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Result of search for "Ewe with the Crooked Horn":

BOB WITH THE ONE HORN [2]. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Go See the Fun," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "The Merry Lasses," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "Peter Street," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Red Blanket," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky Over It." Scottish, Irish; Reel. Version #1 in the major mode.

BUNCH OF KEYS, THE [1]. AKA and see: "Ewe with the Crooked Horn," "Flowers of Limerick" "The Mills Are Grinding," "Old Town Reel," "Paddy On the Turnpike" [2] (Cole), "Telephone Reel," "Yellow Heifer." Irish, Reel. G Dorian (Gm) {Brody}: G Major {O'Neill}: G Major/Mixolydian (Cranitch). Standard. AABB (Brody): ABC (O'Neill): AABBCC (Cranitch). The title refers to door keys, or, as Paul de Grae suggests, it may refer to the winged seeds (called keys) of the ash tree (fabled in Irish folklore), which hang in bunches before dropping. Sources for notated versions: Kevin Burke (Co. Clare, Ireland) [Brody]; Paddy Ryan [Bulmer & Sharpley]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 59. Bulmer & Sharpley (Music from Ireland), 1974, Vol. 1, No. 16. Cranitch (Irish Fiddle Book), 1996; No. 80, pg. 155. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 162. Copley DWL-9-617, Jack Wade- "Ceili Music From Ireland." Folkways FW 8876, Kevin Burke- "Sweeney's Dream." Folkways FG 3575, Barry, Gorman, Ennis, and Heaney- "Irish Music in London Pubs." Paddy Glackin & Paddy Keenan - "Doublin'" (1978). Piping Pig Records PPPCD 001, Jimmy O'Brien- Moran - "Seán Reid's Favourite" (1996. Learned from Séamus Ennis).
T:Bunch of Keys, The
T:Flowers of Limerick, The
S:Sean Ryan, fiddle (Chris Delaney collection)
Z:Transcribed by Paul de Grae
R:reel
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:GMix
DG{A}G^F G3 A|BGdG eGdG|DCDE F2 ~FG|AF (3FFF dFcF|
AGG^F ~G3 A|B2 GA Bc d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F DGGF||
DGG^F G3 A|BG (3GGG cGBG|DCDE F3 G|AF ~F2 CFA,F|
DGG^F ~G3 A|B2 GA Bc d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F DGGB||
dgg^f g2 dg|bg ~g2 bga^f|d^cde f2 ~fg|af ~f2 cfaf|
dgg^f ~g3 a|bga^f gf d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F DGGB||
dgg^f g2 dg|bg ~g2 bga^f|d^cde f2 ~fg|af ~f2 cfaf|
dg ~g2 dg ~g2|bga^f gf d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F DGGA||
BG ~G2 BGdG|BG ~G2 (3Bcd gd|AF ~F2 AFcF|AF ~F2 ABcd|
BG ~G2 DG ~G2|BAGA Bc d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F DGGA||
BG ~G2 DCB,D|BG ~G2 (3Bcd gd|AF ~F2 CFA,F|AF ~F2 ABcd|
BG ~G2 DG ~G2|BAGA Bc d2|(3^fga ge fdcA|BGA^F G4||

CHAORA CHROM. AKA and see "Ewe With the Crooked Horn."

EWE REEL, THE ("Seisd An Aisg," "Cor An Foisc" or "Ril na Foisce"). AKA and see "Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Bob with the one Horn," "Miss Huntley's," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Red Blanket," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Merry Lasses," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street." Irish, Reel. Ireland; County Sligo, west Clare. G Major (Breathnach, Mitchell, O'Neill/1850): G Mixolydian/Major {'A' part} & G Major {'B' part} (Flaherty, O'Neill/1001). Standard. AB (Mitchell): AAB (Flaherty): AA'B (O'Neill): AABB (Breathnach). The Irish version of the Scots "Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn." Breathnach (1985) found the tune under the title "Sweet Roaslea and the Sky over it" in County Monaghan, "Miss Huntly's" in Fermanagh, "Go see the fun" in Kerry, "The Red Blanket" in Clare and "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn" in Armagh. "The Pretty Girl in Danger" was the title printed by Goodman and Kerr gives it as "The Foe" and "The Bob with one horn." Sources for notated versions: piper Pat Mitchell (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; fiddler Fred Finn, 1919-1986 (Kiltycreen, Kilavil, County Sligo, Ireland) [Flaherty]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Chicago fiddler James Kennedy who had the tune from his father, a celebrated local fiddler from Ballinamore, County Leitrim [O'Neill]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 145, pg. 77. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 74. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 106, pg. 91. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 261, pg. 134. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1229, pg. 231. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 504, pg. 95.
T:Ewe Reel, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (504)
K:G
DGGF DGGE|=F2 AF cFAF|DGGF DGGg|1 fdcA BGAF:|2
fdcA BG G2||g2 bg dgbg|f2 af dfaf|g2 bg dgbg|agfa g2 ga|
bgaf gdde|fefd cAGF|dggf (3gab ag|fdcA BGAF||

EW(I)E WI' THE CROOKED HORN, THE/MY [1] ("A' Chaora chrom" or "Ard Mhacha"). AKA and see"Bob with the one Horn," "Carron's Reel," "Crooked Horn Ewe," "Ewe Reel," "The Flowers of Limerick," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn." Scottish, Strathspey; Irish, Highland. G Dorian (Athole, Gow): G Minor (Fraser, Hunter, Kerr): A Minor (Honeyman). Standard. AB (Kerr): AAB (Athole, Fraser, Gow, Hunter): AABB (Honeyman). The title comes an old song, in both Scots and Gaelic. Perhaps the most famous adaptation of the lyrics is by Reverend John Skinner, set to the tune of "Carron's Reel," although some find his set wanting. Fraser further explains: "This set of the Ewe with the Crooked Horn appears to be a standard, formed a century ago, by three neighboring gentlemen in Nairnshire, eminent performers,--Mr. Rose of Kilravock, Mr. Campbell of Budyet, and Mr. Sutherland of Kinsteary. It may not be generally known, that the Ewe thus celebrated is no other than the 'whisky still, with its crooked horn (distilling tube),' which gave more milk than all the sheep in the country." The following words are from an old Scots version appearing in Chambers' Songs of Scotland prior to Burns.
***
verse:
Ilka ewe comes hame at even (x3)
Crookit hornie bides awa
***
chorus:
Ewie wi the crookit horn
May ye never see the morn
Ilka nicht you steal my corn
Ewie wi the crookit horn
***
Ilka ewie has a lambie (x3)
Crookit hornie she has twa
***
A the ewes gie milk eneuch (x3)
Crookit horn gies maist of a
***
Alburger (1983) retells the persistent tale, probably not true, of Niel Gow and this tune: "One (story) concerns a violin which is supposed to have been given to Neil by a London dealer, when Niel was up with the Duke of Atholl. After some discussion the dealer ('said to have been a Mr. Hill') told Neil 'I shall give it you if you play 'The Ewie wi' the Crooked Horn,' in anything like the style in which I heard it in your own country.' Niel played his best, and the dealer presented the violin, 'a veritable 'Gaspar di Salo in Brescia,' to the understandably sceptical Gow, who 'said to his son, 'Come awa, I'm feared he may rue and take it back.'" Niel Gow's own "Cheap Mutton," published in his "Fourth Collection," is a simple variation on this tune.
***
John Glen (1891) thought the earliest printing of the melody was in Robert Ross's 1780 collection (pg. 16), although Bruce Olson finds the melody (under the title "Crooked Horn Ewe") in Rutherford's 24 Country Dances for 1758 (see abc below) and Jack Campin notes it is in the c. 1740 MacFarlane Manuscript in dorian mode under the title "An caora crom." The title also appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes which he published c. 1800. "Ewe/Yowie wi' the crookit horn" is also the name of a Scottish song whose singing was mentioned by Alexander Jaffray in his scketch of the assembly at Aberdeen in 1777 in Recollection of Kingswells. Jaffray gives an accounty of the various assemblys or country dances and recalls them as convivial affairs:
***
After the dance, followed a supper, where cheerfulness and good humour
prevailed. Those who could sing entertained the company, which remained
to a late, or rather early hour...I particularly noticed Mrs. Grant of Caron, a
very pleasant sensible woman. Her two songs were "Yowie wi the crookit
horn," and "Tibby Fowler in the Glen."
***
Irish versions appear in reel or hornpipe form (see Ewe with the Crooked Horn [3], but in County Donegal it is popularly played as a highland (see version #5). The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 55. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 19, pg. 7. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 17. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 169. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 187, pg. 22. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 31 (appears as "Crooked Horn Ewe"). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 191. Culburnie CUL 113D, Alasdair Fraser & Tony MacManus - "Return to Kintail" (1999). Plant Life PLR017, "The Tannahill Weavers" (1979).
X:1
T:Ewie Wi' the Crooked Horn [1]
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Minor
F|D<G G>A F>GA>F|D<G G>A B>G A<a|f>-e d<f c<f A>F|
A<f d>B c<AG:|
G<g g>a f>ga>f|d<g g>a b>ga>^f|d<g g>a f>ga>f|dg/a/ b>ga>^f g2|
f>=f d<f c<f A>F|D<G G>A B>G A<a|b>gf>d c>BA>F|
A<f d>B c<A G||
X:2
T:Crooked Horn Ewe, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:G Mixolydian
D>GG>A F>GA>F|D>GG>B c>GB>G|c>GB>G A>G F>C|D>GG>B AF G2|
D>GG>A F>G AG/F/|D>GG>A c>AB>G|A/B/c B/c/d c/B/A/G/ FA|DGGA FA G2||
G>gg>a f>g ag/f/|d>gg>a b>ga>g|d>gg>a f>ga>f|d>gg>b a^f g2|f>g d>f c>f A>F|
D>GG>B c>GB>G|f/g/a/g/ f>d c>BA>F|D>GGA FA G2||
X:3
T:The Crooked Horn'd Ewe
S:Rutherford's 24 Country Dances for 1758
Z:Transcribed by Bruce Olson
Q:156
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
DG2B AG "tr"FE/D/|DG2B cABG|ABcB AG "tr"FE/D/|DG2B AG/F/ G2::\
dg2a =fagf|dg2a fa g2|dg2a "tr"b(ag) a(g/f/)|\
d(g/a/) _ba/g/ (f/g/a/f/)g2|=(fefd) c_B "tr"A(G/F/)|\
Gd2c BA G2:|]

EWE WITH THE CROOKED HORN, THE [2]. Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 18.
T:Ewie Wi' the Crooked Horn [2]
L:1/8
M:C
S:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
c|e>ec>A d>=GB>d|e>ec>A ddf>d|e>ec>A d>=GB>d|e>dc>A B<G A:|
E>AA>B G>AB>G|E>AA>c d>cB>=G|d>cB>A =G>AB>G|E>AA>c B<GA2:|

EWE WITH THE CROOKED HORN [3]. Irish, Reel. Ireland, County Cork. A Minor (O'Farrell, Cowdery): A Dorian (Stanford/Petrie). Standard. AB (Stanford/Petrie): AAB (Cowdery). A variation of the melody found in Scotland as a strathspey, it is, asserts Cowdery (1990), a development of that air usually set to the old Irish ballad "The Boyne Water." It appears in Ireland c. 1804-10 in O'Farrell's collection and in O'Neill as "The Flowers of Limerick," a reel. Source for notated version: "From P. Carew's MS" [Stanford/Petrie]. Cowdery (The Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 46, pg. 118. O'Farrell, 1804-10; pg. 131. Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 918, pg. 233.

EWE WITH THE CROOKED HORN [4]. Irish, Highland. Ireland, County Donegal. G Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: fiddler John Doherty (1895-1980, County Donegal) [Feldman & O'Doherty]. Feldman & O'Doherty (The Northern Fiddler), 1979; pg. 80.

EWE WITH THE CROOKED HORN, THE [5]. Irish, Jig. Rather like "Paddy on the Railroad." Stanford/Petrie (Complete Collection), 1905; No. 361.

FLOWERS OF LIMERICK, THE (Blata Luimnig). AKA and see "Bunch of Kemp," "Bunch of Keys," "Cairngorm Brooch," "Cronin's Favorite," "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn," "Ewie wi' the Crookit Horn," "Jackson's Last Reel," "The Mills are Grinding," "The Old Reel," "Old Town Reel," "Paddy On the Turnpike Reel," "Telephone Reel," "Yellow Heifer." Irish, Reel. G Major (O'Neill): G Dorian/Major (Allan). Standard. ABCD (O'Neill): AABB (Allan). Bayard (1981) identifies this as belonging to the "Paddy on the Turnpike" variants. Nigel Gatherer identifies the Scottish tunes "The Old Reel" and "Cairngorum Brooch" as variants. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 60, pg. 15. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 31. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 768, pg. 134. Green Linnet SIF-1110, Brendan Mulvihill - "My Love is in America: My Love is in America" (1991). Spin CD 1001, Eoghan O'Sullivan, Gerry Harrington, Paul De Grae - "The Smoky Chimney" (1996).
T:The Flowers of Limerick
D:The Smoky Chimney
N:played in E flat on album, on tuned-down fiddle
R:reel
M:4/4
Z:transcribed by Paul de Grae
L:1/8
K:G
DGGF G3 A|B2 Bd cBAF|D3 E F3 G|ABcA (3BcB AG|
DGGF G3 A|B2 Bd cAAc|d2 eg fdcA|1AGGF G3 E:|
2 AGGF G3 B|:dggf g3 a|bgga bgaf|d3 e f3 g|
affg agfe|dggf g3 a|bg g2 agfe|d2 (3efg fdcA|AGGF G4:|

FOE, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "My Love is Far away", "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Red Blanket," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "Miss Huntley's."

GO SEE THE FUN. AKA and see "Bob with the one Horn", "The Ewe Reel", "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn", "The Kerry Lasses", "The Lowlands of Scotland", "The Merry Lasses", "Miss Huntley's", "My Love is Far Away", "The Ram with the Crooked Horn", "The Red Blanket", "The Pretty Girl in Danger", "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it", "The Foe".

KERRY LASSES, THE [1]. AKA and see "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Go see the Fun," "The Merry Lasses," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it."

LOWLANDS OF SCOTLAND, THE. AKA and see "Bob with the One Horn," "The Bundle of Straw," "Cois an Ghiorria," "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Follow me to Carlow," "Go See the Fun," "The Hare's Foot," "Jim Kennedy's Favourite," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Merry Lasses," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Red Blanket," "The Silvermines," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky Over It," "The Tralee Lasses." Scottish, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AA'BB'. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 116, pg. 14.

MERRY LASSES, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ewe Reel," "The Red Blanket," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "My Love is Far Away," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Miss Huntley's," "Go see the Fun," "The Foe," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it."

MILLS ARE GRINDING, THE [1]. Irish, Reel. G Dorian?. Standard. AB. Other sets of this air are "Bunch of Kemp," "Down the Hill," "Ducks on the Pond," "Flowers of Limerick," "Molly Maguire," "Old Town Reel," "Paddy on the Turnpike," "A Rainy Day," "Salt River," "Telephone Reel," "Pigeon on the Pies," "Whistling Barber," and one of the "Ewe with the Crooked Horn" tunes. The Old Ballinakil Ceili Band recorded a version of the tune under this title on a 78 RPM record in the early 1930's. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 140, pg. 56.

MISS HUNTLEY'S. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the one Horn," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "My Love is Far Away," "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Red Blanket," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Foe."

MY LOVE IS FAR AWAY. AKA and see "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Go see the Fun," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Lowlands of Scotland,""The Merry Lasses," "Miss Huntley's," "Peter Street," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Red Blanket," "Scotch Mary," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it." Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 7.

PETER STREET [2]. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the One Horn," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "Miss Huntley's," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Red Blanket," "My Love is Far Away," "Go See the Fun," "The Foe."

PRETTY GIRL IN DANGER, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the One Horn," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street," "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "My Love is Far Away," "The Red Blanket," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky Over It," "Go See the Fun," "Miss Huntley's," "The Foe."

RED BLANKET, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the One Horn," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Merry Lasses," "Go and See the Fun," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky Over It," "The Foe."

SWEET ROSLEA AND THE SKY OVER IT. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the One Horn," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street," "The Red Blanket," "Miss Huntley's," "Go see the Fun," "The Foe."

YOWIE WI' THE CROOKIT HORN. See "Ewe with the Crooked Horn."


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