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Result of search for "Fire on the Mountain":


BETTY MARTIN. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain(s)," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite," "High, Betty Martin," "Hog Eye," "Hog-Eye Man," "I Betty Martin," "Old Mother Gofour," "Pretty Betty Martin," "Tip Toe Fine," "Very Pretty Martin." Old-Time, Breakdown; American, Reel. USA, southwestern Pa. A Dorian. Standard. AAB. Samuel Bayard (1981) found no British antecedents for this group of tunes. Wilkinson has researched a connection between the "Fire on the Mountain" version of the melody and a Norse "halling" tune published in Norges Melodier (Copenhagen, 1875). Bayard confirms the two tunes are so close that in his opinion a connection is most likely, and concludes that, since "Free (Fire) on the Mountain" was published in a U.S. manuscript (Riley's Flute Melodies) in 1814 or 1815, that the transmission must have been before that. He asks, "Is it possible that this melody represents one of the few scattered cultural relics of the 17th century 'Delaware Swedes'?" (Bayard, 1981). A similar tune by the name of "I Betty Martin" appears in an American MS., "A. Shattuck's Book" (c. 1801). Bayard also states that the following lyrics were sometimes sung to the tune in Pennsylvania:
***
Cat's in the cream crock, run, girls, run!
***
Reminiscent of the old-time lyric "Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run."
Also sung to the "Betty Martin" melody in that state was:
***
You get up on a Sunday-morning,
Just before the break of day;
There you see your own true lovyer
Just a-marching, a-marching away.
Chorus:
Little Betty Martin, tiptoe, tiptoe,
Little Betty Martin, tiptoe fine.
or the alternate chorus:
Granny will your dog bite? No, child, no, child,
Granny will your dog bite? No, child, no.
***
Sources for notated versions: Bayard (1981) gives six versions from six different southwestern Pa. fiddlers--one, from Irvin Yaugher, was origianlly from his great-uncle Uriah, born in 1792. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 60, pgs. 41-43. Revonah Records RS-924, "The West Orrtanna String Band" (1976).

BILLY PATTERSON('S FAVORITE). AKA and see "The Blackthorn Stick," "Boys of Rockhill/Bockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," The Eagle's Nest," "Fire on/in the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "Humors of Bantry," "The Hare on the Mountain," "The Maid on the Green," "The Rose on the Mountain." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 54.

BLACKTHORN STICK [1]. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Daniel O'Connell's Welcome to Parliament," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in the Valley," "Fire on the Mountain," "The Hare on the Mountain," "Humours of Bantry," "The Maid on the Green," "O'Connell's Welcome," "The Rose on the Mountain," and "Joys of Wedlock." Irish (originally), New England; Jig. G Major (Allan, Miller & Perron, Spandaro, Sweet): A Major (Kerr, Raven). Standard. AAB (Kerr): AABB (Allan, Miller & Perron, Raven, Spandaro, Sweet, Tubridy). Bayard (1981) thinks the tune "a thoroughly characteristic Irish jig, probably of no great age." Source for notated version: David Street [Spandaro]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 3, pg. 2. Jarman (Old Tyme Fiddlin' Tunes); pg. or No. 16. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 13, pg. 37. Miller & Perron (New England Fidders Repertoire), 1983; No. 2. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 115. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 44. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 38. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 30. Pibroch MacKenzie - "The Mull Fiddler" (1969). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Better than an Orchestra" (1977).
T:Blackthorn Stick [1]
T:Coach Road to Sligo
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BdB ABd|gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGG G2:|
|:d|edd gdd|edd gdd|Bdd gfe|dBG A2d|gfg age|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGG G2:|

BOYS OF BOCKHILL/ROCKHILL. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "Catholic Boys" [2], "The Blackthorn Stick," "Fire On the Mountain" (floating title), "Humors of Bantry," "Maid on the Green." Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 51. Ryan's Mammoth Collection.

BOYS OF ROCKHILL. AKA and see "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Billy Patterson," "The Humours of Bantry," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Rose on the Mountain," "The Fire/Hare on the Mountain," "The Maid on the Green," "The Eagle's Nest," "The Catholic Boys," "Fire in the Valley."

BOATING UP SANDY [3]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Dorian. Standard. ABB'. The tune is a member of a tune family including "Hog Eye an' a 'Tater," "Hog-Eye Man," "Hog Eye," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite," "Sally in the Garden," "Fire on the Mountain" (there are several tunes by this name; it is a "floater"), and, in some respects "Betty Martin." Known as a West Virginia tune, it is in the repertoire of Wilson Douglas (W.Va.) who learned it from one of his strongest influences, the regionally famous and influential fiddler French Carpenter (W.Va.). Also in the repertoire of Braxton County, W. Va., fiddler Melvin Wine (d. 1999). Source for notated version: Wilson Douglas (W.Va.) & Mel Marshall [Phillips]. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician: Occasional Collection of Old-Timey Fiddle Tunes for Hammer Dulcimer, Fiddle, etc.), No. 2, 1988; pg. 9. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 32. Marimac Recordings, 1989, Wilson Douglas - "Boatin Up Sandy." Rounder 0024, "The Hollow Rock String Band" (N.C.).

BONAPARTE'S RETREAT [1]. Old-Time, Texas Style; March, Reel. USA; Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Kentucky, northeast Alabama, Mississippi, southwestern Va., West Virginia, Pennslyvania. D Major (most versions, though one version in A Major was collected from Mississippi fiddler John Hatcher in 1939). DDAD or DDAE. ABB. A classic old-time quasi-programmatic American fiddle piece that is generally played in a slow march tempo at the beginning and becomes increasingly more quick by the end of the tune, and meant to denote a retreating army. One folklore anecdote regarding this melody has it that the original "Bonaparte's Retreat" was improvised on the bagpipe by a member of a Scots regiment that fought at Waterloo, in remembrance of the occasion. The American collector Ira Ford (1940) (who seemed to manufacture his notions of tune origins from fancy and supposition, or else elaborately embellished snatches of tune-lore) declared the melody to be an "old American traditional novelty, which had its origin after the Napoleonic Wars." He notes that some fiddlers (whom he presumably witnessed) produced effects in performance by drumming the strings with the back of the bow and "other manipulations simulating musket fire and the general din of combat. Pizzicato represents the boom of the cannon, while the movement beginning with Allegro is played with a continuous bow, to imitate bagpipes or fife."
***
In fact, the tune has Irish origins, though Burman-Hall could only find printed variants in sources from that island from 1872 onward. "It has been collected in a variety of functions, including an Irish lullaby and a 'Frog Dance' from the Isle of Man" (Linda Burman-Hall. "Southern American Folk Fiddle Styles," Ethnomusicology, Vol. 19, #1, Jan. 1975). Samuel Bayard (1944) concurs with assigning Irish origins for "Bonaparte's Retreat," and notes that it is an ancient Irish march tune with quite a varied traditional history. The 'ancient march' is called "The Eagle's Whistle" or "The Eagle's Tune," which P.W. Joyce (1909) said was formerly the marching tune of the once powerful O'Donovan family. Still, states Bayard, the evidence of Irish collections indicates that it has long been common property of traditional fiddlers and pipers, and has undergone considerable alteration at various hands.
***
Bayard's primary scope of collecting was in western Pennsylvania in the mid-20th century, where he found the tune still current in fiddle repertoire, though he remarked on its popularity in various parts of the South. His Pennsylvania version has a somewhat simpler melodic outline than most of the other recorded American sets, and, although he notes that these sets vary considerably--even in the number of parts which a version may contain--he finds they are clearly cognate, and all show resemblance's and common traits indicating derivation from the "The Eagle's Whistle." In Southwestern Pennsylvania the march origins were lost and instead "sets of the tune have been recast into the form--and given title-- of 'The Old Man and Old Woman Quarrelin' (Scoldin', Fightin'),' and thus present an alternation of slow and quick parts. Other Pennsylania sets are Bayard Coll., Nos. 81, 84, 252; and see notes to ('Old Man and Old Woman Scoldin'). These refashioned 'Old Man and Woman' sets differ somewhat among themselves, indicating that they have been traditional in their altered form for some time; but whether they assumed this form before their importation into America, or whether the alteration took place here, with an older tune of the type of 'Old Mand and Old Woman Scoldin'' as model, is uncertain. F.P. Provance stated that the fifer from whom he learned this tune played it as a retreat in Civil War days" (Bayard, 1944).
***
According to Blue Ridge Mountain local history the tune was known in the Civil War era. Geoffrey Cantrell, writing in the Asheville Citizen-Times of Feb., 23, 2000 relates the story of the execution of three men by the Confederate Home Guard on April 10th, 1865, the day after Lee's surrender at Appomattox.Courthouse. That news would not have been known to them, given the difficult, but it is documented that Henry Grooms, his brother George and his brother-in-law Mitchell Caldwell, all of north Haywood County, North Carolina, were taken prisoner by the Guard-no one knows why, but the area had been ravaged by scalawags and bushwackers, and the populace had suffered numerous raids of family farms by Union troops hunting provisions. The village of Waynesville had been burned two months earlier, and the citizenry was beleaguered and anxious. Cantrell writes: "The group traveled toward Cataloochee Valley and Henry Grooms, clutching his fiddle and bow, was asked by his captors to play a tune. Realizing he was performing for his own firing squad Grooms struck up Bonaparte's Retreat." When he finished the three men were lined up against an oak tree and shot, the bodies left where they feel. Henry's wife gathered the bodies and buried them in a single grove in Sutton Cemetery No. 1 in the Mount Sterling community, the plain headstone reading only "Murdered."
***
The Kentucky Encyclpedia gives another story which mentions "Bonaparte's Retreat" in connection with an execution. It seems that a Colonel Solomon P. Sharp, a former attorney general of Kentucky, was murdered in the middle of a September night in 1825 by an unidentified assailant who stabbed him in his chest. Sharp had political enemies, all of whom had alibis, but who had circulated rumors that he had seduced one Ann Cook of Bowling Green, fathering her illegitimate child in 1820. Suspicion soon shifted to Ann's husband, Jereboam Beauchamp, who married her after the birth of the supposed love-child but who was infuriated at the circulating handbills containing the rumor. Beauchamp was dully arrested, tried in Frankfort in May, 1826, found guilty and was sentenced to death by hanging. Ann could not bear to be parted from him and somehow gained permission from the jailer to stay with him in his jail cell. The couple tried unsuccessfully to commit suicide by taking an overdose of laudanum, but were still permitted to share the cell. Another suicide attempt with a smuggled knife was made on the day of the execution, with somewhat better results. Ann, mortally wounded, was taken to the jailers house for treatment, but Beauchamp was hustled to the gallows lest he die from his wounds before the sentence was carried out. He proved too weak from his wounds to stand and had to be supported, but he was presumably able to hear the strains of "Bonaparte's Retreat" played before he made the leap, as he had previously requested. Ann and Jereboam were buried in a joint grave in Bloomfield, Kenctucky, graced by a tombstone engraved with an eight-stanza poem written by Ann.
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The tune was cited (by Mattie Stanfield in her book Sourwood Tonic and Sassafras Tea) as having been played by Etowah County, Alabama, fiddler George Cole at the turn of the century (Cauthen, 1990). Musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph recorded the tune from Ozark Mountain fiddlers for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's. Ed Haley (1883-1951) of Ashland, eastern Ky., played the tune so skillfully that "one old-timer, after hearing Haley play ("Bonaparte's Retreat") declared that 'if two armies could come together and hear him play that tune, they'd kill themselves in piles" (Wolfe, 1982). Haley toured regionally in Kentucky and West Virginia It was "Bonaparte's Retreat" that was the first tune Braxton County fiddler Melvin Wine (1909-1999) learned at the age of nine. His father, Bob, played the fiddle and young Melvin practiced when the elder Wine was out cutting timber or working as a farmhand for neighbors. He finally worked up the nerve to play for his father, and it proved a successful entrée, for afterwards which Bob taught him tunes he had learned from his own father, Nels, and Grandfather "Smithy" (Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed., 1999, pg. 8).
***
Another Kentucky fiddler, William H. Stepp (of Leakeville, Magoffin County, whose name, Kerry Blech points out, is sometimes erroneously given as W.M. Stepp, from a misreading of the old abbreviation Wm., for William), appears to be the source (through his 1937 Library of Congress field recording) for many revival fiddlers' versions. Stepp's version of the tune was transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seegar and was included in John and Alan Lomax's volume Our Singing Country (1941). The Crawford/Seegar version has been credited as the source Aaron Copland adapted for a main theme in his orchestral suite "Hoedown." {Lynn "Chirps" Smith says he has even heard people refer to the tune as "Copland's Fancy" in recent times!}. North Georgia fiddler A.A. Gray (1881-1939) won third place honors playing the tune at the 1920 (10th) Annual Georgia Old Time Fiddler's Association state contest in Atlanta, and four years later recorded it as a solo fiddle tune for OKeh Records. Sources for notated versions: J.S. Price (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]: F.P. Provance, Point Marion, Pennsylvania, September 19, 1943, who learned it from Sam Waggle, fifer, of Dunbar [Bayard, 1944]: Marion Yoders (Greene County, Pa., 1962) [Bayard, 1981].
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PRINTED SOURCES: Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 87. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 238, pg. 199. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 52. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 129. Lomax (Our Singing Country), pg 54-55 (appears as "Bonyparte"). Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 36-37. Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1971-72. County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 546, "Arthur Smith and His Dixieliners, Vol. I." County 703, Benny Thomasson- "Texas Hoedown." County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1976). County 790, Leftwich & Higginbotham - "No One to Bring Home Tonight" (1984). Folkways FA 2325, Mike Seeger- "Old Time Country Music." Folkways FA 2366, The Watson Family (N.C.) - "The Watson Family Album." Folk Legacy Records FSA-17, Hobart Smith - "America's Greatest Folk Instrumentalist." Heritage XXXIII, Jay Ungar & Neil Rossi - "Visits" (1981. Learned from a 1937 Library of Congress recording of Lakeville, Ky., fiddler W.M.Stepp). Okeh 40110 (78 RPM), A.A. Gray (1924). Philo 1023, Jay Ungar and Lyn Hardy- "Songs Ballads and Fiddle Tunes" (1975. Learned from Kentucky fiddler W.M. Stepp via Library of Congress recording). Rounder 0010, "The Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972. Learned from Alan Jabbour). Rounder 0057, Sherman Wimmer (Franklin County, Va.) - "Old Originals, Vol. 1" (1978. Learned from Will Willit, nephew and protege of influential Franklin County fiddler Fount Kinrea). String 802, Emmett Lundy (Galax, Va.) - Library of Congress Recording. Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from Audrain County, Missouri, fiddler Warren Elliot in 1967). Yazoo Records, W.M. (William) Stepp - "Music of Kentucky, Vol. 1" (reissue of the 1937 Stepp recording by Alan Lomax. Stepp can be heard on the recording saying in the midst of fiddling: "This is the bony part....That was the bony part").

BRAD WALTERS. Old-Time. USA; Magoffin County, Ky. Recorded by John Salyer, Magoffin County, Ky. Named for a fiddler who played the tune, in lieu of another title. The tune belongs to the "Granny Will Your Dog Bite?"/"Hogeye Man"/"Fire on the Mountain" family of tunes.

CATHOLIC BOYS, THE [3]. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "Blackthorn Stick," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire on/in the Mountains" (floating title), "Fire in the Valley," "Geese on the Bog" (floating title), "The Hare on the Mountain," "Humours of Bantry," "The Maid on the Green," "The Rose on the Mountain." Irish (originally), American; Jig. USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard. AABB. Bayard (1981) calls it a typical Irish jig, of no great age. Source for notated version: Hiram Horner (elderly fifer from Fayette County, Pa., 1961) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 444, pg. 413.

CHIPPY GET YOUR HAIR CUT. AKA and see "Gippy/Johnny/Hippie Get Your Hair Cut." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Mississippi. C Major or A Major. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by collector Herbert Halpert in 1939 from the playing of eighty year old Lauderdale County, Mississippi, fiddler Stephen B. Tucker. The 'A' major tune often features pizzicato notes on the 'E' string. The melody belongs to the "Fire on the Mountain"/"Hog-eye Man"/"Sally in the Garden"/"Granny Will Your Dog Bite" family of tunes.

COACH ROAD TO SLIGO, THE [1] (Bóthar an Chóiste go Sligeach). AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in/on the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "The Hare on the Mountain," "Humors of Bantry," "The Maid on the Green," "The Rose on the Mountain." Irish, Jig. G Major. Standard. AA'B (Breathnach): AABB (Mulvihill): AABB' (DeMarco & Krassen, O'Neill). Breathnach identifies that Goodman and Joyce print the tune under the title "Boys of Rockhill," which is one of O'Neill's titles, although it also appears in O'Neill as "Humours of Bantry" and "Billy Patterson." Bayard (1981) gives it as "The Catholic Boys." The 'A' part shows up as the second part of "Welcome Home, Royal Charlie" in County Donegal versions. Breathnach also finds it in manuscripts from Castleisland, County Kerry, and County Limerick as "Fire on the Mountain" and "Fire in the Valley," respectively. Source for notated versions: Sligo style fiddler Paddy Killoran (County Sligo, Ireland) [Breathnach, DeMarco & Krassen]. Breathnach (CRE III), 1985; No. 5, pg. 4. DeMarco & Krassen (A Trip to Sligo), 1978; pg. 28,42,56. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 42, pg. 73. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 71. Shanachie 33003, "Paddy Killoran's Back in Town" (1977).
T:Coach Road to Sligo, The
R:Jig
M:6/8
K:G
~g3 ege|dBG AGE|DGG FGA|BGB A2e|gfg age|dBG AGE|DGG FGA|BGG G2d:|
|:edd gdd|edd gdd|ede ~g3|edB A2e|gfg age|dBG AGE|DGG FGA|BGG G2d:|

COOLEY'S REEL [1]. AKA and see "Joe Cooley's Reel" [2], "Lutrell Pass," "Reynold's Reel," "Ríl na Tulai," "Tulla Reel." Irish, Reel. E Dorian. Standard. AAB (Carlin, Laufman): AABB (Brody, Mallinson, McNulty, Mulvihill, Songer, Taylor): AA'BB (Miller & Perron, Moylan): AA'BB' (Alewine). The tune is associated with the renowned button accordion player Joe Cooley (1924-1973), originally from Peterswell, County Galway, near the northern boundary of the Sliabh Aughty mountians. Cooley spent much of his later life in an itinerant lifestyle in various cities in America, and back and forth to Ireland. He was a member for a time of the famous Tulla Céilí Band in Ireland.
**
Peter Wood, in his book The Living Note: the Heartbeat of Irish Music (1996), had this to say about Cooley:
**
Cooley's accordion playing made a great impression on all those
who heard him. He had great energy and style. Everything for
him was wrapped up in emotion. There was at the time, and
there have been since, technically better players, faster players,
players who know their way round the box better than Joe did,
but it was always about Joe that you'd find the crowd gathered,
looking at him, watching him drive his whole body behind his
box. You could be standing at the back of a place when Cooley
came to play, the place emptied out into the corners, but when
he strapped on the box and launched into a tune the crowds
would start toward him, even if they didn't know who he was.
He inspired people. Oh, they'd say, can't he make it talk.
**
There are several stories circulating regarding the origins of this extremely popular tune. According to David Taylor (1992) the reel was the composition of Co. Mayo and New York fiddler John McGrath (1900-1955). Philippe Varlet maintains it was the invention of accordion player Joe Mills of the Aughrim Slopes Céilí Band, who originally entitled it "Lutrell Pass." Charlie Piggott, writing in his book co-authored with Fintan Vallely, Blooming Meadows (1998), has yet another version, related to him by Joe's brother Séamus. Its origins date to the 1940's when the teenaged brothers attended a house session in the neighboring county of Clare. There they listened to an old man with a battered concertina playing in front of an open fire (Séamus remembers some of the buttons had been replaced by cigarette ends!), and one tune in particular caught their attention. On returning home the brothers tried their best to remember what the old man had played, staying up through the night working and worrying the remembered fragments until finally the reel took shape. Séamus credits Joe with the first part of their refashioned piece, while himself taking credit for the turn.
**
Sources for notated versions: Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Brody]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Slaibh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded in recital at Na Píobairí Uilleann, November, 1990 [Moylan]; Jim Bly (Co. Roscommon/Northampton, England) & Frank McCollam (Ballycastle, Co. Antrim) [Mulvihill]; set dance music recorded live at Na Píobairí Uilleann, mid-1980's [Taylor]. Alewine (Maid that Cut Off the Chicken's Lips), 1987; pg. 13. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 74. Carlin (Master Collection), 1984; pg. 117, No. 197. Laufman (Okay, Let's Try a Contra, Men on the Right, Ladies on the Left, Up and Down the Hall), 1973; pg. 35. Mallinson (Essential), 1995; No. 27, pg. 12. McNulty (Dance Music of Ireland), 1965; pg. 7. Miller & Perron (Irish Traditional Fiddle Tunes), 1977; Vol.1, No. 33. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary's), 1994; No. 170, pg. 98. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 7, pg. 2. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 54. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Yellow Book), 1995; pg. 21. Avoca 139, Sean Maguire--"Music of Ireland." Fretless 118, Marie Rhines- "The Reconciliation." Gael-Linn Records, Frankie Gavin & Paul Brock - "Tribute to Joe Cooley." Green Linnet 1009, Patricia Conway and Mick Moloney- "Irish Music: The Living Tradition" (appears as "Joe Cooley's Reel"). Greenhays GR 710, John McCutcheon - "Fine Times at Our House" (1982). Philo 1040l, Jay Ungar and Lynn Hardy- "Catskill Mountain Goose Chase" (1977. Appears as third tune of "Four Reels"). Rounder 0111, Russ Barenberg- "Cowboy Calypso." Tara Records, Tony Linnane & Noel Hill. Voyager 320-S, Frank Ferrel- "Fiddle Tunes."
T:Cooley's Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
K:E Minor
EBBA (B2 B)A|~B2 AB dBAG|FDAD BDAG|FDFA dAFD|
EBBA (B2 B)A|~B2 AB defg|afef dBAF|1 DEFD E2 z2:|2 DEFD E2 zf|
|:eB ~B2 eBfB|eB ~B2 gedB|A2 FA DAFA|~A2 FA defd|eB ~B2 eBgf|
eB ~B2 defg|afef dBAF|DEFD E2 z2:|

DURANG'S HORNPIPE [1] (Crannciuil Ui Deorain). AKA and see "Wobble Gears." See also "Little Hornpipe." British Isles, American, Texas Style, Old-Time; Hornpipe, Reel or Breakdown. USA, Widely known. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB (most versions): AABB' (Emmerson, Kerr): AA'BB' (Moylan). The melody is thoroughly ensconced in American traditional repertoire. It is "a Missouri standard," according to Howard Marshall, and "an old stand-by" remarked Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner (in the early twentieth century). It was commonly played at country dances in Orange County, New York in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folk Life Quarterly, pgs. 211-215) and was part of the older fiddle repertory in Patrick County, southwestern Va., before such tunes were superceded in popularity by clawhammer banjo/fiddle tunes (Tom Carter & Blanton Owen, 1976). The title appears in the repertory list of Henry Ford's champion fiddler of the late 1920's, Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham, who was quite elderly at the time. The tune was recorded in the early 1940's from Ozark Mountain fiddlers for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph and was one of the relatively few recordings by legendary Galax, Virginia, fiddler Emmett Lundy. Interestingly, given the usual variation in fiddle tune titles due to faulty memory, "folk process" or other such 'drift', it is nearly always found going by the title "Durang's Hornpipe."
***
Marion Thede speculates the piece was named for Ferdinand Durang, an actor, who first sang the "Star Spangled Banner" in a tavern near Baltimore's Holiday Street Theatre, but in this she is mistaken, at least in part, for Sam Bayard (1981), George Emmerson (1972) and others researched the tune and definitively conclude that it was named after actor and dancer John Durang (b. Lancaster, Pa., 1768--d. Philadelphia, 1821), styled as "the first American dancer." Durang (who was born of German parents) stated in his memoirs that it was composed for him by one "Mr. Hoffmaster, a German Dwarf, in New York, 1785." The thespian had taken violin lessons from Hoffmaster (who, with his wife, was only 3 feet tall "with a large head, hands and feet"), who wrote the hornpipe "expressly for me, which is become well known in America, for I have since heard it play'd the other side of the Blue Mountains (of Pennsylvania) as well as in the cities" (pg. 344, quoted from Downer's "The Memoir of John Durang, American Actor 1785-1816," {1966}). Bayard finds the original a much more banal piece than it is today, and that it has been much improved by the aforementioned "folk process," which has given it character and distinction in his opinion.
***
The dwarf's composition came a year after Durang's debut with the company of Lewis Hallam in 1784, who had just returned from a long period in England which encompassed the Revolutionary War (Emmerson, 1972). Later in his career, around 1790, he records he danced "a Hornpipe on thirteen eggs blindfolded without breaking one," which feat points to the dancer's main claim to fame (beside the tune associated with his name), that of poularizing the nautical-style hornpipe dance the Sailor's Hornpipe. In fact, from Durang's time on the nautical theme became intimately associated with the hornpipe dance and the tune "College Hornpipe," to which it was predominantly performed. Durang went on to dance in comic ballets, "pantomimic dances" and other entertainments, and in 1796 was engaged to direct pantomimes for the circus of John B. Ricketts, a Scottish immigrant, until the enterprise was destroyed in a fire at year's end, 1799.
***
Burchenal gives the tune under the title "The Lady of the Lake" [2], taken from the New England contra dance of that name (which she also prints).
***
In the Irish Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border the tune seems to be considered, and used, as a reel according to Terry Moylan (1994).
***
Sources for notated versions: Marion Unger (Oklahoma County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; black fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Franklin George (W.Va) [Krassen]; John Baltzell, 1923 (Ohio) [Bronner]; Jehile Kirkhuff, 1976 (Pennsylvania) [Bronner]; 6 southwestern Pennsylvania fiddlers [Bayard]; James Marr (elderly fiddler from Missouri, 1949) [Bayard]; New Hampshire Fiddler's Union [Phillips]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Adam, 1938; No. 19. Bayard (Dance the the Fiddle), 1981; No. 349A-F, pgs. 341-344 and Appendix No.22, pg. 581. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 23, pg. 36. Brody (Fiddlers Fakebook), 1983; pg. 94. Bronner (Old Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 6, pg. 34 and No. 11, pg. 68. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 34 (appears as "The Lady of the Lake" [2]). Cazden, pg. 12 or 42. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 63. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 94. DeVille, No. 4. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 87, pg. 163. Ford (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 53. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. 30, pg. 77. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 341, pg. 38. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 82. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 121. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 191, pg. 111. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 215. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1772, pg. 330. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 936, pg. 160. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 192. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 163. Robbins, No. 156. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 42, pg. 16. Shaw (Cowboy Dances), 1943; pg. 387. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 67. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 116. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 17 (includes a harmony part). White's Excelsior Collection, pg. 50. American Heritage 515, Junior Daugherty- "You Be the Judge." Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." County 707, Major Franklin- "Texas Fiddle Favorites." County 747, Clark Kessinger- "Sweet Bunch of Daisies." County 769, U.S. Senator Robert Byrd- "Mountian Fiddler." Edison 50900 (78 RPM), Joseph Samuels, 1920 (appears as 1st tune of "Miss Johnson's Party Medley"). Edison 51236 (78 RPM), 1923, John Baltzell (appears as 1st tune of "Durang Hornpipe Medley"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" F&W Records 2, "F&W String Band 2." Folkways FA 2337, Clark Kessinger- "Live at Union Grove." Gambier Folklore Society GFS 901, Alan Jabbour, ed.- "Seems Like Romance to Me: American Fiddle Tunes From Ohio" (1985). Heritage 060, Art Galbraith - "Music of the Ozarks" (Brandywine, 1984). Jonathan Edwards Memorial Foundation JEMF-105, Wes Dickinson - "New England Traditional Fiddling" (1978). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Kelly Jones (b. 1947) - "Authentic Old-Time Fiddle Tunes." Rounder 0194, John W. Summers- "Indiana Fiddler" (1984). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Topic 12T312, Billy Clifford. Voyager 312-S, Grant Lamb- "Tunes From Home." Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling." 78 RPM, Dan Massey and Family.
X:1
T:Durang's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
DA FA DA FD|Bc dB BA FA|DA FA DA FA|A,E CE A,E CE|
DA FA DA FD|Bc dB BA FA|fg af bg ec|d2f2d4:|
|:de fe dc BA|Bc dc BA GF|E2 E2 ed cB|A^G AB A2 F=G|
A^G AB cB cd|ed ef gf ge|fg af bg ec|d2f2d4:|
X:2
T:Durang's Hornpipe
R:Reel
C:New York, 1785, by Mr. Hoffmaster
H:Composed in honor of the then renowned dancer and actor John Durang.
N:This is a "straightened out" version, giving the basic melody line.
N:Cyril Stinnett, Cleo Persinger and others played the "A" part of this
N:tune with a wholly different melody in the 2nd half of the "A" part.
N:Durang's Hornpipe as it appears in Cole's gives an example of this
N:variation.
A:Missouri
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABCs
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:120
K:D
(de|fe)fa (fe)d(A|BA)Bc (dB)AF|GBAG (FG)AF|(ED)EF E2d(e|!
fe)fa (fe)d(A|BA)Bc (dB)AF|(Ac)ea (3fgf ec|[d3f3][df] [d2f2]:|!
|:(FE|D)AFA DAF(A|Bc)(dB) A(GF)(E|D)AFA DAFA|A,ECE A,EC(E|!
D)AFA DAF(A|Bc)(dB) (AGF)E|(Ac)ea (3(fgf) ec|[d3f3][df] [d2f2]:|

EAGLE'S NEST, THE. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "The Blackthorn Stick," "Boys of Rockhill/Bockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Fire in/on the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "The Hare on the Mountain," "The Humours of Bantry," "The Rose on the Mountain."

FAR IN THE MOUNTAIN. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain."

FAR ON THE MOUNTAIN. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain." Old-Time. This is the title of the tune, as recorded by The Red-Headed Fiddlers."

FIERY CROSS, THE (An Crann Tàra). AKA and see "The Fire Cross Song," "An Crann-tara." Scottish, Jig. G Minor. Standard. AAB. This tune "is from the gentlemen mentioned in the prospectus. The Gaelic words describe the approach of the ancient was signal, or fore-cross, or 'Crantara', with this song accompanying it, so well described by Mr. Scott, in his poem of the Lady of the Lake. The song is first indistinctly heard as wafted upon the gale, or carried off by the roar of a rapid stream; but as it approaches it becomes louder, and leaves no doubt of its being the signal of war, whereupon all becomes bustle and preparation to arm, besides rousing fresh and alert individuals to proceed instantly with the signal to the next station interested" (Fraser). There is some suggestion that the American fiddle tune title "Fire on the Mountain" was derived from the Scottish signal-cross practice. It has also been suggested that the infamous cross-burnings of the Ku Klux Klan were derived from the same tradition. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 215, pg. 88.
T:Fire-Cross Song, The
T:An Crann-tàra
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Fraser Collection
K:E_
B|G2G G>^FG Gcc c2d|e2e e>de|dff f2b|g2g gfe|f2f fed|c2d (c/d/e)c|
BGG G2:|
G/F/|EGE DFD|Ccc c2d|ege dbB|dff f2b|g2g gfe|f2f fed|c2d (c/d/e)c|
BGG G2 G/F/|EGE DFD|Ccc c2d|ege dbB|dff f2 E/F/|GeG FdF|
EcE Dfa|gfe dec|BGG G2||

FIRE IN THE VALLEY. AKA and see "Coach Road to Sligo," "The Blackthorn Stick," "Boys of Rockhill," "Fire on the Mountain" [2]. This title appears in a manuscript from County Limerick.

FIRE ON/IN THE MOUNTAIN [1]. AKA and see "Sambo," "Hog-Eye," "Betty Martin." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, widely known. A Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard, AEAE or ADAE. AAB (Brody, Krassen): AABB (Lowinger): AABB' (Phillips/1994). The tune usually goes at breakneck speed, giving rise to popular folklore for the reason for its name: the fiddler plays so fast the fiddle catches on fire and lights up the woods (Lowinger, 1974). The title may be Celtic in origin: Scottish clans often used blazing bonfires on highland hills as gathering signals (ironically, this also may be the origin for the Ku Klux Klan's blazing crosses). Krassen (1973) notes his 'B' part has similarities with a 78 RPM recording of Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers' "Hog-eyed Man," and Bayard (1981) also recognizes the similarity between the second parts of the same tunes, though a closer match to "Fire On the Mountain" he believes to be "Betty Martin," which is "reminiscent all through." Guthrie Meade (1980) links the Kentucky version of the tune (which also goes by the name "Big Nosed Hornpipe") to the "Sally Goodin'" family of melodies. Winston Wilkinson, in the Southern Folklore Quarterly (vol. vi, I, March, 1942), gives a bar-for-bar comparison of the tune with a Norse 'halling' tune, set by the Norwegian composer Greig and published in Copenhagen in 1875 (Norges Melodier, 1875 & 1922, iv, pg. 72). The tunes are so close as to be almost certainly cognate. Bayard records the tune's earliest American publication date is 1814 or 1815 in Riley's Flute Melodys (where it appears as "Free on the Mountains"), and as "I Betty Martin" in A. Shattuck's Book, a fiddler's manuscript book dating from around 1801. The piece was recorded in the early 1940's from Ozark Mountain fiddlers by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress. Lowe Stokes (1898-1983), one of the north Georgia band 'The Skillet Lickers' fiddlers, remembered it as having been fiddled by his father.
***
Verses are sometimes sung to the melody, especially in the variants by other names such as "Betty Martin," "Pretty Betty Martin" and "Hog-eye." Wilkinson (1942) says that the following verse made its way into some editions of Mother Goose:
***
Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run,
Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run.
***
Other verses (some of which are floating) have been:
***
Fire on the mountain, run boy run;
Sal, let me chaw your rosin some.
***
Fire on the mountain, run, boys, run;
Fire on the mountain till the day is done.
***
Fire on the mountain, water down below;
Never get to heaven 'less you jump Jim Crow.
***
Fire on the Mountain, fire on the hillside
Fire on the Mountain, run, boys, run.
***
Old Uncle Cyrus fished all night,
Never caught a fish on a crawfish bite.
***
Old mother Taylor she drinks whiskey,
Old mother Taylor she drinks wine.
Old mother Taylor she got drunk,
Swung across the river on a pumpkin vine.
***
Two little Indians lying in bed,
One turned over and the other one said,
Fire on the mountain coming son,
Fire on the mountain run boy run.
***
Two little Indians and their squaw
Sittin' on a mountain in Arkansas.
***
All little Indians gonna drink whisky
All little Indians gonna get drunk.
***
Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (N.Y.) [Brody]; Gid Tanner & the Skillet Lickers (Ga.) [Krassen]; Clayton McMichen (Ga.) [Kaufman]; James H. "Uncle Jim" Chisholm (Greewood, Albermarle County, Virginia) [Wilkinson]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 106. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pgs. 76-77. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1973; pg. 72. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 17. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 18. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 85. Wilkinson, Southern Folklore Quarterly, Vol. VI, pg. 9). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 39. Briar 4202l, The Kentucky Colonels- "Living In the Past." Brunswick 470 (78 RPM), The Red-Headed Fiddlers (1929). CMH 9006, Benny Martin- "The Fiddle Collection." Columbia 15185-D (78 RPM), Riley Puckett (fiddled by Clayton McMichen). County Records, Kyle Creed and Fred Cockerham. Flying Fish 065, Buddy Spicher- "Me and My Heroes" (appears as the third tune of 'Fiddle Tune Medley'). King Records (78 RPM), Curley Fox (Greysville, Tennessee). Library of Congress Records, The Red-Headed Fiddlers - "Dance Music, Breakdowns and Waltzes." Morning Star 45004, Ted Gossett's String Band (western Ky.) - "Wish I Had My Time Again" (originally recorded Sept., 1930, probably with fiddling by Tommy Whitmer instead of Ted Gossett, although the recording was issued under the band name Buddy Young's Kentuckians). OKeh 45068 (78 RPM), John Carson. Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire On the Mountain." Rounder 0035, Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973. Learned from Henry Reed, Glen Lyn, Va.). Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985. Appears as "Far in the Mountain," learned from the Red-Headed Fiddler's record). Rounder C-11565, Bob Potts & Walt Koken - "Rounder Fiddle" (1990). Starday SLP 235, Curly Fox {Ga.} (1963). Stoneway 148, E.J. Hopkins- "Fiddle Hoedown." Vetco LP 104, Clayton McMichen - "The Wonderful World of Old-Time Fiddlers" (orig. rec. 1928). In the repertoire of black string band John Lusk Band (as "Sambo") from the Cumberland Plateau region of Ky./Tenn.
T:Fire on the Mountains
L:1/8
M:2/2
S:James H. "Uncle Jim" Chisholm, Greenwood, Albermarle County, Va.
K:A Mixolyidan
efed c2A2|B2G2B2d2|efed c2A2|B2G2 A4:|
|:efed c2d2|e2f2g2g2|efed c2d2|e2a2 a4:|

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN(S), THE [2]. AKA and see "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "Humors of Bantry," "Billy Patterson," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Catholic Boys," "The Rose on the Mountain," "The Eagle's Nest," "The Maind on the Green," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "The Hare on the Mountain." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB. This title is a "floater." Source for notated version: "Mr. Victor Power of Leap Co. Cork, a good amateur violinist, with much knowledge of Irish music, about 1875" (Joyce). Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Songs), 1909; No. 200, pg. 99. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 101, pg. 31.
T:Fire on the Mountains
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Roche Collection
K:G
d|g>fg efg|dBG AFD|DGG AGA|BGB ABd|
gfg efg|dBG AFD|AGG AGA|BGG G2:|
|:d|edd gdd|edd gdB|def gdB|eAA ABd|
edd gdd|edd gdB|DGG AGA|BGG G2:|

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN [3]. American, Dance Tune (4/4 time). D Major. Standard. AABB. Samuel Bayard (1943) is of the opinion that his Pennsylvania collected version bears a slight resemblance to the well-known "Shortnin' Bread," and points out that the title has apparently been a floating one for some time, noting its inclusion in Joyce's Irish collection. "With the first part of "Fire on the Mountain," compare the melody of 'The Organ Grinder Swing'" (Bayard). Source for notated version: Irvin Yaugher Jr., Mt. Independence, Pa., October 19, 1943. Learned from his great-uncle [Bayard]. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 10.

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN [4]. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Mixolydian. Standard. AA'BB. A relative of version #1. Source for notated version: The Canebreak Rattlers [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 86.

FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN [5]. AKA and see "Old Time Fire On the Mountain." Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. Standard. AABB. No relation to any other versions by this title. The 'B' part is a variant of the 'A', played an octave down. Source for notated version: Sam Connor [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 86.

FOGGY DEW, THE [2] (Drucd an Ceo). AKA and see "Sloan's Lamentation," "Granuaile." Irish, Air (4/4 time). G Major (Roche, O'Neill): A Flat Major (O'Sullivan Bunting). Standard. AB (O'Neill/1850): AAB (Roche). The tune converts easily to the minor key (see versions #1 & #3). Cazden (et al, 1982) mentions that the tune strain itself came to serve as a symbol of Irish nationalism and was used for a number of "songs of resistance." He finds the earliest printed version to be an 1828 setting of a poem by William Kennedy called "The Irish Emigrant," where it is called an "old Irish melody." Also related to Bunting's melody is a Catskill Mountain (New York) version collected by Norman Cazden (et al, 1982), while another melody printed in Bunting, "Sloan's Lament," is a variant. The Gaelic title for the tune is "Granuaile," for which there is an interesting story (see note for the tune), though it should be noted there are a great many tunes with the title "Granuaile" or its variants in existance. Source for notated version: the Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody from "J. McKnight, Esq., Belfast, 1839." O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 186, pg. 33. O'Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 150, pgs. 207-208. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 45, pg. 13. DREY 36191, Alan Stivell - "Olympia Concert." Green Linnet SIF 1084, Eugene O'Donnell - "The Foggy Dew" (1988). Green Linnet SIF 1101, Eugene O'Donnell - "Playing with Fire: the Celtic Fiddle Connection" (1989).
**
´Twas down the glen one Eastern morn, to a city fair rode I
When Ireland´s lines of marching men in squadrons passed me by.
No pipes did hum, no battle drum did sound its loud tattoo.
But the Angelus bell o´er the Liffey´s swell, rang out in the foggy dew
**
Right proudly high over Dublin town, they hung out a flag of war.
'Twas better to die ´neath an Irish sky than at Suvla or Sud El Bar;
And from the plains of Royal Meath, strong men came hurrying through,
While Brittanias´s huns, with their long range guns, sailed in from the foggy dew.
**
O, the night fell black and the rifles crack made "Perfidious Abion" reel
´Mid the leaden rail, seven tongues of flame did shine o´er the lines of steel
By each shining blade a prayer was said that to Ireland her sons be true,
and when morning broke still the war flag shook out its fold in the foggy dew
**
´Twas England bade our Wild Geese go that small nations might be free.
But their lonely graves are by Suvla´s waves, on the fringe of the Grey North sea
But had they died by Pearse´s side, or had fought with Cathal Brugha,
Their names we would keep where the fenians sleep, ´neath the shroud of the foggy dew.
**
But the bravest fell, and the requiem bell, rang mournfully and clear,
for those who died that Eastertide in the springtime of the year.
And the world did gaze, in deep amaze, at those fearless men, but true
who bore the fight that freedom´s light might shine through the foggy dew
**
Ah, back through the glen I rode again and my heart with grief was sore
For I parted then with valiant men whom I never shall se more
but to and fro in my dreams I go, and I´d kneel and pray for you,
for slavery fled, O glorious dead, when you fell in the foggy dew.

FREE ON THE MOUNTAINS. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain."

GRANNY, WILL YOUR DOG BITE? [1]. AKA and see "Betty Martin," "Boatin' Up Sandy," "Brad Walters," "Chippy/Gippy Get Your Haircut," "Hog Eye and a Tater," "The Hog Eye Man," "Hog Eye," "Jake Gilly," "Old Mother Gofour," "Old Granny Rattletrap," "Pretty Betty Martin," "Very Pretty Martin," "Sally in the Garden," "Tip Toe Fine,""Fire on the Mountain." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma. A Major/Mixolydian (Christeson, Ford, Phillips, Songer, Thede): D Major (Sweet). Standard or AEAE. AABB (Christeson, Phillips, Sweet): AABBC (Thede). This melody is popular under several titles, however, the title "Granny Will Your Dog Bite" also is a floating title. It was frequently played at Mid-Western fiddle contests. R.P. Christeson says his version is dissimilar to the tune of the same title in Ford (1940), but is similar to "Tip Toe, Pretty Betty Martin" in the same book. Bayard (1981) notes the resemblance between this tune and the "Betty Martin" variants, many listed as alternates above. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. See also related tunes "Gate to Go Through" and "Old Coon Dog." Ford (1940) said that "occasional verses" were sung by fiddlers while playing the tune, and indeed, various verses have been collected from both white and black sources. (Ford's collection area was the Mid-West, often Missouri, and Thede printed Oklahoma versions). Charles Wolfe (1991) remarks the tune has been collected widely from Mississippi to California, and notes that Ray Browne (writing in The Alabama Folk Lyric, 445) heard it often as a banjo tune popular more with blacks than whites.
***
Granny will your dog bite, cow kick, cat scratch?
Granny will your hen peck, sow root the corn patch?
Granny will your duck quack, old grey goose hatch?
Granny will your dog bite? "Yes, child, No!" (Ford)
***
Granny will your hen peck, hen peck, hen peck,
Granny will your hen peck, Lord, child, no;
Hog bit 'er pecker off a long time ago. (Thede)
***
Granny will your dog bite, dog bite, dog bite,
Granny will your dog bite , Lord, child no;
Wolf bit 'er biter off long time ago.
***
African-American collector Thomas Talley, in his Negro Folk Rhymes (edited in a new edition by Charles Wolfe in 1991) printed lyrics under the title "Chicken in the Bread Tray." They go:
***
Auntie, will yo dog bite?
No, Chile, No!
Chicken in the bread tray
A makin' up dough
***
Auntie, will yo broom hit?
Yes, Chile, Pop!
Chicken in the bread tray,
Flop, Flop, Flop!
***
Auntie, will you oven bake?
Yes, Jes fry!
What's dat chicken good fer?
Pie, Pie, Pie!
***
Auntie, is yo pie good?
Good as you could 'spec,
Chicken in the bread tray;
Peck, Peck, Peck!
***
See also Brown (3:205). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (1949, Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]; Sherman Collins (Pawnee County, Oklahoma) [Thede]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 1, pg. 3. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 102. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 87. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 58. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 82. Augusta Heritage AHS6, Melvin Wine - "Vintage Wine." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Dwight Lamb (b. 1937) - "Old Ladies Pickin' Chickens." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters (1889-1960) - "Old Time Fiddler's Repertory" (1976). Revonah Records RS-924, "The West Orrtanna String Band" (1976). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999).

GREY CAT ON A TENNESSEE FARM. Old-Time, Breakdown and song. USA, Tennesse. D Major. Standard. AABB. In repertoire of African-American Kentucky fiddler Cuje Bertram, and appears on a home tape made in 1970 for his family. Source for notated version: Uncle Dave Macon (Tenn.) [Kuntz].
***
Just talk to the man, you can if you will,
Farmed in the valley of the Tennessee hills.
***
Chorus
Big cat spit in the little cat's eye,
Little cat, little cat, don't you cry.
***
I do love liquor and we'll all take a dram,
I'm a-gonna tell you pretty Polly Ann.
***
Cattle in the pasture, hogs in the pen,
Sheep on the ranch and the wheat in the bin.
***
Wagon in the shed, porker in the yard,
Meat in the smokehouse and a big tub of lard.
***
Fruit in the cellar, cheese on the board,
A big sack of coffee and suger in the gourd.
***
Horses in the stable, money's in my pocket,
A baby in the cradle and a pretty girl to rock it. (Kuntz)
***
Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pgs. 216-218. County 521, Uncle Dave Macon- "Original Recordings 1925-1935." Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire on the Mountain." Rounder CD0403, The Freight Hoppers - "Where'd You Come From, Where'd You Go?"

HARE ON THE MOUNTAIN, THE. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Maid on the Green," "The Eagle's Nest," "The Rose on the Mountain," "The Catholic Boys," "The Humours of Bantry," "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill."

HIGH, BETTY MARTIN. AKA and see "Tip Toe, Pretty Betty Martin," "Betty Martin," "Old Mother Gofour," "Fire On the Mountain," "Hog Eye" [1], "Granny Will Your Dog Bite?" Old-Time, New England; Reel. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Cassius Radford (Pembroke, N.H.) [Linscott]. "The tune and words are traditional and fitted for a sort of jig that finished off a quadrille. It is a lively reminder to Radford of the days when he was a champion fiddler travelling all over New England. He remembers this tune and jig as one that was indulged in by those who felt the need of cutting an extra flourish and was executed with steps similar to the Highland Fling (Linscott, 1939)."
***
High, Betty Martin, tip toe, tip toe,
High, Betty Martin, tip toe fine;
Never found a man to suit her fancy,
Never found a man to suit her mind.
***
Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 58 (appears as "Tip Toe, Pretty Betty Martin"). Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 85.

HOG EYE [1]. AKA and see "Betty Martin," "Brad Walters," "Chippy/Gippy/Hippy Get Your Haircut," "High Betty Martin," "Hog-Eyed Man," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite," "Pretty Betty Martin," "Sally in the Garden(, Assisting Sam)," "Tip Toe Fine," "Fire on the Mountain," "Old Mother Gofour," etc. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas. A Mixolydian (Phillips): A Dorian (Kaufman). Standard. AAB (Brody): AABB (Kaufman, Phillips). This melody seems to have been played as much in the major mode as in the mixolydian. The term 'hog-eye' means perhaps 'wall-eyed', according to Thede, though "Sing Out" reported that it was also the slang term (for some reason) for a type of barge that took the 49ers around Cape Horn to the California gold fields in the mid-1800's. 'Hog-eye' also appears to have been a euphemism for female genitalia (see note for Bayard's "Hog Eye an' a 'Tater"). There are several tunes that are quite similar to each other and to this one: "Betty Martin," "Old Mother Gofour," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite," and "Fire on the Mountain." See Bayard's (1981, No. 60, pg. 43). The melody was in the repertoire of Ky. fiddlers Luther Strong and Bill Stepp as "Hog-Eyed Man," and was recorded under this title in 1939 by Herbert Halpert for the Library of Congress from the playing of Lauderdale County, Mississippi, fiddler Stephen B. Tucker.
***
Sally's in the garden sifting, sifting,
Sally's in the garden sifting sand;
Sally's in the garden sifting, sifting,
Sally's upstairs with the hog-eyed man.
***
Sally will your dog bite? No, sir, no,
Daddy cut his biter off a long time ago.
***
Chicken in the bread pan kicking up dough,
Sally will your dog bite? No, sir, no;
Sally in the garden sifting sand,
Sally upstairs with the hog-eyed man.
***
Sources for notated versions: The Arkansas Sheiks (Kuntz); Tony Marcus [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 136. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 93. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 299-300. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 113. Bay 204, The Arkansas Sheiks- "Whiskey Before Breakfast." County 518, Pope's Arkansas Mountaineer's- "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 1." Folkways FA 2398, New Lost City Ramblers- "Vol. 3." Kanawha 311, "Hollow Rock String Band." Victor 21295 {78 RPM}, Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers.
T:Hogeye [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:A
e/f/e/d/ c/B/A/c/|B/A/=G/F/ E/F/G/A/|e/f/e/d/ c/B/A/c/|B/A/G/B/ A/B/c/d/:|
e/f/e/d/ c/A/c/d/|e/f/e/f/ =g/a/g/f/|e/f/e/d/ c/B/A/c/|B/A/G/B/ A/B/c/d/|
e/f/e/d/ c/A/c/d/|e/f/e/f/ =g/a/g/f/|e/f/e/d/ c/B/A/c/|B/A/G/B/ A f/g/||
a/b/a/g/ f/g/f/d/|[d/f/][d/e/][d/f/][d/f/] [dg]>g|f/g/f/d/ e/f/e/c/|d/c/d/f/ ef/g/|
a/b/a/g/ f/g/f/d/|[d/f/][d/e/][d/f/][d/f/] [dg]>g|f/g/f/d/ e/f/e/c/|d/c/d/f/ e>(^d|
e/)[e/f/][e/e/][d/e/] [c/e/][B/e/][A/e/][c/e/]|[B/e/]A/^G/B/ A2||

HOG EYE AN' A 'TATER. AKA and see "Hog Eye('d Man)" [2], "Granny Will Your Dog Bite" (Pa. floating title), "Fire on the Mountain" (Pa. floating title), "Boatin Up Sandy." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, southwestern Pennsylvania. A Dorian ('A' part) & A Major ('B' part). Standard. AB. Related to "Hog Eye" [1]. "This is not the melody which accompanies the well known and often recorded sea shanty called 'Hog Eye', nor is it the playparty song tune with a similar name known farther south (see Sharp-Karpeles, English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians, II, No. 250). A somewhat different version, with the parts in reverse order, is in Bayard Coll., No. 288, from Greene County, where the title is simply 'Hog Eye', and has an indecent meaning. In Fayette County, this tune has the following associated rhyme:
***
I went down to Sally's house
'Bout ten o'clock or later;
All she had to give to me
Was a hog-eye and a tater.
***
The rhyme accompanying the set known in Greene County is:
***
As I was going down the street,
A pretty little girl I chanced to meet;
I stepped right up and kissed her sweet,
And asked her for some hog-eye meat.
***
(Bayard, 1944). Source for notated version: Irvin Yaugher Jr., Mt. Independence, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1943 (learned from his great-uncle). Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 75.

HUMORS OF BANTRY (Sugra Brantraige/Beantraige). AKA and see "The Fire on the Mountains," "Fire in the Valley," "The Rose on the Mountain," "The Hare on the Mountain," "The Maid on the Green," "The Eagle's Nest," "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Catholic Boys." Irish, Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AAB (O'Neill/1915): AABB' (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'BB' (Moylan). Bayard (1981) calls it a "thoroughly characteristic Irish jig, probably of no great age." Although "Fire on the Mountain" is a floating title in Appalachian music, the tune was known as "Fire on the Mountain" to Chicago Irish piper and fiddler James Early and John McFadden and was printed under that title in Joyce's Old Irish Folk Music and Song. Source for notated version: accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 327, pgs. 186-187. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 129, pg. 75. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 711, pg. 133. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 13, pg. 19.
T:Humors of Bantry
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (13)
K:G
d|gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGB AGE|gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGG G2:|
|:d|edd gdd|edd gdB|def gfg|edB AGE|1 gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DGG A/B/cA|BGG G2:|2
gfg aga|bge edB|GFG A/B/cA|BGG G2:|

JENNIE BAKER. AKA and see "Boys of Bluehill," "Beaux of Oad Hill." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Guthrie Meade identifies this as a Kentucky tune which bears a close relationship to "Fire In the Mountain" and other tunes of the "Sally Goodin" tune family. See also the related "Old Ark's A'Movin.'" The melody was recorded by the Jimmy Johnson String Band of Kentucky, featuring Andy Palmer on fiddle. Source for notated version: Pat Conte [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 123.

LAST OF CALLAHAN. AKA- "Callahan," "Callahan Reel," "Last of the Callahans." AKA and see "Old Sport" [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Arkansas, Oklahoma, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky. D Major. AEAE or Standard. AABB (Thede): AA'BB'CC (Brody, Reiner & Anick). Thede says that fiddlers in Arkansas and Oklahoma attribute the tune (as in the "MacPherson's Lament" story) to an outlaw who, just before being hung, requested to play the fiddle one last time ..."In his standing position he played an unnamed fiddle tune and then handed the fiddle down to one of the bystanders. Justice was meted out...and the likeness of the tune became "Last of Callahan" (pg. 49). Reiner & Ancik (1989) say the first published report on the tune is from 1912, which relates the story of a Kentucky outlaw named Callahan who was executed around the year 1835; only in this account he played his tune while sitting on his awaiting coffin and when finished broke the fiddle over his knee before stepping up to the gallows. The tale is an example of a traditional tune-story that goes far back in musical tradition, in the case of the fiddle at least to the old Scottish tune "MacPherson's Lament," and in America is similar to the legend behind the musically related West Virginia/Virginia tunes "Camp Chase," "Joe Coleman's March" (Pa.) and "George Booker." A Cajun version of the legend is attached to the tunes "Guilbeau's Waltz" and "Valse a Napoleon." The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes (as "Last of the Callahans") compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Sources for notated versions: Frank West (Murray County, Oklahoma) [Thede], Highwoods String Band (N.Y.) [Brody, Reiner & Anick]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 165-166. Reiner & Anick (Old-Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 113. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 49. Ghe Records Gr 1001, Mike Cross - "Child Prodigy" (1979). Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire on the Mountain." Rounder 0010, "Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972. Learned from a West Virginia source via revival fiddler Dave Milefsky). In the epertoire of Kentucky fiddlers Luther Strong and Bill Stepp (who recorded for the Library of Congress).

LEE HIGHWAY BLUES. AKA and see "Going Down the Lee Highway," "New Lee Highway Blues," "Opry Fiddler's Blues," "Talkin' Fiddle Blues." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA. D Major. Standard. AAB. Composed by North Carolina/Tennessee fiddler G.B. Grayson in the 1920's. Stacy Phillips (1995) suggests the tune was derived from "Down Home Blues." Roy Parker states this tune was composed by fiddler G.B. Grayson in the back of guitarist Henry Whitter's Model T Ford as it chugged down US 11 (Lee Highway) on the way to the Memphis recording session. Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (Ithaca, New York) [Brody], Robert Wise [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 167. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 76. Bay 203, Jody Stecher- "Snake Baked a Hoecake." Columbia KC 32717, Dave Bromberg- "Wanted Dead or Alive." County CO-CD-3511, "Rural String Bands of Tennessee" (appears as "Going Down the Lee Highway"). Rebel 1531, Curly Ray Cline- "Fishin' For Another Hit." Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire On the Mountain." Rounder 0070, The Kentucky Colonels- "1965-1967." Rounder C-11565, Scotty Stoneman - "Lee Highway Blues" (1990). Rounder CD 11565, Scotty Stoneman - "Rounder Fiddle." Victor 23565 (78 RPM), 1929, G.B. Grayson (N.C./Tenn.).

LIBERTY OFF THE CORN LIQUOR STILL. AKA- "Liberty" [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Va. G Major. Standard. AABB. The title comes from the Highwoods String Band who derived the tune from the "Liberty" on the Skillet Licker's recording "Corn Liquor Still in Georgia." Source for notated version: Highwoods String Band (New York) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 168. Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire on the Mountain." County 727, John Ashby- "Old Virginia Fiddling" (appears as "Liberty").

MAID(EN) ON THE GREEN, THE (An Aindear Air/Ar an Bainseac/b-Faitce). AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "The Blackthorn Stick," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Humours of Bantry," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Daniel O'Connell's Welcome to Parliament," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in the Mountain," "The Fire/Hare on the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "Night of the Fun," "O'Connell's Welcome," "The Rose on the Mountain." Irish (originally), English; Double Jig. G Major. Standard. AAB (Raven): AABB (Allan, Brody, Cole, O'Neill {all versions}, Perlman, Roche, Sweet): AABBCC (Moylan). Bayard (1981) believes this tune to be a derivative of some original tune that also spawned "(Daniel) O'Connell's Welcome (to Parliament)," "Farewell to the Troubles of the World" (Slan agus Beannacht le Buaidhreamh an tSaoghail), and "The Night of the Sun." Source O'Leary's three part tune consists of a different 'B' part in between the two parts found in O'Neill. Sources for notated versions: John Campbell [Brody]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border), recorded in recital at Na Piobairi Uilleann, November, 1990 [Moylan]; Peter Chaisson, Sr. (b. 1929, Bear River, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 10, pg. 4. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 182. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 79. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 179, pg. 103. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 127, pg. 73. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 33. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 853, pg. 158. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 114, pg. 34. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 127. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 118. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 1; No. 108, pg. 46. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 24. Rounder 7003, John Campbell- "Cape Breton Violin Music." Shanachie 33001, Michael Coleman- "The Wheels of the World." Green Linnet 1023, Joe Shannon and Johnny McGreevy- "The Noonday Feast."
T:Maid on the Green
R:Jig
M:6/8
L:1/8
K:G
gfg e2d|Bee dBA|BGG dGG|BAG ABd|
gfg e2d|Bee dBA|BGG dBA|BGF GBd:||
|:gfg afd|gfg abc'|bag agf|gef g2a|

MY OWN HOUSE WALTZ. AKA and see "My Ain Hoose," "My Home" (Mo dhachaidh), "My Home Waltz," "Old Living Room Waltz." Scottish, English, Old-Time; Slow Air or Waltz (3/4 or 6/8 time). A Major [most versions]: A Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part) [Phillips]. Standard. One part (Laufman): AB (Kennedy, Laufman, Phillips, Raven): AABB (Brody): AA'BB' (Kaufman). Scottish versions are generally titled "My Home" (Mo dhachaidh), have a slightly different 'B' part and feature a double tonic at the cadences. Phillips' version, in two keys, is simply a melodic repeat of the same material in the subdominent key. Source for notated version: Highwoods String Band (Ithica, N.Y.) [Brody]; Ned Phoenix [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 201. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 64. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 2, 1954; pg. 28 (appears as "My Home Waltz"). Laufman (Okay, Let's Try a Contra, Men on the Right, Ladies on the Left, Up and Down the Hall), 1973; pg. 15 (appears as "My Home"). Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 2, 1988; pg. 13. Matthiesen (The Waltz Book), 1992; ppg. 37. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 285. Raven (English Country Dance Music), 1984; pg. 133. Avocet Records, Glasnotes - "Live from Contrafornia." Columbia, Dave Bromberg- "My Own House." F&W Records, "F&W String Band 2." Kicking Mule 216, Strathspey- "New England Contra Dance Music" (1977. Appears as "My Home Waltz"). Marimac 9064D, Lauchlin Stamper & A.C. Overton - "Sally with the Run Down Shoes" (1996. Appears as "Home Waltz;" learned by Stamper from younger fiddlers.). Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire On the Mountain."
T:My Home
M:3/4
L:1/4
K:A
e/2d/2|"A"c3/2B/2A|"A"Ace|"D/f+"a"e"g"d"f|"A/c+"e2"b"e/2d/2|"A"c3/2B/2"g#"c|\
"F#m"AB"e"c|"Bm/d"d3/2c/2d|
"E7"B"f#"e"g#"d|"A"c3/2B/2A|"A"Ace|"D/f+"a"e"g"d"f|"A/c+"e2"b"d|"A"c3/2A/2c|\
"G"B3/2=G/2B|"A"A3/2B/2A|"A"A2"E7"E|
"A"A3/2B/2c|"A"cBc|"A"e3/2d/2c|"F#m"c2e|"Bm"d3/2c/2d|"E7"Bcd|"A"e3/2c/2A|\
"A7"Ac/2e/2c/2e/2|
"D"f3/2d/2f|"D/f+"a"e"g"d"f|"A/c+"e3/2d/2c|"A"a2"E7"d|"A"c3/2A/2c|"G"B3/2=G/2B\
|"A"A3/2B/2A|"A"A2||

NANCY ROWLAND [1]. AKA and see "Little Nancy Rowland." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Georgia, Arkansas, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, West Virginia. G Major. Standard. AABB. Charles Wolfe (in his notes for "Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers - Kickapoo Medecine Show") states that this tune was apparently well-known in the Atlanta area during the 1920's but that its popularity has since considerably dwindled. He believes a more archaic solo fiddle rendition was rendered by John Carson on a mid-1920's OKeh recording (#40238). It was also in the repertoire of fiddler Tommy Magness (1911-1972), born in north Georgia near the southeastern Tennessee border. The title appears (as "Nancy Rowland" and "Nancy Rollins") in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (N.Y.) [Brody]; Carter Brothers [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 201. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 56. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 162. County 520, Carter Brothers and Son- "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 3." County 528, The Carter Brothers- "Traditional Fiddle Music of Mississippi." June Appal 007, Thomas Hunter- "Deep in Tradition" (1976. Learned from his grandfather, James W. Hunter, Madison County, N.C.). Marimac 9038, Dan Gellert & Brad Leftwich - "A Moment in Time." Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire on the Mountain." Rounder 1023, Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers- "Kickapoo Medicine Show."

O'CONNELL'S WELCOME {TO PARLIAMENT}. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "The Blackthorn Stick," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Humours of Bantry," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Daniel O'Connell's Welcome to Parliament," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in the Mountain," "The Fire/Hare on the Mountain," "Fire in the Valley," "Maid on the Green," "Night of the Fun," "O'Connell's Welcome," "The Rose on the Mountain," "Welcome home, royal Charlie." Irish, Jig; American, March. G Major (Coles): D Major (Bayard). Standard. AABB. Bayard (1981) regards this piece as a major form of the Irish tune "Slan agus Beannacht le Buaidhreamh an tSaoghail" (Farewell to the Troubles of the World), usually played in the Dorian or Mixolydian mode. Also derived from the original tune, he thinks, is the jig "The Maid(en) on the Green." Source for notated version: Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1944, 1960; who plays it "as always heard from fifers and bagpipers") [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 623, pg. 548. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 68. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; pg. 66. Jonathan Edwards Memorial Foundation JEMF-105, L.O. Weeks - "New England Traditional Fiddling" (1978).

OLD MOTHER GOFOUR. AKA and see "Granny Will Your Dog Bite?" "(Pretty) Betty Martin," "Hog Eye (Man)," "Fire On the Mountain," "Tip Top Fine."

OLD TIME FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN. AKA and see "Fire on the Mountain" [5]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Franklin County, Va. D Major. Standard. The tune (which has nothing to do with the commonly heard "Fire on the Mountain") consists of a single strain repeated in a different octave. Tom Carter and Blanton Owen remark that the tune is reminiscent of Norman Edmond's "Hawks and Eagles." See also the tune "Sambo." Rounder 0057, Sam Connor (Franklin County, Va.) - "Old Originals, Vol. 1" (1978).

ORGAN GRINDER SWING. Melody compares with Bayard's (1944) "Fire on the Mountain."

PRETTY BETTY MARTIN. AKA and see "Tip Toe Pretty Betty Martin," "High Betty Martin," "Tip Toe Fine," "Very Pretty Martin," "Fire on the Mountain," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite?," "Old Mother Gofour," "Hog-Eye (Man)."

RICKETT'S HORNPIPE. AKA and see "The Manchester Hornpipe," "The New College Hornpipe" [1], "One Eyed Fidler," "Raker's Hornpipe," "Sailor's Hornpipe" [2]. English, Irish, American; Hornpipe, Breakdown. USA; Arizona, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, New England. Canada, Ontario. D Major (most versions): C Major (Hardings). Standard or ADAE (some Southern versions, e.g. Tommy Jarrell). AABB. The particular Rickett honored in the title was a circus promoter, one John Bill Ricketts, a Scots immigrant who came from England in 1792 and flourished in America through the 1790's till about 1800, when his Philadelphia enterprise was destroyed in a fire on Dec. 17, 1799. He reportedly delighted his audiences by dancing hornpipes on the backs of galloping horses (Tribe), and toward the end of his career hired another famous American hornpipe dancer, John Durang, to produce pantomimes for him. Jabbour (in "American Fiddle Tunes") says that circuses under his name appeared in New York City, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Charlestown, Albany, Boston, Hartford, and Montreal.
***
The earliest appearance of the melody, finds Jabbour, was in Alexander McGlashan's Collection of Scots Measures of 1781, with the notation "danced by Aldridge," a reference to the great Irish-born dancer of the late 18th century Robert Aldridge (see note for "Aldridge's Hornpipe"). Krassen (1973) states that "Rickett's," common in the British Isles, is very popular in the Appalachians (albeit slightly less so than "Fisher's Hornpipe" which is easier to play), although in the South the tune lost all connections with the hornpipe dance, and is usually played at the same pace as a breakdown. Bayard (1981) agrees it is an "exceedingly well-known" hornpipe whose title is almost invariably the same, and that it was as popular with fifers in Pennsylvania as fiddlers. It was also popular with northeastern U.S. fiddlers, notes Bronner (1987), who says that by the 1850's it was a common selection for fiddle-tune collections. It retained its popularity into the 20th century and was cited as having frequently been played for country dances in Orange County, New York, in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly). At mid-century it was one of the tunes often in the repertories of amateur fiddlers throughout the country, as, for example with Buffalo Valley, Pa., region dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, for the same institution by Herbert Halpert from Mississippi fiddler Stephen B. Tucker (b. 1859) in 1939 (under the title "Raker's Hornpipe"), and in 1937 from the playing of Luther Strong (Hazard, Kentucky). It was played by R.L. Stephens of Camp Hill, Alabama, at a contest in Columbus, Georgia, according to the Columbus Enquirer of December 10 & 12, 1926 (Cauthen, 1990).
***
Versions of "Rickett's" are still quite common among traditional musicians in southern England, where its usually called "Pidgeon on the Gate" or "We'll Sit Upon the Gate."
***
Sources for notated versions: Evans (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]: Frank George (W.Va.) [Krassen]; Pop Weir, 1960 (New York State) [Bronner]; ten southwestern fiddlers and fifers [Bayard]; Warren Smith via Frank Maloy [The Devil's Box]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario). Adam, 1928; No. 10. American Veteran Fifer, 1927; No. 111. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 165A-J, pgs. 107-111. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 13, pg. 26. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 229. Bronner (Old-Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 26, pg. 111. Cazden, 1955; pg. 43 (2nd tune). Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 89. The Devil's Box, pg. 52. Ford, 1940; pg. 50. Hardings All-Round, 1905; No. 174, pg. 55. Hardings Original Collection (1928) and Harding Collection (1915), No. 30. Howe (School for the Violin), 1851; pg. 38. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; pg. 43. Jarman, (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No. or pg. 23. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 10, pg. 5 (appears as "Manchester Hornpipe"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; pg. 43. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 80. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 23. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 138. O'Malley, 1919; pg. 17. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 169. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 220. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 159 (appears as "Manchester Hornpipe"). Robbins, 1933; No. 68. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 38, pg. 14. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 47. Sym, 1930; pg. 11. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 118. Thomas & Leeder (The Singin' Gatherin'), pg. 151. White's Excelsior Collection, 1907; pg. 51 (2nd tune). White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 95. Columbia 15682 (78 RPM), The Skillet Lickers (1931. Appears under the title "Tanner's Hornpipe"). County 745, John Ashby- "Down on Ashby's Farm." Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker" (1966). Folkways FA 2472, Roger Sprung- "Progressive Bluegrass, Vol. 3." Gennett 5613 (78 RPM), The Tweedy Brothers (1924. West Virginia). Green Mountain 1061, Wilfred Guillette- "Old Time Fiddlin.'" Marimac 9017, Vesta Johnson (Mo.) - "Down Home Rag." Marimac 9064D, Lauchlin Stamper & A.C. Overton - "Sally with the Run Down Shoes" (1996). Mountain 310, Tommy Jarrell - "Joke on the Puppy" (1976). Rounder 0084, Bill Keith- "Something Bluegrass." Rounder 0004, Clark Kessinger- "Old-Time Music." Dutch Cove String Band- "Sycamore Tea."
R:Rickett's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
(3ABc|dc dA FA df|ed cB A2g2|fg af gf ed|ed cB Ag fe|
dc dA FA df|ed cB A2g2|fa fd eg ec|d2f2d2:|
|:fg|af af d2 ga|bg bg e2fg|af ba gf ed|ed cB Ag fe|
dc dA FA df|ed cB A2g2|fa fd eg ec|d2f2d2:|

ROSE ON THE MOUNTAIN, THE [1]. AKA and see "The Coachroad to Sligo," "The Humours of Bantry," "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Rockhill/Bockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Blackthorn Stick," "The Fire/Hare on the Mountain," The Maid on the Green," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in the Valley."

SALLY IN THE GARDEN [1]. AKA- "Sally in the Garden, Assisting Sam." AKA and see "Brad Walters," "Boatin' Up Sandy," "Fire on the Mountain," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite?" "The Hogeye Man," "Hogeye," "Hogeye an' a 'Tater." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA. A Aeolian. Standard. AABB.
**
Sally in the garden, sifting, sifting,
Sally in the garden sifting sand
Sally in the garden sifting, sifting,
Sally's upstairs with a hog-eye man.
**
Sources for notated versions: John McCutcheon [Brody], Uncle William Raines (Morgan County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Ken Kosek [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 247. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 6. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 120. June Appal 014, John McCutcheon- "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" (1977). Rounder 0040, "Pickin' Around the Cookstove." Clyde Davenport - "Puncheon Floor."

SAMBO. AKA and see "Old Time Fire on the Mountain." Old-Time, Breakdown (?) Two-Step (?). G Major. Standard or GDGD. AAAABB'. The tune is from African-American fiddler John Lusk, from Kentucky. Similar to Isham Monday's version. Source for notated version: Kerry Blech [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 121.

TIP TOE, PRETTY BETTY MARTIN. AKA and see "Betty Martin," "Pretty Betty Martin," "I Betty Martin," "Tip Toe Fine," "Very Pretty Martin," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite," "Old Mother Gofour," "Fire On the Mountain," "Hog-Eye." Old-Time, Breakdown. A Major. Standard. AABB'. The words that were attached to the tune have led to a varity of titles for it:
Pretty Betty Martin, tip toe, tip toe,
Pretty Betty Martin, tip toe fine.
Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 58.

TOM SULLIVAN'S. AKA and see "Gather 'Round the Fire." Irish, Polka. D Major. Standard. AB (Cowdery): AABB (Sullivan): AABB' (Mallinson). The melody is based on a melodic variant of "The Job of Journeywork." See also the related "Matt Hayes's Polka." Cowdery (The Melodic Tradition of Ireland), 1990; Ex. 33A, pg. 91. Mallinson (100 Polkas), 1997; No. 83, pg. 32. Sullivan (Session Tunes), Vol. 2; No. 20, pg. 9. Globestyle Irish CDORBD 085, Jackie Daly - "The Rushy Mountain" (1994. Reissue of Topic recordings).

WALKING IN THE PARLOR [1]. See related tune "Trude Evans." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas. D Major. Standard. ABB (Brody): ABA'A'B'B' (Krassen). A melody with minstrel-era origins. The tune was mentioned in an account as having been played at a LaFollette, northeast Tennessee fiddlers' contest in 1931. The title (as "Walk in the Parlor") appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountian fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Wilson Douglas (Ivydale, W.Va.) remarks it was noted W.Va. fiddler French Carpenter's favorite tune, and says of its origins with his mentor:
***
A lady composed that. She was a fiddler and a top square
dancer. She lived during Carpenter's time, but she was old.
French said she played that tune and nobody could beat her.
That's where he learned it. Her name was Trod Evans. She
was a lady fiddler.
***
Indeed, the tune is sometimes called "Trude Evans." It took five years, according to Douglas, for him to learn the tune with "the proper time at the proper time, or the proper rock, or the proper swing, or the proper shuffle." Despite its minstrel beginings Gerald Milnes found a version with topical references regarding the nature of John D. Rockefeller (Milnes, Play of a Fiddle, 1999). Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (New York) [Brody, Phillips]; John Hilt (Tazewell County, Virginia) [Krassen]; Wilson Douglas (W.Va.) [Phillips]; Charlie Acuff [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 284. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 114-115. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 252 (two versions). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 6. Anachronistic 001, John Hilt (Va.) - "Swope's Knobs." Paramount 33153 (78 RPM), Dr. D. Dix Hollis (Ala., 1861-1927), 1924. Rounder 0047, Wilson Douglas (W.Va.) - "The Right Hand Fork of Rush's Creek" (1975). Lee Hammons - "Shaking Down the Acorns." Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band - "Fire on the Mountain." Rounder 0089, Oscar and Eugene Wright - "Old Time Fiddle and Guitar Music from West Virginia." Rounder C-11565, Eugene Wright - "Rounder Fiddle" (1990). In the repertoire of Luther Davis, Galax, Va.
T:Walkin' in the Parlour
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:D
|:f2a2e4|f2a2e3e|f2a2 abaf|gfe2 d4:|
|:fdfd A2d2|fdfd e2d2|fdfd A2d2| fee2 d4:|

WAYS OF THE WORLD [1]. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; Tennessee, Kentucky, southwestern Va. D Major. Standard. AABB. The tune was first recorded in 1937 by Dalesbury, Ky., fiddler Luther Strong. Tom Carter and Blanton Owen (1976) identify it as a popular Patrick County, Va., fiddle tune belonging to an early repertoire established before the "band" style, or fiddle/clawhammer banjo combination, became popular. One of the original sources for the tune was Magoffin County, Kentucy, fiddler William Stepp, who recorded the tune for the Library of Congress in 1937. When the index cards for the recording were typed up, explains Kerry Blech, the name Wm., for William, was rendered 'W.M.' and this error was repeated for many years. The fiddler's name was actually William Hamilton Stepp. Source for notated version: Highwoods String Band (Ithaca, N.Y.) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 286. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 253. Front Hall FHR-021, John McCutcheon - "Barefoot Boy with Boots On" (1981. Learned from a recording by W.H. Stepp, Ky.). Library of Congress, 1937, Bill Stepp (Lakeville, Magoffin County, Ky.). Meadowlands MS1, "Allan Block and Ralph Lee Smith." Philo 1023, Jay Ungar and Lyn Hardy- "Songs, Ballads and Fiddle Tunes" (1975. Appears as second tune of "Twin Fiddle Medley"). Revonah RS-924, "The West Orrtanna (Pa.) String Band" (1977). Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire on the Mountain." Yazoo 2013, William Stepp - "The Music of Kentucky, Vol. 1."

WEST VIRGINIA GIRLS. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. May be related to a version of "Fire On the Mountain" (Frank George). Source for notated version: Henry Reed (Va.) via Alan Jabbour [Krassen]. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1973; pg. 39.


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