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A. A. GLADSTONE [EDINBURGH]. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABCCD. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 232.

ABERDEENSHIRE VOLUNTEERS. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887, pg. 53.
T:Aberdeenshire Volunteers, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:D
A,|D<D F>B A<F F>A|B/c/d/c/ B/A/G/F/ G/F/E/D/ C<E|D<D F>B A<F F>A|
(3Bec (3ABc (3dAG (3FGE|D<D F>B A<F F>A|B/c/d/c/ B/A/G/F/ G/F/E/D/ C<E|
D<D F>B A<F F>A|(3Bec (3ABc (d2d)||A|d<d d>g f/g/a/f/ d<f|g<B e>d c<A A>c|
d<d d>g f/g/a/f d>f|(3efg (3ABc d2 d>A|d<d d>g f/g/a/f/ d<f|g<B e>d c<A A>c|
(3dfd (3cec (3BdB (3AGF|(3GAB (3ABc [F2d2] [Fd]||

ALEX SANDY SKINNER. Scottish, Reel. F Major. Standard. AABB. A double-tonic tune composed in 1934 by Aberdeen fiddler and composer J. Murdoch Henderson (1902-1972), called the greatest exponent of the Scottish fiddle in the 20th century. Alex Skinner was the brother of the famous James Scott Skinner (1843-1927), and a fellow dance musician. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 153, pg. 61. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935.

ALICE'S DOLLIE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 8.

ANGUS CAMPBELL [GLASGOW]. Scottish (originally), Canadian, American; Reel. USA; Missouri, Vermont, New York. Canada; Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard. AABB. "Angus Campbell" is the product of Scottish composer and fiddle virtuoso J. Scott Skinner (1842-1927), who coined it a "concert reel" (tempo 136). Skinner turned the same melodic motif into a strathspey called "The Laird o' Drumblair." The melody quickly found its way into traditional repertory on both sides of the Atlantic and can now even be heard played by American Mid-West fiddlers as well as Canadian and New England musicians. Illustrative of its dissemination is that the title appeared in a list of dance tunes played in the early/mid-20th century by Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner, while at approximately the same time Adirondack Mountains, N.Y., fiddler Vic Kibler believed he had learned the tune in Vermont. Sources for notated versions: Kelly Jones (Missouri) [Phillips]; Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 26, pg. 39. Bohrer (Vic Kibler), 1992; No. 21, pg. 21. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 23. Hinds/Hebert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 8. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 224. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes), No. or pg. 23. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. or pg. 22. Messer (Way Down East), 1948; No. 7 {Messer's version is altered from the original}. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 27, pg. 26. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 104. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 15. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 13. Also appears in Skinner's collection Harp and Claymore. American Heritage 516, Jana Greif- "I Love Fiddlin.'" Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson (Mo.) - "Fiddle Favorites." Condor 977-1489, "Graham and Eleanor Townsend Live at Barre, Vermont." Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family--Champion Fiddlers." Fretless 200 A, Yankee Ingenuity- "Kitchen Junket" (1977). Green Mountain 1026, Leo Beaudoin- "Old Time Fiddler's Contest 7/30/77." Green Mountain 1050, Sonja Nordstrom- "Old Time Fiddler's Contest 7/26/75." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association 002, Taylor McBaine - "Boone County Fiddler." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett (Stinnett epitomized the "North Missouri Hornpipe Style of fiddling). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Kelly Jones (b. 1947) - "Authentic Old-Time Fiddle Tunes." Philo 1040, Jay Ungar and Lyn Hardy- "Catskill Mountain Goose Chase" (1977. Learned from Putnam County, N.Y. fiddler Bud Snow). Tradition 2118, "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).

ANGUS MACRAE. Scottish, Pipe Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), the self-styled 'Strathspey King'. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 13.

ARBEADIE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 6.

ARCHIE/AIRCHE BROWN. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 20.

ARTHUR('S) SEAT [1]. Scottish, Hornpipe. B-Flat Major. Standard. AABB (Hardie): AA'BB (Brody). Composed by the famous Scots composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his Cairngorm Series (Pt. 6), titled after a prominent Edinburgh landmark, a high volcanic plug. In fact, the name is quite ancient having been first recorded by Giraldus Cambrensis in the 12th century as 'Cathedra Arturi' (the Greek word cathedra means throne), and stems from the time the area was Brittonic, prior to the invasions of the Anglo-Saxon tribes. Bill Hardie notes that the cross bowing he indicates in his printed version of the tune "is particularly suited to the chromatic writing in the second strain." Skinner recorded the tune in the early 1920's as part of "The Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. Source for notated version: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 26. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 39. Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (first tune of 'Bank'). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (first tune of 'Banks Medley'). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."

ATHOLE HIGHLANDER'S FAREWELL TO LOCH KATRINE, THE. AKA and see "The Heids o Vigon" (Shetland). Scottish, March. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABB (Brody): AABCCD (Hunter). Composed by William Rose. Version in notation by J. Scott Skinner, Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 32. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 27. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 346. Greentrax CDTRAX, Donald MacDonell (1888-1967) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993. Appeasr as "Atholl Highlander's March to Loch Katrine"). Rounder 7006, Theresa and Marie Maclellan- "A Trip to Mabou Ridge." Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King" (first tune of 'Bagpipe Marches' and third tune of 'Cradle Song' medleys).

AULD CHAPEL BRAE. Scottish, Air (4/4 time). G Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Bert Murray in memory of his grandfather, Alexander (Sandy) Murray of Banchory, Kincardine-shire. The air takes its name from the hill called Chapel Brae, where Murray's old cottar house was situated. Sandy was a fiddler who played at Lowlands social gatherings, often accompanied by his brother on the cornet and cousin on double bass. J. Murray Neil (1991) relates:
***
Sandy was an acquaintance of James Scott Skinner, who visited
him regularly. On those occasions, the children would sit
under the bed, which had been raised on blocks, while the
two men chatted and perhaps had a 'dram'. Scott Skinner
would often pass a small plug of tobacco through the spars
to the boys, which they would smoke in their clay pipes.
Sandy composed a number of fiddle tunes, which he wrote
out on strips of paper and left on the mantle-piece, and which
occasionally could not be found after such a visit.
***
Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 95, pg. 128.

AULD ROBIN GRAY [1]. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). G Major (Hunter): F Major (Neil). Standard. One part (Hunter): AB (Neil). The air which superseded the older air was composed by the Englishman Rev. W. Leeves (1748-1828), rector of Wrington in Somerset, to words composed by the Lady Anne Barnard (nee Lindsay, born 1750, the eldest daughter of the 5th Earl of Balcarres in Fife). The melody was set to a song by Lady Barnard, who wrote her lyrics to the favorite tune of one Suphy Johnson of Hilton. Suphy, incidently, became "one of the intelligent eccentrics of Edinburgh society--the girl who, as an experiment, was left to educate herself, who dressed in an oddly masculine manner, who practised blacksmithing as a hobby, and played the fiddle!" (Emmerson, 1971). Lady Barnard had the reputation of being comely, quick witted, and vivacious and has been referred to as 'the daughter of a hunderd earls' (Neil, 1991). She married at the rather advanced age of 43 to one Andrew Barnard, Bishop of Limerick, who died in 1807. Lady Anne apparently preferred her work to remain anonymous and shunned publicity, however, Neil (1991) tells the story that, on one occasion, she sang "Auld Robin Gray" for Lady Jane Scott (the writer of the modern "Annie Laurie"), who remarked "that she had sung it as if it were her own, and if Lady Barnard would give her a copy, she would keep the secret" (Neil, 1991). The following is one verse composed by Lady Anne (who either originally set the words to the Scottish tune "The Bridgroom Grat" or composed the original air herself):
***
I gang like a ghaist and I carena to spin,
I darena think o' Jamie, for that wad be a sin;
But I'll do my best a gude wife to be,
For auld Robin Gray is kind to me.
***
The real Robin Grey was a shepherd on her father's estate of whom the children were rather fond, but the tale related in the song seems to have been fashioned from fantasy. It tells of a young woman, forced by poverty to wed an elderly man, Auld Robin Grey, though she loves young Jamie. She is forced to endure a number of travails, such as Jamie going off to sea, her father breaking his arm, her mother sick, her marriage, but the final sorrow was supplied by Lady Anne's younger sister, Elizabeth, who suggested "steal the cow, sister Anne", and the verse was completed. The melody was a favorite piece de resistance of many Scottish fiddlers, including J.S. Skinner in the latter 1800's. Davie's Caledonian Repository. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 8. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 15, pg. 21.

AULD WHEEL, THE. AKA and see "Mill O' Hirn, Cathes." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Hunter notes it was one of the "birling" reels which so pleased Scott Skinner. The birl is an accent in Scottish music, much like a short drum roll. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 205. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 7. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 67.
T:Auld Wheel, The
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
A|d/d/d AG FG Ac|B/B/B ed cAAc|d/d/d AF GA Bd|cdec dDDA|d/d/d AG FG Ad|
B/B/B ed cAAc|d/d/d AF GA Bg|fedc dDD||g|fDFA dfaf|eEGB efge|fDFA dfaf|
Efga fddg|fDFA dfaf|eEGB efga|bagf edcB|AGFE DABc||

BACK TO THE HILLS. Scottish, Solo Piece (4/4 and 12/8 time). D Minor. Standard. ABC. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), and dedicated by him to Tom Fraser. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 111. Skinner, The Scottish Violinist; pg. 41.

BAKER, THE. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard. AABB. Written by Scottish fiddling and composing giant J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927) for George Gordon. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 78, pg. 34. Shanachie 14001, "The Early Recordings of Angus Chisholm" (Cape Breton fiddler who recorded it in the 1930's a medley with "The 10 Pound Fiddle").

BALLOCHMYLE BURN. Scottish. Written by J. Scott Skinner for a place he visited in Scotland.

BALMORAL CASTLE [1]. Scottish, March (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner after he visited the summer residence of Queen Victoria in Scotland, located between Braemar and Ballater on the river Dee in the Grampians. Hardie (1992) states that the Queen had commanded Skinner, who first gained considerable fame as a dancing master, to include the tenantry of the castle among his pupils. The word Balmoral is said to mean "the house of the laird," the root being the Gaelic baile, a homestead or, later, village (Matthews, 1972). The estate belonged to the earl of Huntly from the 15th century, and was acquired by Prince Albert and Queen Victoria in 1852 at a price of £31, 500. They demolished the old buildings and built a new castle in the neo-Gothic Scottish baronial style. It was not used much by Victoria after Alberts death, but it has since become a favorite abode of Prince Charles. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 124 (includes variations). Skinner, Harp and Claymore. Olympic 6151, The Scottish Fiddle Festival Orchestra - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

BALMORAL HIGHLANDERS. Scottish, March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. AABBCCDD. The melody, composed by Angus Mackay of Raasay, was included in one of J. Scott Skinner's concert sets (1921) called "Warblings From the Hill's." Mackay's father, John MacKay of Raasay, had been among the last of the pupils at the famous ancient piping college of the MacCrimmons at Boreraig. The younger Mackay wrote, while still in his early twenties, a book called A Collection of Ancient Piobaireachd, or Highland Pipe Music; a piper's bible for many decades after its appearance in 1838. The word Balmoral is said to mean "the house of the laird," the root being the Gaelic baile, a homestead or, later, village (Matthews, 1972). See note on "Balmoral Castle" for more on Balmoral. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 37.

BANKS HORNPIPE. AKA- "Banks of the River." AKA and see "Kinloch's Grand Hornpipe," "Mrs. Taff," "Souvenir of Venice." Scottish, Canadian, Irish; Hornpipe. Canada, Nova Scotia. E Flat Major (Scottish versions): G Major (Black). Standard. AAB (Black, Honeyman): AABB (Brody, Hardie, Hunter). "Composed by Parazotti" is an ascription often found attached to this tune, sometimes called a 'descriptive hornpipe'. The composer's origins were somewhat obscure. Alburger (1983) stated she could find no composer by that name and suggested it could possibly be a set of a piece which was danced to by Mme Pariot, who retired from the London stage to marry in 1809. Alastair Hardie (1992), however, reports that Parazotti did exist and was actually the grandson of an Italian violinist who settled in Glasgow. The tune was inspired by the sights and sounds of a river in spate. The melody appears first in print in 1881 in Kohlers' Violin Repository (Bk. 1) under the title "Mrs. Taff" (whom Hardie explains was a person who resided on the West coast of Scotland and was Parazotti's patron for a time. It is said she was the owner of the house in which Parazotti composed his tune). The piece is similar to the tune "Souvinir De Venice Hornpipe" in the 1883 Ryan's Mammoth Collection. " This tune is credited to L. Ostinelli, an Italian who arrived in Boston in the year 1818. Michael Broyles references this musician in his book Music of the Highest Class: Elitism and Populism in Antebellum Boston:
***
He was keenly aware of the reputation the violin had as a
vernacular instrument in New England. According to several
anecdotes, he was furious when his violin was referred to as a
fiddle or when he was requested to play dance music. Once
when asked by a lady if he was to play for a dance following
a concert, he deliberately cut his violin strings and said 'Veree
story, veree story, madam, you see I can no play.'
***
Ostinelli, of whom little is known, was mentioned in Dwight's Journal of Music in 1859. His lasting cliam to fame is his variation which is often used as a finale today by fiddler's playing "The Banks" (Cranford, 1997). The present title, "Banks," is actually the shortened form of the composer's alternate title "Banks of the River" (according to the late Shetland fiddler, collector, teacher and composer Tom Anderson). Scottish fiddler Charles Hardie (1849-1893) was praised by one of the greatest Scottish violinists of his time, J. Scott Skinner, for his rendition of this tune. "The Banks" is one of the tunes sometimes requested of Shetland fiddlers because it is popularly known that "anything composed in a flat key is considered to be a real test of a fiddler's ability" (Cooke, 1986). Skinner himself recorded the tune in the 1920's as part of his "Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. It is also popular in Nova Scotia. In Scotland it is traditionally preceded by the slow strathspey "The Dean Brig o' Edinburgh." Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 136, pg. 71. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 34. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 39, pg. 14. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 55. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 128. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 340. Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1903. Fiddler FRLP001 Tom Doucet (Nova Scotia/eastern Mass.) - "The Down East Star." Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968) {third tune of 'Bank'}. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Andy McGann and Paddy Reynolds - "My Love is in America: The Boston College Irish Fiddle Festival" (1991). Outlet 1031, Sean McGuire- "Ireland's Champion Traditional Fiddler." Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (third tune of 'Banks Medley'). Philo 2019, Tom Anderson and Aly Bain- "The Silver Bow". Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974). Shanachie 29009, "Andy McGann & Paul Brady" (McGann learned the tune from Lad O'Beirne). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
X:1
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
B:The Caledonian Companion, Alastair J. Hardie
N:as played by J. Scott Skinner
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G4 (3BGE D2 F4 (3AFD|A,2 c4 de =ABcB _AGFE|
G,2 B4 c2 A,2 c4 de|DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|:{a}g>^f|
g2[G,2E2][G,2E2] (3gbg f2[B,2D2][B,2D2] (3fgf|
e2 c4 fe dcB=A {A}B2{=e}f2|
(3DBf (3fBD (3DBf (3fBD (3EBg (3gBE (3EBg (3gBE|
=ABcd ecAc BABc B_AGF|[EG,]GBG eGFE DFBF dFED|
CEAE cBAG FGFE DCB,A,|
(3G,EB (3BEG, (3G,EB (3BEG, (3A,Ec (3cEA, (3A,Ec (3cEA,|
DEFG AFDF E2[B,2G2][G,2E2]:|
X:2
T:Banks
T:Banks of the River
T:Mrs. Taff
C:Parazotti
N:transposed from Eb
R:hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/16
K:G
(3DEF|G2 B4 (3dBG F2 A4 (3cAF|E2 e4 fg ^cded =cBAG|
B,2 d4 e2 C2 e4 fg|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|:b>^a|
b2 G2 G2 (3bc'b a2 F2 F2 (3aba|g2 e4 ag fed^c d4|
dfaf dfaf dgbg dgbg|^cdef gece dcde d=cBA|
Bded bgdB Adfd afdA|EGcG edcB (3ABA (3GFE D2C2|
B,DGD B,DGD CEGE CEGE|FGAB cAFA G2 B2 G2:|
X:3
T: The Banks
S: McGann / Conway
Q: 300
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
(3DEF|G2 B2 B2 (3dBG|F2 A2 A2 (3cAF | C2 e2 e2 fg | ^cded =cBAG |
B,2 d2 d2 ef | C2 e2 e2 fg | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
ba | b2 g2 g2 (3bab | a2 f2 f2 (3aba | g2 e2 e2 ag | fed^c d2 D2 |
Fdad Fdad | Gdgd Gdgd | ^cdef gece | d^cde d=cBA |
GBdB gdAG | FAdA fAGF | EGBG edcB | ABAG FEDC |
B,GdG B,GdG | CGeG CGeG | FGAB cAFA | G2 B2 G2 :|
W:
P: original key Eb
K: Eb
(3B,CD|E2 G2 G2 (3BGE|D2 F2 F2 (3AFD|A,2 c2 c2 de| =ABcB _AGFE |
G,2 B2 B2 cd | A,2 c2 c2 de | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|
gf| g2 e2 e2 (3gfg | f2 d2 d2 (3fgf | e2 c2 c2 fe | dcB=A B2 B,2 |
DBfB DBfB | EBeB EBeB | =ABcd ecAc | B=ABc B_AGF |
EGBG eBFE | DFBF dFED | CEGE cBAG | FGFE DCB,A, |
G,EBE G,EBE | A,EcE A,EcE | DEFG AFDF | E2 G2 E2 :|

BEAUTIES OF THE BALLROOM. AKA and see "The Lads of Leith." Canadian, Jig. Canada, Cape Breton. A Minor (Cranford/Holland): A Mixolydian/Dorian (Dunlay & Greenberg). Standard. AA'BB'CC'. Originally a Scottish tune called "The Lads of Leith" set in G Minor in James Oswald's c. 1747 The Caledonian Pocket Companion, remarks editor Paul Stewart Cranford (1995), who says the A Minor setting was introduced to Cape Breton repertoire by Little Jack MacDonald. Dunlay and Greenberg (1996) find that in modern times the jig appeared in J. Scott Skinner's Beauties of the Ballroom as the third figure of "Ettrick Vale Quadrille" with no name; on Cape Breton it took its name from Skinner's volume. The more demanding parts of Skinner's setting were omitted by Cape Breton fiddlers, but his fourth part became the third part of the island settings, played an octave lower than Skinner's. Source for notated version: Buddy MacMaster (Cape Breton) [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 209, pg. 60. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music from Cape Breton), 1996; pg. 108. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall." Boot Records BOS 7231, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). Marquis ERA-181, David Greenberg - "Bach Meets Cape Breton"(1996. Appears as "The Lads of Leith").

BERRYDEN COTTAGE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. One part. Composed by P. Milne (1824-1908), a self-taught fiddler born in Kincardine O'Neil. Milne earned his living playing in theatres about Scotland and was one on J. Scott Skinner's teachers, but later became an opium addict and was reduced to playing on the ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth (in the company of blind musician Willie Grant). Hunter (1988) says: "He was a talented composer and a natural fiddler who, in his own words 'was that fond o' my fiddle, I could sit inside it and look oot.'" Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 23.


BETTY WASHINGTON. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Betty Washington was a music hall artist, states James Hunter (1988). Composed by the great Scots composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), but only first published in 1979 by Hunter. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 89.

BIG JOHN McNEIL(L)/McNEAL. AKA and see "John McNeil/MacNeil." Canadian, American, Scottish; Reel. Canada, widely known. USA; New England, Missouri. A Major. Standard (or infrequently AEAE). AABB (Gibbons, Messer, Sweet): AABB' (Miller & Perron): AA'BB' (Begin, Perlman, Phillips). Though now known as a Canadian standard it originally was a reel composed (as "John McNeil") by the brilliant Scottish fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and early playing partners, who earned his living playing in theaters until his opium addiction (he abused laudanum, originally prescribed for rheumatism) reduced him to busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in unpleasant circumstances in a mental institution. John McNeil was apparently a famous Highland dancer at the turn of the century. The melody was in the repertoire of Cyrill Stinnett, a fiddler who epitomised the 'North Missouri Hornpipe Style' of playing, who apparently learned it and other tunes from listening to Canadian fiddlers broadcasting on the radio from Canada. A similar melody is "Lord Ramsey's Reel." Perlman (1996) notes the tune is a popular tune on Prince Edward Island, and a favorite vehicle for stepdancing in Prince County, PEI, on the eastern part of the island. Sources for notated versions: Mex Sexsmith (British Columbia), who learned this "classic" reel in the 1940's from radio broadcasts and records by Don Messer and His Islanders (who recorded it in 1942) [Gibbons]; Jay Unger (West Hurley, New York) via Bud Snow (Putnam County, New York) who also learned it from Canadian fiddler Don Messer [Fiddle Fever]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ontario) [Begin]. Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 5, pg. 19. Gibbons (As It Comes: Folk Fiddling From Prince George, British Columbia), 1982; No. 11, pgs. 28-29. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 12, pg. 79. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 133. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 23. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 77. Condor 977-1489, "Graham & Eleanor Townsend Live at Barre, Vermont." Flying Fish FF 247, "Fiddle Fever" (1981). Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family: Champion Fiddlers." MCA Records MCAD 4037, "The Very Best of Don Messer" (1994). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion" (taught to Hartford in his early years by Missouri fiddler Gene Goforth).
T:Big John McNeil
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CE|A,2CE FE CE|FA GF ED CB,|
A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CB,|A,C B,D CE DF|EF Bd cA A2:|
|:eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 (3agf|eA fA eA ce| de dc B2 cd|
eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 fg|ag fe fe dc|1 de fg a2 cd:|2 BA GF ED CB,|]

BLAIRNANES RANT. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 65.
T:Blairnanes Rant
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
F|F<(A A>)B A>Bd>f|e>fe>d (B B<)d|F<(A A>)B A>Bd>b|a<f e>f d2d:|
D|D<d d>B B>AA>D|D<d d>B (B<A) (A>D)|D<d d>B B>AA>F|G>A F>G (E2 E>)D|
D<d d>B B>AA>D|D<d d>B B<A A>c|(3dcd (3efg (3fed (cBA|(3cBA (3GFE (D2D||

BLIN' JAMIE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 2.

BLINK BONNIE. Scottish, Reel. D Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 135, pg. 55.

BLOOMS OF BON ACCORD, THE. AKA - "Cockers Roses." Scottish, Slow Air. A Major ('A' part) & E Major ('B' part). Standard. ABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. 'Bon Accord' was another name for the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. Skinner ("The Scottish Violinist"); pg. 32.

BONNIE ANNIE ANDERSON. Scottish, Strathspey or Schottische. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Scottish fiddling giant J. Scott Skinner, first appearing in print near the end of his life in his "Cairngorum Series," No. 1 (1922). Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 19. A & M Records 79602 2000-2, Ashley MacIsaac - "Close to the Floor" (1992).

BONNIE GLENFARG. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 22.

BONNIE LASS OF BON ACCORD. Scottish, Air or March (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AAB. Of the 600 tunes composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), this is one of his best and most famous, composed in 1884 and still popular today. 'Bon Accord' is an affectionate name for the city of Aberdeen, Scotland, and is ensconsed over the arms of the city -- it means "happy to meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again." Its origins are thought to date to 1308, when it was a watchword or 'cri de guerre' of the burghers of ther town who at that time overcame the English garrisoning the town. "'It's inspirer,' wrote Skinner, 'was a young girl named Wilhelmina Bell (who later became Mrs. Peters, and whom Skinner had met at a house party in Union Terrace, Aberdeen, in December 1884)...[whose] father used to play bass fiddle for my father.' She was a splendid dancer, but was having to work as a servant, for her father had been ruined by taking on a friend's debts. 'Never mind, my lassie,' said I, cheerfully...'I'll ma' a tune that'll maybe keep ye in min' when we're baith deid'" (Alburger, 1983). This is perhaps close to the literal truth, for the opening bars of the tune were inscribed on Skinner's gravestone in Aberdeen's Allenvale cemetary (Hardie, 1992). Skinner wrote the tune the next morning after meeting Mina, and later that day, having completed the melody, he showed to an Aberdeen photographer named Alexander Dinnie. Dinnie was impressed by the tune and suggested that Skinner "make it something about Bon-Accord. Just at that point Mina passed on an errand. Scott Skinner whispered to Dinnie that she was the bonnie lass that the tune was about. 'I've got it,' exclaimed Dinnie, 'Ca' it the bonnie lass o' Bon-Accord' and he did" (Neil, 1991). It was first published in Skinner's Logie Collection. Purser (1992) remarks that the tune follows the same formal pattern as Niel Gow's "Lament for the Death of His Second Wife," repeating its second strain three times in slightly different versions. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 107, pg. 184. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 53. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 82 (includes variations). Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 21 (includes variations). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 152 (includes one set of variations). Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 87, pg. 117. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 1 (includes variations). Green Linnet 1015, Eugene O'Donnell- "Slow Airs and Set Dances." Philo 1051, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977). Rounder 7001, Joseph Cormier- "Scottish Violin Music of Cape Breton" (1974). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
T:Bonnie Lass o' Bon Accord
L:1/8
M:C
Q:80
S:MacDonald - The Skye Collection
K:A
E|A>B {aB}c>B AA,CE|A{BAG}A/f/ e/c/{c}B/A/ {A}B2 Bc|
A>B {A/B/}c>B AcE=G|(F/D/F/A/) (G/E/G/B/) A2 A:|
{efg}a>cd>f eA a(g/f/)|eA (f/e/)(d/c/) {c}B2 B(3e/f/g/|a>c (df) (e/A/c/A/) (a=G)|
(F/D/F/A/) (G/E/G/B/) A2 A (3e/f/g/|a>c df eA a(g/f/)|eA (f/e/)(d/c/) {c}B2 B>c|
(A,/C/E/A/) c>B AC E>=G|(F/D/F/A/) (G/E/G/B/) A2 A||
E|{B/}(A/G/A/B/) {AB}(c/B/A/G/) (A/A,/B,/C/ E/F/G/G/)|
(A/G/)(A/f/) (e/c/){c}(B/A/) {A}B2 B>c|
(A/G/A/B/) (c/B/A/G/) (A/A,/B,/C/ D/E/F/=G/)|(F/D/F/A/) (G/E/G/B/) A2 A:|
|{efg}a/g/f/e/ d/c/B/A/ e/A/c/A/ a/(G/A/)B/|c/A/e/A/ a/e/d/c/ {c}B2 B (3e/f/g/|
a/g/f/e/ d/c/B/A/ e/A/c/A/ a/(G/A/=G/)|(F/D/F/A/) G/E/G/B/ A2 A (3e/f/g/|
a/g/f/e/ d/c/B/A/ c/A/e/A/ ag/f/|e/(G/A/a/) f/e/d/c/ B2 B>c|A,/C/E/A/ c>G AC E>=G|
(F/D/F/A/ G/f/e/G/) {G}A2A||

BOVAGLIE'S PLAID. AKA "Roualeyn's Plaid." Scottish, "Pastoral" or Slow Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AAB. From the Logie Collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner. The 'Roualeyn' of the alternate title (Skinner's original title for the tune) refers to Roualeyn Gordon Cumming, a famous local eccentric character of Fort Augustus in the 19th century. Neil (1991) tells several charming anecdotes of this man who was a big game hunter in Africa for a time, and who dressed in full Highland kit when he came to town, though donned only in shirt and stockings in the country on hot days. A congenial and well mannered man, he was sometimes to be found in the woods of Glenmoriston where he sought hazel to make walking sticks, when he was not puttering about his showroom where he housed his trophies. He was a great friend of the huge village blacksmith, Donald Cumming, who himself was blessed with "a high intellect and warm personality. They both died within a short period of one another and Fort Augustus lost two of its outstanding characters" (Neil, 1991). The title 'Bovaglie's Plaid' is from a description of Queen Victoria's of a location on the farm or place of Bovaglie, thought to be near Crathie in Deeside, in which a belt of trees seemed to her to stand in the shape of a plaid. The melody was one of the tunes recorded as played by the composer on tour in 1921, late in his life, in a set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh points out the the first few bars of "Bovaglie's" overlap with "The Lowlands of Holland." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 24. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 85, pg. 115. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 36. Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Éireann CL 13, "Tommy Peoples." Rounder 7020, Alex Francis MacKay - " A Lifelong Home - An Dachaidh Dha Mo Shaoghal." SG155, Alasdair Fraser - "The Road North." Natalie MacMaster - "Road to the Isles."
T:Bovaglie's Plaid
M:C
L:1/8
C:J Scott Skinner
Q:100
Z:transcribed by John Erdman
K:A
A|"D"(FE/C/) "A"E>F A>B c>A|"D"dc/B/ "A"{B}(ec) "Bm"{c}BA (F/A)
z/|"A"(FE/C/) (E>F) A>B"D"c>d|
"A"ec/A/ "E7"G/d/z/G/ "A"{G}A2 A::e|"A"ag/a/ (3 ecA "D"(3 fdA "A"(3
ecA|(3(CEA) (3(cea) "E"{cd}c>B(B>e)|
"A"ag/a/ (3ecA "D"(3(FAd) "A"(3 (EAc)|"Bm"(3(DFB) "E7"(E/d/)z/G/ "A"{G}(A2
A) e|"A"{g}a(4b/a/g/f/ (3ecA "D"(3fdA "A"(3ecA|
"A"ae/d/ cB/A/ "E"B>BB A/G/|"D"(FG/A/) "A"(EG/A/) "Bm"(DG/A/) "A"{CD}(3
CB,A,|(3(ECA,) "E7"G,/D/z/G,/ "A"(A,2 A,):|

BOGNIEBRAE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. From the Logie Collection, credited to J. Scott Skinner (at least the arrangement). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 8.

BRAES O' AUCHTERTYRE, THE [2]. Scottish, "Pastoral Air" (Skinner) or Slow Strathspey (Honeyman). A Major. Standard. One Part (Hunter, Skinner): AB (Honeyman). J. Scott Skinner, who fashioned a popular arrangement of the tune for his Harp and Claymore collection, said it was an "admired old air by Crocket." Honeyman (1898) agrees that "this grand melody was composed or adapted about the year 1723 by James Crocket (see note for version #1), but was first transposed from the key of C to that of A, and played as a slow strathspey by James Scott Skinner." Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton), "inspired by J. Scott Skinner's setting and by his friend Angus Chisholm" [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 64, pg. 30. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 36. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 26. Skinner, Harp and Claymore. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 37.
T:Braes o' Auchtertyre, The [2]
L:1/8
M:C
R:Slow Strathspey
S:Honeyman - Tutor
K:A
A,2 A,D C<E E>F|A>Bc>B A>F E<A|F<F F>E F2 Ff|eAdc B2 Az|
A,2 A,D C<E E>F|A>Bc>B c/B/A/G/ AE|F>AE>A D>AC>A c/B/A/G/ AC B,2 A,z/||
d/|c>de>f ecAe|f/e/d/c/ Bd c>BAE|Fffe (f2 f)g/a/|eAdc B2 A z/d/|c>de>f ecAe|
f/e/d/c/ Bd c>B AE|F>AE>A D>AC>A|c/B/A/G/ AC B,2 A,z||

BRIDE'S REEL, THE [1]. AKA and see "Mrs. Scott Skinner." Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Hunter, Skinner/Harp & Claymore): AABB (Cranford/Fitzgerald). Composed by the Scottish composer and violinist J. Scott Skinner (1842-1927) on the occasion of his wedding. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 125, pg. 51 (includes variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 206. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 7. Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1881 (includes variations). Skinner, The Scottish Music Maker (includes variations). Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). Altan - "Runaway Sunday" (from Donegal fiddler John Doherty who played it in a medley he called "Flood on the Holm" which included the tunes "Spinning Wheel" and "The Auld Wheel").

BRIG O' FEUGH, THE. Scottish (originally), Cape Breton. Composed by J. Scott Skinner for a place in Scotland he visited. Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier - "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

BRIG O' POTARCH, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor. Standard. AAB. From J. Scott Skinner's Logie Collection, composed by him for a place in Scotland he had visited. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 71. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 23.

BUCK O' THE CABRACH, THE [2]. Scottish, Jig Strathspey (12/8 time). A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 28.

BUNGALO, THE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. One part. One of the tunes composed and inlcuded by J. Scott Skinner in his 1921 concert tour set romantically named "Spey's Fury's." The 'bungalo' refers to the cottage in Forgue which Skinner's friend, the 'Laird o' Drumblair', gave to the musician rent-free for several years. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 228. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall."

CARNIE'S CANTER. Scottish, Reel. F Major. Standard. One part (Hunter): AB (Skye): AABB (Perlman). Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1842-1927). Source for notated version: Kenny Chaisson (b. c. 1947, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Rollo Bay) [Perlman]. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 260. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 142. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 117. Skinner (Miller O'Hirn).
T:Carnie's Canter
R:Reel
C:J. Scott Skinner
S:Charlie Menzies
O:Scotland
M:4/4
K:F
B|\ A>c c/c/c dc =Bc|Ac =Bc fc _BA|\B>d d/d/d ed ^cd|Bd ^cd ed =cB|\A>c c/c/c dc =Bc|Ac =Bc fc _BA|\{Bc}BA Bd g^f ga|ba gf ed cB||\A>f f/f/f cf Af|af ef cf Af|\B>g g/g/g dg Bg|ba gf ed cB|\a>f f/f/f cf Af|af ef cf Af|\bg af ge fd|cB AG F3||

CASTLE SPYNIE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 56.
T:Castle Spynie
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
B|A>FG>E F<A d>e|f>ed>f e<E E>B|A>FG>E F<A (d>e)|f>de>c d2d:|
f/g/|a>f g>e f<a dc/d/|e>cd>B c<e Af/g/|a>fg>e f<d B>g|f>de>c (d2 d)f/g/|
a?fg?e f>a dc/d/|e>cd>B c<e Af/g/|(3agf (3edc (3B^c^d (3efg|(3fed (3edc d2d||

CADAM WOODS [1]. Scottish, Reel. Composed by Scottish violinist J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Philo 10--, Boys of the Lough - "Good Friends, Good Music" (1977). Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).

CAMERON HIGHLANDERS, THE. Scottish, March. A Major. Standard. AABB (Brody): AABBCCD (Hunter). A well-known march composed by J. Scott Skinner, first printed in his Logie Collection. Skinner titled the piece after the famous Highland regiment in which his brother Sandy served for eleven years in the middle of the Victorian era. Sandy survived this experience and became a dancing master patroned by Sir Charles Forbes of New Strathdon. Noted as having been played by him in 1921 concert turs as one of the tunes in the romantically named set "Spey's Fury's" (Alburger). Source for notated version: Boys of the Lough (Scotland/Ireland) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 61. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 347. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 30. Philo 1026, The Boys of the Lough- "First Album;" Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
T:Cameron Highlanders, The
R:Pipe march
C:J. Scott Skinner
M:4/4
K:Hp
|:A2ecA2eA| f2e2e2a2| A2ecA2eA| c2B2B2c2|A2ecA2eA| f2e2e2a2| fa ea ca Ba| c2A2A2 :|*|:a2 | f2 ea c2 Aa| c2A2A2a2 |f2 ea c2 Aa|c2B2B2A2|f2 ea c2 Aa| ec ac e2a2| fa ea ca Ba| c2A2A2:|*|:ec| A<A ec Ae cA|f2e2e2a2| A<A ec Ae cA| c2B2B2 ec|A<A ec Ae cA |f2e2e2a2| fa ea ca Ba| c2A2A2:|*a2| fa ea ca Ba| c2A2A2a2|fa ea ca Aa| c2B2B2a2|fa ea ca Aa|ec ac ef ga| fa ea ca Ba| c2A2A2a2|\ fa ea ca Ba|Aa Ba ca Aa |fa ea ca Aa| c2B2B2ec|\A<A cA eA cA| eA fA gA aA|fa ea ca Ba|c2A2A2||**

CANE HORNPIPE. Scottish, Hornpipe. The tune was listed in the program of J. Scott Skinner's dance school ball in Forres, 1880; he also instructed "advanced lady pupils" in the dance at Elgin. Skinner, noted later in his life as a fiddle virtuoso, earned his livlihood as much as a dance instructor as a musician in his youth.

CANTY JEANIE MUNROE. Scottish, Strathspey. B Flat Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927), who originally set it in the key of B Major (but who gave the direction that it could also be played in B Flat). Canty means jolly or happy in Scottish dialect. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 108, pg. 45. Skinner (Miller o' Hirn Collection), 1881.

CAPE WRATH. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 131, pg. 54.

CHARLES SUTHERLAND. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Murdoch Henderson. Sutherland was a Fraserburgh violinist and "disciple" of J. Scott Skinner, according to Alastair Hardie (1992), who owned the famous and fine "Goddard" Stradivarius violin. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 39. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).
T:Charles Sutherland
C:J Murdoch Henderson
D:Hardie/Marwick
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:E
B|E2- eg fdec|B2 BG cBGB|c2 Ac B2 ge|fgfe dBcd|
E2- eg fdec|B2 BG cBGB|c2 Ac Bgbg|afdf e2:|]
a|g2 eg bge=d|c2 ac B2 gB|A2 fA G2 ge|fgfe dBBa|
g2 eg bge=d|ceac Bege|c2 Ac Bgbg|afdf e2:|]

CHARLIE HARDIE. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard. AB. composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) for violinist Charles Hardie (1849-1893), 'the Methlick Wonder', a member of the famous Scottish family fiddling dynasty. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 146, pg. 59. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 82. Skinner, Miller o' Hirn.

CLAN MUNROE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 65, pg. 30.

CLUNY CASTLE (INVERNESS-SHIRE). Scottish, Slow Strathspey or Pastoral Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by Alexander Troup (b. 1835) of Dalbadgie near Ballater. The melody first appears in J. Scott Skinner's Harp and Claymore collection, published in 1904. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 14 (includes variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 16.

CORGARFF CASTLE [1]. Scottish, Slow or "Pastoral Air" (4/4 time). G Minor. Standard. AB (Skinner): AAB plus variations by Skinner CCD (Cranford). Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). According to Paul Cranford (1997), the tune was a favorite of the late Cape Breton fiddler Dan Hughie MacEachern. "Amongst the last generation of Cape Breton fiddlers Dan Hughie was not only one the the finest composers, he also had one of the largest repertoires of traditional tunes." Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 228, pg. 91. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations); pg. 39.

CORTES GARDENS. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by the self-styled 'Strathspey King', J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), from his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 14.

COUNTESS OF CRAWFORD, THE. AKA and see "Dunecht House." Scottish, Slow Strathspey or Air. A Major. Standard. AB. One of the most famous compositions of Peter Milne (1824-1908), a Scottish fiddler, one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and, later, fiddling partner. Milne managed to make a living playing theater venues all over Scotland, but became addicted to opium in the drug laudenaum, which he originally took as a pain-killer. Milne ended his life in reduced circumstances, busking on the ferry which crossed the Firth of Forth until the Forth Bridge was built in 1908. He died in an insane asylum. Source for notated version: Arthur S. Robertson (Shetland) [Hunter]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 88, pg. 38. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 121. Olympic 6151, Arthur Robertson - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

D. MORRISON'S SEVEN THISTLES. Scottish, March. Composed by the great Scottish violinist/fiddler J. Scott Skinner. Olympic 6151, The Scottish Fiddle Festival Orchestra - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

DASHING WHITE SERGEANT, THE. AKA and see "Highland Reel." English, Scottish, Irish, American; Country Dance Tune, Reel or Hornpipe. F Major (Ashman, Athole, Hunter): G Major (Roche, Ford): D Major (Kennedy, Kerr, Sweet). Standard. AB (Ford): AAB (Kennedy): AAB (Ashman): AA'B (Athole, Hunter, Kerr, Sweet): AABB (Roche). The Dashing White Sergeant is the name of a specific social dance in Scotland, though J. Scott Skinner (who in his younger days before earning fame as a violinist and composer was a country dancing master) taught a progressive longways country dance by that name, one of the few in his mostly North-East (Scottish) repertoire. Source for notated verison: a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Ford [Ashman]. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 112, pg. 47. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 75. Hunter (Fiddler Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 320. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No. or pg. 25. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 59, pg. 29. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 29, pg. 30. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 2, pg. 16, No. 227. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 150. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 57. Island Records (Antilles) AN-7003, Kirkpatrick & Hutchings - "The Compleat Dancing Master" (1974). Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).
T:Dashing White Sergeant
L:1/8
M:2/4
R:Country Dances
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
A/G/|:FF/G/ F/G/A/B/|c/B/c/d/ ca/g/|~fdcA|dG G/B/A/G/|FF/G/ F/G/A/B/|
c/B/c/d/ ca|gfed|1 cc/d/ c/B/A/G/:|2 c2z||C|cc/d/ c/d/e/f/|g/a/g/e/ c>e|
dd/e/ d/e/f/g/|a/b/a/f/ dd/d/|ec/c/ fc/c/|gc/c/ ag/a/|bagf|ed c/B/A/G/|
F>f f/e/f/g/|fcc>f|dg g/f/g/a/|gdd>~f|c>f f/e/f/g/|az c'>e|fe/d/ c/B/A/G/||

DAVID ADAMS. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 9.

DAVIE TAYLOR. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scots fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1842-1927). Source for notated version: Johnny Morrissey (1913-1994, Newtown Cross, Queen's County, Prince Edward Island; late of Vernon River) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 189. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 14.

DAVIE WORK. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. The tune is similar to Donegal fiddler John Doherty's "Nine Pint Coggie." Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 9.
T:Davie Work
M:2/4
L:1/16
C:J Scott Skinner
R:Reel
Z:Transcribed by Ted Hastings
N:from The Scottish Violinist
K:A
E|{G}[A2A2]cA (GA).B.c|dEBA GBeg|{g}a2(ga) .f.e.d.c|dBed [Ec]A[EA]:|!
g|aAag fedc|bBba gefg|aAag fedc|dfeg aA[FA]g|!
aAag fedc|bBba gfed|cAdB ecfd|eagb {g}aAHA||

DELNABO. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor (Skinner): E Dorian (Perlman). Standard. AAB (Skinner): AABB (Perlman). Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Kenny Chaisson (b. c. 1947, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Rollo Bay) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 198. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 49. Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier - "The Dances Down Home" (1977).

DEVIL/DIVEL/DE'IL AMONG THE TAYLORS/TAILORS [1]. AKA and see "Devil's Dream" (New). Scottish, English, Irish, Canadian, Scotland, American; Reel. Canada, Prince Edward Island. England, Northumberland. A Major (Bain, Cole, Emmerson, Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Johnson, Kennedy, Kerr, MacDonald, Skinner, Stwart-Robertson & Raven): D Major (Huntington). Standard. AB (Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Johnson, Kerr, Skinner): ABB' (MacDonald, Emmerson): AABB (Bain, Cole, Huntington, Kennedy, Raven): ABCB (Skye). A popular tune throughout the present and former English commonweatlh. It was performed on the concert stage as part of a set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's" by J. Scott Skinner in 1921. "De'il Among the Tailors" is the name of a skittles game, according to Nigel Gatherer. Title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes, which he published c. 1800./ Johnson (1983), whose version is from Macgoun's Five fashionable Reels (c. 1800), states the tune was written c. 1790./ Bayard collected a version resembling the "Devil's Dream" forms of the tune from a source raised on Prince Edward Island, Canada (Bayard, 1981; Appendix No. 2B, pg. 572). See also "Devil's Dream" for another PEI collected version. In America the tune is almost invariably known by the Dream title, while in the British Isles it appears under the De'il/Devil title. Emmerson (1971) suggests the melody can be identified as belonging to a class of melodies with phrases based on a quarter note followed by two eighth notes; tunes in this class also include "Largo's Fairy Dance," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley."
***
The English novelist Thomas Hardy mentions the tune in Absent Mindedness in a Parish Choir, a passage which bears repeating:
***
"...Twas a very dark afternoon, and by the end of the sermon all you
could see of the inside of the church were the pa'son's two candles
alongside of him in the pulpit, and his spaking face behind 'em. The
sermon being ended at last, the pa'son gi'ed out the Evening Hymn.
But no quire set about sounding up the tune, and the people began
to turn their heads to learn the reason why, and then Levi Limpet, a
boy who sat in the gallery, nudged Timothy and Nicholas, and said,
"Begin! Begin!" "Hey? what?" says Nicholas, starting up; and the
church being so dark and his head so muddled he thought he was at
the party they had played at all the night before, and away he went,
bow and fiddle, at "The Devil among the Tailors," the favourite jig
of the neighborhood at that time. The rest of the band, being in the
same state of mind and nothing doubting, followed their leader with
all their strength, according to custom. They poured out that there
tune till the lower bass notes of "The Devil among the Tailors" made
the cobwebs in the roof shiver like ghosts; then Nicholas, seeing
nobody moved, shouted out as he scraped (in his usual commanding
way at dances when the folks didn't know the figures), "Top couples
cross hands! And when I make the fiddle squeak at the end every man
kiss his pardner under the mistletoe!"
***
"...Then the unfortunate church band came to their senses, and
remembered where they were; and 'twas a sight to see Nicholas
Puddingcome and Timothy Thomas and John Biles creep down
the gallery stairs with their fiddles under arms, and poor Dan'l
Hornhead with his serpent, and Robert Dowdle with his claionet,
all looking as little as ninepins; and out they went. The pa'son
might have forgi'ed 'em when he learned the truth o't, but the
squire would not. That very week he sent for a barrel-organ
that would play two-and-twenty new psalm-tunes, so exact
and particular that, however sinful inclined you was, you could
play nothing but psalm-tunes whatsomever. He had a really
respectable man to turn the winch, as I said, and the old players
played no more..."
***
Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 8. Carlin (English Concertina), 1977; pg. 36. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 18. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 49, pg. 140. Gow (Beauties), 1819. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 36. Honeyman (Stathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 7. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 229. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 14. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 75, pg. 225. Kennedy (Fiddler's Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 18, pg. 9. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 6, No. 2, pg. 6. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 4. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 170. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 29. Skinner - Harp and Claymore. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 11. Antilles (Island) AN-7003, Kirkpatrick and Hutchings - "The Compleat Dancing Master" (1973). Beltona BL2128 (78 RPM), The Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Ideal Music" (1977).
T:De'il Among the Tailors
M:C
L:1/8
Z:Andrew Kuntz
K:A
|: e2 | a2eg a2eg | a2eg fedc| dfBf dfBf | dfba gefg | a2eg a2eg | a2ea
fedc | defe dcBA| E2G2 2A2 :|
|: ed| ceAe ceAe | ceAa fedc| dfBf dfBf | dfBb gfed | ceAe ceAe | ceAa f
edc | defe dcBA| E2G2 A2 :|

DEVIL AND THE DIRK, THE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner and first published in his Harp and Claymore collection. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 110. Skinner (Harp and Claymore, arranged by Gavin Greig) Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 3.

DEVIL IN THE KITCHEN, THE [1]. AKA and see "Calum Crubach," "Devil Shake the Half-Breed," "Gurren's Castle," "Miss Sarah Drummond of Perth," "Miss Drummond of Perth," "Mountain Reel" [4], "Our Highland Cousins," "The Prince of Wales Jig," "The Titanic Highland," "Yorkshire Bite" [2]. Scottish, Shetland, Canadian, Irish; (Pipe) Reel, Fling or Strathspey. Ireland, County Donegal. Canada; Prince Edward Island, Cape Breton. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Hunter): AABB (Martin): AABBA'A'BB (Perlman): AABCCD (Skinner). Composed (according to Skinner) as a pipe tune by William Ross, the Queen's Piper, the melody was arranged (and popularized) by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) and appears as a two part tune in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner later expanded the melody to four parts (variations) in his Scottish Violinist. In pipe collections the tune set as a strathspey is attributed to one John MacPherson and once to a Donald McPhedran (in his own collection). "Devil in the Kitchen" is popular reel in County Donegal. In Scotland it is often used to accompany the Highland Fling. Source for notated version: Gus Longphie (b. 1914, Little Harbor, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Souris) [Perlman]. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 120. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 50 (strathspey setting). Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 192 (strathspey). Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1903/4. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 11. Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Culburnie COL 113D, Aladair Fraser & Tony McManus - "Return to Kintail" (1999). Rodeo Banff RBS 1066, Dan Joe MacInnis - "The Cape Breton Fiddle of..." (1962). Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974. Strathspey setting). Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996).

DRUMIN [1]. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 6.

DOCTOR BAIRD. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 28.

DOCTOR GORDON STABLES' REEL. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 7.

DOCTOR MACDONALD'S COMPLIMENTS TO MR. JAMES SCOTT SKINNER. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by editor Keith Norman Macdonald in honor of the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 94.
T:Dr. MacDonald's Compliments to Mr. James Scott Skinner
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
B,|G,2 B,<D E<D B,<D|E<G A<B G2 E/E/E|1 G,2 B,<D E<D B,<D|dB AB G<GG:|2
(E<G) (D<G) (B,<G) (E<G)|B,<A, G,<A, B,2 G,/G,/G,||
|:(B<d) de g>de>d|g>de>d A<A A>c|1 (B<d) de g>de>d|BdAB G/G/G G2:|2
B<d A<B G<B E<G|D<G B,<G G,/G,/G, G,||

DONALD McPHERSON'S LAMENT. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), the self-proclaimed "Strathspey King." Martin (Ceol na Fidle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 9 (includes a harmony part).

DONALD STEWART THE PIPER. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. ABB'. Composed by Scottish virtuoso performer and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), though only first published in J. Murdoch Henderson's Scottish Music Maker (1957), some thirty years after Skinner's death. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 19. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier - "The Dances Down Home" (1977).
T:Donald Stewart the Piper
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:D
(3DDD FA d3 A |\ dcBA GFED|(3CCC A,C ECA,C|edcB AGFE|(3DDD FA d3 A|
defa gfed|BcdB Aagf|1 edcB AG FE:|2 edcB AG Ac||
|:(3ddd fd Adfa|^gaba =gfed|(3ccc Ac EDCB,|Acea ^ga=ge|(3ddd fd Adfa|
^gaba =gfed|BcdB AdcB|AGFE DAFE:|

DOVE COT, THE. Scottish, Marching Air. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 30.

DUCHESS TREE, THE. Scottish, "Pastoral Air." A Major. Standard. AB. The tune was printed in A Flat Major in Skinner's Logie Collection. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist); pg. 36.

DUCHESS TREE, THE. Scottish, "Pastoral" Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner as a song to words by William Martin, and first published in his Logie Collection (1888). Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 79. Skinner, The Scottish Violinist; pg. 86.

DUMBARTON CASTLE [1]. Scottish, "Pastoral Air" or March. A Major. Standard. AAB. From Skinner's Harp and Claymore collection, credited to J. Scott Skinner. A tune by this name earlier appeared in Joshua Campbell's 1778 collection. It was the Celtic population of Scotland that gave the name Dun Breattan (now Dumbarton), 'the fort of the Brittons', to the stronghold of that people on the Clyde for four centuries (Matthews, 1972). It was the capitol of Ceretic in the 5th century and the kings of Strathclyde until 1058. The fortress proved impregnable for three centuries until it was finally taken by the Pictish king Angus and Eadbert of Northumbria in 756; it was later stormed by the Vikings in 871 at taken after Artgal was betrayed. Skinner (The Scottish Harpist), pg. 38. Olympic 6151, The Scottish Fiddle Festival Orchestra - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

DUNCAN ON THE PLAINSTONES (Elgin). Scottish, Reel. D Major/ D Dorian. Standard. AB (Carlin): AAB (Skye). Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927). Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 74, No. 114. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 56.
T:Duncan on the Plainstones
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
G|F>D D/D/D (FG) AB|=cBcG ECEG|F>D D/D/D (FG) AB|dABG FDD:|
g|fa^gb adfd|Be^df eAcA|fa^gb adfd|Bdce fddg|fa^gb adfd|Be^df eAce|
fedc BAGF|EDCB, A,GFE||

EARL HAIG [THE LAIRD O' BEMERSYDE]. AKA and see "The Chief o' Bemersyde (A War Sermon)." Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of Field Marshall Earl Haig (1861-1928), the Commander-in-Chief of the British forces during the First World War. Skinner originally titled the piece "The Chief o' Bemersyde (A War Sermon)," and said of it "a great effort, I think." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 107. Henderson, Scottish Music Maker (1957).

EARL OF CRAWFORD, THE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB (Neil): AAB (Hunter). The melody was composed by self-taught fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and fellow-performers, who played on theater circuit until his opium addiction (brought on by taking laudenum prescribed for rheumatism) reduced him to busking on the ferry-boats crossing the Firth. Neil (1991) relates that one Earl of Crawford was became the vanquished in a 1452 battle with the Earl of Huntly, for which the latter was rewarded by the King in recognition "for keeping the crown on our head." Crawford was supposed to have "wished to have seven years in hell to have the honourable victory that had fallen the the Earl of Huntly that day," however, it came at no mean cost to Huntly for two of his brothers had been slain on the field. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 227. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 69, pg. 94.

EAST NEUK OF FIFE. AKA and see "She Gripped At the Greatest On't," "Green Grow the Rushes" (Bayard, 1981;No. 206H-M). Scottish (originally), Shetland, Canadian; March, Country Dance, Scots Measure or Reel. Scotland, Lowlands region. Canada, Prince Edward Island. G Major (double tonic, G and A). Standard. AB (Skye): AABB (Athole, Brody, Emmerson, Hardie, Hunter, Kerr, Perlman, Skinner, Williamson): AA'BB' (Cooke {Thomson}). Composed by James Oswald (c. 1711-1769) and included in his Caledonian Pocket Companion (Bk. 4, 1752) as "She gripped at the greatest o't." It first appears under the above title in William McGibbon's (c. 1690-1756) Third Collection (1755) and Bremner's 1759 Scots Tunes (Bremner negotiates the double tonic by using G and A Major in even numbered strains and G and A Minor in odd numbered strains"). It is still a popular Scots tune today, including the variations which uncharacteristically have survived in the popular repertory (variations were published by Nathaniel Gow in 1823-the first three were recorded by J. Scott Skinner in the first part of the 20th century). The East Neuk of Fife is that part of Scotland's county of Fife that juts into the North Sea and contains the town of St. Andrews, the ancestral home of the game of golf. In the eighteenth century Fife sported a profusion of decaying architectural marvels, a trade in thread, the making of calico, and the shooting of porpoises in the firth for their blubber-oil" (Williamson, 1976). The tune has become associated with a Robert Burns song, though it was not his choice of an air for the words, but rather an editor's substitution (Alburger). Bayard (1981) collected versions of the tune "Green Grow the Rushes" or by the floating title (in America) "Over the Hills and Far Away." Johnson (1984) retells an anecdote about the tune which was first published in Murdoch's Fiddle in Scotland, pg. 59 (Murdoch learned it from Baillie's grandson): "One day in about 1805, the fiddler Peter (Pate) Baillie of Loanhead, near Edinburgh, was on his way to play at a ball in Fife. The journey involved crossing the Firth of Forth by ferry, and when Baillie boarded the boat at Leith the other passengers noticed the violin he was carrying. As everyone had an hour to kill before the boat reached Burntisland, Baillie was soon holding an impromptu musical session on deck, with the other passengers calling out requests for tunes:
***
A gentleman asked Pate if he could play the 'East Neuk of Fife'
with ten variations, to which the minstrel replied in his homely
way: 'Weel, sir, I'll try it'. Off Pate set at a brisk pace with both
theme and variations, till the number bargained for was completed.
But Pate did not stop here. He dashed into fresh variations of his
own improvising, more wonderful than the first, and went on,
and on, and on, the gentleman looking at him with astonishment,
till at last the fiddler did make a halt. 'Well I declare!' said the
gentleman. 'Every one of the variations must have turned out
twins since I last heard them!' (pgs. 66-67).
***
Sources for notated versions: Henry Thomson (Vidlin, Mainland, Shetland) and George Sutherland (Bressay, Shetland) [Cooke], Bremner's (Scots Tunes), pg. 17 [Johnson, 1983]; George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Aird (Selections), 1778, Vol. 1; No. 57. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 97. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 251. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex's. 52 and 53, pgs. 110-111. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 89, pg. 164. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 31. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935 (includes the traditional set of variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 309. Johnson, (The Scots Musical Museum) 1787-1803; Vol. 3; No. 277. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1983; No. 34, pg. 92-93 (with variations). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 23. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 170. McGibbon CST, pg. 89. McGibbon Scot, Vol. 3; pg. 17. McGlashan (Collection of Scots Measures), 177?; pg. 8. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 61. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with 5 of his variations), pg. 22-23. Smith (The Scottish Minstrel), 1820-24; Vol. 2; pg. 42. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 147. Thompson (Original Scottish Airs for the Voice, 1805; Vol. 4; No. 165. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 53. Olympic 6151, The Scottish Fiddle Festival Orchestra- "Scottish Traditonal Fiddle Music" (1978). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."
T:East Neuk of Fife
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
D|G2G2G2Bc|dBGB dBGB|A2A2A2gf|edef g2fe|dcBA GABc|
dBGB d2cB|ABcd BcAB|B2E2E2:|
|:dc|B2G2G2dc|B2G2G2ed|c2A2A2 eg|a2A2A2dc|B2G2d2G2|
g2G2d2cB|ABcd BcAB|G2E2E2:|

EDITOR'S FAREWELL, THE. Scottish, Air. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 48.

EMSLIE'S FIDDLE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 4.

EUGENE STRATTON. Scottish, Hornpipe. B-Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the famous Scots composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), recorded by him on a 78 RPM disc in the 1920's, at the end of his career, as part of "The Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Phillips]; Winston Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Brody (Fiddler's Companion), 1983; pg. 100. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; pg. 3. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1989; pg. 18. Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Folkways FG3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (appears as the second tune of 'Bank'). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (appears as the second tune of 'Banks Medley'). Rounder RO 7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996. Learned from Dave MacIsaac). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."

FAIRBAIRN'S. Scottish, English; Slow Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB (Honeyman): AABC (Kerr): AABCCD (Hardie). Bill Hardie (1986) identifies the melody as English in origin. A note in J. Scott Skinner's collection, Harp and Claymore, reads: "the last strain is often used by street players as a part of "Earl Grey"--a practive to be deprecated." The melody is played as a jig on Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 30. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 37. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 1, pg. 15. Skinner (Harp and Claymore).
T:Fairbairn's
L:1/8
M:C
S:Honeyman - Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor
R:Slow Strathspey
K:A
c/B/|A>E (3CEA (3DFA (3CEA|(3DFA (3CEA B,<B Bc/B/|A>E (3CEA (3DFA (3CEA|
(3DFA (3B,EG A2 A:|
e|a>Ag>A f>Ae>c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<B B>G|(3ABc (3Bcd (3cde (3def|(3efg a<A A>e|
a>Ag>A f>Ae>c|d>B d/c/B/A/ G<B B>e|e'>Ac'>A a>Ae>c|(3def (3efg a<A A>e|
e'>Ac'>A a>Ae>A|(3cea (3ecA G<B B>d|(3cec' (3ebd' (3c'e'c' (3aec|
(3def e>c A2 A||

FAIRY DANCE (Rinnce Na Sideoga/Sideog). AKA and see "Fisher Laddie," "The Haymaker," "La Ronde des Vieux," "Largos Fairy Dance," "The Merry Dance" (New England), "Old Molly Hare" (Old-Time). Irish, English, Scottish, Shetlands, American, Canadian; Reel. D Major (most versions): G Major (Merryweather): A Major (O'Neill/1001). Standard. AB (Honeyman, Raven): AAB (O'Neill/1001): AABB (Ashman, Brody, Ford, Sweet, Taylor, Trim): AABB' (Kerr): AA'BB' (Athole, Merryweather): AABCCD (Roche): AABBCCDDEEF (Cranford/Fitzgerald). Often this tune is a "beginning tune" for fiddlers, and though simple, it seems to have retained its popularity through the years. It was one of 197 compositions claimed and published (in Fifth Collection,"1809) by Nathaniel Gow under the title "Largo's Fairy Dance," which dates it to the latter eighteenth or early nineteenth century. Breandan Breathnach states that it was composed by Niel Gow for the Fife Hunt Ball held in 1802, but this is only partly true, according to Nigel Gatherer, for it was actually a pair of tunes Gow wrote, the second being "The Fairies Advance." Both tunes together make up "Largo's Fairy Dance." Emmerson identifies this tune in a class of tunes defined by the rhythm 'quarter note-two eighths-quarter note-two eigths,' which includes "De'il Among the Tailors," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley" (which Emmerson {1971} says is substantially a set of "Fairy Dance").
***
In Ireland, it was learned by Joyce in his boyhood in County Limerick, c. 1840. He (1909) says a Donegal setting of this will be found in the 'Journal of the Irish Folk Song Society.' O'Neill (1913) records that a special dance was performed to the tune in that country. Under the title "The Fairy Reel" the tune features in stories of enchantment by the wee folk. A tale is told by Padraig Mac Aodh-O'Neillin in his 1904 book Songs of Uladh (Songs of Ulster) of the origins of the tune which stem from a fiddler of the Mac Fhionnlachs from Flacarragh:
***
There was a gathering of Bel-Taine on St. John's Day (23rd of June), around
the bonfire in Caislean-na-dThuath in northern Dun-na-nGall about 150-160
years ago (~1850).
***
"...the fire was wearing low, the dancing nearly over, and the sturdiest
steppers getting tired, a stranger came among the people, announcing himself
in the words: "Sonas, sonas--luck on all here! The music called me, and I
going to bed." He said no more.
***
He was attired only in his night-garments. Much consternation was
caused by his curious appearance and behaviour, the more so as he was quite
unknown to the festive-maker. He went around asking the young girls to
dance with him; but out of fifty or more assembled there, he found but one
(and she, happily, was not a native of the district) who expressed herself
willing to accept his invitation. There were three or four fidilers there
and one piper, and he called on them to turn on the "Fairy Reel." But not
one of them knew it; every man of them declared that the air and the name
was new to him. Whereupon the mysterious stranger snatched the fidil out of
the hands of mac Fhionnlaoich, the Falcarrach man, who was nearest him, and
flourishing his bow with the grace of a master, turned on the tune himself,
the people standing around with their mouths wide open in wonderment.
***
"Now," he said to mac Fhionnlaoich, when he had finished the wonderful
tune, "there's your fidil for you. Turn on the 'Reel.' Play it after me;
for you're the only man in the Five Kingdoms can do that same!"
***
So mac Fhionnlaoich complied--somewhat reluctantly, it must be said-and played the 'Fairy Reel: through from beginning to end without a break, while the weird stranger and his fair partner danced, all the people looking on. When he had finished dancing with the girl he slipped a gold peiece into her hand, and turning solemnly towards the people, said: "Remove the fire seven paces to the North, and enjoy yourselves till daybreak. A Sonas, sonas--luck with all here!"
***
And so saying, he strode off into the darkness, disappearing as
mysteriously as he had come.
***
I give this story pretty much as I got it from my friend Padraig mac
Aodh o Neill, who got it from Proinseas mac Suibhne, the schoolmaster of
Losaid, in Gartan
***
Another fairy tale collected (by Seamus Ennis) on Tory Island mentions the tune, is again related by Mac Aoidh, and has parallels in other cultures. It seems that an islander, while going to collect his sheep at Port Glas, overheard wonderful music emanating nearby and investigated. The fairy folk were playing the "Fairy Reel" and the man, being an avid and accomplished dancer, felt compelled to join in. The music and dancing lasted and lasted, and he danced and danced, unable to stop until by chance another islander came upon him. This second man heard no music, and saw nothing of the fairy celebration, and asked the first what he was doing. He got the reply that the dancer was enchanted and would not be able to stop until a mortal laid hand on him. This was done, and the dancer saved from his fate. Mac Aoidh translates: "The soles of his shoes and his socks were worn through and his feet were sore to the bone from the roughness of the place he was dancing on." A similar tale is told by Canadian storyteller Alan Mills (to the accompanying fiddling of Montreal musician Jean Carignan) collected from French-Canadian tradition, which he calls "Ti-Jean and the Devil" (with the Devil substituting for Fairies).
***
A Pennsylvania collected version appears in Bayard (1981) as "Rustic Dance" (No. 52, pg. 38), and, as "La Ronde des Vieux" it was recorded in the latter 1920's by French-Canadian fiddler Willie Ringuette.
***
The tune is associated with a traditional dance in the village of Askham Richard, which lies a few miles from York, England. The famous Dorset novelist Thomas Hardy, himself an accordion player and fiddler, mentioned the tune in The Fiddler of the Reels:
***
Then another dancer fell out - one of the men - and went into
the passage in a frantic search for liquor. To turn the figure into
a three-handed reel was the work of a second, Mop modulating
at the same time into 'The Fairy Dance,' as best suited to the
contracted movement, and no less one of those foods of
love which, as manufactured by his bow, had always intoxicated her.
***
Sources for notated versions: Dave Swarbrick (England) [Brody]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton), who adapted J. Scott Skinner's variations [Cranford]. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; NO. 30b, pg. 9. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 7. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 100. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 129, pg. 53. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 71. Honeyman (Secrets of the Gaelic Harp), 1898; pg. 8. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin Tunes); No. or pg. 24. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 129, pgs. 65-66. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 2, pg. 10. Merryweather (Merryweather's Tunes for the English Bagpipe), 1989; pg. 53. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 986, pg. 170. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 162. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 138, pg. 43 (listed as a Long Dance). Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1903. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 113. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 61. Taylor (Where's the Crack), 1989; pg. 13 (appears as "Fairy Reel"). Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 24. Edison 50653 (78 RPM), Joseph Samuels (appears as 4th tune of "Devil's Dream Medley"). Glencoe 001, Cape Breton Symphony- "Fiddle." Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Fife Strathspey and Reel Society - "The Fiddle Sounds of Fife" (1980). "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Ideal Music" (1977). "Fiddlers Three Plus Two." Ron Gonella- "A Tribute to Niel Gow."
X:1
T:Fairy Dance
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
f2fd f2fd|f2fd cAeA|f2fd gfed|1 cABc d2de:|2 cABc defg||
|:a2af b2ba|gfge a2ag|1 fefd B2 e>d|cABc defg:|2 fefd Bged|
cABc d2D2||
X:2
T:Fairy Dance, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:D
f2fd f2fd|gfed cdeg|f2fd gfed|cABc d2d2|f2fd f2fd|gfed cdeg|fafd gfed|cABc defg||
a2af b2bf|g2ge a2 ag|f2fd gfed|cABc defg|a2af b2bf|g2ge a2 ag|fagf gfed|cABc d2d2||
X:3
T:Fairy Reel, The (Irish)
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Philippe Varlet
M:C
L:1/8
K:G
~B3 A GBdB|{d}cBAG FGAc| BG~G2 cBAg|fdaf {a}gedc|
~B3 A GBdB|{d}cBAG FGAc| BG~G2 cBAG|1 FDEF G3 A :|2 FDEF GABc||
~d3 g e3 d|cA A/A/A d3 c|BG~G2 cBAg|fdaf {a}gfge|
~d3 g e3 d|cA A/A/A d3 c|BG~G2 cBAG|1 FDEF GABc :|2 FDEF G4||

FALLEN CHIEF, THE. Scottish, Slow Air or Lament (6/4 time). A Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner as a dirge in memorial of dancer and piper Willie MacLennan who died tragically in Canada while touring with Skinner in 1893. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 30.


FAREWELL TO HUNTLY. Scottish, Marching Air. A Major. Standard. AAB. One of the 600 or so compositions by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), the self-proclaimed Strathspey King. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 34.

FIELD OF BANNOCKBURN, THE. Scottish, Pipe March (2/4 time). A Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Neil): AABB (Skinner). Composed by the most famous Scots fiddler, J. Scott Skinner, who published it in his "Harp and Claymore" collection in the latter part of the 19th century. The title refers to the famous victory of Robert the Bruce, King of the Scots (1274-1329), at the end of his seven year struggle with the forces of England under Edward II. Robert was by far the more skillful commander, while Edward was weak and foolish, and though the Plantagenet had twice the number of men (along with, it is rumoured, the bones of his father, Edward I, the 'Hammer of the Scots', in the forefront of his army) he fell prey to superior generalship, luck, and a final ruse by the wiley Scot. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 58, pg. 81. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 30.

FIRE AWAY. Scottish, Hornpipe. F Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 44, pg. 17.

FLOWER O' THE QUERN, THE. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. One Part (Hunter, Neil, Skinner): AABB (Martin). Published in song form by J. Gordon Phillips, Elgin (Scotland), whose words were written as a tribute to a young woman, Mary Morrison. Mary, who lived in Forres in the latter half of the 19th century, was described as "the bonniest lass from Inverness to Aberdeen", but was widowed at an early age. She remarried David Flyslop who was the chauffeur to the Earl of Moray, and lived in a lodge at the end of one of the driveways to Darnaway Castle. The music was composed by J. Scott Skinner as a tune for the song, but the melody also became popular as a slow air. It appears in his Logie Collection, dedicated to another girl, Miss Jessie Stockwell.
**
The flo-ers grow fair on the lowland vales,
an' green grow the wids on the braes,
an' saft an' low sing the scented gales
in the lang, lang simmer days;
But dearer to me are the mountains blue
where grow the heath an' fern,
an' the bonniest flo'er is the ane I lo'e
that blooms 'mang the braes o' the Quern.
**
A quern (pronounced 'kern') is Gaelic for 'hollow'. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 28 (arranged by James Hunter for string quintent). Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 14 (includes a harmony part). Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 88, pg. 119. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 35.

FORBES LEITH. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. One of the six hundred or so compositions by J. Scott Skinner. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 44.

FORBES MORRISON. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB (Hardie, Hunter): AAB (Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner, it appears in his Logie Collection. It was included as one of the tunes Skinner used in 1921 concert tours in the romantically entitled set "Spey's Fury's." Forbes Morrison (1833-1906), according to Hunter (1979), was a fiddler and dancing master in Tarves, Aberdeenshire, expert in the use of the Scottish fiddle ornaments of short snap bow and syncopated triplets. Purser (1992) states the tune "gives a good idea of the rhythmic vigour characteristic of the Scotch fiddle style (Skinner) so loved, and which was carried on by fiddlers such as James Dickie and John Murdoch Henderson..." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 55. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 123. Purser (Scotland's Music), 1992; Ex. 15, pg. 238. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 10.

FRANK GILRUTH [1]. Scottish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), from his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 43.

FYVIE CASTLE. Scottish, "Pastoral Air." E Flat Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 39. Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Paul Anderson - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).

GALLATION. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 14.

GANE IS MY JEAN. Scottish (4/4 time). A Flat Major. From J. Scott Skinner's Logie Collection (1888).

GAVIN McMULLEN. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 117. Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (appears as the second tune of 'J. Scott Skinner Medley'). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Starthspey King."

GAY GORDONS [1]. AKA - "Gie Gordans." Scottish (originally), New England; Country Dance Tune (cut time) or March. A Major. Standard. AB (Miller & Perron, Sweet): AABBCCDD (Cranford/Fitzgerald). This tune was included in J. Scott Skinner's 1921 concert set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's," and is attributed to him by Paul Cranford. The 'Gay Gordons' was also a popular couple dance, still occasionally to be found at contra dances. The original 'Gay Gordon' was doubtless Lord Strathven, according to Emmerson (1972), who danced with Marie Antoinette and became a favorite at the court of Louis XVI for his "agreeable personality and admirable skill in dancing." Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 76, pg. 34. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 166. Sweet (Fifer's Delight); No. or pg. 27 (has an alternate 'B' part). Alcazar Dance Series FR 204, "New England Chestnuts 2" (1981). Folkways FW8827, Arbuckle, Mikkelson & Clifton - "Old Time Couple Dances" (1961).
T:Gay Gordons
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
E2|A2AB c2A2|dc de f2ed|c2a2 ef ed|c2B2B2E2|
A2AB dc BA|dc de (3fgf ed|c2a2 ef ed|c2A2A2e2|]
[|a4e2fg|a2e2c2A2|a2a2 ef ed|c2B2B2e2|a4e2fg|a2e2c2A2|
d2B2 ef ed|c2A2A2|]

GIBSON'S WHISKEY. Scottish. Composed by J. Scott Skinner.

GILLAN'S REEL. AKA - 'Gillian's Reel." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Peter Milne (1824-1908), the Tarland Minstrel, a self-taught fiddler and one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers as well as his friend. Milne earned a living playing in theaters until his career deteriorated from opium addiction, reducing him to ekeing a livlihood from busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in 1908, destitiute, in an insane asylum. "Gillan's Reel" is sometimes nowadays called "Gillian's Reel." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 230. Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

GILLIAN'S REEL. Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Peter Milne (1824-1908), the Tarland Minstrel, a self-taught fiddler and one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers as well as his friend. Milne earned a living playing in theaters until his career deteriorated from opium addiction, reducing him to eking a livelihood from busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in 1908, destitute, in an insane asylum.. Source for notated version: Jerry Holland (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 119. Rounder 7004, Joseph Cormier- "The Dances Down Home" (1977). Rounder 7008, "Jerry Holland."
T:Gillian's Reel
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:A
|:A2 cA {d}B2 dB|c2 ec dBAG|A2 ce fgaf|edcB AGFE|AEAc BEBd|cdec dcBA |(3A/2A/2A/2 Ace fgaf|1 edcB A2 FG:|2 edcB A2 fg||
|:a2 fa g2 eg|f2 df ecBA|{b}a2 fa gaba|gfe^d e2 fg|agfa gfeg|fedf ecBA|
(3A/2A/2A/2 Ace fgaf|1 edcB A2 gf:|2 edcB A2 (3GFE||

GLADSTONE'S REEL. AKA - "A.A. Gladstone (Edingburgh)." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB (Skinner): AABCCD (Hunter). Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Played as part of the romantically entitled set "Warblings From the Hill's" during Skinner's 1921 concert tours. Source for notated version: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 121. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 232. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 22. BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall" (appears as "The Gladstone"). Green Linnett GLCD 1137, Altan - "Island Angel" (1993). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (appears as the fourth tune of the "J. Scott Skinner Medley"). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King".

GLENCOE [1]. Scottish, "Dirge." E Flat Major. Standard. One Part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner after visiting the place in Scotland; from his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 42.

GLENGRANT. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of James Grant of Glengrant. Not to be confused with "Glen Grant", another tune althogether. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 126 (arranged by James Hunter).

GLENLIVET, THE [1]. AKA and see "Minmore Schottische." Scottish, Strathspey or Highland Schottische. A Major. Standard. AB (Hardie, Skinner): AAB (Hunter): AA'B (Alburger). The tune was composed by J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927), in honor of the famous Scotch whisky founded by George Smith, who owned an illicit still in Upper Drummin. In 1797, according to Moyra Cowie (1999), the parish of Glenlivet had some 200 stills in operation, and, along with stills in neighboring parishes, they distilled the finest malt liquor for local consumption and export. The following lines preface the melody in Skinner's Elgin Collection:
***
Scott Skinner's made anither tune
The very dirl o't reached the moon
Till ilka lassie an' her loon
Commenced to dance fu' frisky O.
***
Another literary reference to the whisky in conjunction with fiddling was penned by R.P. Gillies, describing the effect of James Hogg, "the Ettrick Shepherd", on Edinburgh society. Hogg was a noted poet and a keen fiddler as well:
***
...cast utterly into the shade by an illiterate shepherd, a man
also who seemed to give himself no thought or care about
his own works, but to be engaged day after day, or rather
night after night, in scraping on the fiddle, singing his own
ballads, and, with the help of Glenlivet, making himself and
others uproariously happy.
***
Source for notated version: Bill Hardie (Scotland) [Hardie]. Alburger, 1983; Ex. 113, pg. 189. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 74. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 132. Skinner, (The Elgin Collection). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 8.

GRAMIN. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Hornpipe. Canada, Cape Breton. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and compoer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 24, pg. 9. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CS 44).

GRANITE CITY, THE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, the 'Strathspey King' (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 53.
T:Granite City, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
A,|D/D/D (FB) AFFA|GFED CDEC|D/D/D (FB) AFFA|(B/c/d) (e/f/g) fdd:|
g|fdec dBcA|(B/c/d) (AF) BEEg|fdec dBcA|(B/c/d) (e/f/g) fddg|fdec dBcA|
(B/c/d) (AF) BEEF|DFEG FAGB|Adce fdd||

H. MACKWORTH. Scottish, Strathspey. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 105, pg. 44.

HAMILTON'S. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927), first appearing in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 13.

'HAP ON' ROW THE FEETIES O'T. Scottish, Quickstep. A Major. Standard. AABBCCDD. "J. Scott Skinner's Set." Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 40.

HAPPY TOM. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 4.

HAUNT OF THE GNOMES, THE. Scottish, "Reverie" (Slow Air). A Major. Standard. Composed by the great Scots fiddler of the latter 19th and early 20th century, J. Scott Skinner, originally published in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 47.

HECTOR MACDONALD'S LAMENT. Scottish. One of the tunes played by J. Scott Skinner in his 1921 concert tour set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's."

HECTOR [MACDONALD] THE HERO. Scottish, Lament ("with intense sadness," 6/8 time). A Major. Standard. AAB (Hunter): AA'BB (Perlman): ABC (Martin, Skinner). Composed by the great Scots fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) in honor of the famous Major-General Sir Hector MacDonald (1857 - 1903), one of the most famous Victorian-era British military figures. MacDonald was born in the Black Ilse and at the age of thirteen enlisted in the 92 Gordon Highlanders. He came up through the ranks, serving as a color-sergeant in the Afghan War, until he was promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant at the end of those hostilities. Transferred to South Africa, he was mentioned in dispatches in the 1st Boer War, and in 1885 he led a military expedition up the Nile to Sudanese territory. In 1888 he took part in the Battle of Sunkin and a year later won the Distinguished Service Order for his service in Sudan. He remained in the Sudan for the next decade, seeing action in the Battle of Tokar (1891), and leading the 2nd Infantry Brigade in the Dunglen Expeditionary Force, by which time he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General. During the next two years he took part in the battles of Khartoum and Omdurman, with which he ended his Sudan service. He subsequently served as the Aide de Camp to Queen Victoria and as a Major General with the Highland Bridgade in South Africa during the Boer War. In 1901 he was knighted and the next year was stationed as Major General with British forces in Ceylon, however, in 1903 he was accused of being a homosexual and, feeling disgraced, he committed suicide.
***
Though the charge of homosexuality was probably true it was popularly believed by all levels of society in Scotland at the time that MacDonald had been framed. Soon after the incident Edward VII made his first visit to Scotland, though the atmosphere was decidedly chilly.
***
This ballad was composed in the soldier's honor:
***
HECTOR THE HERO
***
Lament him, ye mountains of Ross-shire;
Your tears be the dew and the rain;
Ye forests and straths, let the sobbing winds
Unburden your grief and pain.
Lament him, ye warm-hearted clansmen,
And mourn for a kinsman so true
The pride of the Highlands, the valiant MacDonald
Will never come back to you.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
Lament him, ye sons of old Scotia,
Ye kinsmen on many a shore;
A patriot-warrior, fearless of foe,
Has fallen to rise no more.
O cherish his triumph and glory
On Omdurman's death-stricken plain,
His glance like the eagle's, his heart like the lion's
His laurels a nation's gain.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
O rest thee, brave heart, in thy slumber,
Forgotten shall ne'er be thy name;
The love and the mercy of Heaven be thine;
Our love thou must ever claim.
To us thou art Hector the Hero,
The chivalrous, dauntless, and true;
The hills and the glens, and the hearts of a nation,
Re-echo the wail for you.
***
O, wail for the mighty in battle,
Loud lift ye the Coronach strain;
For Hector, the Hero, of deathless fame,
Will never come back again.
***
Perlman (1996) notes that the melody is currently played on Prince Edward Island as a lament at funeral services. Source for notated version: Sterling Baker (b. mid-1940's, Morell, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Montague) [Perlman]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 29. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 24. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 208. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 49. The Bothy Band (1st album). Dougie MacDonald - "A Minor." Green Linnet GLCD 1189, John Cunningham - "Celtic Fiddle Festival: Encore." Greentrax CDTRAX 096, "Tony McManus" (1995).
T:Hector the Hero
C:James Scott Skinner
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
L:1/4
M:3/4
K:A
A,|{B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|{D}E3|~E2A,|{A,B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|\
{A,}B,3|~B,2A,/<B,/|{B,}C>>B,A,|{E}F>>EC|{D}E2A,|{A,}[A,2A2]{AB}A/F/|\
E<<A,{B,}C|{D}B,2=G,/<A,/|A,3|~A,2||A|{AB}c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|e3|e2A|\
{AB}c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|{A}B3|~B2A/<B/|c>>BA|{A}f>>ec|{c}e2A|\
{ABcdefg}a2{ab}af|e<<A{B}c|{Bd}[E2B2]{Bd}[E/B/][E/A/]|[E3A3]|\
[E2A2]c/<[c/e/]||[d2f2][~df]|[c2a2]g/<f/|[A3e3]|[A2e2]c/<[c/e/]|\
[d2f2]{fg}e/<c/|e<<AB/<c/|[E3B3]|[E2B2]c/<[c/e/]|[d2f2]f/{gfef}>g/|\
[c2a2]a/{bag}>f/|e<<AB|c<<a{ab}a/f/|e<<AB/<c/|\
{Bd}[E2B2]{Bd}[E/B/][D/A/]|[E3A3]|[E2A2]|]

HERR ROLOFF'S FAREWELL. Scottish, Air (4/4 time). F Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of a musical friend who helped him arrange his Harp and Claymore collection. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 19. Skinner (Harp and Claymore Collection). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996).

INVERURIE. Scottish. Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of the place in Scotland he visited.

HURRICANE, THE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AAB. From reknowned Scottish fiddle-composer J. Scott Skinner's (d. 1927) Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 5. Flying Fish FF-299, The Battlefield Band - "There's a Buzz" (1982). Philo FI 2018, "Jean Carignan Plays the Music of Coleman, Morrison & Skinner."

IRON MAN, THE. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard. AB (Hunter, Perlman): AABB (Brody, Cranford, Phillips). Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) for his friend and benefactor William M.F. McHardy, the Laird of Drumblair, who gave Skinner the use of a rent-free cottage for several years. Hunter (1979) reports that McHardy could well have afforded this, for he had made a fortune of 100,000 pounds in engineering enterprises in South America before returning to live at Forgue near Huntly. Skinner also composed in his honor "The Laird o' Drumblair." Sources for notated versions: Joseph Cormier (Cape Breton/Boston) [Brody]; Winston Scotty Fitzgerald (Cape Breton) [Phillips]; Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 141. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 73, pg. 53. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 128. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 195. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tune Book), 1989; pg. 31. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 17). CCF2, Cape Cod Fiddlers - "Concert Collection II" (1999). Celestial Entertainment CECS001, Brenda Stubbert (Cape Breton) - "In Jig Time!" (1995). Celtic 17, Winston Scotty Fitzgerald. Flying Fish FF-250, The Battlefield Band - "Home is Where the Van Is" (1981). Rounder 7001, Joseph Cormier- "Scottish Violin Music of Cape Breton" (1974). Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."

J. O. FROBES OF CORSE. Scottish, Slow Strathspey ("Pastoral Air"). E Major. Standard. AB. Composed by self-taught fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers, who earned a living playing in theaters until his opium addicition (he had become dependent while taking laudenum for a ailment while living in London) reduced him to busking on ferry-boats running across the Firth. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 225, pg. 90. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 156. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg.37.

J. SCOTT SKINNER. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Aberdeenshire fiddler and composer J. Murdoch Henderson (1902-1972) in 1933. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 71, pg. 32. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935.
T:J Scott Skinner
C:J Murdoch Henderson
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:A
e|c>A A/A/A EGAE|CEAc eaec|d>B B/B/B GABc|dBba gbed|c>A A/A/A EGAE|
CEAc eaec|fdcd eaga|fdBG A3||B|Aaga caga|ecea fedc|
Bb^ab egb=a|gfe^d defg|aAAa gebg|fdda ecce|fdcd eaga|fdBG A3|]

JAMES D. LAW'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. E Flat. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 45.

JAMES HARDIE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner for the violin maker James Hardie, a contemporary. It was written specifically to follow the strathspey "The Miller o' Dervil." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 75. Skinner, Harp and Claymore Collection.

JAMES SCOTT SKINNER. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed in 1934 in honor of the great Scots fiddler and composer James Scott Skinner (1841-1927) by Aberdeen, Scotland, fiddler J. Murdoch Henderson (1902-1972). See also Henderson's accompanying reel, "J. Scott Skinner." Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 94, pg. 40. Henderson (Flowers of Scottish Melody), 1935. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX40). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Paul Anderson - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).
T:James Scott Skinner
C:J Murdoch Henderson, 1934
R:Strathspey
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:A
D|C<A,A,>C E>FE<C|A>FE>C (3AGF (3EDC|D<B,B,>C D>FB>A|G>Bg>f (3efe (3dcB|
C<A,A,>C E>FE<C|A>FE>C (3AGF (3EDC|F<DF>A E>Ac>A|(3FBA G/EG/ A2 A||
f|e<Ac>f e<c c2|a>A>B (3ABG (3ABc|B<EG>B e>Bg>e|b>eg>f (3efe (3dcB|
c>Ac>f e<cc>A|a>ec>B (3ABG (3ABc|F<DF>A E>Ac>A| F/BA/ G/EG/ A2 A|]

JAMIE HARDIE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. One Part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, who says: "Relative of the Famous Drumnagarry Reel for 'Bob Steel.'" Jamie (James) Hardie (1836-1916) was an Edinburgh violin maker whom Skinner knew, and who had a fine reputation as a craftsman, producing over two thousand instruments (the finest of which were based on the master Maggini's violins) during his long career. He was a member of the famous Hardie family who have been for generations Scots fiddlers of renown. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 21.

JAMIE SHEARER. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 3.

JOHN McCOLL'S REEL. Scottish, Pipe Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 28.

JOHN McNEIL('S REEL). AKA and see "Betty's Fancy," "Big John McNeil," "John McNeilis." Scottish (Originally), Irish, Canadian; Reel. Ireland, County Donegal. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by self-taught though masterful fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), a native of Aberdeenshire and one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers, who earned a living playing in theaters until his opium addiction (he had originally taken laudanum in London for rheumatism) reduced him to busking on ferry-boats plowing the Forth of Firth. The completion of the Forth Bridge (c. 1890) deprived him of even this livelihood, and he died destitute in an insane asylum. As "Big John McNeil" the melody is quite popular with Canadian and New England fiddlers. John McNeil is thought to have been a famous Highland dancer at the turn of the century. The tune is well-known in County Donegal where the first part is played in the upper octave on the fiddle for "reversing" purposes, according to fiddler Caoimhin Mac Aoidh. Alternate local Donegal names for the melody include "Betty's Fancy" and "John McNeilis" (the latter is a Donegal adaptation of the name McNeil). Source for notated version: Danny O'Donnell (County Donegal), who was familiar with Scottish music in the Donegal tradition but who also worked in Scotland [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 237. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), pg. 187. Olympic 6151, Angus Cameron - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). Battlefield Band - "Battlefield Band" (appears as part of set which includes "Inverness Gathering" and "Marquis of Huntley's Strathspey").
T:John McNeil's Reel
B:Feldman & O'Doherty, The Northern Fiddler
S:Danny O'Donnell
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:A
A,2 CE FECE|AECE FECE|A,2 CE FECE|FCEC B,DCB,|
A,2 CE FECE|A/A/ECE FECE|B,DCE DFE=G|FA=GB cAAf||
eAfA eAcf|eAfA e2 (3agf|eAfA eAce|dfca B2 cd|
eAfA eAcd|eAfA e2 fg|1agag fedc|BAGF EDCB,:|
2 agag fece|fagb a2 [ac]2||

JOHNNIE WALKER. Scottish. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, presumably after the famous Scotch whisky; it was the last piece he published (1924).

KING ROBERT THE BRUCE. Scottish, Marching Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, and a companion piece to his "Sir William Wallace." Robert Bruce was the Scottish hero who successfully led a second rebellion in 1306, the year Wallace was executed, which eventually led to his being crowned king of an independent Scotland. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 126 (with variations). Skinner, Harp and Claymore. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 32 (includes variations).

KIRRIE KEBBUCK. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner and one of the tunes included in his concert set of 1921 which was romantically entitled "Warblings From the Hills." 'Kebbuck' is the Scots word for a large whole cheese. Hunter (1988) reports that when the tenants of Skinner's friend, Alex McPherson ("The Laird o' Thrums"), paid rent "he always offered them a whisky, a bannock and a slice of kebbuck." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 105.

LADS OF LEITH, THE [1]. AKA and see "Beauties of the Ballroom," "Gearrbhodaí Laoise," "Lads of Laois." English, Scottish; Jig and Country Dance. England, Northumberland. G Minor (Seattle/Vickers): E Minor (Gatherer). Standard. AB (Gatherer): AABB (Vickers). The melody appears in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodleian Library, Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740." A few years later James Oswald reprinted it in his Caledonian Pocket Companion, Book III (c. 1747, 1752). It was collected and adapted by the Scots poet Robert Burns as the vehicle for his song "She's Fair and Fause (that causes my smart)," printed in James Johnson's Scots Musical Museum (No. 398, 1792). Another early setting was mentioned in James C. Dick's book The Songs of Robert Burns (1903) where he states that the Scottish collector John Glen finds "Lads of Leith" in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances (c. 1744). The jig appears as an untitled 'A' Minor tune in J. Scott Skinner's Beauties of the Ballroom, as the third figure of "Ettrick Vale Quadrille." In Ireland the tune is called "Lads of Laois," and see also "Beauties of the Ballroom," by which name the tune is known on Cape Breton Island. Gatherer (Gatherer's Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 17. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 3; No. 498. Wood, Songs of Scotland (1848-49). Marquis ERA 181, David Greenberg/Puirt a Baroque - "Bach Meets Cape Breton" (1996).

LADY ANDERSON. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 53.
T:Lady Anderson
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
A|d>A A/A/A (FA)DF|G>E E/E/E (CE)A,A|d>A A/A/A (FA)DF|GECE (D2D):|
A|dcdf e^deg|fdcd AFDc|dcdf e^deg|fdec (d2 d>)A|dcdf e^deg|fdcd AFDF|
GFGB A^GA=g|fdec (d2d)||

LADY MARY RAMSAY('S) [1]. AKA and see "Sailor Ower da Raft Trees" (Shetland), "The Auld Toon O' Edinburgh." Scottish, Shetland, Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. D Major (Athole, Coles, Cooke, Hunter, Kerr, Skye): G Major (Huntington): E Flat Major (Athole, Gow). Standard or ADAE (in the Shetlands). AB (Cole, Honeyman): AAB (Hunter, Kerr): AABB (Huntington): AABB' (Athole): AABB'CCD (Skye). Composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831). "This tune...(appears) in James Porteous's Collection and having his initials attached it is possible he may have been the composer of it" (Skye). Renamed in the Shetlands (as "Mary Ramsay") and played as a reel, for when the tune first circulated via [J. Scott Skinner's] gramaphone records which played at a higher speed than the original performance, it was assumed a reel, as the Shetlanders had no knowledge of strathspeys in the country districts (Alburger {1983} quoting the late Shetland collector and fiddler Tom Anderson). The tune was printed in Lowe's First Collection (1844). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 127. Cooke (The Fiddle Tradition of the Shetland Isles), 1986; Ex. 19a, pg. 69. Gow, Fourth Collection of Strathspey Reels, 1822; pg. 15. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 31. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 106. Huntington (William Litton's), 1977; pg. 22. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 1, pg. 10. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 34. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 88. Beltona 2103 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978). Ron Gonella - "A Tribute to Niel Gow."
T:Lady Mary Ramsay
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
N:"Original key."
K:D
A,|D3B A<F F>B|A>FB>G A<FF<d|D3B A<F F>A|d>BA>F E/E/E E:|
g|f<d d>f e<c c>e|d<B d>B A<F F>e|f<d d>f e>dc>A|d>BA>F E/E/E Ee|
f>dd>f ecce|d<B d>B A<F F>A|d>fc>e B>dA>F|d>BA>F E/E/E E||
N:last two bars at end of tune go: (3def (edc (3dcB (3AGF|(3GAB (3AGF F<E E>F||
T:Lady Mary Ramsay
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:E_
G|E3c B<G G>c|B<G c>A B<G G>e|E3c B<G G>B|c>EB>G F/F/F F:|
e/f/|g<e e>g f<d d>f|e<c c>e B<G Ge/f/|g<e e>g f>de>B|c<e B>G F/F/F Fe/f/|
g<e e>g f<d d>f|e<g c>e B<G G>B|e<g d>f c<e B>c|G<e B>G F/F/F F||

LAIRD O' DRUMBLAIR STRATHSPEY, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major (Alburger, Bain, Brody, Cranford, Emmerson, Phillips, Skinner): G Major (McCutcheon). Standard or AEAE (recommended by Skinner in 1904). AB (Alburger, Hardie, Hunter, Skinner): AA'B (Emmerson): AABB (Bain, Brody, Cranford, Phillips): AA'BB' (Perlman). The mansion of Drumblair lies in the Parish of Forgue, on the north-western borders of Aberdeenshire in the North West of Scotland. The tune was composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) for his friend and benefactor William F. McHardy of Drumblair, who gave Skinner use of a rent-free cottage for many years to support his art. In his autobiography (My Life and Adventures, Wallace Music, 1994) Skinner wrote that McHardy, the Laird, was so impressed with the composition that for the remaining 15 years of his life he sent Skinner a thank-you check at Christmas-time. McHardy could apparently well afford to be magnanimous, for he had made a fortune of over 100,000 pounds in South America with engineering enterprises before returning to live at Forgue near Huntly. The tune is considered one of the finest and most famous of Skinner's 600 compositions, and appears in his Harp and Claymore collection. It was one of the tunes included by him later in his career in the romantically entitled 1921 concert set "Warblings From the Hills." Skinner, writing in his autobiography My Life and Adventures (first serialized in The People's Journal, 1923), described his inspiration for the tune: "Suddenly [one night] a tune, 'pat' and complete, flashed into my head in his honour. I jumped out of bed [looking for music manuscript paper]...but a search produced nothing better than a piece of soap paper, and on this I promptly dashed off 'The Laird o' Drumblair.' And the tune was dispatched as it had been written." "Ye're no' gaun tae send that awfy-like paper tae the Laird," protested his wife, "He'll jist licht his pipe wi' it!" It was sent anyway. Skinner also rendered the same melodic motif as a reel called "Angus Campbell." Sources for notated versions: Jean Carignan (Montreal, Canada) [Brody, Phillips]; Bill Hardie (Scotland) [Hunter]; Francis MacDonald (b. 1950, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1982; Ex. 111, pg. 187. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 13. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 162. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 77, pg. 34. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 9, pg. 104. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 73. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 134. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 197. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 33. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 10. Green Linnet SIF 3037, Silly Wizard - "Golden, Golden" (1985). June Appal 003, John McCutcheon - "How Can I Keep From Singing" (1975. Learned from Malcolm Dalglish, who learned it from a recording of a Scottish accordion player). Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan" (appears as third tune of "J. Scott Skinner Medley"). Philo 1031, Boys of the Lough- "Lochaber No More." The Bothy Band- "1975" (in which fiddler Tommy Peoples renders it as a strathspey, then a reel).

LAIRD OF THRUMS. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) and dedicated to Alex MacPherson of Kirriemuir; the title was Skinner's nickname for his friend, and Thrums was the old name for Kirriemuir. Hunter (The Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 131. Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan."

LALLA SINCE THE QUEEN'S COME. Scottish, Strathspey. D Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 52.
T:Lalla Since the Queen's Come
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
(F<A) (A>=c) (B>G) A2|F<A A>=c B>G A<d|F<A A>=c B>G A2|E<=c ~c>G E2 =C2:|
A>d (c<d) A<D F2|A>d (c<d) A<D F<A|A>d c<d A<D F2|E<=c c>G E2 =C>E|
A>d (c>d) A<D F2|A>d (c<d) A<D F>A|A>d (c<e) (3dcB (3AGF|E<=c c>G E2 =C2||

LARGO'S FAIRY DANCE. AKA and see "Daunse ny Farishyn," "Fairy Dance," "The Jolly Banger," "La Ronde des Vieux." Scottish, Reel. C Major (Emmerson, Gow): D Major (Hardie, Hunter, Skinner). Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (most versions). A piece for the eightsome reel composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831) for the Fife Hunt in 1802, by which organization he was employed for their balls. Largo is a small parish in Fife containing two villages, Upper Largo and Lower Largo, and a hill, Largo Law. The original "Largo's Fairy Dance" was a medley consisting of two Gow-composed tunes, "The Fairy Dance" and "The Fairies Advance," according to Nigel Gatherer. According to David Johnson, Gow seems to have then set the melody as an introduction and march for keyboard in D Major, which was published on a single sheet about 1805 (such sheets often contained sets for dancing). It was again published in reel form in C Major in the Gow's Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels of 1809. A tune "as popular today as the day it was written" (Collinson, 1966), it is Nathaniel's most famous reel (though modern fiddlers invariably play it in D Major, rather than the C Major of the 1809 printing). A famous set of variations were composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his Harp and Claymore collection. Emmerson (1971) identifies a sub-group of Scots reels with the characteristic quarter note/two eighths notes/quarter note/two eighths notes per measure rhythm, including this tune as well as "De'il Among the Tailors," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley" (he says this last tune is "substanitally" a set of "Fairy Dance." The Hardie family, notes Bill Hardie, "have traditionally played this reel as a follow-lup to 'The Smith's.'" The melody entered North American tradition and can be found in America under the title "Old Molly Hare" and similar variants, and in Canada as "La Ronde des Vieux." On the Isle of Man it is called "Daunse ny Farishyn." Breathnach (1985) believes it was composed "under the influence of " "The Wind that Shakes the Barley." Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 83, pgs. 133-134 (original tune), and Ex. 108, pg. 185 (Skinner variations). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 268. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 51, pg. 141. Gow, 5th Collection, 1809. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pgs. 16-17 (includes J. Scott Skinner's variations). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 219 (includes variations arranged by James Hunter, based on Scott Skinner's). Green Linnet GLCD 3105, Aly Bain - "Lonely Bird" (1996. Variations by the late Ronald Cooper and others by Scott Skinner).
T:Fairy Dance, The
C:Nathaniel Gow
S:Peter Hardie's MSS, via Scottish Country Dance Book 3
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
f2 fd f2 fd|f2 fd cAec|f2 fd gfed|1cABc d2 de:|]2cABc defg|]
a2 af b2 ba|gfge a2 ag|fefd B2 ge|cABc defg|
a2 af b2 ba|gfge a2 ag|fefd B2 ge|cABc d2 z2|]

LAWSON'S STRATHSPEY. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Nigel Gatherer found this strathspey, probably unpublished, by James Scott Skinner in the author's hand on a scrap of paper in Perth Library. A note with the tune read: "Composed in Perth Station...Lawson's Strathspey...by J S Skinner...while waiting for a train...Died in Canada...April 1920."
T:Lawson's Strathspey
C:James Scott Skinner
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
z|D<DA>D B>DAc|d>cB<d A>DC<E|D<DA>D B>DA>F|G/F/E A>G F<DD:|]
g|(3fed (3edc (3dcB A>F|(3GAB (3AFD G>EC>g|(3fed (3edc (3dDE (3FGA|
B<dA>G F<DDg|\
(3fed (3edc (3dcB A>F|(3GAB (3AFD G>EC>E|D<DA>D B>D A>g|\
(3fga (3gfe d<DD|]

LEFT HANDED FIDDLER, THE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner and named for George Taylor of Aberdeen, whose son also was a left-handed fiddler. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 240. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 5.

LES TROIS GRANDE LUTHIERS. Scottish, Air. A Major. Standard. AB. From J. Scott Skinner's collection The Harp and Claymore, composed by him. Perhaps a reference to the 3 great Italian violin makers of Cremona, Stradivarius, Guarnari and Amati. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 47.

LITTLE JOHN'S HAME. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Strathspey. Canada; Cape Breton, Ontario. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Sources for notated versions: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music from the Ottawa Valley), 1985; No. 71, pg. 81. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 124, pg. 51.
T:Little John's Hame
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
|:D2 A>D (3FED (3AGF|d2 c>d (3Bcd (3AGF|E2 B,>E (3GFG g>f|
(3efd (3cdB (3ABG (3FGE|D2 D>D (3FED (3AGF|d2 c>d (3Bcd (3AGF|
(3GFG (3Bdg (3fed (3afd|1 (3cBA (3GFE D>A, B,C:|2 (3cBA (3GFE D>a ^g>a||
(3faf (3fdf (3Adf a>g|(faf (3dfd (3Adf (3agf|(3gbg (3ege (3Beg b>a|
(3^gab (3efe (3cdc (3Aa=g|f>a d>f (3Adf a>g|(3faf (3dfd (3AdA (3FDF|
(3GFG (3Bdg (3fed (3afd|(3cBA (3GFE D>a ^g>a:|2 (3cBA (3GFE D>A, B,>C||

LITTLEJOHN'S HAME. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 17. Tommy Peoples - "50 Irish Fiddle Tunes."

LODGE OF GLEN-TANA, THE. AKA and see "Glentana." Scottish, Strathspey or Slow Air. F Sharp Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 105. J. Scott Skinner, Elgin Collection. J. Scott Skinner, The Logie Collection (appears as "Glentana"). Greentrax CDTRAX 9009, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980) - "Scottish Tradition 9: The Fiddler and his Art" (1993).

LORD HUNTLY'S CAVE. Scottish, Marching Air. D Major. Standard. AABB. Lord Huntly succeeded his mother, Jane Maxwell the Duchess of Gordon, to presiding over the Northern Meeting balls and dances after her death in 1812. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, the melody first appears in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 34. Front Hall Records FHR-08, Alistair Anderson - "Traditional Tunes" (1976).

MACALLAN. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 10.

MACKENZIE HAY. Scottish, Strathspey. D Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 20.

MACPHERSON'S BLADE. Scottish, Marching Air. E Minor. Standard. AAB. From Harp and Claymore, Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 41.

MACRIMMON'S WEIRD. Scottish. One of the tunes included by J. Scott Skinner in his 1921 concert set romantically entitled "Warblings From the Hills." It is, perhaps, an amalgamation of the alternate titles "Macrimmon's Farewell" and "The Piper's Weird."

MADAM NERUDA. Scottish, Hornpipe. E Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) in honor of Wilhelmina Neruda (1839-1911), a celebrated concert violinist of the Victorian era. She became Lady Halle when she married Sir Charles Halle, founder of the famous English orchestra. Skinner recorded the tune in the 1920's as part of his "Celebrated Hornpipes" medley. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 127. Skinner, The Logie Collection. Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991).

MADAME VANONI. Scottish, Shetlands; Hornpipe. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Tom Anderson (1978) says the tune has been a favorite with Shetland fiddlers for over half a century. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 131. Skinner (The Harp and Claymore). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 45. Topic 12TS379, Aly Bain & Tom Anderson - "Shetland Folk Fiddling, Vol. 2" (1978).

MADGE. AKA - "Farewell to Scotland." Scotland, Marching Air. A Major. Standard. One Part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, the melody appears in his Logie Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 35.

MADGE ("FAREWELL TO SCOTLAND"). Scottish, Song Air (6/8 time). A Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner to words by William Martin. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 95. Skinner, The Logie Collection. Skinner, The Scottish Violinist.

MAINS OF GARTLY. Scottish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner after a place he visited in Scotland, and appears in his Logie Collection. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 112, pg. 188. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 23.

MAR CASTLE [1]. Scottish, "Pastoral Air" (4/4 time). E Major. Standard. AB (Hardie): AAB (Hunter, Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner after a site he visited in Scotland, it appears in his "Harp and Claymore" collection. Hardie (1992) reports Mar is an ancient district of south west Aberdeenshire, subdivided into Braemar, Midmar and Cromar. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 99. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 155. Skinner, Harp and Claymore Collection. Skinner, The Scottish Violinist, pg. 36.

MARCHIONESS OF HUNTLY--ABOYNE CASTLE [3]. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. One part. Composed by self-taught fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of the great fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner's teachers. Milne made his living playing in theaters until his opium addiction (which began with laudanum taken for an injury) reduced him to busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 92, pg. 39. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; pg. 138.

MARQUIS OF HUNTL(E)Y'S FAREWELL, THE. AKA and see "George Booker." Scottish, Strathspey ("Slow when not danced"). A Major. Standard. AB (Alburger, Athole, Collinson, Gow, Honeyman, Kerr, Marshall & Skye): ABAB' (McGlashan): ABAB'AB''AB''' (Skinner). An andante air with "just a touch of strathspey," composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). The Marquis of Huntly, George Gordon (b. 1770), was the heredetary heir to the Duke of Gordon and became the 5th and last Duke. This tune was written by Marshall, the Gordon's steward or butler, who was emotionally moved as the young man took his farewells from his family when he departed for his Continental tour in 1787. Witnessing the family's sorrow and grief at his leaving, Marshall "endeavoured in the first part (of the tune) to imitate the wailing of the parents, and in the latter bars that of his young sisters" (Marshall, 1845 Collection). It was one of the earliest composed by Marshall and was first published in his First Collection of 1781; it is particularly celebrated and one of his most famous pieces (Collinson {1966} was much impressed by it and used it as an example of Marshall's melodic grace and power). The melody was published by the Gows, with no credit to the composer in their Repository, Part First, 1799. It was included as one of the tunes in a 1921 concert set by the famous Scots violinist J. Scott Skinner, which set was romantically entitled "Spey's Furys;" Skinner was thorughly familiar with the tune by that time, for his rendition of it gained him a first place prize at a competition held nearly sixty years previously in Inverness in September, 1863. Skinner was not only a noted violinist but, especially early in his career, was a tutor of the national dances, and had formerly included the melody as one of the pieces in his dance school ball in Forres in 1880. In America the tune became the precursor for the old-timey tune "George Booker," first printed by George P. Knauff in his Virginia Reels, volume III (Baltimore, 1839). Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 54, pg. 80. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 133. Collinson (The Traditional and National Music of Scotland), 1966; pg. 223. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 62, pgs. 150-151. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 24. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 71. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 22. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 10, No. 1, pg. 8. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 1. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 14. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 38. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 16. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 12. Beltona BL2096, Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). HCD 008, Tommy Peoples - "Traditional Irish Music Played on the Fiddle" (appears as 2nd tune, track 5).
T:Marquis of Huntly's Farewell, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
C|A,2 A,>C E/E/E (E>F|A>Bc>B A2 (A>c|A,2 A,>C E/E/E (E>c|
B>c d/c/B/A/ (A<F F>A|A,2 A,>C E/E/E (E>F|A>Bc>B A2 (A>c|
d2 d>f e<c c>A|B>c d/c/B/A/ A<F F||f|f/e/d/c/ a>c b>c a2|f/e/d/c/ ac f>ed>c|
B<b b>f b/a/g/f/ b2|f<b b>f a>gf>e|f/e/d/c/ a>c b>c a2|f/e/d/c/ ac f>ed>c|
d/e/f/g/ a>g f>e d>c|B>c d/c/B/A/ A<F F>A||

MARY SCOTT (NAIRN). Scottish, Marching Air (cut time). G Major (Cranford): A Major (Skinner). Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish violinist and composer J. Scott Skinner (d. 1927). Source for notated version: learned by fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton) from Arthur Muise (Cheticamp, Cape Breton) who probably had it from either Cape Breton fiddler Cameron or Angus Chisholm [Cranford]. Cranford (Brenda Stubbert's), 1994; No. 67, pg. 24. Skinner (The Logie Collection).

MARY WALKER. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB (Brody), AB (Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner; from his Miller o' Hirn Collection. Source for notation: the late Graham Townsend (Ontario, Canada) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 184. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 15. Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend- "Le Violin/ The Fiddle." Olympic 6151, William McPherson- "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). CC25, Sean Keane - "Jig it in Style."
T:Mary Walker
M:C|
L:1/8
S:Sean McGuire, Avoca 33-ST-139, 1962
R:reel
Z:Philippe Varlet
K:Bb
B2dB ecAc|B2df bfdB|egce dfBd|cBAc BFGA|
B2dB ecAc|B2df bfdB|egce dfBd|cf=ef gf_ec:||
d/c/B bB aBgB|f2df bfdB|A/G/F eF dFcF|Acd=e fcAc|
d/c/B bB aBgB|f2df bfdB|egce dfBd|cBAc B3c:||

MATHEMATICIAN, THE. Scottish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. ABB' (Hardie): AA'BB (Skinner). Composed by J. Scott Skinner for a Dr. Clark, Cairo, it appears in his Scottish Violinist (1900) and Harp and Claymore (1890/1904) collections. The tune is technically demanding on the left hand, and Donegal fiddler John Doherty held the view (according to Alun Evans) that Skinner wrote it "to fool the country fiddlers." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 97. Skinner (Harp and Claymore Collection), 1904. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), 1900; pg. 45. Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Green Linnet Records SIF 1058, Matt Molloy & Sean Keane - "Contentment is Wealth" (1985). Green Linnet SIF-1101, Sean Keane - "Playing with Fire: the Celtic Fiddle Collection" (1989).
T:The Mathematician
L:1/8
M:C
K:D
G|F>G ^G>A f>d A>F|G>A _B>=B g>e B>d|c>b a>g f>e d>c|
(3dfe (3dcB (3ABA (3GFE|F>G ^G>A (3fed (3cBA|G>A _B>=B (3gfe (3dcB|
(3cba (3gfe (3dcB (3ABc|(3dAf (3dAF D3||a|d'>a f>d A>F D>=C|
B,>^D E>G B>e g>b|e'>b g>e B>G E>D|C>E A>c e>a c'>e'|
f'>d' a>f d>A F>D|G>B d>g b>d' g'>b|(3ad'c' (3bag (3fgf (3gfe|(3dfa (3d'af d3||

MESSE, LE. Scottish, Violin Solo or Polka (2/4 time). A Major ('A', 'B' & 'C' parts) & D Major ('Trio'). Standard. AABCCDD (the 'D' part is a trio). Composed by Scottish fiddler J. Scott Skinner and published in 1904 in his Harp and Claymore collection, dedicated "To A.W." The tune features pizzicato runs. Caoimhin Mac Aodh reports the tune was in the repertoire of Donegal fiddler John Doherty as "The Postman's Knock." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pgs. 132-133. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 47.

MILLADEN. Scottish, Strathspey. B Minor. Standard. AAB. From the Harp and Claymore collection, composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 6.

MILLER OF DRON(E), THE [1]. See "Cairistiona Chaimbel" and "Christy Campbell." Scottish (originally), English, Canadian; Strathspey. England, Northumberland. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. E Minor (Hall & Stafford, Raven): F Sharp Minor (Athole, Cole, Gow, Hardie, Hunter, Kerr, Skye): A Minor (Carlin/Master, Honeyman, Perlman). Standard. AB (Carlin, Cole, Gow, Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Perlman): AA'B (Athole, Skye): AABB (Raven). The piece was probably composed by Nathaniel Gow (1763-1831), to whom it is often attributed, and appears in his Complete Repository, Part Second, 1802. Nathaniel's father Niel Gow is also sometimes credited with the piece (e.g. by Perlman). "The Miller of Drone" was published about 1801 by John Pringle. It has been said that Pringle also claimed authorship, and certainly "Drone" is sometimes credited to him as well, however, Alburger (1983) points out that Pringle clearly identified other tunes on the same page as his own, but did not put his name with "Drone." Although Gow published it a year later most authors seem to lean toward ascribing the tune to him, with the notable exception of the collector and Gow sceptic John Glen (1895), who called Gow's claim "doubtful." J. Scott Skinner, never one to shy from self-promotion, predicted when he published his own famous strathspey "The Miller o' Hirn" that "'The Miller o' Drone' will drone no more"--time, however, has not proven him correct. A melody with this title (perhaps version #2) is one of the "missing tunes" from William Vickers' 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript. See also note for "Grey Eagle." Sources for notated versions: Bill Hardie (Scotland) [Hunter]; Peter Chaisson, Jr. (b. 1942, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Alburger, 1983; Ex. 79, pg. 131 (appears as "Millar of Drone"). Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 146, pg. 88. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 486. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 124. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pg. 25. Hall & Stafford (Charlton Memorial Tune Book), 1974; pg. 55. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pgs. 26-27 (includes variations by Bill Hardie). Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 18. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 144. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 30, No. 1, pg. 18. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 2. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 197. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 181. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 10. Surenne (Dance Music of Scotland), 1852. ACC-49398, Brenda Stubbert - "House Sessions" (1992). Beltona BL2128 (78 RPM), The Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Canadian Broadcasting Corp. NMAS 1972, Natalie MacMaster - "Fit as a Fiddle" (1993). Celtic CX 017, Dan J. Campbell. Green Linnet SIF3040, De Dannan - "Ballroom" (1987. The tune appears on the record as "The Miller of Drohan," rendered as a hornpipe. It was learned from the playing of Tara and Dermy Diamond of Belfast, though the version probably originally came from Co. Fermanagh fiddler Tommy Gunn.) Rounder 7003, John Campbell - "Cape Breton Violin Music" (1976). "James F. Dickie's Delights" (1976).
T:Miller of Dron
L:1/8
Q:140
M:C
R:Strathspay
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
c/B/|A<FF<A E>F E<C|A,<Ad>c B2 Bc/B/|1 A<FF>A E>F E<C|D<FE>G A2A:|2
e>Bc>G A>EF>C|D>FE>G A2A||
c/d/|e<cc<a e>e f/e/d/c/|e<cc<a f2 f>a|e<c c>a e>e f/e/d/c/|d>Bc>A F2 Fc/d/|
e<cc<a e>e f/e/d/c/|e>fa>g f2 f>g|(3agf (3efg (3aed (3cBA|(3dcB (3cBA (3Ffe (3dcB|]

MILLER O' HIRN, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. The first tune composed by J. Scott Skinner, for his friend James Johnston, the miller at Hirn, near Banchory, whom he visited as a child (Hunter says Skinner's grandfather and Johnston married sisters). Skinner apparently was confident that his composition, which in fact is one of his best, would supplant the famous strathspey "Miller o' Drone" in the literature, for he prefaced the tune in his Harp and Claymore collection with:
***
We'll 'Drone' nae mair, sin' we ha'e got
The 'Miller o' the Hirn', O.
***
Hunter (1979) includes this bit of verse in his note on the melody:
***
'Lad, cam' ye doun by Feugh's green howe,
The Feugh that rins through Crathes, O?
Heard ye a fiddler dirl a bow,
Wi' something like a pathos, O?
Weel, gin he meet wi' your applause,
I brawly can discern, O,
The dusty-noted fiddler was
"The Miller o' the Hirn", O.
***
Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 105, pg. 182. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 109 (appears as "Untitled Strathspey"). Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 73. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 111. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 67. Skinner, Harp and Claymore Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 2. Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979).
T:Miller o' Hirn, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
D>E F<B A<F (D2|B,>)E G/F/E/D/ C<A, ~A,>C|D>E F<B A<F D2|
B,>D (C<A) F<D D2:|
A>G (F<d) B<(G ~G2)|B>A ^G<e c<A A>B|A>G (F<d) B>A (G<B)|
c>B A<a f<d ~d>B|A>G (F<d) B<(G ~G2)|B>A (^G<e) c<A A>c|
(3dAB (3cde (3fde (3fga|(3bag (3fed (3cBA (3GFE||

MILLER'S RANT [1]. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish concert fiddler and composer, James Scott Skinner (1843-1927), from his Logie Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 2.
T:The Miller's Rant
C:J Scott Skinner
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:Strathspey
K:D
A,<DF>D A>DF>D|B,<EG>EB>EG>E|A,<DF>D A>DF>D|G<BC<A D2 D:|]
A|A<df>d a>df>d|B>^de>f g>ec>B|A|A<df>d a>df>d|B<dc<a d2 d>A|
A<df>d a>df>d|B>^de>f g>ec>B|(3agf (3edc (3BAG (3FED|(3CDE (3A,B,C D2 D|]

MILLHILLS. Scottish, Pastoral Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AB. The tune was composed by perhaps the most famous Scots fiddle/composer, J. Scott Skinner (b. Banchory in Kincardine-shire, 1843). Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 89, pg. 121.

MISS LAURA ANDREW. Scottish, Reel. E Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 226, pg. 90. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 40. Olympic 6151, Florence Burns - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

MISS MARY WALKER [OF PETERHEAD]. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. One part. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 269.

MISS PAUL. Scottish, Circassian Circle. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the great Scottish violinist and composer J. Scott Skinner (1941-1927), from his Logie Collection. credited to J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 46.

MISS PRIMROSE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. From Harp and Claymore, credited to J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 4.

MISS SHEPHERD. Scottish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AAB (Hunter, Perlman, Skinner): AABB (Songer)h. Composed by Scottish fiddling great J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), first published in his Harp and Claymore Collection. Hunter (1988) reports that Miss Shepherd was a clerk in Strachan's music shop on Belmont Street in Aberdeen, at one time a favorite meeting place on Saturday nights for fiddlers. Source for notated version: Paul MacDonald (b. 1974, Charlottetown, Queens County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 192. Perlman (Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 98. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 27. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 137 (appears as "Miss Shepherd's Reel"). Green Linnet SIF 3037, Silly Wizard - "Golden, Golden" (1985).

MISS SUTHERLAND GUNN (ELGIN). Scottish, Strathspey. F major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 165.
T:Miss Sutherland Gunn (Elgin)
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:F
C|(C<~F F>)G A>G A<c|d>c {c}(f>A) {A}G>F G<A|C<~F F>G A>B (A<c)|
{c}(d>c) {c})f>A) {A}(G2 F)||c2|{c}d>c {c}f>c d>c A<c|d>c AF GF (D<F)|
(C2 DE) F>G A>G (A<c)|{c}d>c {c}f>A {A}G2 G>c|{c}(d>c) {c}(f>c) d>c A<c|
d>c AF GF D_D|(C>F) (_D>F) C(D/E/ F)(G/A/|~B(c/d/ c)B/A/ {A}G2 F||

MISS AUSTIN. Scottish, Slow Strathspey. G Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by Archibald Allan of Forfar (1794-1831), described in J. Scott Skinner's "Harp and Claymore" collection as "one of the very best players and composers of his day." His most famous composition is "The Dean Brig o' Edinburgh." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 40. Stewart-Roberson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 302.
T:Miss Austin
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Minor
^f|g<d d>c B>AG>A|B>c dc/B/ A2 D>^f|g<d d>c B>cd>c|BA/G/ AG/^F G2 G,:|
A|B>df>b A>cf>a|B>c dc/B/ A2 D>A|B>df>b A>cf>a|BA/G/ AG/^F/ G2 G,>A|
B>df>b A>cf>a|B>c e/d/c/B/ A2 D^f|ga/b/ a>g ^fg/a/ d>c|BA/G/ AG/^F/ G2 G,||

MISS JOHNSTONE [1]. Scottish, Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 24.
T:Miss Johnstone [1]
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Skye Collection
K:A
E|A2 eA (cd)ec|B2 =gd (BG)GB|A2 eA (cd)ec|A2 ae (cA) A:|
f|e(agf) eAcA|B(=gfe) dGBG|A(agf) eAcA|dfeg a(AA)f|eagf eAcA|
B=gfe dGBG|A2 eA (cd)ec|df ea cAA||

MOY HALL. Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard. AB. "From the Inverness Collection" (Skye). "Moyhall is the romantic residence of Sir Aeneas MacIntosh, Bart., chief of that name, a most worth, benevolent, and hospitable character. {Alexander Aeneas Mackintosh of Mackintosh is now (1874) Chief of the Clan, and owner of Moyhall}" (Fraser). Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 128, pg. 51. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 116. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884.
T:Moy Hall
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C
G|c2ec GcEC|FDAD dDAB|1 c2ec GcEC| G,CB,D ECC:|2 c2ec GcEF|
GcBd ecc||
f|ecgc aceg|fdad bdfa|1 ecgc acec|GcBd eccf:|2 ecgc ecGE|G,CB,D ECC||

MR. A. G. WILKEN'S FAVOURITE. Scottish, Solo Strathspey. F Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). The Mr. Wilken was an amateur violinist from village of Ellon, Aberdeenshire. Source for notated version: Bill Hardie (Scotland) [Hardie]. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 72. Skinner, Miller o' Hirn Collection.

MR. BEVERIDGE. Scottish, Slow Strathspey. E Flat Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his "Miller o' Hirn Collection" (1881). Mr. Beveridge was a "violin maker, late of Tough," a village near Alford in Aberdeenshire. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 42.

MR. THOMAS FORBES. Scottish, Strathspey. G Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1943-1927). Winston Fitzgerald's version mixed the tonality between minor and major. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 164, pg. 65. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 132. Skinner (The Miller o' Hirn).
T:Mr. Thomas Forbes
L:1/8
M:C|
S:MacDonald - The Skye Collection
K:G Minor
^c|d>cB>A (G2 G>)A|B>A G<d B<G G>^c|d>=cB>A G2 G>B|
A>G F<f A<F ~F>^c|d>cB>A (G2 G>)A|B>A G<d B<G G>A|
B<Gc<A d<B=e<c|f>d c<f A<FF:|
[fa]|b>ag>^f g2 d>g|b<gd<g B<gd<g|a>gf>=e f2 c>f|a<f=e<f c<fA<f|
b>ag>^f g2 d>g|b<gd<g B<gd<g|a<fg<=e f<d=e<c|d<Bc<A B<GG||

MRS. DOUGLAS HENDERSON. Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 134, pg. 55.

MRS. FORBES LEITH. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AB (Hardie): AA'BB' (Perlman). Composed by the great Scottish fiddler, composer and dancing master J. Scott Skinner (1842-1927). Source for notated version: Kenny Chaisson (b. c. 1947, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island; now resident of Rollo Bay) [Perlman]. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 60. Henderson, Flowers of Scottish Melody. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 114. Skinner, Thirty New Strathspeys and Reels, 1868. Skinner, Miller o' Hirn Collection.

MRS. FORBES OF LEITH. Scottish, Reel. B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 106, pg. 44.

MRS. JAMES CHRISTIE. Scottish, "Scottish Minuet." B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing in The Cairngorm Series, Part 3. The melody, styled a "Scottish Minuet" by Skinner, is actually in 4/4 time and thus not a minuet at all. Hardie states it has the charater of a slow strathspey. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 38.

MRS. SCOTT SKINNER [1]. Scottish, ("Solo") Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AABCCD. From Skinner's Miller o Hirn collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner and dedicated to his first wife, Jane Stuart of Aberlour, who died suddenly in the twelfth year of their marriage. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 20. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 17. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 158. Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974).
T:Mrs. Scott Skinner [1]
L:1/8
M:C
S:MacDonald - Skye Collection
K:D
A,|D>F A>B (B/A/)G/F/ (d>e)|(f/e/)d/c/ d[DF] [C2E2] [C>E>]F|
D>FA>B (B/A/)G/F/ (d^G)|(A<d) f>e d2 [Fd]:|
f/g/|a>f d>A B<g ~g>B|(Af) (e>d) (e2 e)f/g/|a>fd>A B<g ~g>B|
[FA][Af][Af][Ge] [F2d2][Fd]f/g/|(^g/a/)b/a/ fd B<g ~g>B|[FA]f (ed) ec A>G|(F/E/F/G/) A>_B (=B/A/G/F/) [G>d>]^G|(A<d) f>e d2 [Fd]||
A,|(D/E/)F/G/ (A/^G/)A/B/ (B/A/)=G/F/ d>e|(f/e/)d/c/ d[DF] [C2E2] [C>E>]F|
(D/E/)F/G/ (A/^G/)A/B/ (B/A/)=G/F/ [Gd]^G|(A<d) f>e d [Fd]:|
f/g/|(^g/a/)b/a/ (=g/f/)e/d/ (B/^d/)e/f/ g[GB]|[FA][Af] [Af][Ge] [F2d2] df/g/|
(^g/a/)b/a (=g/f/)e/d/ (B/^d/)e/f/ g[GB]|[FA][Ad] (ed) (ec) A>G|
(F/E/F/G/) (A/^G/A/_B/) (=B/A/=G/F/) d^G|A<d f>e d2 [Fd]||

MUIR O' GELLAN, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and, later, fiddling partner. Milne managed to make a living playing theater venues all over Scotland, but became addicted to opium in the drug laudenaum, which he originally took as a pain-killer. Milne ended his life in reduced circumstances, busking on the ferry which crossed the Firth of Forth.Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 97, pg. 41.

MUSIC O' SPEY, THE. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). C Major (Skinner/Hirn): A Major (Bain, Hunter, Skinner/Violinist). Standard. One Part (Skinner): AB (Hunter): AABB (Bain). Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927). Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 10. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 49. Skinner, Miller o' Hirn Collection, 1881. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 35.

OSSIAN. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). F Sharp Minor. Standard. AAB. From Skinner's Harp and Claymore Collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner himself. Ossian was a Celtic bard believed to have lived around the 3rd century A.D. Poetry austensibly written by him was published in the early 1760's by James Macpherson (1736-1796) of Kingussie, Inverness-shire, who claimed to have copied the poems from original manuscripts which he declined to produce. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 104. Skinner, The Scottish Violinist, pg. 36 (arranged by Gavin Greig).

PETER GRAY [1]. Scottish, Reel. G Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist). pg. 14.

PETER LAING. Scottish, Strathspey. F Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 15.

PITTENGARDNER'S RANT. Scottish, Rant. D Major. Standard. AAB (Skinner): AA'B (Hardie). Pittengardener was one of the best violin pupils of Skinner's father, William Skinner, and was "one of the most successful 'Men o' the Mearns,' reramin' fu' o' music" (Hardie, 1992). Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing in his Harp and Claymore Collection. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 81. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 2.

PRESIDENT, THE. Scottish, "Violin Solo" (Polka). A Major ('A','B','C' parts) & D Major ('D' part). Standard. ABCD(Trio), with variations. Composed in 1904 by J. Scott Skinner, and his most technically demanding piece for the left hand. Skinner played in the United States twice, in 1893 and again in 1926 (at the age of 82). Purser (1992) states the tune shows Skinner's classical techniques: "To the purist, The President has only a peripheral place in the tradition, but it is still played in country pubs in Aberdeenshire by fiddlers who would make short work of purists if given the chance." Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 109, pg. 186 (variation II only). Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pgs. 135-139 (with variations by Skinner). Purser (Scotland's Music), 1992; Ex. 14, pg. 238. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 18-19.

PRETTY PEGG{Y} [1] (Mairgreadin Deas). AKA and see "The Ladies Delight." Scottish, Irish; Reel. D Major. Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AAB (Athole, Gow, Hunter, Skye): AA'B (O'Neill/Krassen): ABB' (Hardie). The melody is identified by the band Altan as a Scottish reel that has been popular in Ireland for a number of years; indeed, J. Scott Skinner, in his Harp and Claymore collection observes it is "One of the finest of the old Reels." The 'B' part is similar to "The Perthshire Hunt." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 440. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 34. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 25. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 214. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 140, pg. 17. Kerr (Caledonian Collection), pg. 5 (appears as "Pretty Peg"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 76. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 146 (appears as "Pretty Peggy"). O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1476, pg. 273. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 704, pg. 124. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 90. Culburnie Records CUL 102, Alasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher - "The Driven Bow" (1988). Green Linnet SIF-1094, Capercaillie - "Sidewaulk" (1989). Green Linnet GLCD 1117, Altan - "Harvest Storm" (1992). Ron Gonella - "Scottish Violin Music" (1966).
X:1
T:Pretty Peggy
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
A|d2fd AFDA|d2fd e/f/g fe|d2fd AFDF|GEFD CEE:|
A|F/E/D AD BDAD|G/F/D G/F/D CEEG|G/F/D AD BDAD|
GFED A,DDA|G/F/D dD cDBD|AD G/F/D CEEG|FAdf ecdB|
BFGE FDD||
X:2
T:Pretty Peg
R:Reel
D:Altan
Z:Adrian Scahill
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
(3ABc|d2fd ADFA|defd (3efg fe|defd AFDF|(3GFE (3FED CEEA:||\ (3FED AD BDAD|(3FED AD CEEG|(3FED AD BDAD|FDAD A,DDG|\ (3FED dD cDBD|ADFD CEEG|FAdf ecdB|AFEF D4:||

PROFESSOR BLACKIE. Scottish, Air. D Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 48.

QUEEN'S WELCOME TO INVERCAULD, THE. Scottish, Marching Air. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Included as one of the tunes in his 1921 concert set romantically entitled "Warblings From the Hills." Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 31.

REEL O'/OF TULLOCH, THE ("Ridhle Thulichun" or "Ruighle Thulaichean"). Scottish; Reel and Strathspey. A Major/A Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Athole): AAB (Hunter, Neil, Skinner, Skye): AABB (Emmerson, Kerr): AABB' (Gow): ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO (Johnson). The tune was originally a very popular 17th century bagpipe piece, probably by an unknown composer (although in MacGregor's collection it is confidently stated that the tune was composed by John Dubh Gear, a MacGregor of Glen Lyon). MacDonald once remarked that this reel was composed at Tulloch in Aberdeenshire, and this assertion has survived in tradition. Legend has it, reports Nigel Gatherer, that the reel was improvised on the spot by a MacGregor who had just emerged victorious from a fight with a Robertson for the hand of the Laird o' Tulloch's daughter. Its earliest appearence is in David Young's 1734 Duke of Perth Manuscript (AKA the Drummond Castle Manuscript, where it appears with 160 bars of variations) and it was later reprinted in his 1740 MacFarlane Manuscript (Volume 2, No. 115). Purser (1992) states that it was adapted for the violin "with superb rhythmic pointing and synchopations, mostly composed by David Young in 1740." The piece subsequently appears in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection, the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768), and Davie's 1829 Caledonain Repository (with some pizzicato variations). Johnson (1984) is of the opinion that Young probably composed the three finest sections of the version given in the former's 1984 volume (parts 'F', 'L', and 'O'). This important melody, which at one time was known as 'Righ na' m Port,' or 'King of Airs', has retained its popularity through the ages and is still part of the pipe repertory today.
***
"The Reel of Tulloch" has for several centuries been used in Scotland for a specific dance for males which is always performed to the tune, and it has been quite dominent at Highland dances for several centuries. Instructions for the popular dance, but not the melody, appear in the Menzies Manuscript (contained in the Atholl Collection of the Sandeman Library, Perth), 1749, which carries the alternate title "The Mighty Pretty Valley." J. Scott Skinner, the celebrated violinist who was also dancing master, routinely taught the dance to his students throughout the latter 19th century. Another "Reel of Tulloch" (Ruidhleadh Thulachain), for two mixed couples, was composed around 1800, and appears in dance literature in 1844 (in The Ballroom Annual), though it was mentioned in accounts of dances from the year 1819 onward. Flett & Flett conclude the dance was originally a 'society' dance which was developed at the Breadalbane Balls. It was a particular favorite of Queen Victoria, states Hunter (1979), who first witnessed its performance at a ball at Taywouth Castle given by the Marquis of Breadalbane (the dancers on the occasion were the Marquis of Abercorn, the Hon. Fox Maule, Cluny Macpherson and Davidson of Tulloch). In most parts of Scotland the dance was performed to the tune "The Reel of Tulloch" but in Roxburghshire and Berwickshire, where the dance was often known as "The Hullachan Jig," a double jig such as "The Irish Washerwoman" was played. For an extensive discussion of the dance and its origins see Flett & Flett (Traditional Dancing in Scotland), 1964, pgs. 132-155.
***
"The 'Reel of Tulloch' should be played first as a Strathspey and then as a Reel followed by 'Stumpie' and 'The Deil Among the Tailors,' a welcome combination to enthusiastic dancers" notes MacDonald in his Skye Collection. Paul Stewart Cranford (1995) remarks that versions of this reel vary in late 20th century Cape Breton, from a simple reel setting to J. Scott Skinner's elaborate strathspey variations. Emmerson (1971) finds that the tune on close examination reveals itself to be a rant. Sources for notated versions: Bremner's Scots Tunes, pg. 4 (Bremner clearly meant that parts were only to be repeated once, stated Johnson) [Johnson]; fiddler Mike MacDougall (Ingonish, Cape Breton, 1928-1982), whose style was greatly influences by the highland pipes [Cranford]. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 3, pg. 2. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 42, pg. 136. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 1, 1799; pg. 25. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 250. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 30, pgs. 82-83. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 5, No. 4, pg. 5. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 3. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 132, pg. 171. Purser (Scotland's Music), 1992; Ex. 2, pg. 174. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with seven variations by the author), pg. 24-25. Skinner (Harp and Claymore), 1904. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 6. Cranford Publications CP-R2, "Jerry Holland Solo" (1988). Green Linnet GLDC 1108, The Tannahill Weavers - "Cullen Bay." "The Caledonian Companion" (1975).
T:Reel of Tulloch
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
a/f/|e2 a>c e>cA>a|e2 A>c d>B=G>f|e2 A>c e>Ac>A|B>E c/d/e d>B=G>f|
e2 e>c ecAa|e2 e>c dB=Gf|e2 e>a e>Ac>A|Bece d>B=G>B|]
c>A c/d/e cAAB|c>A c/d/e dB=GB|cA c/d/e cAcA|BEBe dB=GB|
cA c/d/e cAAB|cA c/d/e dB=GB|cA c/d/e c2 c>e|Bece d>B=G>f|]

ROLLING SPEY, THE. Scottish, "A Strathspey Study." G Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, impressed by Scotland's Spey river. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 48.

ROSE ACRE. Scottish, Air (4/4 time). A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scots fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 215, pg. 85. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 37.

ROSE BUD OF ALLENVALE, THE. AKA and see "Rose of Sharon Waltz," "Rose of Allendale," "Rose(bud) of Avonmore," "Rosebud of Allenvale." Scottish (originally), Canadian; Air (6/8 time) or Waltz. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scots fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), originally published in the 1920's in his Cairngorn Series #9. The title sometimes appears as "The Rose of Allendale" and similar variants, and can be found in America under the title "Rose of Sharon Waltz." Missouri fiddler Howard Marshall writes: "we call this "Rose of Sharon" (for those of us who may have learned it off Howdy Forester's old LP) or "Rosebuds of Aviemore" (there is a town in the Scottish Highlands south of Inverness named Aviemore; I've been there), or "Rosebuds of Avamore" (maybe a reference to the Ozark town of Ava MO where fiddler Bob Holt lives)." Source for notated version: George MacPhee (b. 1941, Monticello, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 38. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 49. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 174.

ROSE OF SHARON WALTZ. AKA and see "Rose of Allendale," "Rose(bud) of Avonmore/Allenvale." Scottish (originally), American; Waltz. A Major. Standard. AA'B. The melody was originally composed by the great Scots fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), who titled it "Rose Bud of Allenvale." Source for notated version: J.T. Perkins [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 301.

ROSEBUD OF AVONDALE. (AKA - "Rose of Avondale"?). New England, Waltz. A Major. Standard. One part. Perhaps the J. Scott Skinner melody "Rose Bud of Allendale."

ROSEBUSH JIG, THE. Scottish, Jig. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Not "The Rose Bush", a jig in Ryan's/Cole's. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 176, pg. 70.

ROSEWOOD'S DIRK. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 82, pg. 36.

SAILOR'S HORNPIPE [1]. AKA and see "College Hornpipe," "Jack's the Lad," "Lancashire Hornpipe." English (originally), American; Reel, Hornpipe, or Breakdown. England, Northumberland. USA; New York, southwestern Pa., West Virginia, Alabama, Arkansas. G Major (Most versions): D Major (Sweet): B Flat Major (Hardings, Seattle/Vickers). Standard. AABB. Originally titled the "College Hornpipe" this melody became known as the "Sailor's Hornpipe" through its association with the performance of the hornpipe dance, typically performed on the stage in nautical costume (see notes for "College Hornpipe"). At the turn of the 18th century a sailor was a favorite character of the musical stage and the nautical theme became so associated with the dance that many hornpipes were generically labled a 'sailor's hornpipe'. The dance itself features a distinctive 'side-cutting' step. The style retained its popularity throughout the century, and none-less than J. Scott Skinner, the famous Scottish violinist who was also a dancing master, taught the dance at Elgin and other places to his pupils. As the "College Hornpipe" the tune was in print in 1797 or 1798 by J. Dale of London, and though the melody predates Dale's publication, the English antiquarian Chappell's editor dates it no earlier than the second half of the 18th century.
***
"Sailor's Hornpipe" was imported to North America where it entered traditional repertoire and became fairly widely known, still with its nautical connotations--so strong was the association, in fact, that it was selected as the theme song of a popular mid-20th century animated cartoon character, Popeye the Sailorman. Bronner (1987) reports the earliest known printing in the United States was in a publication by B. Carr entitled Evening Entertainments in the year 1796 (under the "College Hornpipe" title). Although the name "Sailor's Hornpipe" has been something of a floating title in the United States, it is probably the 'College' tune under this title which was cited as having commonly been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). Similarly in American tradition, it was played at a fiddle contest in Verbena, Alabama, in 1921 (as noted in the Union Banner of October 27, 1921), and also in another 1920's contest in Georgia by one R.L. Stephens of Camp Hill, Alabama (according to the Columbus (Ga.) Register of December 10-12, 1926) {Cauthen, 1990}. The title also appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. The late Kentucky fiddler George Lee Hawkins, renowned as a "hornpipe fiddler," played "Sailors" in the key of F. Sources for notated verisons: W. Franklin George (W.Va.) [Krassen]; Floyd Woodhull, 1976 (New York State) [Bronner]; Marion Yoders (fiddler and fifer from Greene County, Pa., 1963) and Brown Hall (fiddler from Fayette County, Pa., 1956) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 310E-F, pgs. 262-263. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 243. Bronner (Old Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 10, pg. 56. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 87 (appears as "College Hornpipe"). Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 46. Hardings All-Round, 1905; No. 177, pg. 56. Krassen (Appalchian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 83. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 222. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987; No. 439 (appears as "College Hornpipe"). Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 41. Folkways FA 2472, Roger Sprung- "Progressive Bluegrass, Vol. 3." Decca DL 74601, Bill Monroe- "Bluegrass Instrumentals." New World NW 293, Rodney Miller - "Instrumental Dance Music 1780's-1920's." Paramount 3017 (78 RPM), 1927, John Baltzell {Baltzell was a native of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, as was minstrel Dan Emmett (d. 1904). Emmett returned to the town in 1888, poor, but later taught Baltzell to play the fiddle}.

SANDLAW'S WELCOME. Scottish, "Pastoral Air." A Major. Standard. One part. From Skinner's Harp and Claymore collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 37.

SANDY CAMERON'S. Scottish, Canadian; Strathspey. Canada, Cape Breton. J. Scott Skinner composed this pipe strathspey for Sandy Cameron, "The Famous Athlete." The Gordon Highlanders Pipe Music Collection, Vol 1, 1983. A & M 79602 2000-2, Ashley MacIsaac - "Close to the Floor" (1992). Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996).

SANDY GRANT. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner and named for Alexander Grant, inventor of the rondello, a round fiddle, and conductor of the Highland Strathspey and Reel Society. It appears in Skinner's collection "Harp and Claymore." Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 3.

SANDIE OVER THE SEA. Scottish, Slow Air. G Major. Standard. One part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner and first appearing in his Logie Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 35.

SARONA. Scottish, Slow Air. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 49.

SCOTT SKINNER. AKA - "Scott Skinner's Reel." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the famous Scots violinist and composer J. Scott Skinner (1848-1927). Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 9.

SCOTT SKINNER'S COMPLIMENTS TO DR. MACDONALD. Scottish, Marching Air. A Major. Standard. AAB (Skinner): AABCCD (Hunter). Composed by J. Scott Skinner in honor of Dr. Keith Norman McDonald (1834-1913) or Ord in Skye, an excellent musician and violinist, and a physician who practiced in Skye, Lochaber, Edinburgh and Burma. McDonald edited both the Skye Collection of Reels and Strathsepys (1897) and the Gesto Collection of Highland Music (1895). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 345. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variation), pg. 31. Olympic 6151, Angus Cameron - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978).

SCOTT SKINNER'S ROCKIN' STEP. Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing first in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 13.

SHAKIN'S O' THE POCKY, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927), in collaboration with Peter Milne (1824-1908); it appears in Skinner's Miller o' Hirn Collection. Milne, a great strathspey player equally at home with classical music, gave Skinner his first lessons in playing strathspeys, but had the misfourtune to become an opium addict after taking medicinal laudanum to relieve pain from an injury. He deteriorated, and finally was reduced to busking for change on the ferries that travelled from Queensferry and Burntisland. When the Forth Bridge (road bridge) was built even this income ended and he returned to Aberdeen, where he died, an invalid (Alburger, 1983). The title refers to a time when Milne and Skinner, both impoverished, had to pool their meagre resources together just to afford the price of one dram ('pocky' meaning a bag, especially a beggar's bag for meal). "The Shakin's o' the Pocky" is also a Scottish expression meaning the smallest pig in a litter, or the smallest child in a family. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 104, pg. 173. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 59. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 164.
T:Shakin's o' the Pocky, The
C:James Scott Skinner and Peter Milne
B:adapted from The Caledonian Companion
N:as played by Aly Bain
Z:Nigel Gatherer
K:Bb
M:4/4
L:1/8
B,>DF>G F<D B,>A|B>A G/A/B/c/ d4|e>cd>B c>A BG|F<D B>D C2 C>D|
B,>DF>G F<D B,>A|B>A G/A/B/c/ d4|e>cd>B c>AB>G|G/F/E/D/ F/E/D/C/ B,2 B|]
a|b>f d<B g<e c>a|b>f e/d/c/B/ f3 g/a/|b>f d<B g<ec>B|A>B c<f B2 B>a|
b>f d<B g<e c>a|b>f e/d/c/B/ f2 f>e|d>Be>c d/c/B/A/ B>G|\
G/F/E/D/ F/E/D/C/ B,2 B|]

SHE'S BONNIE AN' BRAW. Scottish, "Flirtation" (6/8 time). A Major. Standard. AB. From the Logie Collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 46.

SIESTA, LA. Scottish (3/4 time). A Flat Major. From J. Scott Skinner's Logie Collection (1888).

SILVERWELLS. Scottish (originally), Canadian; Slow Air (4/4 time). Canada, Cape Breton. F Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). Popular with older Cape Breton fiddlers such as Winston Fitzgerald, Angus Chisholm and Alex F. MacKay. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 227, pg. 91. Skinner, Miller O' Hirn Collection. Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996. Learned from her uncle, Buddy MacMaster).

SIR WILLIAM WALLACE. Scottish, "Pastoral Air." A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing in his Harp and Claymore Collection. It commemorates the Scottish hero William Wallace (b. 1270), who led a revolt against the English but was finally defeated at the Battle of Falkirk in 1298 by the forces of Edward I. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 114. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 38.

SIRDAR'S MARCH, THE. Scottish, Pipe Quickstep. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner who originally published it in his Harp and Claymore Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variation), pg. 33.

SMITH'S A GALLANT FIREMAN, THE. AKA and see "Carrick's Reel/Rant," "More Luck to Us," "Riley's Favorite." Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB (Kerr, Skinner): AAB (Skye): ABCD (Hardie). Bill Hardie (1986) remarks the title refers to the days when the village blacksmith would serve the populace not only by his trade, but would be called upon to extinguish fires in the event of an emergency. From "J. Scott Skinner's Set" notes Skinner (1843-1927) himself in The Scottish Violinist, while Bill Hardie (1986) styles it "After Charles Hardie's Set." Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 15. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 3, No. 1, pg. 4. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 44. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variation), pg. 16. Rounder 7001, Joe Cormier - "Scottish Violin Music from Cape Breton Island" (1974). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975).
T:Smith's a Gallant Fireman, The
L:1/8
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S:Skye Collection
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d2 d>f d/d/d d>A|B>Ad>A F/F/F F>D|G>BG>B F>AF>A|E>DE>F B/B/B B||

SO I'M OFF WITH THE GOOD ST. NICHOLAS BOAT. Scottish, Jig or "Flirtation" (6/8 time). A Major. Standard. AB (Skinner): AA'B (Cranford). From the "Hirn Collection," composed by J. Scott Skinner. Source for notated version: fiddler Brenda Stubbert (b. 1959, Point Aconi, Cape Breton) who learned it from a recording by the influential fiddler Winston Fitzgerald [Cranford]. Cranford (Brenda Stubbert's), 1994; No. 88, pg. 33. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 46. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 17).

SPEED THE PLOW/PLOUGH [1] (Bí ag Treabhadh leat). AKA and see "The Doon Reel," "God Speed the Plow," "The Naval Pillar." English (originally), Irish, Scottish, Old Time, American; Reel, Breakdown or Hornpipe. England; Yorkshire, Northumberland. USA; New England, New York, southwestern Pennsylvania, Maine, Michigan, Arkansas, Missouri. Ireland; Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border. A Major (most versions): G Major (Breathnach, Hall & Stafford, O'Neill {1915}): D Major (Johnson, Moylan). Standard. One part (Burchenal): AB (Athole, Bayard, Hardie, Kerr, Skye): AA'B (Bacon): AABB (Barnes, Breathnach, Brody, Ford, Hall & Stafford, Huntington, Johnson, Merryweather & Seattle, Miller & Perron, O'Neill, Phillips/1989, Sharp): AABB' (Moylan): AA'BB' (Phillips/1994). The phrase 'God speed the plough' is derived from a wish for success and prosperity in some undertaking, and is many centuries old. It occurs as early as the 15th century in the song sung by the ploughmen on Plough Monday (the first Monday after the twelve days of Christmas). Linscott (1939) concludes (perhaps speculatively) the name of this dance and tune indicates association with or derivation from the ancient rituals connected with 'Plough Monday' in Great Britain. This festival, he says, was part of the worship of agriculture which the early villagers practiced and occured in mid-winter (January): "The prayers for a good harvest were presented to the house gods with great ceremony; bread and cheese were set into the plough, and a like offering scattered to the fields for the crows. The first offering was to seek the blessing for the harvest; the second, to appease the adverse elements" (Linscott, 1939).
***
A note in O'Neill {1913} (based on the authority of the British Musical Biography) states the air was composed in 1799 by John Moorehead of Armagh, Ireland (though born in Edinburgh, emigrating to Armagh in 1782), a famous violinist who came from a musical family and who acquired some reknown in the latter 18th century. He was violinist of Covent Gardern Theatre in 1798, though his life ended tragically some six years later when he committed suicide by hanging in 1804. Apparently his tune was first called "The Naval Pillar." A year after Moorehead was supposed to have composed it the melody was used for a play called "Speed the Plough" (1800) written by Thomas Morton, and was published in New York as an instrumental piano piece about the same time. It quickly entered tradition on both sides of the Atlantic--apparently about the same time--and it has appeared regualrly in fiddle-tune collections since that time in America and the British Isles.
***
In America the tune was known in the tradition as early as 1839 when it was printed in George P. Knauff's Virginia Reels, volume I. "Speed the Plow" is cited as having often been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly) and it also appears in the repertoire list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham (the elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's). The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tumes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. To entertainer John Hartford it appears a cousin of "Greenfields of America," and he likens it to "Devil's Hornpipe" as played by Roy Wooliver. Burchenal (1918) prints a New England contra dance of the same name with the tune, and Linscott (1939) supports that the same dance has always been linked with this tune in that region.
***
Flett & Flett report the tune a Scottish country dance and that it is the first half of the Perth Medley, peculiar to the Perth Hunt Balls. The tune was included by J. Scott Skinner in his 1921 concert set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's." In Scotland the country dance Speed the Plow is sometimes known by an alternate title, the Inverness Country Dance. The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800, soon after the tune was written. The tune does not generally appear in Cotswold morris tradition, a type of rural ritual dance in southern England, though it was introduced to the village of Bampton, Oxfordshire, dances in 1975 (Bacon, 1974).
***
O'Neill (1913) believes the tune to be Irish in character, and states it was regarded as English due to its being first heard in English theatres, though he regretfully determined it too associated with England to include in his Dance Music of Ireland.
***
Sources for notated versions: J. Scott Skinner (Scotland) [Phillips]; Willie Woodward (Bristol, N.H.) [Linscott]; Albert Quigley, c. 1950's (New England) [Miller & Perron]; Bradley Grimshaw (northern N.Y., 1958) and Hogg (Pa., 1948) [Bayard]; piper Seamas Ennis, 1959 (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; Paul Goelz [Johnson]; Kelly Jones (Mo.) [Phillips/1994]; an MS collection by fiddler Lawrence Leadley, 1827-1897 (Helperby, Yorkshire) [Merryweather & Seattle]; George Edwards (Woodland Valley, Catskill Mtns., New York) [Cazden]; Charlie Mulvihill via accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region) [Moylan]. Adam, 1928; No. 58. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 53a. Barnes (English Country Dance Tunes), 1986. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 275A-B, pgs. 230-231. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 160, pgs. 84-85. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 264. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 37. Carlin (English Concertina), 1977; pg. 37. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 17. Cazden, 1955; pg. 344. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 7. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 21. DeVille, 1905; No. 68. Fiddler Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 1, Spring 1996; pg. 32. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 78. Hall & Stafford (Charlton Memorial Tunebook), 1974; pg. 34. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 37. Harding Collection (1915) and Harding's Original Collection (1928), No. 15. Howe (Musicain's Omnibus), pg. 41. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 23. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No. or pg. 12. Johnson, Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 9. Kennedy (Fiddler's Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 16, pg. 8. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 6, pg. 24. Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 112. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 5. Merryweather & Seattle (The Fiddler of Helperby), 1994; No. 5, pg. 29. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddler's Repertoire), 1983; No. 94. O'Malley, 1919; pg. 24. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 371, pg. 179 (listed as a hornpipe). Phillips (Fiddle Case Tunebook: British Isles), 1989; pg. 44. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 229. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 189. Robbins, 1933; No. 78, pg. 25. Saar, 1932; No. 13. Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1994; pg. 4. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 15. Sym, 1930; pg. 7. White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 79, pg. 15. Beltona BL2096 (78 RPM), Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). F&W Records 4, "The Canterbury Country Orchestra Meets the F&W String Band." Fretless 136, Arm and Hammer String Band- "Stay on the Farm." Green Linnet 1023, Joe Shannon and Johnny McGreevy- "The Noonday Feast." Kicking Mule 209, Hank Sapoznik- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." Mulligan 017, "Molloy, Brady, and Peoples." Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King."Voyager 320-S, Frank Ferrel- "Fiddle Tunes." "The Fiddler's Companion" (1980).
T:Speed the Plough
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
E|A2(Ac efec|eaec efec|dfdB cecA|FBBA GABc|ABcd efec|eaga ecAc|
decd BcAB|FAGB A2A||g|a2 (ag aece|aAgA fAec|dfdB cecA|FBBA GABd|
cAce aece|fgaf ecAc|decd BcAB|FAGB A2A||

SPINNIN' WHEEL, THE [1]. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927) and published in his Logie Collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 3. Altan - "Runaway Sunday" (from Donegal fiddler John Doherty who played it in a medley he called "Flood on the Holm" which included the tunes "The Brides Reel" and "The Auld Wheel").

SPRINGBANK HOUSE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 85, pg. 37.

STIRLING CASTLE. AKA - "Sterling Castle." AKA and see"The Grey Daylight," "Gray Day-Licht," "Harvest Home" [2], "The Kirn," "Marquis of Hansley's." Scottish (originally), Irish; Highland or Strathspey. Ireland, County Donegal. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Professor Bannatyne, this tune is in both bagpipe and fiddle repertories. According to Bill Hardie (1986), North-East Scottish fiddlers "of two or three generations ago" knew this strathspey by the title "The Grey Day-Licht." The reference to "Harvest Home" as an alternate title comes from J. Scott Skinner's Harp and Claymore collection; as Bill Hardie notes, the similarity between "Stirling Castle" and the popular hornpipe "Harvest Home" is a tenuous one, however, there is considerable similarity to "Harvest Home" [2]. In Ireland the piece is popular today as a highland in County Donegal, and was one of the several Scottish tunes recorded by the great Sligo/New York fiddler Michael Coleman. Sources for notated versions: Bill Hardie (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) [Hunter]; MacDonald (1887) in his Skye Collection notes the tune is "According to Doig"; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 121, pg. 50. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 22. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 8. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 114. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 2, No. 1, pg. 4. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 55. Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Tourish, Dermot McLaughlin, Seamus Glackin, Kevin Glackin - "Fiddle Sticks: Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991). Topic 12TS381, The Battlefield Band - "At the Front" (1978). "Melodeon Greats" (1978).
T:Stirling Castle
S:session playing
Z:Juergen.Gier@post.rwth-aachen.de
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:Strathspey
K:D
D2F>A D>A F<A|A,2 C>E A,>E C<E|\
D2F>A D>A F<A|1(3Bcd (3efg (3fed (3cBA :|2\
(3Bcd (3efg f<d d|]A|d2 f>d g>e f>d|\
B2 c>d (3efd (3cBA|d2 f>d g>e f>d|\
(3Bcd (3efg f<d d>A|d2 f>d g>e f<d|\
B2 c>d (3efd (3cBA|(3fga (3gfe (3dcB (3AGF|\
(3GAB (3ABc (3dAG (3FGE|]
T:Stirling Castle
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:D
A,|D<D F>D A>D F>D|A,<A, C>A, E>A, C<E|D<D F>D A>D F>A|
(3Bcd (3efg (3gfe (3cBA|D<D F>D A>D F>D|A,<A, C>A, E>A, C>E|
D<D F>D A>D F>A|(3Bcd (3efg f<d d||A|d<d f>d g>e f>d|
(3Bcd (3efg (3fed (3cBA|d<d f>d g>f g>b|(3agf (3gfe (3dcB (3AGF|
d<d f>d g>e f>d|(3Bcd (3efg (3fed (3cBA|(3fga (3gfe (3dcB (3AGF|
(3GAB (3ABc (3dAG (3FED||

SURGEON'S TRIUMPH, THE. Scottish, March (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the famous Scottish fiddle-composer, J. Scott Skinner, c. 1922 and dedicated to a Dr. Milne, a surgeon who had operated on him. The MS is published for the first time in Bill Hardie's Beauties of the North (1986), having been obtained from the surgeon's son, who gave it to Ian Collie, Director of Education for Central Region, who in turn gave it to Dr. Tom Anderson (Shetland), and thence to Mr. Hardie. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 18 (includes variations).

TALISKER [1]. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927); it appears in his Logie Collection. It and Skinner's reel of the same name are presumably written after the famous Scotch whisky. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 31. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 8.
T:Talisker [1]
L:1/8
M:A
S:Skye Collection
K:A
~A2 A>a e<A c>d|(e>A a>)e f>BB>c|A2 A>a e<A c>e|(d/c/B) e>d c>A A:|
a|b>ga>f e<A c>d|(e>Aa>)A f>BB>a|(b>ga>)f e<A (c>d)|e>Aa>e c>AA>a|
(b/a/g) a>f e<A (c>d)|e>Aa>e f>BB>c|~A2 A>a e<A c>e|d/c/B e>d c>A A||

TALISKER [2]. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by the great Scottish fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1843-1927). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 36.
T:Talisker [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Skye Collection
K:D
c|d2 fd (AF)GA|Bcde dABc|d2 (fd) AFGA|Bdce d2 d:|
B|AFGA Bcdf|edcB cAAB|AFGA Bcde|fedc d2 dB|AFGA Bcde|
edcB cAAc|d2 fd (AF)GA|BGEC D2D||

TARLAND MEMORIES. AKA - "George Rose Wood." Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AB. One of the last compositions of self-taught Scots fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), who was one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers. Milne performed in theaters until his opium addiction reduced him to busking on ferryboats crossing the Firth of Forth, until the roadbridge was built and this income too was denied him. Milne died destitute in a mental institution, a victim of an addiction contracted by taking Laudanum (an opium derivative) for an injury. The alternate title is "George Rose Wood," named for J. Scott Skinner's chief concert agent from 1922-1925, the end of his career. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 96. Henderson, Flowers of Scottish Melody, 1935.

TEN POUND FIDDLE, THE. Scottish (originally), Canadian, Reel. Canada, Cape Breton. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by the great Scottish composer and fiddler J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927), who recorded it on a 78 RPM the year he died. The pound, of course, is a British monetary unit. Source of notated version: Angus Chisholm (Cape Breton) [Phillips]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 79, pg. 35. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 255. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 47. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 5. Shanachie 14001, "The Early Recordings of Angus Chisolm" (a Cape Breton fiddler who recorded the tune in the 1930's in a medley with "The Baker").

THERE'S NAETHING LIKE THE TALISKER. Scottish. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, in honor of the famous Scotch whisky.

THRUM'S CAIRN. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by the great Victorian fiddler and composer J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927). Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 72, pg. 32.

TIMOUR THE TARTAR. AKA and see "Peter Street," "Babes in the Woods," "Blanchard Races." Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard. AB (Athole, Emmerson, Honeyman, Hunter, Kerr, Skye): AABB (Raven): AABB' (Brody, Cranford, Phillips). Timour the Tartar was otherwise known as Timur the Lame, Tamburlaine and Tamerlane, who lived from c. 1336 to 1405. The Tartars were Mongol Turks, and Timur was a devout Muslim, descended from the infamous conqueror Genghis Khan. Like his forebearer Timur created an empire by the sword, which did not survive his death. Rising to the throne of Smarkand in Tukestan in 1369, Timur soon set about conquoring huge territories, from India to Syria. He died of a camp fever just before a planned invasion of China. Uilleann pipers, not being able to play in the key of A, render the tune in G Major. The alternate title "Peter Street" comes from the c. 1880's Ryan's Mammoth Collection, while Kerr prints it (Vol.1, pg. 22) as "Babes in the Woods." Sources for notated versions: Dave Swarbrick (England) [Brody]; Scott Skinner (Scotland) [Phillips]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 277. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 83, pg. 36. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 50, pg. 141. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 22. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 257 (arranged for strings by James Hunter). Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 17, pg. 9. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 30, No. 2, pg. 18. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 6. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 49. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 164. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 40. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 9. Glencoe 001, Cape Breton Symphony- "Fiddle." Fretless 118, Marie Rhines- "The Reconcilliation." Transatlantic 337, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick." Topic 12T280, J. Scott Skinner- "The Strathspey King." "Fiddlers 5."
T:Timour the Tartar
L:1/8
M:C
S:Skye Collection
K:A
E|A2 (c/B/A) eA (c/B/A)|(eA)aA gAfA|A2 (c/B/A) eA (c/B/A)|BEdE cEBE|
A2 (c/B/A) eA (c/B/A)|(eA)aA gAfA|eaec eaec|BABc A2A2||E (G/F/E) BE (G/F/E)|
BEdE cEBE|A2 (c/B/A) eA (c/B/A)|(eA)aA gAfA|(e^d)ec (ag)af|e^dec (ag)af|
ecag fedc|BAGF EFGE||

TULCHAN LODGE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner (1841-1927), appearing in his Logie Collection. Tulcan Lodge, near Advie in Speyside, was the Scottish home where Skinner, early in his career as a dancing master, taught the family of Lady Chetwode of Oakley. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 98, pg. 41. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 56. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1992; No. 152. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 4.

TULLOCH CASTLE. Scottish. Composed by J. Scott Skinner for a place he visited in Scotland.

TULLOCHGORUM/TULACH GORM (The Blue-Green Hill). AKA - "The Corn Bunting," "The Blue Hill," "The Green Hill." Scottish, English; Rant or Strathspey. England, Northumberland. G Mixolydian (Alburger, Athole, Cole, Emmerson, Gow, Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Kerr, Skinner): G Major (Peacock). Standard: F Mixolydian (Johnson). One part (Hunter): AB (Carlin/Gow, Cole, Hardie, Johnson/Emmerson, Skinner): AAB (Athole, Emmerson, Honeyman, Kerr): AA'B (Carlin - Master): AABB (Alburger): AABBCCDD (Peacock). The title means "Blue-Green Hill" in Gaelic, and port-a-beul words have been set to "Tulach Gorm." The tune and song appear to be quite old; music historian Francis Collinson finds that a tune in the Rowallan lute manuscript (c. 1612-1628) called "Ouir the Deck Davy" has a "distinct resemblance" to "Tullochgorum." The earliest record of this tune appears in David Young's Duke of Perth MS (AKA the Drummond Castle MS) of 1734; it is also found in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768), and John Glen (1891) finds it in Robert Bremner's 1757 collection (2nd part, pg. 16); these early versions show little of the later strathspey rhythm, at least as noted, and appear as rants. Tullochgorm is also the name of a Scottish dance of twelve steps, and was one of several taught by Cape Breton fiddler Donald "the Tailor" Beaton of South West Margaree (who was an itinerant tailor). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. "Tullochgorum" was one of the tunes Niel Gow played for Robert Burns in October, 1787, when Burns visited the fiddler at his home in Dunkeld (see also "Loch Erroch-side," "Lament for Abercairney"). In fact, it is one of the most famous tunes in the repertoire, and must be mastered by every serious strathspey player, according to Hunter (1979); Niel Gow and J. Scott Skinner "built their reputations on the performance of it." Skinner wrote a set of six famous variations on the tune, though those printed in the McGlashan Collection may be the earliest. Words were set to it by the Rev. John Skinner (1721-1807), pastor of the Episcopal Chapel at Langside near Peterhead, which begin:
**
There needsna be sae great a phrase,
Wi' dringing dull Italian lays,
I wadna' gi'e our ain Strathspeys,
For half a hundred score o' 'em.
They're douff and dowie at the best
Douff and dowie, douff and dowie,
They're douff and dowie at the best
Wi' a' the variorum:
They're douff and dowie at the best,
Their allegros and a' the rest,
They canna please a Highland taste,
Compar'd wi' Tullochgorum. (The Songs of Scotland, 1887)
**
Hunter (1979) remarks that Rev. Skinner came to the defense of Scottish folk music at a time when fashion ran to the Italian musical influence among the middle and upper classes of Scotland. Robert Burns ("Amang the trees") and Robert Fergusson (1750-1774), in "Daft Days" (in Scotland the 'daft days' are the Christmas-New Years holiday period), also joined his fight. "Daft Days" includes the following excerpt:
**
Fiddlers! your pins in temper fix
And roset weel your fiddlesticks;
But banish vile Italian tricks
Frae out your quorum;
Nor fortes wi' pianos mix----
Gie's Tullochgorum.
**
Source for notated version: Mary MacDonald, who learned her setting from fiddler Sarah (Mrs. John Angus) MacArthur of Mabou Coal Mines, Cape Breton [Dunlay & Greenberg]. Alburger (Scottish Fiddlers and Their Music), 1983; Ex. 15, pg. 36. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; No. 137, pg. 84. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 226. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 3. Dunlay & Greenberg (Traditional Celtic Violin Music of Cape Breton), 1966; pg. 89. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 58, pg. 149. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 109. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 31. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 86. Johnson (Scots Musical Museum), 1790; No. 289. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 15, No. 1, pg. 10. McGlashan (Collection of Strathspey Reels), Vol. 3, 1786; pg. 4. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 87. Peacock (Peacock's Tunes), c. 1805/1980; No. 38, pg. 17. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with six variations), pg. 26-27 {also appears in his collection Harp and Claymore}. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 158. Celtic CX 24, Alexander MacLean - "Piano Stylings of the Cape Breton Scott." CLM 1000, Carl MacKenzie - "Tullochgorum" (1979). Topic 12TS280, J. Scott Skinner (originally recorded in 1905). Topic 12TS354, Mary MacDonald - "Cape Breton Scottish Fiddle" (1978). NQD-5447, Doug MacPhee - "Cape Breton Master of the Keyboard."
T:Tullochgorum
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
d/c/|:B<Gd<G c<=F A>c|B<Gd<G B>c d<g|B<Gd<G c<=F A>c|
B<Gd<G A/B/c BA:|
G>gd>g =f<=F A2|G>gd>g B>gd>g|G>gd>g =f<=F A2|
G>gd>B ~c2 BA|G>gd>g =f<=F A2|G>gd>e !=f<c f>g|
A/g/f/e/ =fd c<=FA<a|g>d g/a/b e>gd>g||
T:Tulloch Goirm
L:1/8
M:C
S:McGlashan - Strathspey Reels
K:C
G>gd>e f>cA>F|G>gd>g B>gd>g|B>gd>e f>cA>F|G>gd>g B>GA>G|
G>gd>e f>cA>F|G>gd>e f>cf>a|g>efd cFAf|gdgb g2 de||
|:B>Gd>G c>Fc>A|B>Gd>G e>Gd>(g|g)>Gd>G c>Fc>A|B>Gd>G B2 AG:|
|:G>g a/g/f/e/ f>c d/c/B/A/|G>gd>g B>gd>g|G>g a/g/f/e/ f>c d/c/B/A/|
G>gd>g B>GA>G|G>g a/g/f/e/ f>c d/c/B/A/|B>g a/g/f/e/ f>cf>a|gefd cFA^f|
g>dg>b g2 de:|
|:BG B/c/d/B/ cF A/B/c/A/|BGGA B/A/B/c/ dg|BG B/c/d/B/ cF A/B/c/A/|1
BGGc B2 AG:|2 GDDC B2 A,G,||
G>gd>e f>c f2|e>gd>g B>gd>g|B>gd>e f>c f2|e>gd>g B2 AG|Ggdg fc f2|
G>gd>e f>cf>a|gefd cFAf|gded B/d/d e2||
|:B,>GD>G, C>B,A,>C|B,>GD>G, E>G,D>G|G>G,D>G, C>B,A,>C|
B,>GD>G, D2 C>B,:|

TWIST YE TWINE YE EVEN SO. Scottish, Air. F# Minor. Standard. AB. "A spinning wheel song" (Skinner). Title is from a Sir Walter Scott poem. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 21.

VALLEY OF SILENCE. Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, appearing in his Harp and Claymore Collection. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 65. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 39. Olympic 6151, William MacPherson - "Scottish Traditional Fiddle Music" (1978). Tartan Tapes CDTT1004, Paul Anderson - "Heat the Hoose" (1998).

WARDS HORNPIPE. Scottish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard. AABB. Originally printed in his Harp and Claymore collection, composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 43.

WARRIOR O' PERSIE, THE. Scottish, Slow Air and Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with 'B' part variation), pg. 11.

WARRIOR'S GRAVE, THE. Scottish, "Wild Melody." D Minor. Standard. AAB. From J. Scott Skinner's collection Harp and Claymore, composed by the author. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 42.

WEEPING BIRCHES OF KILMORACK, THE. AKA - "The Weeping Birches." Scottish, Slow Air (4/4 time). E Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner after visiting the site of a tragedy in Scotland with two friends, Donald Morrison and Dr. McDonald. Hunter (1979) relates that above the Falls of Kilmorack on the river Beauly lies the Pass of Dhreim, where some time previous to the friends' sojurn a traction engine with a couple of trucks had fallen one hundred feet into the gorge, resulting in the death of two men. "A strange phenomenon happened--most of the birches within thirty yards of the accident began to wither away. Skinner became obsessed with the tragedy and gave it expression through this fine melody." On Cape Breton the tune is known simply as "The Weeping Birches." Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Winston Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 222, pg. 89. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 64.

WILLIAM DUGUID--FYVIE. Scottish, Strathspey. A Major. Standard. AA'B. Composed by William Martin (1836-1908), a teacher, fiddler, composer and poet, who wrote the lyrics to J. Scott Skinner's most famous tune, the "Bonny Lass of Bon Accord." William Duguid (1866-1905) was a disciple of J. Scott Skinner, and teacher to the great 20th century Scottish fiddle stylist James F. Dickie. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 80. Henderson, Flowers of Scottish Melody, 1935.

WILLIE MACLENNAN. Scottish, Marching Air. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABBCCDD. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, first printed in his Harp and Claymore collection. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 30.

WILL'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. F# Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by J. Scott Skinner. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 12.

ZEPPELIN, THE. Scottish, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard.
T:The Zeppelin
C:J. Scott Skinner
S:The Monekie Series no.3 "The Laird o' Thrums"
B:NLS Scop.2.4
N:Humorous Hornpipe
N:* The Audience clap their hands in imitation of
N: the Allied Shots bringing down the Monster.
Z:Jack Campin, Oct 2000
N:I added the natural marking in bar 10
M:2/4
L:1/16
K:A
E2|\
{B}A>GA>B c>de>c |d>cd>e f>ga>f|e>a(g>a) e>cA>c | B2"*"e2"*"e2 E2 |
A>GA>B c>de>c |d>cd>e f>ga>f|e>(ag>)f e>cd>B |{B}c2"*"A2"*"A2 :|
e2|\
a>ga>f g>^^fg>e|f>^ef>^d =e>de>c|d>cd>B c>^Bc>A | B2"*"e2"*"e2 .E2
{B}A>GA>B c>de>c |d>cd>e f>ga>f|e>(ag>)f (3efe (3dcB|{B}c2"*"A2"*"A2 z2||


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