece called "An chuaichin Mhaiseach" ("The Bonny Cuckoo" or "The Cuckoo"), which can be found in O'Neill, Bunting (1796) and Mulholland's Collection of Ancient Irish Airs (1810). A dance by Gail Tickner appeared in CDSS news #69, March/April 1986 by the title "The Bonny Cuckoo" to the melody.
***
The following set of words for Si Bheag, Si Mhor was published by the Irish Text Society in The Poems of Carolan (Amhrain Chearbhallain):
***
Imreas mór tháinig eidir na ríoghna,
Mar fhíoch a d'fhás ón dá chnoc sí,
Mar dúirt an tSídh Mór go mb'fhearr í féin,
Faoi dhó go mór ná 'n tSídh Bheag.
***
"Ní raibh tú ariamh chomh uasal linn,
I gcéim dár ordaíoch i dtuath ná i gcill;
Beir uainn do chaint, níl suairceas ann,
Coinnigh do chos is do lámh uainn!"
***
An tráth chruinnigh na sluaite bhí an bualadh teann,
Ar feadh na machaireacha anonn 's anall;
'S níl aon ariamh dár ghluais ón mbinn
Nár chaill a cheann san ár sin.
***
"Parlaidh! Parlaidh! agus fáiltím daoibh,
Sin agaibh an námhaid Charn Chlann Aoidh,
Ó bhinn Áth Chluain na sluaite díobh,
'S a cháirde grá dhach, bí páirteach!"
***
Source for notated version: Shetland fiddler Aly Bain via Fred Breunig (Putney, Vt.) [Miller]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 253. Bunting, 1796; No. 63. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; pg. 98, Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 42. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Music), 1977; Vol. 1, No. 58. Ó Canainn (Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland), 1995; No. 24, pg. 27. Phillips (Fiddle Case Tunebook: British Isles), 1989 {B}; pg. 43. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1979; pg. 55. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 41. Acorn Music, Tony Elman - "Shakkin' Down the Acorns." CBS MK 42665, Pierre Bensusan - "Spices" (1988). Claddagh CC18, Derek Bell- "Carolan's Receipt" (appears as "Sidh Beag Agus Sidh Mor"). June Appal 014, John McCutcheon- "The Wind That Shakes The Barley" (1977. Appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor"). Kicking Mule 206, Tom Gilfellon- "Kicking Mule's Flat Picking Guitar Festival." Kicking Mule 301, Happy Traum - "American Stranger" (1977. Learned from Boys of the Lough). North Star NS0031, "Dance Across the Sea: Dances and Airs from the Celtic Highlands" (1990). Rooster Records, "Swallowtail." Rounder 0113, Trapezoid - "Three Forks of Cheat" (1979). Rounder 3038, Pierre Bensusan - "Musiques" (1979). Shanachie 79002, "Boys of the Lough" (1973). Shanachie 79009, "Planxty" (appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor"). Shanachie 79013, Derek Bell - "Carolan's Receipt" (1987). Shanachie 97011, Dave Evans - "Irish Reels, Jigs, Airs and Hornpipes" (1990). Trailer 2086, "Boys of the Lough" (1973). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Warner Brothers, Dave Bromberg- "My Own House" (appears as "Si Bheag, Si Mhor").
T:Si Bheag, Si Mhor
M:3/4
L:1/8
Q:225
K:D Major
de|f3ed2|d3ed2|B4 A2|F4 A2|BA Bc d2|e4 de|f4 e2|d4 f2|\
B4 e2|A4 d2|F4 E2|D4 f2|B4 e2|A4 dc|d6-|d4:|*
de|f3 e d2|ed ef a2|b4a2|f4 ed|e4 a2|f4 e2|d4 B2|B4 BA|\
F4 E2|D4 f2|B4 e2|A4 a2|ba gf ed|e4 dc|d6-|d4:|**

SILLOCKS AND TATTIES. Shetland, Shetland Reel. D Mixolydian ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AAB. A Shetland reel "well known over the most of the country districts of Shetland" (Anderson); though Cooke credits it to the district of Nesting. Anderson (Ringing Strings), 1983; pg. 92.
T:Sillocks and Tatties
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:1/4=220
C:Trad Shetland
Z:Chris Hoseaso
K:D
B|A2 B=c BGGB|A2 Ag fded|A2 A=c BGGe|faef d3:||!
g|fdad ecce|fdad bdad|fdad edde|faef d2 de|!
fdad edde|fdad bdad|gefd eaae|faef d3||!

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