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The Fiddler's Companion

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BRAES OF BALQUHITHER/BLAQYHEDER/BALQUHIDDER/BALQUIDDER, THE. Scottish; Air, Strathspey and Country Dance Tune (4/4 time). G Major (Kerr): F Major (Athole). Standard. AABCC (Gow, Kerr): ABCD (McGlashan): AABCCD (Athole). No matter which spelling is used the name 'Balquhither' is pronounced 'Balwhither'. The tune appears in both air and dance versions. Glen (1891) finds the piece frist published in Bremner's 1757 collection (pg. 37), however, the tune (and dance instructions) appear in The Bodleian Manuscript (1740), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740" (the MS is named for the Bodleian Library, Oxford, where it is housed). Robert Tannahill (1774-1810), bard and weaver of Paisley, wrote a song by this name which appeared twice in R.A. Smith's Scottish Minstrel (1821-1824), Vol. 1, pg. 49 and Vol. IV, pg. 89 (the latter air is a modification of the first and is called "The Three Carles o' Buchanan"). The song text appears in Henry W. Shoemaker's Mountain Minstrelsy of Pennsylvania (1931), with the following note:
***
Potter County: This very ancient ballad was furnished by Mr.
Myron Hill, 70 years old. It was sung to my grandfather when a
child, soon after the War of Revolution, by veterans of that war,
and he sang it to me in 1876, in memory of our family soldiers
of 100 years before.- John C. French, 1919.
***
Mr. French's account predates the Tannahill publication by some forty years, and perhaps he was a victim of the human penchant for subscribing increased antiquity to already old items, though it is possible that an older song text to the country dance tune predated the Tannahill publication. Tannahill's words begin:
***
Will ye go, lassie, go,
To the braes o' Balquhidder?
Where the blaeberries grow,
'Mang the bonnie bloomin' heather;
Where the deer and the roe,
Lightly bounding together,
Sport the lang summer day
'Mang the braes o' Balquhidder.
***
Chorus:
Will ye go, lassie, go,
To the braes o' Balquhidder?
Where the blaeberries grow,
'Mang the bonnie bloomin' heather.
***
The song "Wild Mountain Thyme" is derived from "Braes of Balquidder," as is "Will You Go, Lassie, Go" reworked by Frank McPeake of Belfast. Gow notes the tune "may be play'd very Slow." Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 27. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 16, No. 1, pg. 11. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 37. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 212. Folk Lyric FL-116, Betsy Miller (Ewan MacColl's mother). Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994. Tannahill's song).
T:Braes of Balquhidder
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:F
c|A/B/c Fc A2 AB|A/B/c Fc AGGB|A/B/c Fc A2 Ac|defd cAA:|
c|defd cAag|fdcA AGGc|defd cAfg|agfd cAAc|defd caga|~fdcA AGGA|
FCA,C FGAc|defd cAA||
|:c|dFcF A2Ac|dFcF AGGc|dFcF A2Ac|defd cAA:|
c|defd cAag|fdcA AGGc|defd cAfg|agfc A2Ac|defd caga|fdcA AGGA|
FCA,C FGAc|defd cAA||
T:The Braes o' Balquhidder
B:G.F. Graham, The Popular Songs and Melodies of Scotland (1900)
C:Words written by Robert Tannahill 1774-1810.
N:it's vaguely like The Duke of Bucclugh's Tune in Playford, 1687
M:2/4
L:1/8
R:Air
Q:1/4=96
K:D
% hexatonic, G missing
F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B2 A>F|F<E F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B>c d>B |A<F||
F>A|B>c d>B|A<F f>e|d<B A>F|F<E F>A|B>c d>B|A<F f>e|dB AF |F<E||
F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B2 A>F|F<E F>A|B2 A>D|F2 F>A|B>c e/d/c/B/|A<F|]

FISHER'S HORNPIPE (Crannciuil {Ui} Fishuir). AKA "The Fisher's," "Fisherman's Hornpipe." AKA and see "The Blacksmith's Hornpipe" (Ireland {Joyce}), "China Orange Hornpipe," "Egg Hornpipe," "Fisherman's Lilt," "The First of May," "Kelly's Hornpipe" [3], "Lord Howe's Hornpipe," "O'Dwyer's Hornpipe," "Peckhover Walk Hornpipe," "Roger MacMum" (Irish), "Sailor's Hornpipe," "Wigs on the Green" (Ireland {Roche}). English, Irish, Scottish, Shetlands, Canadian, Old-Time, Texas Style, Bluegrass; Hornpipe, Reel, Breakdown. USA & Canada, widely known. D Major {most modern versions}: G Major {often in the Galax, Va. area, also Bayard's version collected in Prince Edward Island}: A Major (Mississippi fiddler Charles Long): F Major {Burchenal, Cranford, Honeyman, Linscott, Miller & Perron, Miskoe & Paul, Perlman, Raven, Phillips/1995, Welling}. Standard or ADAD. AABB (most versions): AA'BB (Perlman): AA'BB' (Miskoe & Paul). On the subject of the title, several writers have posited various speculations on who the 'Fisher' might have been. Charles Wolfe, among others, believes it was originally a classical composition by German composer Johann Christian Fischer (1733-1800), a friend of Mozart's, which thought Samuel Bayard (1981) concurs, noting the tune goes back to latter 18th century England where it was composed by "J. Fishar" and "published in 1780" (Most of the alternate titles he gives {and which appear above} are "floaters"). Van Cleef and Keller (1980) identify the composer as probably one James A. Fishar, a musical director and ballet master at Covent Garden during the 1770's, and note it is included as "Hornpipe #1" in J. Fishar's (presumably James A. Fishar's) Sixteen Cotillons Sixteen Minuets Twelve Allemands and Twelve Hornpipes (John Rutherford, London, 1778). A few years later the melody appeared in England under the title "Lord Howe's Hornpipe" in Longman and Broderip's 5th Selection of the Most Admired Dances, Reels, Minuets and Cotillions (London, c. 1784). McGlashan printed it about the same time in his Collection of Scots Measures (c. 1780, pg. 34) under the title "Danc'd by Aldridge," a reference to the famous stage dancer and pantomimist Robert Aldridge, a popular performer in the 1760's and 1770's. Although it is known in Europe as a hornpipe, it has also been played as a reel for dancing the Shetland Reel in Scotland's Shetland Islands. Linscott (1939) thinks the melody resembles an "ancient" Irish folk tune known as "Roger MacMum," implying it might have been derived from that source.
***
The tune became widely popular in a short span of time. It was already known as "Fisher's Hornpipe" in both England and the newly independent United States when it was written out by the American John Greenwood in his copybook for the German flute of c. 1783. Another 18th century American publication, a 1796 collection entitled An Evening Amusement for German Flute and Violin, was printed in Philadelphia by Carr and contains the hornpipe set in 'D' Major. An American country dance was composed to the tune and first appeared in this country in John Griffith's Collection, a Rhode Island publication of 1788. Both dance and tune became American classics and entered traditional repertory throughout the county. A fiddler with the Moses Cleaveland surveying party (the city of Cleveland, Ohio, is named after him) is recorded as having played "Fisher's" during an impromptu dance on the first evening the party camped on the banks of the Cuyahoga river, as recorded in the diary of a surveyor with the party. It was one of the most widely known fiddle tunes and, along with "Rickett's Hornpipe," the most popular hornpipe played in the Southern Appalachians (although as time went on hornpipes were not generally dropped from the repertoire, certainly as an accompaniment for dancing, but "Fishers" remained in the repertoire as a fiddler's tune which was frequently played when a few musicians would get together for their own enjoyment). The tune retained its popularity, and Jim Kimball states that both "Fishers" and "Ricketts" (along with "Devil's Dream" and "Soldier's Joy") were favorite tunes for the last figure of square dances in western New York state into the early 20th century.
***
Around the Galax, Va., region quite a few fiddlers, like Charlie Higgins and John Rector, play 'Fisher's' in the key of 'G' Major. Tommy Jarrell, of nearby Mt. Airy, N.C., plays the tune in 'D' Major, as did his father, Ben Jarrell, though the tune usually appears in 'F' Major in early collections (the earliest American appearance, John Greenwood's flute MS of 1783, has the tune in 'G,' however). 'F' Major renditions are still common (along with 'D' Major versions) among fiddlers in central and north Missouri-- though relatively rare in the Ozarks region of the state--perhaps because of the because of the influence of the old town orchestras or brass bands (with flat-keyd wind instruments), radio broadcasts from Canadian fiddlers, and local classically trained music professors. Despite the seeming prevalence of the hornpipe set in 'F' major in early publications, Jim Kimball finds that the John Carroll manuscript collection, copied before 1804, gives "Fisher's" in the key of D Major, as does the John Studderd manuscript, c. 1808-1815, and the John Seely manuscript, c. 1819-1830 (Carroll was an Irish-American military musician stationed at Fort Niagara at the time he wrote his manuscript who apparently played both fife and fiddle; Studderd was a native of England prior to emigrating to western New York state in the 1820's; Seely, according to family history, was a fiddler who lived in western New York state for whom "Fishers" was a favorite tune).
***
The title "Fisher's Hornpipe" has been mentioned frequently in periodicals and other printed sources in America over the years. For example, it was recorded as having been one of the catagory tunes at the 1899 Gallatin, Tenn., fiddlers contest; each fiddler would play his version of the tune, with the best rendition winning a prize (C. Wolfe, The Devil's Box, Vol. 14, No. 4, 12/1/80). Similarly, it was listed in the Fayette Northwest Alabamian of 8/29/1929 as one of the tunes likely to be played by local fiddlers at an upcoming convention (Cauthen, 1990). Moving north, another citation stated it had commonly been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), while Burchenal (1918) printed a dance from New England of the same name to the tune. A Report of the Celebration Held in August 1914 for the 150th Anniversary of the Town of Lancaster (N.H.) gives the title as one of the tunes and dances performed at a cotillion that month. The title appears in a list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham's repertoire (Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's) and Gibbons (1982) notes it has been "a traditional dance melody familiar to fiddlers throughout Canada." Perlman (1996) notes it has status as one of the "good old tunes" played by Prince Edward Island fiddlers. In the South and Midwest the tune was recorded for the Library of Congress from the playing of Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, and (by Herbert Halpert) from the playing of Mississippi fiddlers Charles Long and Stephen B. Tucker in 1939. The Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner related that it, in modern times, it was "played often at (the) Weiser (Idaho) annual (fiddle) contest" (Shumway), to which Louie Attebery (1979) concurs, calling it part of the "standard fare" of many fiddlers at that festival and contest.
***
In the repertiore of Uncle Jimmy Thompson (1848-1931) {Texas, Tenn.}, and Buffalo Valley, Pa. dance fiddler Harry Daddario. See also "Miss Thompson's Reel," which particularly resembles the "Fisher's" in it's second section.
***
Sources for notated versions: Edson Cole (Freedom, N.H.) [Linscott]: Frank George (W.Va.) [Krassen]; Frank Lowery (Prince George, British Columbia) [Gibbons]; Lorin Simmonds (Prince Edward Island, 1944) [Bayard, 1981]; transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.), who learned the tune when young in Quebec [Miskoe & Paul]; 6 southwestern Pa. fiddlers and fifers [Bayard, 1981]; Ruthie Dornfeld and Major Franklin (Texas) [Phillips/1995 {two different versions}]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded in recital at Na Piobairi Uilleann, February, 1981 [Moylan]; Dennis Pitre (b. 1941, St. Felix, West Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, in the 1980's [Taylor]. Allan's (Allan's Irish Fiddler), No. 105, pg. 27. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 345, pgs. 332-334 and Appendix No. 3, pg. 573. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 107. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 47. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 57. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 45, pg. 17. Ford (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 39. Gibbons (As It Comes: Folk Fiddling From Prince George, British Columbia), 1982; No. 6, pgs. 18-19. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 40 (two versions, one in Newcastle and Sand Dance style, on in Sailor's style). Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. 20, pg. 67. Johnson & Luken (Twenty-Eight Country Dances as Done at the New Boston Fair), Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 4. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 103. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 79. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 3, pg. 42. Linscott (Folk Music of Old New England), 1939; pg. 77. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 117. Miskoe & Paul (Omer Marcoux), 1994; pg. 31. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 63, pg. 36. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 351, pg. 171. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 168. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; Nos. 1575 & 1576, pg. 292. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 825, pg. 143. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 117. Phillips, 1989 (Fiddlecase Tunebook: Old-Time); pg. 19. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pgs. 1992-193. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 163. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 26. Roche Collection, Vol. 3, No. 181. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 23, pg. 10. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 10. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 297. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 42. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 14. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 20. Alcazar Dance Series FR 204, "New England Chestnuts" (1981). Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 17). Caney Mountain CEP 212 (privately issued extended play album), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), 1965-66. Claddagh CC5, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford - "The Star Above the Garter" (appears as "Fisherman's Hornpipe"). County 405, "The Hill-Billies." County 707, Major Franklin- "Texas Fiddle Favorites." County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1986. The only time Tommy's famous fiddling father, Ben Jarrell {who took no active part in his musical education and rarely commented on his son's efforts}, praised his playing in front of him was after hearing the younger fiddler play the tune, remarking "By gawd, that's the best I've ever heard "Fisher's Hornpipe" played"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" F&W Records 4, "The Canterbury Country Orchestra Meets the F&W String Band." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways FG 3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes" (1968). Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family: Champion Fiddlers." Gourd Music 110, Barry Phillips - "The World Turned Upside Down" (1992). North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." Rounder 0035, Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973). Rounder 7004, Joe Cormier- "The Dances Down Home" (1977). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Northern Spy - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Topic 12T309, Padraig O'Keeffe, Denis Murphy & Julia Clifford - "Kerry Fiddles" (appears as "Fisherman's Hornpipe").
X:1
T:Fisher's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:F
|:c2|fc Ac Bd cB|Ac Ac Bd cB|Ac Fc Bd Gd|Ac FA G2 (3cde|
fc Ac Bd cB|Ac Fc Bd cB|AB cd ef ge|f2a2f2:|
|:ef|ge ce ge bg|af cf af ba|ge ce ga ba|gf ed c2 Bc|
dB FB dB fd|cA FA cA fc|df ed cB AG|F2A2F2:|
X:2
T:Fishers
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Hornpipe
B:The Athole Colletion
K:D
dc|dAFA GBAG|FAFA GBAG|FDFD GEGE|FDFD E2 dc|dAFA GBAG|
FAFA GBAG|FAdf gedc|d2 d2 d2:||:cd|ecAc ecge|fdAd fdaf|ecAc ecgf|
edcB A3A|BGDG BGdB|AFDF AFdA|BdcB AGFE|D2 D2 D2:|

RAGTIME ANNIE [1]. AKA and see "Raggedy Ann (Rag)," "Bugs in the 'Taters." Old-Time, Canadian; Breakdown. USA, very widely known. D Major ('A' and 'B' parts) & G Major ('C' part). Standard. AAB (Phillips/1989): AA'B (Sweet): AABB (Ford, Welling): AA'BB (Ruth): AA'BB' (Krassen): ABCC (Christeson): AABCC (Jarman, Johnson): AA'BCC' (Reiner & Anick): AA'BBC (Messer): AA'BB'CC (Miskoe & Paul): AA'BB'CC' (Phillips/1995). A popular tune and a staple of the North American fiddling repertoire. "Ragtime Annie is almost certainly a native American dance tune, possibly less than 100 years old" (Krassen, 1973), in fact, rumors persist that it first was heard played by Texas fiddlers around 1900-1910. Guthrie Meade has a similar point of view regarding the tune's antiquity, noting that this very popular piece appears in many relatively modern collections, but not in early ones. Reiner & Anick (1989) suggest the tune is derived from a piano piece called "Raggedy Ann Rag," and catagorize it as a 'Midwest' and 'Southwest' tune. One "Raggedy Ann Rag" was written by Joe "Fingers" Carr and published in 1952, far too late to have been the original for "Ragtime Annie," which was first recorded by Texas fiddler Eck Robertson (along with Henry C. Gilliland) in June, 1922, (backed with "Sally Goodin'" it was the best-selling country music record for that year), and a few years later by the Texas duo Solomon and Hughes. It was later recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's.
***
There is often some confusion among fiddlers whether to play the tune in two or three parts, and both are correct depending on regional taste. Eck Robertson's version was in three parts (the third part changes key to G major) as are many older south-west versions, and some insist this form was once more common that the two-part version often heard in more recent times. Other Texas fiddlers only learned the two-part version. Glen Godsey writes: "Of the fiddlers I knew in Amarillo in the 1940's-1950's, Eck was the only
one who played the third part. I learned only two parts as a kid, and we always played just two parts for the square dances. I only learned the third part many years later from Eck's recording." Little Dixie, Missouri, fiddler Howard Marshall says the third part has been a vital part of the tune in Missouri for many many years, offering that the renowned regional fiddler Taylor McBaine remembered playing it that way as a child in the very early 1920s. Marshall reports that local speculation is that the third part was inserted to relieve a square dance fiddler from the stress of keeping the main part of the tune going through a long set. Some feel the third part is reminiscent of "Little Brown Jug," although there can be considerable variation from fiddler to fiddler in the way third parts are rendered.
***
"Ragtime Annie" was the first tune learned by itinerant West Virginia fiddler John Johnson (1916-1996), originally from Clay County, from fiddler Dorvel Hill who lived in a coal-mining town called Pigtown, not far from Clay, W.Va.
***
I was bashful back then and wouldn't go in anybody's house hardly. I'd
sit on the railroad and listen to Dorvel play the fiddle at night. And I
learned most all of Dorvel's tunes. I just set down there and listened
to all his tunes and then go home and play them. (Michael Kline, Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed. 1999).
***
See the related "Going Uptown." Sources for notated versions: African-American fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Hector Phillips [Reiner & Anick]; Alexander Robertson [Phillips/1995]; transplanted French-Canadian fiddler Omer Marcoux {1898-1982} (Concord, N.H.) who "played (the tune) way back in Canada" [Miskoe & Paul]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 171-172. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 44. Frets Magazine, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle," July 1980; pg. 64 (includes variations). Jarman, 1944; pgs. 2-3. Johnson, Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 12. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 48-49. Messer, 1980; No. 10, pg. 1 (appears as "Raggedy Ann"). Miskoe & Paul, 1994; pg. 35. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 107. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 131. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 123, pg. 43. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 75. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 5 (with variations). Caney Mountain CEP 212 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.). Columbia 15127-D (78 RPM), 1926, Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers (Posey Rorer, fiddler). County 507, The Kessinger Brothers (Clark Kessinger, fiddler) - "Old Time Fiddle Classics." County 509, "Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers, Vol. 2." County 725, "The Riendeau Family: Old-Time Fiddling from Old New England." County 733, "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways 8826, Pers Four--"Jigs and Reels." Fretless 200a, Yankee Ingenuity--"Kitchen Junket" (1977). Front Hall 01, Bill Spence and Fennigs All-Stars--"The Hammered Dulcimer." Heritage 048, Gordon Tanner - "Georgia Fiddle Bands" (Brandywine 1982). Marimac 9110, Floyd County Ramblers - "It'll Never Happen Again" (orig. rec. 1930). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers Association 002, Taylor McBaine - "Boone County Fiddler" (played in three parts). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling." Rounder 0100, Byron Berline - "Dad's Favorites." Vanguard VSD 79170, "Doc Watson and Son." Victor LPV 552, Eck Robertson - "Early Rural String Bands" (a reissue of the original 1922 recording). Victor 19149 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1922). Victor Vi V-40244 (78 RPM), {Ervin} Solomon & {Joe} Hughes (1929. A twin fiddler version). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999). Voyager, Benny Thomasson - "Say Old Man Can You Play the Fiddle?"
T:Ragtime Annie
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:D
FE|DFBF AFBF|DFBF A2FE|DEFG ABAF|A2c2c2cB|
ABcA B2cB|ABcA BAcB|ABcd egfe|d2dc d2:|]
fg|a2ab afd2|A6 fg|a2ab agf2|g6 ef|
gfef gfef|gagf e2ef|gagf edcB|A6 fg|
a2ab afdB|A2AB A2 AA|d4 =c4|B6 A2|B2 b2 b2ag|
f2a2 a2gf|A2ef gfec|d2=c2 B2A2||
K:G
:G6 AB|c6 cB|A2f2 f2ef|gfga gedc|D2B2 B2AB|E2 c2 c2cB|
A2f2 f2ef|gfga g2:|
Variant of 'C' part from Dave Barton:
|: "G" B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| "G" gage dBAG
| B5AB2| "C" c3d cBAG| "D" F2fe fdef| gfga g4:|

SALT RIVER [2]. AKA and see "Salt Creek." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; West Virginia, Virginia, Texas. D Major {Krassen}: A Major/Mixolydian (Brody, Phillips). Standard. AB (Krassen): AABB (Brody, Lowinger): AABBAA'B'B' (Phillips). Popular in central and southern West Virginia (Krassen). Guthrie Meade thinks it reminiscent of an old tune called "Horny-knick-a-brino", but is "probably derivative of some Irish air." Charles Wolfe (1997) also believes it to be Irish in origin. Other writers have similar thoughts: according to one source the West Virginia version bears a resemblence to "Red Haired Boy" (Gilderoy), while Bayard (1981) believes the tune to be associated with sets of the American/Irish tunes "Ducks on the Pond," "Molly Maguire," "The Mills Are Grinding," "Pigeon on the Pies," "Paddy on the Turnpike," "Down the Hill," "The Flowers of Limerick," "The Telephone," and "A Rainy Day." An influential early recording was by Kanawha County, West Virginia, fiddler Clark Kessinger (1896-1975) for the Brunswick label in 1929 (Kessinger later re-recorded the tune). "Salt Creek" was later recorded by bluegrass mandolin player Bill Monroe under the title "Salt Creek." Sources for notated versions: Doc White (Clay County, West Virginia) [Krassen, 1983]; Frank George (W.Va.) [Krassen, 1973]; Kenny Baker and Benny Thomasson (Texas) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 249. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 37. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 71. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 15 (appears as "Salt Creek"). Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 212. Brunswick Records (78 RPM), the Kessinger Brothers (1929). County 527, Clark Kessinger- "Old-Time Fiddle Classics, Vol. 2." County 733, Clark Kessinger- "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Decca 31596, Bill Monroe. Front Hall 017, Michael and McCreesh- "Dance Like a Wave of the Sea" (appears as "Salt Creek"). Rounder 0087, Tony Trishka- "Banjoland" (appears as "Salt Creek"). Vanguard VSD 9/10, Doc Watson- "On Stage." Voyager 309, Benny and Jerry Thomasson- "The Weiser Reunion: A Jam Session" (1993).

TOM HILL'S HORNPIPE (Cornphíopa Thomáis a Chnoic). Irish, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: fiddler John Kelly/Seán O'Kelly (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 212, pg. 85.


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