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The Fiddler's Companion

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A, E AND D QUADRILLE. AKA and see "Blue Bird Quadrille." Old-Time, Quadrille. USA, Nebraska. A Major ('A' part), E Major ('B' part) & D Major ('C' part). Standard. AABBCC. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (b. 1889, Burt County, Neb.) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 123. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters - "Drunken Wagoneer."

ADRIAN'S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Hornpipe or Breakdown. USA; Missouri, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Neb.) [Christeson, Phillips]. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973, Vol. 1.; pg. 121. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 178. Marimac 9017, Vesta Johnson (Mo.) - "Down Home Rag."

AIN'T GONNA GET NO SUPPER HERE TONIGHT. AKA and see "Not Gonna Get No Supper Here Tonight". Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Texas. Learned from Texas fiddler John Wills (Bob Wills' father) via mandolinist Kenny Hall and fiddler Pete Sutherland. The original key was A Major, though Sutherland plays it in 'G'. A tune called "Not Gonna Have No Supper Tonight," also played in G Major, was recorded for the Library of Congress in 1939 by Tishomingo County, Mississippi fiddler John Brown. Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1979).

ALY BAIN. Composed by New Hampshire accordion player and contra dance composer Bob McQuillan in honor of Shetland fiddler Aly Bain.

AMELIA'S WALTZ [1]. AKA - "Amelia." American, Waltz. USA, New Hampshire. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. This waltz was composed in 1981 by New Hampshire accordionist and composer Bob McQuillen (Peterboro, N.H.) for three-and-a-half year old Amelia Stiles, daughter of Deana Stiles, a flute player friend who played with Dudley Laufman's Canterbury Country Dance Orchestra. McCutcheon relates that "current legend" has it that Amelia was named because of the fact that her family lived in a house built around a shipping crate for Amelia Earhart's plane. Deana Stiles has been a member of Dudley Laufman's Canterbury Country Orchestra and currently plays with McQuillen in the trio "Old New England." The tune has proved quite popular at New England dances, an instant classic. McQuillen apparently prefers the title to be simply "Amelia." Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's Occasional: Waltz, Air and Misc.), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 12. Matthiesen (Waltz Book I), 1992; pg. 11. McQuillen, Bob's Notebook #5, 1981. Alcazar FR 2204, Rodney and Randy Miller - "New England Chestnuts, Vol. 2" (1981). BM-91, Buddy MacMaster - "Glencoe Hall." Greenhays GR 710, John McCutcheon - "Fine Times at Our House" (1982. Learned from Rodney and Randy Miller). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Whistlers Music, New England Tradition - "Farewell to the Hollow."
T:Amelia's Waltz
M:3/4
L:1/8
S:Gregory Taylor, Ir-trad, april 1997
K:D
"D"D3E3D2|"D"D2F3E|"Bm"D2F2BF|"F#m"A3FA2|\
"G"B2G3B|"D"A2F3E|"Bm"D2B3^A|"G"B4A2|
"D"D3ED2|"D"D2F3E|"Bm"D2F2BF|"G"B3cD2|\
"G"d2e2f2|"A"e2c2A2 :|"A"A3fag|"D"f2a3b|
"D"a2f2df|"A"e3cb2|"A"A3cfe|"Bm"d3cd|\
"Bm"f3ed2|"F#m"c3BA2|"F#m"F3EF2|"G"G2B3G|
"D"F2A2d2|"A"e3ce2|"D"f2d2f2|"G"g3fg2|\
"D"a2f2e2|"A"a2e2c2|"D"d4 |>|

ANDREA'S WALTZ. American, Waltz. USA, Pa. E Minor. Standard. AB. Composed by Bob Pasquarello in 1988 for Andrea Osgood. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 1.

ANGLEWORM WIGGLE. AKA - "Jumping Cactus." Old-Time, Quadrille (4/4 time). USA; Arizona, Michigan. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated tune: dulcimer player Donald Baker via his son (also named Donald Baker and a dulcimer player) who taught it to dulcimer player Bob Spinner when Spinner was age 17. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 7: Michigan Tunes), 1986/87, No. 7; pg. 5. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 44, pg. 16 (appears as "Jumping Cactus, or Angleworm Wiggle").
T:Angleworm Wiggle
T:Jumping Cactus
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:G
[d/b/][d/b/][d/b/][d/b/] [db][ca]|[B/g][B/g/][B/g/][B/g/] [Bg][df]|
[c/e/][c/e/][c/e/][c/e/] [ce][Fd]|cB A2|[c/a/][c/a/][c/a/][c/a/] [ca][Bg]|
[d3f3] (f/e/)|ddef|[B2g2][B2g2]:|
|:GABc|[F3d3] (B/c/)|d(B/c/) dB|[F3A3] AA|DFAc|[c3e3]d|
f>e d(e/f/)|gg gz:|

ART WOOTEN'S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AA'BBCCDD (Phillips): AABBCCDD (Christeson). Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 181.

ART WOOTEN'S QUADRILLE. Old-Time, Quadrille. USA, Nebraska. B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 117.

ATHOLL HIGHLANDERS, THE. AKA - "Athol Highlanders Jig." AKA and see "Lord Athlone's March," "The Three Sisters" (Shetland). Scottish (originally), Irish; Pipe March (6/8 time) or Jig. Scotland, Perthshire. Ireland, Donegal. A Major/Mixolydian (Brody, Hinds, Martin, Neil, Songer, Sweet): G Major (Kerr). Standard. AABB (Kerr): AABB' (Neil): AABBCC (Brody): ABCD (Sweet): AABBCCDD (Hinds, Martin, Songer). The name Athole (or Atholl) derives from the Gaelic ath Fodla, generally translated as New Ireland, and stems from the first invasion of the northern land by the Irish tribe the Scots in the 7th century (Matthews, 1972). The tune, described sometimes as a Scottish warpipes melody, is dedicated to the private army of the Duke of Atholl, the last private army still legally existing {albeit on a token level} in the British Isles (Boys of the Lough). Musically, the tune contains a characteristic melodic cliché in Scottish music in which a figure is followed by the same or a related figure on the triad one tone below or above (Emmerson, 1971). The original Athole Highlanders (and the ones associated with the tune) were the old 77th Highland Regiment, raised in 1778 and commanded by Colonel James Murray. The 77th served in Ireland and was not engaged in active service, though its garrison services were apparently useful in freeing other units for the conflicts with America and France. They were disbanded in 1783 after those conflicts ended (though the disbanding may have come about because of a mutiny). The tune was later taken up as a march past by the 2nd Battalion of the Cameronians, the 90th Light Infantry, who over the years had shed their Scottish origins. However, when pipers were introduced in 1881 they recollected their Perthshire origins and chose to play "The Atholl Highlanders" (also known in pipe literature as "The Gathering of the Grahams"). Susan Songer notes that when played for contra dances once through the tune is twice through a dance. Source for notated version: the tune was first brought to the Portland, Oregon, area by Seattle accordion player Laurie Andres and Olympia fiddler John Culhane in 1989 when playing at the first Spring Festival, and subsequently entered contra dance repertoire in that region [Songer]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 27. Hinds/Hebert (Grumbling Old Woman), 1981; pg. 20 (appears as "Athol Highlanders Jig"). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 265, pg. 29. Martin (Ceol na Fidhle), Vol. 1, 1991; pg. 23. Neil (The Scots Fiddle), 1991; No. 117, pg. 155. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997, pg. 21. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 37. Banff SBS5406, "Graham Townsend, Champion Folk Fiddler." Green Linnett GLCD 3090, Mairead Ní Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy - "Ceol Aduaidh" (1983/1994). Nimbus NI 5320, Ciaran Tourish et al. - "Fiddle Sticks: Irish Traditional Music from Donegal" (1991). Philo 1042, Boys of the Lough- "Piper's Broken Finger" (1976). Tradition 2118, "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Better Than an Orchesta" (1977).

AULD BOB MORRIS. Scottish. The tune appears in Thomson's "Orpheus Caledonius" (1725) where it is ascribed to David Rizzio (Queen Mary's secretary and an accomplished lutenist and singer). The ascription was removed by Thomson from his second edition, and the veracity of Rizzio's authorship is questionable.

AULD BRIG O' AYR, THE. AKA and see "Johnnie Steele," "Benholm Castle," "The New Brig o' Dee," "Bob Steele," "The Miller o' Dervil." Scottish, Strathspey. F Major. Standard. AB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 155, pg. 18.

AUTUMN WALTZ [2]. American, Waltz. G Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AA'AA'B. Source for notated version: Stuart Williams and Bob Fast [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 239.

BABBITY BOWSTER/BOLSTER. AKA - "Bee-Ba-Babbity." AKA and see "Country Bumpkin," "Who learned you to dance and a towdle." Scottish, Jig. This common Scottish melody (which Emmerson {1972} states is "yet on the lips of every Lowland child") first appears in the Skene Manuscript (1620) under the title "Who learned you to dance and a towdle," and later was printed by Stewart in his Reels (c. 1768) as "Country Bumpkin" and by Aird in Airs (1782) as "Bab at the Bowster." A tune by this title shows up as a fugue theme in Barsanti's overture in G, op. IV no. 9, c. 1750. Flett & Flett (1964) explain that "Babbity Bowster" is the name of a kissing dance once widely performed as the last dance at country dances in Scotland, though the name changed from region to region. In the Borders and Aberdeenshire it was known as "Babbity Bowster," a corruption of "Bob at the Bolster," in Fife and Lanarkshire as "Bee Bo Bobbity," in the Highlands and the Isles under the Gaelic titles "Ruidhleadh nam Pog" (The Kissing Reel), "Dannsadh nam Pog" (The Kissing Dance), and also by the English names "Blue Bonnets," "The Bonnet Dance," "The Bonny Lad," "Pease Strae" and "The White Cockade." In Orkney (where it was danced as late as 1925) it was called the "Lang Reel," "The Swine's Reel", "The Reel of Barm" or as "Babbity Bowster." The dance began with a man displaying a twisted handkerchief who then selected a woman, spread the handkerchief on the floor and both knelt and kissed. Then it was her turn to join the dance and to select another from the audience to kiss and join the dance. There were many variations of steps and endings, and in some regions it was customary for the man to escort the woman home whom he had chosen during the dance. A poetic description is given in Alexander Fordyce's piece A Country Wedding (1818):
***
...but custom is pressing
That Bob at'e Bowster be danced ere you go
We must close in the door, tho' constraint be distressing,
Bestman, let us see where the napkin you'll throw:
***
That's plenty o' capers, come, kiss and be done, Sir,
Another, another, and round, round you go
The circle increases; that squeak in the tune, Sir,
Is meant, by the fiddler, more kissing to show.
***
Flett & Flett make the connection of this dance with an earlier and very similar dance called "The Cushion Dance" or "Joan Sanderson," which was danced at court at the time of the Restoration. The 'bolster' of the Scottish title was in fact the 'cushion' referred to in the English name, and refers to the small pillow that was used at one time before the handkerchief was substituted.

BACKSTEP CINDY. AKA - "Backstep." AKA and see "Step Back Cindy," "Old Time Back Step Cindy," "Hollyding." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; southwestern Va., western N.C. D Major. ADAE. AABBCC' (Brody): ABBCC (Krassen). The tune, called "Step Back Cindy" by the late North Carolina fiddler Tommy Jarrell, is a medley of the 'old' way of playing the melody (called "Hollyding") coupled with the 'new' way made up by Tommy's father, fiddler Ben Jarrell, along with his musical partners Tony and Charlie Lowe. Jarrell thought the tune came to the Round Peak, N.C., area from "the back side of the mountain" (i.e. from Virginia). Sources for notated versions: The Fuzzy Mountain String Band (Durham, N.C.), who learned the tune from Fred Cockerham (Low Gap, N.C.) [Brody]; Uncle Charlie Higgins (Galax, Va.) [Krassen]; Tommy Jarrell (Mt. Airy, N.C.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 30. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 47. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994;pg. 18. County Records 748, Tommy Jarrell- "Come and Go With Me." County 756, Tommy Jarrell - "Sail Away Ladies" (1976). County CO-CD-2711, Kirk Sutphin - "Old Roots and New Branches" (1994. Appears as "Old Time Back Step Cindy"). Heritage XXIV, Tommy Jarrell - "Music of North Carolina" (Brandywine 1978), 1979. Rounder Records 0035, The Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973). Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985).

BALANCE ALL. Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard. AABBCC. The title comes from a square dance direction. Source for notated version: fiddler Howdy Forrester from his Uncle Bob [Devil's Box]. Devil's Box, Vol. 23, No. 1, Spring 1989; pg. 22.
T:Balance All
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, learned from his Uncle Bob; transcribed by John Hartford
K:C
G|e2 e/g/e/d/|c/A/G/c/ A/c/c|e2 e/g/e/d/|ca g/a/g|e2 e>d|c/A/G/c/ A/G/c|
Ba g/a/g/e/|c>d c:|
|:G,/A,/|C/D/E/C/ D/C/E/C/|D(C CC)/D/|E/C/E/C/ D/C/E|G>A GA|
B/G/B/G/ Bd|B(G G2)|A/c/B/G/ AB|c>d c:|
|:e|g/g/a/g/ e/g/e/d/|c(G G>)(c|c/)e/g/e/ ga|g>a g(g|g/)g/a/g/ e/g/e/d/|
c(G G2)|A/c/B/G/ AB|c>d c:|

BALL AND PIN HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Ariel Hornpipe." American, Hornpipe. A Major. Standard. AABB. Christeson's (1973, pg. 30) notation of a Bob Walter's (Burt County, Nebraska) tune, entered as "Breakdown #40," is a modification of this tune with an added third part. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 98. Green Linnet SIF 3046, Skylark - "All of It" (learned from Rose and Pat McKenna).


BEAUMONT RAG. Old-Time, Bluegrass, Texas, Western Swing; Country Rag. USA, Texas. F Major. Standard. AB (Brody): ABBC (Phillips/1989): ABC (Phillips/1995): AA'BB'CC'D (Reiner). Named after the town of Beaumont, Texas. "Beaumont Rag" was first recorded by Cleburne, Texas, fiddler Samuel Morgan Peacock in 1929, under the name Smith's Garage Fiddle Band (Wolfe, 1997). Peacock was a barber by trade who died after collapsing on the sidewalk in front of his barber shop in 1932. The tune was popularized by Texas swing fiddler Bob Wills, though an influential version was recorded by Terrell, Texas, fiddler Oscar Harper--another barber. The parts are variable in length, some versions having 12 measures while others have sixteen. A fourth part is sometimes added to the tune which features double-shuffle bowing. See the related "Oklahoma Rag" and "White River Stomp." Sources for notated versions: Bill Driver (Missouri) and Red Williams (Texas) [Christeson]; Bill Boyd [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 38. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 149. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 4. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 18. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 65. County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 410, "East Texas Serenaders - 1927-1936" (1977). County 517, Smith's Garage Fiddle Band- "Texas Farewell." County 703, Vernon Solomon- "Texas Hoedown." Folkways FTS31098, Ken Perlman - "Clawhammer Banjo and Fingerstyle Guitar Solos." Gusto 104, Bob Wills- "30 Fiddler's Greatest Hits." June Appal 015, Plank Road String Band- "Vocal and Instrumental Blend." June Appal 030, Marion Sumner- "Road to Home." Omac-1, Mark O'Conner- "A Texas Jam Session." Omac-2, Berline, Bush and O'Conner- "In Concert." RCA AXM2 5503 (Bluebird Reissue), "Bill Boyd's Cowboy Ramblers." Rounder 0117, "Blaine Sprouse." Rounder RO7023, Natalie MacMaster - "No Boundaries" (1996). Vanguard VSD 45/46, Doc Watson- "The Essential Doc Watson."

BELL COW, THE [1]. AKA and see "Captain Collins," "Bob Ridley," "The Belling Tune," "Montrose's March," "A Rock and a Wee Pickle Tow," "The Highlander's March," "O'Sullivan Mor's March."

BELLS OF AMERICA, THE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. D Major. Standard or ADAE. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 57.

BENHOLM CASTLE. AKA and see "Johnnie Steele," "The New Brig o Dee," "Bob Steele," "The Miller o' Dervil," "The Auld Brig o' Ayr."

BETTY ANN. AKA and see "Pretty Polly Ann." Old-Time, Breakdown. The tune is possibly a variant of the song "Little Betty Ann". It was recorded for Columbia under the above title on a 78 RPM by fiddler Jesse Ashlock on 12/11/1947; Ashlock credits the tune to John Wills, the father of his former employer Bob Wills. A tune by this name was recorded by north Virginia fiddler John Ashby (1915-1979). County 773, John Ashby and the Free State Ramblers - "Fiddling by the Hearth."

BIG-EYED RABBIT [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Alabama, Mississippi, western North Carolina. A Major. AEAE (e.g. Tommy Jarrell) or Standard. ABB (irregular 'A' part). Recorded by Quitman, Mississippi, fiddler Charles Long in 1939 in the field for the Library of Congress.
***
Yonder comes a rabbit,
Fast as he can run,
If I see another one,
Gonna shoot him with a double-barrel gun.
Gonna shoot him with my gun.
***
Yonder comes a rabbit,
Slippin' through the sand,
Shoot that rabbit, he don't care,
Fry him in my pan,
Fry him in my pan.
***
Chorus:
Rockin' in a weary land (x2)
or Big-eyed rabbit's gone, gone (x2)
***
Yonder comes my darlin',
How do I know?
Know her by her bright blue eyes,
Shinein' bright like gold,
Shinein' bright like gold. (Tommy Jarrell/Plank Road String Band).
***
Bob Woodcock (Pa.) supplied this verse (a coney is an old English term for a rabbit-Coney Island=Rabbit Island):
Coney on the island, coney on the run,
I'll get that rabbit in my pan, I'll shoot him with my gun
***
Source for notated version: Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 38. Carryon Records 005, "The Renegades" (1993). County 401, "The Stripling Brothers." County CO-CD-2711, Kirk Sutphin - "Old Roots and New Branches" (1994). Mountain 310, Tommy Jarrell - "Joke on the Puppy" (1976. Learned brom his father.). Vocalation 5412 (78 RPM), Stripling Brothers (Ala., played in C Major) {1929}.
T:Big Eyed Rabbit [2]
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
c4 c4|BA A2 A4|A4 B2c2|d8|d2d2f2f2|e2e2 d4:|
|:c2B2A2F2|B4B4|c2B2A2F2|A8:|

BIG-FOOTED NIGGER (IN THE SANDY LAND). AKA - "Bigfoot." AKA and see "Big-Footed Nigger/Man in the Sandy Lot," "Sandy Lot," "Big-Footed Man," "Big-Footed Coon," "Virginia Reel." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; N.C., Ala., Miss., Tenn. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is a mixture of phrases from common dance tunes. The coarse phrase, played on the middle strings will be recognized from the "Turkey in the Straw"-"Natchez Under the Hill"-"Zip Coon" tune family, while the fine part will be found in tunes like "Fort Smith Breakdown" (as played by Ozark old-time musician Luke Highnight). Charles Wolfe says the Stripling Brothers (Charlie and Ira) learned the tune from local West Alabama fiddlers ("Devil's Box", Dec. 1982), and Robert Fleder (1971) relates (in liner notes to the County album of Stripling Brothers releases) that Charlie Stripling recalled "waking up one morning at 3:00 with the second part of the tune running through his head, having heard it played only once earlier in the evening by a neighbor, Henry Ludlow." Stripling was a contest fiddler, and the recording of "Big Footed Man in the Sandy Lot" includes a 'trick' or feature that helped him impress judges and win in competitions; in the midddle of the song he inserts a chorus of "Sweet Bye & Bye." Sources for notated versions: Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Charlie Stripling (Alabama) [Phillips]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 23. Recorded by the Roane County (East Tenn.) Ramblers {1929 }. County 401, "The Stripling Brothers." Library of Congress AFS 4806-H-3, Osey Helton (Western N.C.). Library of Congress recording, 1939, W.A. Bledsoe, Meridian, Mississippi (appears as "Big Footed Nigger in a Sandy Lot" and was learned from his father in Lincoln County, Tennessee). Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH-002, W.A. Bledsoe - "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo-American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1939). Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985). Vocalation 5321 (78 RPM), Stripling Brothers (Pickens Cty., Alabama; learned from Henry Ludlow) {1928} [appears as "Big-Footed Nigger in the Sandy Lot"].
T:Bigfoot
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
K:G
(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ BA/(B/|B/)D/G/E/ D(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ B/A/G/(D/|
E>)(D E/)(3D/E/F/|G)A/A/ BA/(B/|B/)D/G/E/ DD/D/|D/(E/D/)(D/ E)F|
(G/ B) (G/ B:|
|:(e|g/)(a/g/)g/ (g/e/)d|e/f/e/(d/ B/)B/d|(e/ e) (e/ ef|e/(d/B/)B/ d(e|
g)g/g/ g/e/d|e/f/e/A/ G(A/(B/|B/)A/d/(A/ B/A/)G|(C/ E) (C/ E:|

BIG JOHN McNEIL(L)/McNEAL. AKA and see "John McNeil/MacNeil." Canadian, American, Scottish; Reel. Canada, widely known. USA; New England, Missouri. A Major. Standard (or infrequently AEAE). AABB (Gibbons, Messer, Sweet): AABB' (Miller & Perron): AA'BB' (Begin, Perlman, Phillips). Though now known as a Canadian standard it originally was a reel composed (as "John McNeil") by the brilliant Scottish fiddler Peter Milne (1824-1908), one of J. Scott Skinner's teachers and early playing partners, who earned his living playing in theaters until his opium addiction (he abused laudanum, originally prescribed for rheumatism) reduced him to busking on ferry-boats crossing the Firth of Forth. He died in unpleasant circumstances in a mental institution. John McNeil was apparently a famous Highland dancer at the turn of the century. The melody was in the repertoire of Cyrill Stinnett, a fiddler who epitomised the 'North Missouri Hornpipe Style' of playing, who apparently learned it and other tunes from listening to Canadian fiddlers broadcasting on the radio from Canada. A similar melody is "Lord Ramsey's Reel." Perlman (1996) notes the tune is a popular tune on Prince Edward Island, and a favorite vehicle for stepdancing in Prince County, PEI, on the eastern part of the island. Sources for notated versions: Mex Sexsmith (British Columbia), who learned this "classic" reel in the 1940's from radio broadcasts and records by Don Messer and His Islanders (who recorded it in 1942) [Gibbons]; Jay Unger (West Hurley, New York) via Bud Snow (Putnam County, New York) who also learned it from Canadian fiddler Don Messer [Fiddle Fever]; Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ontario) [Begin]. Francis MacDonald (b. 1940, Morell Rear, North-East Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 5, pg. 19. Gibbons (As It Comes: Folk Fiddling From Prince George, British Columbia), 1982; No. 11, pgs. 28-29. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 12, pg. 79. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 133. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 23. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 77. Condor 977-1489, "Graham & Eleanor Townsend Live at Barre, Vermont." Flying Fish FF 247, "Fiddle Fever" (1981). Fretless 101, "The Campbell Family: Champion Fiddlers." MCA Records MCAD 4037, "The Very Best of Don Messer" (1994). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion" (taught to Hartford in his early years by Missouri fiddler Gene Goforth).
T:Big John McNeil
L:1/8
M:C|
K:A
A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CE|A,2CE FE CE|FA GF ED CB,|
A,2CE FE CE|AE CE FE CB,|A,C B,D CE DF|EF Bd cA A2:|
|:eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 (3agf|eA fA eA ce| de dc B2 cd|
eA fA eA cd|eA fA e2 fg|ag fe fe dc|1 de fg a2 cd:|2 BA GF ED CB,|]

BIG SCIOTY/SCIOTA, THE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. G Major. Standard. AABB. A popular tune in the old-timey revival repertoire. It is named for the Scioto/Sciota River, which flows through Ohio and emptys into the Ohio River. The source for most of the versions, Marlinton, West Virginia, fiddler Burl Hammons, evidently played different versions of the tune (or perhaps it was a tune in evolution), for recordings of his playing by different collectors reveal variations of the melody. These different versions have influenced different revival bands -- contrast, for example, the Red Clay Rambler's version (learned from a 1970 field recording of Hammons by Malcolm Owen, Blanton Owen and Bert Levy) with versions based on the Alan Jabbour-collected recording of Burl which appears on the Library of Congress recording "The Hammons Family." See John Salyer's "Kentucky Winder" for a Magoffin County, Ky., variant of "Big Sciota." Sources for notated versions: Burl Hammonds (Marlinton, West Virginia) via Ship in the Clouds (Indiana) [Brody]; Zenith String Band (Connecticut) [Carlin]; Bill Christopherson & Tom Phillips [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 41. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 24. Bay 209, "The Gypsy Gyppo String Band" (1977. Learned from Burl Hammons via Jenny Cleland {of the Highwoods Stringband}). Carryon Records 005, "The Renegades" (1993). Flying Fish, Red Clay Ramblers - "Stolen Love" (1975. Collected from Burl Hammons in 1970). Folkways 31062, Ship in the Clouds - "Old Time Instrumental Music" (1978). Green Linnet, "Pigtown Fling." Reed Island Ramblers - "Wolves in the Wood" (1997). Rounder 0018, Burl Hammonds - "Shaking Down the Acorns." Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for the Clawhammer Banjo" (1979). Wheatland Records, the Henrie Brothers - "Wheatland Festival 1978."
T:Big Scioty
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:G
|:DE|GA BG AGED|EDEF G2 ((3D/E/F/|G)ABG AGED|EDEF G2 ({DEF}G2)|
GFGA Bc d2|e3 f e2 d2|BAGB AGEG|E G2 F G2:|
|:z e|gfga gedg|egab a3 e|gfga gedc|Bdef e3 (e|e)fgf edBd|B e2 f e2 (e2|e)fgf edBd|
B e2 f e2 A2|BAGB AGED|D {EF}G2 F G2:|

BIG TATERS IN THE SANDY LAND. See "Great Big Taters in Sandy Land." In the repertoire of Texas fiddler Bob Wills under this title.

BILL POWELL'S WALTZ. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. A Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Lincoln, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; No. 195, pg. 151.

BILLY/BILLIE IN THE LOW GROUND. AKA and see "Beaus of Albany," "Billy in the Low Land," "Braes of Auchtertyre," "Fiddler's Drunk and the Fun's All Over," "Jinny in the Lowland," "Kerry Fulton's Schottishe," "The Kerryman's Daughter." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, known under this title throughout the American South, Midwest, and Southwest. C Major (most versions): D Major (Bayard-Marr). Standard. AABB. See also related tune "Apple Blossum" and the related part 'A' of "Shelvin Rock." Miles Krassen (1973) identifies an Irish version called "The Kerryman's Daughter" which may be cognate or ancestral, while R.P. Christeson suggests it can be traced to the Scottish "Braes of Auchentyre" in (Cole's 1001) {as John Hartford has supported} and "Beaus of Albany" in Howe. Samuel Bayard (1981) agrees with Stenhouse-Johnson in concluding that the tune originated in Britain as a slow 3/4 time song tune from c. 1710 or earlier, called "O Dear Mother (Minnie) What Shall I Do?" He sees the development of the tune as having then split into two branches, and that during the 1740's a 6/8 "giga" or jig form was composed called variously "All the Blue Bonnets Are Over the Border," "Blue Bonnets Over the Border," "Over the Border," or "Blue Bonnets." Later in the century the second branch was fashioned from the original 3/4 tune into a fast duple time (4/4) dancing air which went by several titles including "The Braes of Auchtertyre/ Auchentyre" (the oldest and most common title), "The Belles of Tipperary," and "The Beaus of Albany." These latter tunes are the immediate ancestor of the "Billy in the Lowground" group of tunes in America.
**
The melody is widely disseminated through the United States. Bayard (1944) writes that when he collected the melody it was "current as a marching tune in Greene County, Pennsylvania, and is known to its 'Billy' form of the title farther south (as the tune resembles another Pa. tune called 'Jinny in the Lowlands'). The resemblances between this tune and 'Jinny in the Lowlands' may be fortuitous; but they have at any rate attracted enough notice from the players to cause confusion of the titles..." Tom Carter and Blanton Owen (1976) maintain the tune and title are characteristic of the Franklin, Floyd and Patrick County area of southwestern Virginia, and represent an older fiddle repertoire which predates the later development of stringband or fiddle/clawhammer banjo tunes. "Billy in the Lowground" was played by Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner for dances in the Southwest at the beginning of the twentieth century (the piece was identified by him as having come to that region from the American South, and assessed it as "a good one"). It was recorded from the playing of an Ozark fiddler for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph who collected in the early 1940's, and, likewise, by Herbert Halpert (also for the Library of Congress) in 1939 from Tishomingo County, Mississippi, fiddler John Hatcher. Cauthen (1990) collected evidence from period newspapers and other accounts in Alabama and records that it was one of the tunes commonly played throughout every region of that state in the first part of the 20th century. The Marion Standard of April 30th, 1909, reported it was one of the tunes (along with "Miss McLeod") played at a housewarming in Perry County, Ala., in 1827. Elsewhere in the deep South, a Georgia fiddler named Ben Smith, serving with the 12th Alabama Infantry in the Civil War, played the tune in that conflict according to a memoir of the unit. It is also known to have been associated with Kentucky fiddlers (Wolfe, 1982). The famous Kentucky fiddler Dick Burnett related this improbable story about the origin of the tune and title:
**
You know how come them to make that? There was a man a goin'
through an old field one time and he had his fiddle with him and
he walked out on the bank of a sink hole and it broke off and he
fell down in that hole and couldn't get out. He just sat down there
and took his fiddle and played that tune. His name was Billy
something but I forgot his full name. (Charles Wolfe)
**
Early American printings of the piece can be found from the early 19th century onwards. The melody appears under the "Billy/Low Grounds" title in George P. Knauff 's Virginia Reels," volume III (Baltimore, 1839). Folklorist and fiddler Alan Jabbour finds that, in some sources, the title changed around 1800 to "Johnny in the Nether Mains."
**
The tune was in the repertories of Uncle Jimmy Thompson 1848-1931 (Texas, Tenn.), Fiddlin' Cowan Powers 1877-1952? (Russell County, southwest Virginia) [and recorded by him for Victor, though the side was unissued], Bob Wills (Texas), black Kentucky fiddler Cuje Bertram. and Alabama fiddlers Monkey Brown (1897-1972) and D. Dix Hollis. Sources for notated versions: black fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Charlie Higgins (Galax, Va.) [Krassen]; David P. Gilpin, 9/22/1943 (played at Connellsville, Fayette County, Pa. but learned at Dunbar, Pa., though Gilpin did not have the title) [Bayard, 1944]; Irvin Yaugher, John Meighen, Frank Lowry, John Filby & Wiley Jobes (from Greene or Fayette Counties, southwestern Pa.) [Bayard, 1981]; James Marr (Mo., age 93 in 1949) [Bayard]; Howdy Forrester via John Hartford [The Devil's Box]; Lowe Stokes (Ga.) [Kaufman]; Billy Baker & Forest Daugherty (Texas) [Phillips]; John Johnson [Phillips]; Clyde Davenport (Indiana) [Phillips]. Adam, 1938; No. 42. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 5 (appears as "Reel"). Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 234A-E, pgs. 192-194. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; Appendix No. 23, pg. 581. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 42-43. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 54, pg. 41. The Devil's Box, pg.s 51-53. Fiddler Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 2, Summer 1996; pg. 30. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 65 (as "Billy in the Low Land"). Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pgs. 68-69. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 74 (an irregular version with nine measure parts instead of eight). Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; No. 21. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 65, pg. 39. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 6. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 25 (three versions). Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 74, pg. 27. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 78. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 1. Brunswick 239 (78 RPM), Dr. Humphrey Bate and His Possum Hunters {1928) (Nashville, Tenn. Columbia 15209-D (78 RPM), Burnett and Rutherford (1927). Columbia 15620 (78 RPM), Lowe Stokes (1930). County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 507, Lowe Stokes (North Ga.) {1930} - "Old Time Fiddle Classics." County 512, The Fiddlin' Bootleggers - "A Day in the Mountains" (orig. rec. in 1928). County 703, Benny Thomasson - "Texas Hoedown." County 733, Clark Kessinger - "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Davis Unlimited 33015, Doc Roberts (Ky.) - "Classic Fiddle Tunes" (One of the first tunes recorded by this fiddler). Folkways 2337, Clark Kessinger (Va.) - "Live at Union Grove." Gennet 3235 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (1925). Gennet 6390 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (1927). Library of Congress 1010A2, Jilson Setters, recorded for Alan Lomax and the Library of Congress in June, 1937. Marimac 9110, Dr. Humphrey Bate and his Possum Hunters - "It'll Never Happen Again: Old Time String Bands Vol. 1." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Casey Jones (1910-1967) - "Rocky Road to Jordon." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyrill Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling." Okeh 40020 (78 RPM), John Carson. Okeh 45397 (78 RPPM), Oscar and Doc Harper. Omac 1, Thomasson, Shorty, Morris, and O'Connor - "A Texas Jam Session." Rounder 0046, Mark O'Connor - "National Junior Fiddle Champion." Rounder 1004, "Ramblin' Reckless Hobo: The Songs of Dick Burnett and Leonard Rutherford." Rounder CD0262, Mike Seeger - "Fresh Oldtime String Band Music" (1988. Appears as part of "Billy in Waynesboro"). Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson (Texas) - "Master Fiddler." Vanguard VSD 9/10, Doc Watson - "On Stage." Vetco 102, Jilson Setters (under the name Blind Bill Day) {b. 1860, Rowan County, Ky.}, originally recorded on Victor 21407 (78 RPM) in 1928 (as "Billy in the Low Land"). Victor 19372 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (Texas) {1922}. Recorded by Burnett and Rutherford (Ky.), 78 RPM, and Uncle Am Stuart (b. 1856, Morristown, Tenn.) in 1924 for Vocalation. Voyager 309, Benny and Jerry Thomasson - "The Weiser Reunion: A Texas Jam Session" (1993).
T:Billy in the Lowground
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Jay Ungar
K:C
CA,|:G,A,CD EGAB|cBcd cAGB|ABAG EGAB|1 cAGE DCA,C:|2 cAGE D C3||
|:e g2 e g3 (g|g)age d c3|e a2 e a3 (a|a)bag edcd|e g2 e g3 (g|g)age d c3|ABAG EGAB|
cBGE D C3:|

BLUE MONDAY. American, Waltz. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Linda Henry and Bob Snope (Mass.) in tribute to Paul Eric Smith, upon his "retirement" from the Amherst, Mass., Monday night dance when the commuting became too much. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 7.

BLUE MULE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. G Major. Recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folkorist Vance Randolph in the early 1940's from Ozark Mountain fiddlers. It is in the repertoire of Missouri fiddler Bob Holt.
BLUE OCEAN. AKA and see "Aileen Bonner's," "Belles of Ballinderry." Irish, Polka. Ireland, West Kerry. D Major. Standard. AABB. The melody is mislabled "The Lonesome Road to Dingle" in Mac Amhlaoibh's book. Mac Amhlaoibh & Durham (An Pota Stóir: Ceol Seite Corca Duibne/The Set Dance Music of West Kerry), No. 39, pg. 29.

BLUEJAY POLKA. New England, Polka. F Major. Standard. AABB. A modern programmatic composition about a bluejay song by Peterborough, New Hampshire, accordion player and composer Bob McQuillen, December, 1974. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 80.

BLACK EYED SUSIE [1]. AKA and see variant "(Hop Up) Kitty Puss" (northeast Ky.). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; southwestern Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Nebraska, Kentucky. D Major. Standard. AB (Christeson, Krassen/1983): AABB (Brody, Krassen /1973): AA'BB' (Phillips). "One of the most popular breakdown tunes," note the New Lost City Ramblers (1964).
**
Bayard (1981) traces the history of the tune, beginning in the British Isles with a melody called "Rosasolis," set by Giles Farnaby (c. 1560- c.1600), which appears in the the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. Another version of the melody is called "Morris Off" and appears in Jehan Tabourot's Orchesographie (1588); it is still used for English morris dances and has been called the earliest recorded morris tune. Still another version appears as a Welsh harp tune, "Alawon Fy Ngwlad." Later developments of the tune were popular in England and Scotland from the early 17th century through the 18th, under the title "Three (Jolly) Sheep Skins;" while in Ireland a variation became known as "Aillilliu mo Mhailin" (Alas My Little Bag) {a humorous lament for a stolen bag of sundries}.
**
Transported to the United States from these various sources the melody developed into an old-time standard, "Black Eyed Susie," well-known throughout the South and Midwest. It was mentioned in reports from 1926-31 of the De Kalb County, northeast Alabama, Annual (Fiddler's) Convention, and at a 1929 Grove Hill, southwest Alabama, contest (Cauthen, 1990). Musicologist Vance Randolph collected and recorded the breakdown in the early 1940's for the Library of Congress from Ozark Mountains fiddlers, and it was similarly waxed in 1939 from the playing of Tishomingo County, Mississippi, fiddler John Hatcher for the same institution. Sources for notated versions: John Hilt (Tazewell County, Virginia) [Krassen, 1983]; Bob Walters (Lincoln, Nebraska) [Christeson]; New Lost City Ramblers [Brody, Kuntz]; John Tustin & S. Clark (southwestern Pa., mid-1900's) [Bayard]; Uncle Tom West (Boyd County, Ky., 1911) [Thomas & Leeder]; Doc Roberts (Ky.) [Phillips]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 185A-B, pg. 142. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 47. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol.1) , 1973; No. 71, pg. 54 (appears as "Black Eyed Susan"). Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddle), 1983; pg. 110. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 51 (appears as "Blackeyed Susan"). Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1986; pg. 327. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 28. Thomas & Leeder (The Singin' Gathering), 1939; pg. 61. Anachronistic 001, John Hilt - "Swope's Knobs." County 405, "The Hill-Billies." County 713, Cockerham, Jarrell, and Jenkins - "Down to the Cider Mill." County CO-CD-2711, Kirk Sutphin - "Old Roots and New Branches" (1994). Davis Unlimited 33015, Doc Roberts - "Classic Fiddle Tunes." Folkways FA 2492, New Lost City Ramblers - "String Band Instrumentals" (1964. Learned from J.P. Nestor & Whitter's Virginia Breakdowners). Gennett 6257 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (Ky.), c. 1928. Marimac 9009, Rafe Stefanini - "Old Time Friends" (1987). Marimac 9060, Jim Bowles - "Railroading Through the Rocky Mountains" (1992). Okeh 40320 (78 RPM), Whitter's Virginia Breakdowners (Henry Whitter, John Rector, James Sutphin). Rounder 0032, Buddy Thomas (northest Ky.) - "Kitty Puss: Old Time Fiddle Music From Kentucky." Victor 21070 (78 RPM), J.P. Nestor and Edmonds (Galax, Va.) {1927}. Victor 40127 (78 RPM), Jilson Setters (as Blind Bill Day; b. 1860, Rowan County, Ky.) {1928}.
T:Blackeyed Susie [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:D
(a>b) a(e/f/)|(g>a) ga|fd/d/ [d/e/][d/e/]d|BA FA:|
|:dd/d/ f/d/e/d/|dc/c/ Bc|dd/d/ f/d/e/d/ BAFA:|

BLACK SNAKE BIT ME ON THE TOE. AKA - "Blacksnake Bit Me on the Toe." Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. DDAD. The tune is a version of "The Pateroller Song" or "Run Johnny/Smoke/Nigger Run," which supposedly dates to the slave rebellions of the 1830's and the attempts of the plantation owners to establish organized patrols to prevent clandestine meetings and runaways. Source for notated version: learned by Indiana fiddler Clyde Davenport from his father [Carlin]. Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985).

BLACKBERRY BLOSSOM [2]. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; Tennessee, Kentucky, Nebraska. G Major ('A' part) & E Minor ('B' part). Standard. ABB (Christeson): ABB' (Berline): AABB (Brody, Krassen, Lowinger, Phillips). The tune is well-known as a traditional Kentucky dance tune. Charles Wolfe and Barry Poss note that Kentucky fiddlers have played a tune by that name since before the Civil War and that Kentucky fiddler Dick Burnett recorded a version in 1930 which has been the model for many traditional southern Kentucky/northern Tennessee versions. This version however is not Arthur Smith's "Blackberry Blossum," which is different and may have been an original of his. Smith recorded his version with the Arthur Smith Trio in 1929. "A family story tells of Arthur's playing the tune over WSM and the station conducting a contest to name the tune; bushels of mail came in, and a woman in Arkansas won with the name 'Blackberry Blossom'" (Charles Wolfe & Barry Poss)./ Ky. fiddler Dick Burnett said he learned his version "from a blind fiddler in (Ashland,) Johnson County, (eastern) Ky., named Ed Hayley" (elsewhere Burnett said he actually learned the tune from northeastern fiddler Bob Johnson, who had it from Hayley {1883-1951}, who was a legendary fiddler in east Kentucky). The tune was in fact Haley's signature tune, though he never commercially recorded it (Mark Wilson & Guthrie Meade, 1976). Another story about the origin of the title comes from Jean Thomas's "Ballad Makin' in the Mountains of Kentucky." It seems that a General Garfield named the tune during the Civil War after hearing a soldier playing it on the harmonica. He remarked to the musician that it was his favorite tune but said he couldn't remember the title, whereupon he expectorated a stream of tobacco juice onto a white blackberry bush blossom; this was noticed and the tune named. As improbable as that story sounds, the tradition of General Garfield's liking for the tune was corroborated by Ed Morrison on his Library of Congress recording (an influential version); he says Garfield used to whistle the tune frequently. Western New York Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Lincoln, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Charlie Higgins (Krassen says his version is loosely based on Higgin's playing); Benny Thomasson (Texas) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1973; pg. 47. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 142, pg. 101. Frets Magazine, February 1988, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle;" pg. 56. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 60. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 14. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 7. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pgs. 26 & 27 (two versions). Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 32. Columbia 15567 (78 RPM), Burnett and Ruttledge (1930). County 705, Sonny Miller & the Southern Mountain Boys- "Virginia Breakdown." Green Linnet SIF 1075, John Whelan & Eileen Ivers - "Fresh Takes" (1987. Learned from Eamonn O'Loughlin and played as a hornpipe). Marimac AHS #3, Glen Smith - "Say Old Man" (1990. Learned from legendary Galax, Va., fiddler Uncle Charley Higgins). Rounder 0092, Tony Rice - "Manzanita." Rounder 0090, Mark O'Connor - "Markology." Rounder 0073, "The White Brothers in Sweden." Rounder 0241, The Chicken Chokers - "Shoot Your Radio" (1987. Learned from Mike Seegar, Judy Hyman & Bert Levy). Rounder 1004, "Ramblin' Rickless Hobo: The Songs of Dick Burnett and Leonard Rutherford." Sugar Hill Records, Byron Berline & John Hickman - "Double Trouble." Vanguard VSD 45/46, "The Essential Doc Watson." Omac 1, Mark O'Connor - "A Texas Jam Session." Columbia 15567-D (78 RPM), Burnett and Ruttledge, 1930.
T:Blackberry Blossom
L:1/8
M:2/4
K:G
e/f/|g/a/b/g/ f/g/a/f/|e/f/g/e/ d/B/A/B/|G/A/G/E/ D/E/G/A/|B/A/G/B/ Ae/f/|
g/a/b/g/ f/g/a/f/|e/f/g/e/ d/B/A/B/|G/A/G/E/ D/E/G/A/|B/G/A/F/ G:|
|:G/D/|Ee/B/ de/d/|Ee/B/ d/e/d/B/|Ee/B/ d/d/e/f/|g/a/b/g/ a/g/e/d/|Ee/B/ d/e/d/B/|
Ee/B/ dd/A/|B/d/g e>d|B/G/A/F/ G:|

BLACKTHORN STICK [1]. AKA and see "Billy Patterson," "Boys of Bockhill/Rockhill," "The Catholic Boys," "The Coachroad to Sligo," "Daniel O'Connell's Welcome to Parliament," "The Eagle's Nest," "Fire in the Valley," "Fire on the Mountain," "The Hare on the Mountain," "Humours of Bantry," "The Maid on the Green," "O'Connell's Welcome," "The Rose on the Mountain," and "Joys of Wedlock." Irish (originally), New England; Jig. G Major (Allan, Miller & Perron, Spandaro, Sweet): A Major (Kerr, Raven). Standard. AAB (Kerr): AABB (Allan, Miller & Perron, Raven, Spandaro, Sweet, Tubridy). Bayard (1981) thinks the tune "a thoroughly characteristic Irish jig, probably of no great age." Source for notated version: David Street [Spandaro]. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 3, pg. 2. Jarman (Old Tyme Fiddlin' Tunes); pg. or No. 16. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 13, pg. 37. Miller & Perron (New England Fidders Repertoire), 1983; No. 2. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 115. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 44. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 38. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 30. Pibroch MacKenzie - "The Mull Fiddler" (1969). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Better than an Orchestra" (1977).
T:Blackthorn Stick [1]
T:Coach Road to Sligo
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BdB ABd|gfg e/f/ge|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGG G2:|
|:d|edd gdd|edd gdd|Bdd gfe|dBG A2d|gfg age|dBG AGE|DEG AGA|BGG G2:|

BOOGERMAN (WILL GET YOU). AKA and see "Whip the Devil Around the Stump." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, "Most common in North Carolina," but known throughout the Appalachians (Krassen, 1973). G Major ('A' part) & E Minor or E Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. In repertoire of Samantha Bumgarner (Asheville, N.C.), J. Dedrick Harris (Eastern Tenn.), and Osey Helton (Western N.C.) {who knew it as "Whip the Devil Around the Stump"}. Helton may have learned the tune from influential fiddler J.D. Harris, who moved to Western N.C. from Eastern Tenn. in the 1920's, and who recorded the tune on Broadway A1964 (78 RPM). Harris, who once played regularly with Bob Taylor when he was running for Governor of Tenn. in the late 1800's, also influenced other N.C. fiddlers of Helton's generation such as Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, and Marcus Martin. The tune was also in the repertoire of fiddler Tommy Magness (1911-1972), born in north Georgia near the southeastern Tennessee border. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 30.

BOSWELL'S FANCY. American, Reel. G Major. Standard. AABBC. Source for notated version: The tune's source origins are somewhat vague; Susan Songer got it from Alan Garren, who may have had it from fiddler Michael Meyer, who may have learned it from Bob Childs, who remembers acquiring the tune in the state of Maine. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 36.

BOX (THE) FOX. AKA and see "Double Hornpipe," "Blockhouse Dutchman." American, Breakdown or Reel. USA, central and southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: Issac Morris (Greene County, Pa., 1930's) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 299B, pg. 253. Folkways Records, Bruce Hutton - "Old Time Music, It's All Around." Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1979. Learned from Washington D.C. revival musician Bruce Hutton, who had it from a Pa. source). Revonah Records RS-924, "The West Orrtanna String Band" (1976. Identified as a "popular breakdown" in the York County, Pa., area for many years).

BOYS AROUND THE WORLD. See "Sally Lost Her Slipper." Old-Time, Polka. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. A Major. Standard or AEAE. AABB. Sources for notated versions: fiddler Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Cyril Stinnett (Mo.) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers' Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 16. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 334.

BOB AND JOAN. See "Boban John," "Bobbing Joan," "Bobbing Joe," "Hey for Stoney Batter," "Fill the Bumper Fair," "Love and Whiskey," "Stoneybatter" [1]. Irish, Air or March (9/8). G Major (E Minor, 'A' part?). Standard. AB (Roche): AABB (Breathnach). A variant of the Scottish tune "Boban John" in a different time. The air was used in the opera The Wife of Two Husbands for the song "Love and Whiskey," to which Thomas Moore later wrote "Fill the Bumper Fair." Breathnach (1963) gives these words:
***
Hi for Bob and Joan,
Hi for Stoneybatter;
Leave your wife at home
Or surely I'll be at her.
***
Crofton Croker mentions "Bob and Joan" in conjunction with James Gandsey (1769-1857), the famous Kerry piper (as reported by Brendan Breathnach in The Man and His Music {1997}). Gandsey, who was nearly blind from smallpox contracted as an infant, nevertheless was an incomparable talent of his time on his instrument, whose talents also included telling a good story, singing a good song and holding his own at capping Latin verses (a skill learned as a youth in a hedge school) with any educated person in the county. Croker describes several musical encounters with Gandsey at Gorham's Hibernian Hotel, at one of which a request was made of the piper for a lively song. "Come boy, scrape away," said Gandsey to his son, a fiddler, and responded by singing "Bob and Joan," to which he had set his own words:
***
To Killarney we will go,
And see fair nature's beauties,
The mountain topped with snow,
And covered with arbutus.
Oh! Then, to hear at night,
At Gorham's, how entrancing,
Old Gandsey play his pipes,
Which steps the maids a dancing!
Tow, row, row, row, row etc.
***
Source for notated version: piper Seán Potts (Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE I), 1963; No. 63, pg. 27. Roche Collection, Vol. II, 1982; No. 343, pg. 61.

BOB AND JOHN. See "Boban John." Scottish, Slip Jig (3/2). A Aeolian. Standard. AAB. A variant of the Scottish tune "Boban John." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 478.

BOB CHADDUCH'S JIG. AKA and see "King Pin Jig." American, "Sand Jig". A Major. Standard. AABB. A "sand jig" is a designation for a synchopated type of dance tune. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 80. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 424, pg. 48.

BOB JOHNSON'S MARCH AND REEL. Canadian, March and Reel. Canada; Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island. A Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Composed by Cape Breton fiddler and composer Dan R. MacDonald (1911-1976). Source for notated version: Eddy Arsenault (b. 1921, St. Chrysoston, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 92. Shanachie 14001, "The Early Recordings of Angus Chisholm."

BOB LE SUEUR'S FANCY. Irish, Jig. D Dorian. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: piper Kirk Lynch (Kansas City) [Black]. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 219, pg. 118.
T: Bob le Sueur's Fancy
S: Kirk Lynch
Q: 325
R: jig
Z:Transcribed by Bill Black
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Dmix
ded cAG | A3 BGE | D3 DEG | A3 cAG |
ded cAG | A3 BGE | D3 AGE | FGA D3 :|
ded fed | cAG c2 d | ded cAG | ^F3 AFD |
ded fed | cAG c2 d | fed cAG | FGA D3 :|

BOB McQUILLAN'S. American, Reel. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Although the tune has been credited to Peterborough, New Hampshire, composer, piano and accordion player Bob McQuillan, the tune was actually composed in his honor by Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, perhaps to return the favor for McQuillan's tune "Aly Bain." It appears as "Maud McQuillan's" in Tommy Walshe's book Irish Tin Whistle Legends, where it is transcribed from Míchéal Ó hAlmhain's playing ("Maud McQuillen's" will be recognized as a corruption of the composer's name, Bob McQuillen). The tune has gained some currency in Ireland, played by fiddler Maire O'Keeffe and recorded by the band Arcady. Shanachie Records, Arcady.
T:Bob McQuillan's
R:reel
C:Aly Bain
D:Arcady
Z:id:hn-reel-425
M:C|
K:G
~B3c dcBA|GABG D2DB|c2cd edcB|AGFE D2dc|
~B3c dcBA|GABG D2ED|C2CD EDEG|1 FDEF G2GA:|2 FDEF G2Bc||
|:d2Bd gagf|eccB c2AB|cAAc ~a3g|fdd^c d2B=c|
d2Bd gagf|eccB cege|dBGB cAFG|1 AGGF G2Bc:|2 AGGF G2GA||

BOB MORRIS. Scottish, Strathspey. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 155, pg. 18.

BOB O' DOOLY, THE. AKA and see "Carlin, Is Your Daughter Ready?," "Port Nan Con." Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian. Standard. AAB (Athole): AABB (Hunter). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 117 (arranged for string quintet by James Hunter). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 14.
T:Port Nan Con
T:Bob o' Dooly, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:A
A>ee>f e>d c2|A>ee>c d=GdB|A>ee>f edcA|BEEF =GABG:|
A>a a2 eaca|=G>=g ~=g2 dgBG|aAA2 eaca|BE~E>F =GABG|Aaa2 eaca|
B=GG2 dGB=G|aAAe f<eae|=gbeg dgB=G||

BOB OF DOWALLY, THE. AKA and see "The Bob O' Dooly."

BOB OF FETTERCAIRN, THE. AKA and see "Newburn Lads/Lasses," "Kail and Knockit Corn" (Shetland), "Come Kiss With Me, Come Clap With Me," "Mrs. Reneau's Reel" (Canada), "Had I the Wight." Scottish (orig.), Canadian; Reel. G Major. Standard. AB. The tune is often played in Scotland in a medley with "Caber Feidh/Fey." In Northumbria the tune has been embroidered with arpeggi and retitled "Newburn Lasses." Fettercairn, Aberdeenshire, is a village north of Brechin approached by a wooded valley along which MacBeth is believed to have retreated after his defeat at Dunsinane. It was the site of Kincardine Castle, whose history goes back to the 10th century. A turreted arch commemorating the 1861 visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert survives at the entrance to the village. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 236. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 13. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 3, pg. 24. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 99. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 163. Philo 2001, "Jean Carignan."
T:Bob of Fettercairn, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:G
B/c/|dBGB dBGB|dBdg f2df|ecAc ecAc|edef gage|dBGB dBGB|
DBdg f2df|aefd edBg|A/A/A Bd e2g2||dgBg dgBg|dgBg f2df|
ea^ca eaca|edef gage|dgBg dgBg|dgBg f2 df|aefd edBg|A/A/A Bd e2g2||

BOB RIDDEO. AKA - "Bob Riddley." American, March (2/4 time). USA, southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard. AB. Bayard (1981) found this fif tune in the Mount Pleasant Tablatures, 1950's. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 32, pgs. 30-31.

BOB RID(D)LEY [1]. See "Bob Riddeo."

BOB RIDLEY [2]. American, Jig. AKA and see "Captain Collins."

BOB SHEAR HARVEST. AKA - "Bob Sheer Harvest." English, Scottish; Old Hornpipe? England, Northumberland. F Major. Standard. AABB. The title comes from "Robin Shure in Hairst" (Robin Sheared in Harvest) {Seattle}. Mooney (Choicest Scots Tunes), 1982; pg. 2. Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 323.

BOB SIMMS. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AA'BB. Composition credited to Hugh Dunlop in Kerr. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 51, pg. 8.

BOB STEELE. AKA and see "The Miller O' Dervil," "Auld Brig o'Ayr," "New Brig o'Dee," "Johnnie Steele," "Benholm Castle."

BOB TAILED MULE. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Larry Shumway [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 33.

BOB TAYOR'S MARCH. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Tennessee. D Major. Standard. AAB. The melody comes from Bob Taylor, who, along with his brother, was both a fiddler and a Governor of Tennessee (they were in office at different times). Source for notated version: Charlie Taylor (Tenn.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 243. CA-01, Charlie Acuff - "Left Handed Fiddler" (1990. A privately issued cassette featuring the 70 year old fiddler from Alcoa, Tennessee).

BOB THOMPSON'S FAVOURITE. AKA and see "The Coravat Jig," "Wiseman's Favourite," "The Mountain Lark," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Twice Tricked," "Jackson's Coola," "The Piper's Frolic," "The Humours of Limerick," "Tuhy's Frolic," "The Geese in the Bog(s)," "The Green Meadow."

BOB WALTER'S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AA'AA'BB'BB'. Bob Walters was a regionally influential fiddler from Nebraska whose hey-dey was the mid-20th century. Source for notated version: Lynn Smith [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 182.

BOB WALTERS WALTZ, A. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. G Major ('A' part), D Major ('B' part) & C Major ('C' part). Standard. ABC. Christeson's name for an untitled waltz played by Nebraska fiddler Bob Walters. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory II), 1984; pg. 159.

BOB WINE'S TUNE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. D Major ('A' part) & A Mixolydian ('B' part). Standard. AA'B. Source for notated version: Melvin Wine (W.Va.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 33.

BOB WITH THE ONE HORN [1]. Scottish; Reel or Rant. USA, New England. G Minor. Standard. AAB. Tolman probably got his version from Kerr, who lists it at the end of his section of Irish reels. This seems either to be a mistake, perhaps of the printer, for the reel appears to be Scottish, or else it is an Irish reworking of the Scots tune "Ewie Wi' the Crookit Horn." Tolman, taking his cue from Kerr, lists the tune as "Irish". Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 187, pg. 21. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 21.

BOB WITH THE ONE HORN [2]. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Go See the Fun," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "The Merry Lasses," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "Peter Street," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Red Blanket," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky Over It." Scottish, Irish; Reel. Version #1 in the major mode.

BOB WITH THE TWO HORNS, THE. Scottish, G Minor. Standard. AABB'. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 4; No. 188, pg. 21.

BOBAN JOHN. AKA and see "Bob and John," "Bob and Joan." AKA - "Bobbing John," "Bobbin John." Scottish, March (?, 3/2 time). G Mixolydian. Standard. One part. Williamson (1976) says: "'Boban' or 'Bobbin John'... was a nickname for the Earl of Mar, a supporter of James Stuart, The Old Pretender. Mar had never been in the field before he raised James's standard at Castleton of Braemar on the 6th of September, 1715, and proclaimed James King of Scotland, England, France, Ireland, and so forth. The standard had been made by the Earl's Lady, and it was an extremely elegant job featuring pennants, sub-pennants, and mottos in blue , white, and other colours of silk. Unfortunately, when it was first erected, the ornamental ball on the top of the pole fell off. Many of Mar's mostly Highland troops interpreted this as an evil omen. Nevertheless, the Jacobite forces acquitted themselves well in many raids and skirmishes and won a near victory over George's Redcoats at the battle of Sherriffmuir. The Jacobites received much popular support from the people of Scotland and the north of England who were not enamoured of the political juggling that had placed George on the throne, but finally the highly disciplined Redcoats and experienced English generals defeated the Jacobites at the battle of Preston in Lancashire. James fled back to France, the leaders were executed, and the rebellion was quelled, for a time." Printed by Robert Petrie in Fourth Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, and Jigs (1796). Gow (Complete Repository), Part 2, 1802; pgs. 22-23. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 49.
T:Bobin John
L:1/8
M:3/2
S:Gow - 2nd Repository
K:A Minor
e2(A2 A2)c2 B4|e2(A2A2)c2 BcdB|e2(A2A2)c2 B3c|d2G2G2d2 BcdB:|
c2 ef g2c2 e4|c2 ef g2 c2 e2 g2|a3f g3f e4|d2G2G2d2 BcdB|c2efg2 c2 e4|
c2 ef g2c2e2g2|a3f g3f~e4|d2G2G2d2 BcdB||

BOBBI ROJO. New England, Reel. D Major. Standard. AABB. A modern composition by Peterborough, New Hampshire, composer, accordion and piano player Bob McQuillen. McQuillen (Bob's Notebook), Vol. 1; No. or pg. 10.

BOBBIN JOHN. See "Boban John," "Bobbing Joan," "Bob and Joan."

BOBBING JOAN. AKA and see "Bob and Joan," "Bobbing Joe," "Bobbing John," etc.

BOBBING JOE. AKA and see "Bobbing Joan(e)," "Bob(by) and Joan/John," "Bobbin-a-Jo." English, Country Dance Tune (6/4 time). A Minor. Standard. AB (Sharp): AAB (Chappell, Raven). This air appears in Playford's The English Dancing Master (1651) and Musick's Delight on the Cithren (1666). Quite old, it was considered part of the traditional repertoire in John Playford's day (Pulver, 1923), and may be related to the morris tune "Bobbin-a-Joe." As "Bobbing Joane" it appears in several ballad operas, including Gay's Polly (1729), The Bay's Opera (1730), The Mad House (1737), and A Cure for a Scold (1738). Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time), Vol. 1, 1859; pg. 312. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 37 (a facsimile copy of Playford's Dancing Master version). Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 36. Maggie's Music MMCD216, Hesperus - "Early American Roots" (1997).

BOBBY AND JOAN. AKA and see "Bobbing Joe." English, Morris Dance Tune (6/8 time). G Major (Mallinson): A Major (Bacon). Standard. AABBBB, x4. From the Fieldtown (the village of Leafield, Oxfordshire) area of England's Cotswolds. Related to "Bobbin-a-Joe." The dance from Wheatley is identical to that from Fieldtown, leading John Kirkpatrick (1976) to speculate that there must have been considerable "poaching" of repertoires during the hey-day of morris dancing. The tune is not related to "Bob and Joan"/"Stoneybatter" [1]. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pg. 150. Mallinson (Mally's Cotswold Morris Book), 1988, Vol. 2; No. 41, pg. 20. Topic TSCD458, John Kirkpatrick - "Plain Capers" (1976).

BOB'S DOUBLE CLOG. New England, Clog or Hornpipe. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Page (Ralph Page Book of Contras), 1969; pg. 17.

BOB'S GARDEN OF EARTHLY DELIGHTS. Irish, Reel. A Dorian. Standard. AABB. Composed (in G Dorian) by button accordion player John Whelan. Black (Music's the Very Best Thing), 1996; No. 176, pg. 93. John Whelan - "From the Heart."
T: Bob's Garden of Earthly Delights
C: J. Whelan
Q: 350
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
AB | cA A2 cAed | (3cBA BG DGBG | cA A2 EAcd | edef gedB |
cA A2 gedB | GB B2 dBGB | cABG AG=FD | EAAG A2 :|
AB | ea a2 gaba | ge e2 dBGB | cA A2 cAef | gfgb agba |
ge e2 bage | dg g2 edcB | cABG AG=FD | EAAG A2 :|

BOGANNACH, THE. AKA - "New Bob." Scottish, Reel. B Minor (Gow, MacDonald): A Minor (McGlashan). Standard. AAB (Gow): AABB (MacDonald): ABCD (McGlashan). From "Neil Gow's Collection." Gow (Complete Repository), Part 1, 1799; pg. 37 (appears as "The Boganuadh or the New Bob"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 62. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 41.
T:Boganuadh
T:Bogannach, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:A Minor
ABcd e2 dc|egde BGdB|ABcd e2 dc|BAGB A/A/A AG|A/B/c/d/ e2 dc|
E2 de cdeg|aega e2 dc|BAGB A/A/A AB||A/A/A ag a>bae|g>age c>dec|
dega e2 dc|BAGB A/A/A AG|A/A/A ag a>bae|g>aeg cdec|dega egdg|
BGgB A/A/A e2||ABcd e2 dc|BGdG gGdB|ABcd e2 dc|BGgB A/A/A e2|
ABcd e2 dg|BGdG gGdB|ABcd egdg|BGgB A/A/A AB||A/A/A ag aAae|
g>age cdec|dega egdg|BGgB A/A/A AB|A/A/A ag aAae|gaeg cdec|
dega egdg|BGgB A/A/A e2||

BONAPARTE CROSSING THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. AKA and see "Battle of Waterloo," "Bonaparte Crossing the Alps" [2], "Bonaparte Crossing the Rhine" [2], "Bonaparte's March," "Caledonia March." Old-Time, Breakdown. A Aeolian (Am). Standard. AABB. The title is perhaps comes from a garbled transmission of "Bonaparte Crossing the Rhine," or perhaps a deliberate Americanism. There's a story about this tune in Allen H. Eaton, Handicrafts of the Southern Highlands (1937, repr. Dover 1973). Tunes at a Knoxville fiddlers' convention included "Napolean Crossing the Rocky Mountains, which several contestants chose to render. This tune seemed to be a particular favorite and one which it was stated was local to that part of Tennessee. This, however, proved to be an error, for it was found to be also popular in parts of North Carolina and in Kentucky. Dean WIlliam Jesse Baird of Berea College heard it in Pine Mountain and tells this story about it: 'Uncle John' delighted in playing for visitors and sooner or later he would say, 'Now, I want to play you my favorite; I calls hit Napolean Crossing the Rocky Mountains.' One day a teacher at Pine Mountain said, 'Uncle John, you mean Napolean Crossing the Alps'. 'I don't know, maybe I do,' he replied. Sometime later he was playing for a visitor and at his usual point announced, 'Now I want to play you my favorite; I calls hit Napolean Crossing the Rockies. Some folks say Napolean never crossed the Rockies, that he crossed the Alps, but historians differ on that point'". Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 51. Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo."

BONAPARTE'S RETREAT [1]. Old-Time, Texas Style; March, Reel. USA; Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Kentucky, northeast Alabama, Mississippi, southwestern Va., West Virginia, Pennslyvania. D Major (most versions, though one version in A Major was collected from Mississippi fiddler John Hatcher in 1939). DDAD or DDAE. ABB. A classic old-time quasi-programmatic American fiddle piece that is generally played in a slow march tempo at the beginning and becomes increasingly more quick by the end of the tune, and meant to denote a retreating army. One folklore anecdote regarding this melody has it that the original "Bonaparte's Retreat" was improvised on the bagpipe by a member of a Scots regiment that fought at Waterloo, in remembrance of the occasion. The American collector Ira Ford (1940) (who seemed to manufacture his notions of tune origins from fancy and supposition, or else elaborately embellished snatches of tune-lore) declared the melody to be an "old American traditional novelty, which had its origin after the Napoleonic Wars." He notes that some fiddlers (whom he presumably witnessed) produced effects in performance by drumming the strings with the back of the bow and "other manipulations simulating musket fire and the general din of combat. Pizzicato represents the boom of the cannon, while the movement beginning with Allegro is played with a continuous bow, to imitate bagpipes or fife."
***
In fact, the tune has Irish origins, though Burman-Hall could only find printed variants in sources from that island from 1872 onward. "It has been collected in a variety of functions, including an Irish lullaby and a 'Frog Dance' from the Isle of Man" (Linda Burman-Hall. "Southern American Folk Fiddle Styles," Ethnomusicology, Vol. 19, #1, Jan. 1975). Samuel Bayard (1944) concurs with assigning Irish origins for "Bonaparte's Retreat," and notes that it is an ancient Irish march tune with quite a varied traditional history. The 'ancient march' is called "The Eagle's Whistle" or "The Eagle's Tune," which P.W. Joyce (1909) said was formerly the marching tune of the once powerful O'Donovan family. Still, states Bayard, the evidence of Irish collections indicates that it has long been common property of traditional fiddlers and pipers, and has undergone considerable alteration at various hands.
***
Bayard's primary scope of collecting was in western Pennsylvania in the mid-20th century, where he found the tune still current in fiddle repertoire, though he remarked on its popularity in various parts of the South. His Pennsylvania version has a somewhat simpler melodic outline than most of the other recorded American sets, and, although he notes that these sets vary considerably--even in the number of parts which a version may contain--he finds they are clearly cognate, and all show resemblance's and common traits indicating derivation from the "The Eagle's Whistle." In Southwestern Pennsylvania the march origins were lost and instead "sets of the tune have been recast into the form--and given title-- of 'The Old Man and Old Woman Quarrelin' (Scoldin', Fightin'),' and thus present an alternation of slow and quick parts. Other Pennsylania sets are Bayard Coll., Nos. 81, 84, 252; and see notes to ('Old Man and Old Woman Scoldin'). These refashioned 'Old Man and Woman' sets differ somewhat among themselves, indicating that they have been traditional in their altered form for some time; but whether they assumed this form before their importation into America, or whether the alteration took place here, with an older tune of the type of 'Old Mand and Old Woman Scoldin'' as model, is uncertain. F.P. Provance stated that the fifer from whom he learned this tune played it as a retreat in Civil War days" (Bayard, 1944).
***
According to Blue Ridge Mountain local history the tune was known in the Civil War era. Geoffrey Cantrell, writing in the Asheville Citizen-Times of Feb., 23, 2000 relates the story of the execution of three men by the Confederate Home Guard on April 10th, 1865, the day after Lee's surrender at Appomattox.Courthouse. That news would not have been known to them, given the difficult, but it is documented that Henry Grooms, his brother George and his brother-in-law Mitchell Caldwell, all of north Haywood County, North Carolina, were taken prisoner by the Guard-no one knows why, but the area had been ravaged by scalawags and bushwackers, and the populace had suffered numerous raids of family farms by Union troops hunting provisions. The village of Waynesville had been burned two months earlier, and the citizenry was beleaguered and anxious. Cantrell writes: "The group traveled toward Cataloochee Valley and Henry Grooms, clutching his fiddle and bow, was asked by his captors to play a tune. Realizing he was performing for his own firing squad Grooms struck up Bonaparte's Retreat." When he finished the three men were lined up against an oak tree and shot, the bodies left where they feel. Henry's wife gathered the bodies and buried them in a single grove in Sutton Cemetery No. 1 in the Mount Sterling community, the plain headstone reading only "Murdered."
***
The Kentucky Encyclpedia gives another story which mentions "Bonaparte's Retreat" in connection with an execution. It seems that a Colonel Solomon P. Sharp, a former attorney general of Kentucky, was murdered in the middle of a September night in 1825 by an unidentified assailant who stabbed him in his chest. Sharp had political enemies, all of whom had alibis, but who had circulated rumors that he had seduced one Ann Cook of Bowling Green, fathering her illegitimate child in 1820. Suspicion soon shifted to Ann's husband, Jereboam Beauchamp, who married her after the birth of the supposed love-child but who was infuriated at the circulating handbills containing the rumor. Beauchamp was dully arrested, tried in Frankfort in May, 1826, found guilty and was sentenced to death by hanging. Ann could not bear to be parted from him and somehow gained permission from the jailer to stay with him in his jail cell. The couple tried unsuccessfully to commit suicide by taking an overdose of laudanum, but were still permitted to share the cell. Another suicide attempt with a smuggled knife was made on the day of the execution, with somewhat better results. Ann, mortally wounded, was taken to the jailers house for treatment, but Beauchamp was hustled to the gallows lest he die from his wounds before the sentence was carried out. He proved too weak from his wounds to stand and had to be supported, but he was presumably able to hear the strains of "Bonaparte's Retreat" played before he made the leap, as he had previously requested. Ann and Jereboam were buried in a joint grave in Bloomfield, Kenctucky, graced by a tombstone engraved with an eight-stanza poem written by Ann.
***
The tune was cited (by Mattie Stanfield in her book Sourwood Tonic and Sassafras Tea) as having been played by Etowah County, Alabama, fiddler George Cole at the turn of the century (Cauthen, 1990). Musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph recorded the tune from Ozark Mountain fiddlers for the Library of Congress in the early 1940's. Ed Haley (1883-1951) of Ashland, eastern Ky., played the tune so skillfully that "one old-timer, after hearing Haley play ("Bonaparte's Retreat") declared that 'if two armies could come together and hear him play that tune, they'd kill themselves in piles" (Wolfe, 1982). Haley toured regionally in Kentucky and West Virginia It was "Bonaparte's Retreat" that was the first tune Braxton County fiddler Melvin Wine (1909-1999) learned at the age of nine. His father, Bob, played the fiddle and young Melvin practiced when the elder Wine was out cutting timber or working as a farmhand for neighbors. He finally worked up the nerve to play for his father, and it proved a successful entrée, for afterwards which Bob taught him tunes he had learned from his own father, Nels, and Grandfather "Smithy" (Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed., 1999, pg. 8).
***
Another Kentucky fiddler, William H. Stepp (of Leakeville, Magoffin County, whose name, Kerry Blech points out, is sometimes erroneously given as W.M. Stepp, from a misreading of the old abbreviation Wm., for William), appears to be the source (through his 1937 Library of Congress field recording) for many revival fiddlers' versions. Stepp's version of the tune was transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seegar and was included in John and Alan Lomax's volume Our Singing Country (1941). The Crawford/Seegar version has been credited as the source Aaron Copland adapted for a main theme in his orchestral suite "Hoedown." {Lynn "Chirps" Smith says he has even heard people refer to the tune as "Copland's Fancy" in recent times!}. North Georgia fiddler A.A. Gray (1881-1939) won third place honors playing the tune at the 1920 (10th) Annual Georgia Old Time Fiddler's Association state contest in Atlanta, and four years later recorded it as a solo fiddle tune for OKeh Records. Sources for notated versions: J.S. Price (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]: F.P. Provance, Point Marion, Pennsylvania, September 19, 1943, who learned it from Sam Waggle, fifer, of Dunbar [Bayard, 1944]: Marion Yoders (Greene County, Pa., 1962) [Bayard, 1981].
***
PRINTED SOURCES: Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 87. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 238, pg. 199. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 52. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 129. Lomax (Our Singing Country), pg 54-55 (appears as "Bonyparte"). Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 36-37. Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1971-72. County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 546, "Arthur Smith and His Dixieliners, Vol. I." County 703, Benny Thomasson- "Texas Hoedown." County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1976). County 790, Leftwich & Higginbotham - "No One to Bring Home Tonight" (1984). Folkways FA 2325, Mike Seeger- "Old Time Country Music." Folkways FA 2366, The Watson Family (N.C.) - "The Watson Family Album." Folk Legacy Records FSA-17, Hobart Smith - "America's Greatest Folk Instrumentalist." Heritage XXXIII, Jay Ungar & Neil Rossi - "Visits" (1981. Learned from a 1937 Library of Congress recording of Lakeville, Ky., fiddler W.M.Stepp). Okeh 40110 (78 RPM), A.A. Gray (1924). Philo 1023, Jay Ungar and Lyn Hardy- "Songs Ballads and Fiddle Tunes" (1975. Learned from Kentucky fiddler W.M. Stepp via Library of Congress recording). Rounder 0010, "The Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972. Learned from Alan Jabbour). Rounder 0057, Sherman Wimmer (Franklin County, Va.) - "Old Originals, Vol. 1" (1978. Learned from Will Willit, nephew and protege of influential Franklin County fiddler Fount Kinrea). String 802, Emmett Lundy (Galax, Va.) - Library of Congress Recording. Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from Audrain County, Missouri, fiddler Warren Elliot in 1967). Yazoo Records, W.M. (William) Stepp - "Music of Kentucky, Vol. 1" (reissue of the 1937 Stepp recording by Alan Lomax. Stepp can be heard on the recording saying in the midst of fiddling: "This is the bony part....That was the bony part").

BRIARPICKER BROWN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Ky., Ohio. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB. The melody is known as a Kentucky tune in modern times, largely due to an influential recording by fiddler Buddy Thomas (who died at age 39 in the mid-1970's). Thomas had the tune from a elderly Portsmouth, Ohio, fiddler named Morris Allen. The tune structurally resembles West Virginia fiddler Clark Kessinger's "Everybody to the Punchin' (Puncheon) Floor," and Allen was in fact a friend of Kessinger. Sources for notated versions: Norman Blake (Ga.) [Brody]; Bill Christopherson (Conn.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 56. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 36. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 41. Flying Fish FF 266, Malcolm Dalglish & Grey Larsen- "Thunderhead" (1982). Rounder 0032, Buddy Thomas (Northeastern Ky.) - "Kitty Puss - Old Time Fiddle Music From Kentucky." Rounder 0122, Norman Blake- "The Rising Fawn String Ensemble." Rounder 0172, Bob Carlin - "Where Did You Get That Hat?" (1982).

BRISK BOB. Scottish, Strathspey. B Minor. Standard. AA'B. Attributed to Duncan Mackintyre by Gow. Gow (Complete Collection), Part 1, 1799; pg. 38. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 35, pg. 6. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 130.
T:Brisk Bob
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:B Minor
B/c/|d<B f>B F<B B>c|d>e f/e/d/c/ d<A AB/c/|1d<B f>B F<B B>d|
ef/g/ f>e d<B~B:|2 B<dc<e d<fe<g|f>g f/e/d/c/ d<B~B||f|b<f g>e f<d B>c|
d>e f/e/d/c/ d<A A>f|b<f g>e f<d B>g|f<d f/e/d/c/ d<B B>f|b>fg>e f>de>c|
d<B f>B d<A AB/c/|d>Be>c f<d g>e|f>F f/e/d/c/ d<B~B||

BROWN'S DREAM [2]. AKA and see "McGraw's Ford." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri. The tune is in the repertoire of Ava, southewestern Missouri Ozarks, fiddler Bob Holt (b. 1930), learned from local sources. The late Missouri fiddler Art Galbraith called it "McCraw's Ford."

BUCK REEL. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory), Vol. 2, 1984; pg. 52.
T:Buck Reel
M:2/4
L:1/16
K:D
|:D2FD ADFD|DDGA Bdd2|D2FD ADFD|A,A,CE A,A,CE|! D2FD ADFD|DDGA Bdd2|faec dBAF|GBAG FDD2|! |:faed BdAd|BBe2 e3e|efed BAFA|Bd2e d2de|! faed BdAd|BBe2 e3e|efed BAFA|1Bdde d3e:|2Bdde d2dA|! _

BUCKING MULE. See "Cumberland Gap on a Buckin' Mule." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; north Georgia, western N.C., eastern Tenn., Ky., southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard. AA'BB. The favorite contest tune of north Georgia fiddler A.A. Gray, who recalled in a 1934 interview:
***
I find the tune you play has a lot to do with winning prizes.
A fellow just ahead of me used "Bully of the Town" and
that's a mighty good piece. He won four prizes in a row.
Finally, I happened to think of "Bucking Mule." It's a hard
piece, but its snappy, and you do a lot of fancy work behind
the bridge that makes the fiddle bray like a mule. I won so many
prizes that the other follows got to calling my 'Mule' Gray (Old
Time Music, No. 41, Spring 1985).
***
Georgia duo Gid Tanner and Riley Puckett's version for Columbia Records in 1924 was the first string band record ever released. Further north, the piece was reportedly popular with Tennessee fiddlers. It was in the repertoire of Monticello, Ky., fiddler Dick Burnett and was one of two pieces he remembered getting the most applause for from audiences during his hey-day. "Bucking Mule" was also frequently played by "Natchez the Indian," a contest fiddler in the 1930's and 40's who may or may not have been a Native American; Natchez dressed in beaded buckskins and wore his hair in long braids, and when he fiddled this tune "the animation of his coiffure and the tassles on his buckskins was of greater interest than the quality of his music" (Mark Wilson & Guthrie Meade, 1976). Source for notated version: A manuscript from fifer Thomas Hoge (Greene County, Pa.) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 339, pg. 325. Broadway A-1963 (78 RPM), 1924, J. Dedrick Harris (Harris was a legendary fiddler from Tennessee who played regularly with Bob Taylor when he ran for Governer of the state in the late 1800's. Harris moved to Western N.C. in the 1920's and influenced a generation of fiddlers there: Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, Osey Helton, Marcus Martin. This was one of two songs only he recorded [see "Whip the Devil Round the Stump"]). Columbia 110-D (78 RPM), 1924, Gid Tanner and Riley Puckett. Rounder Records, Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers (1934) - "The Kickapoo Medecine Show" (appears as "Cumberland Gap on a Buckin' Mule"). Vocalation 5432 (78 RPM), A.A. Gray (part of "A Fiddler's Tryout in Georgia").

BULL AT THE WAGON. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Texas, Oklahoma. A Major. Standard or AEAE (Lewis Brothers). AABBCC. Recorded by the Lewis Brothers for Victor in 1929. Earl Collins learned his version from the Lewis Brothers but altered it somewhat, especially in the 'A' part. See also the related tunes "Karo" and "Red Bird." Source for notated version: Dempson Lewis (Texas) [Brody]; Earl Collins (Oklahoma) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 58. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 41. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 1. Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl" (learned in 1966 from a 78 RPM recording of the Lewis Brothers) {1975}. County 517, Dempson and Denmon Lewis- "Texas Farewell." Heritage 054, The Hotmud Family - "Brandywine '83: The Music of French America" (1984). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion."
T:Bull at the Wagon
L:1/8
M:C|
S:Jay Ungar
K:A
AB|c(ecA) c(ecA)|cea(g fe)cA|B(cBA) B(cBA)|Bcf(g fe)cB|c(ecA) c(ecA)|AAcd e(dcA)|
[E3B3] A a(gfe)|cAB(c A2):|
|:(A|A)Bce a(gfb)|gef(g fe)ce|f(gfe) cAFA|B2 (FB B4)|ABce a(gfb)|gef(g fe)ce|
f(gfe) cBAG|A2 (EA A3):|
|:[A,3E3] z[CE]|[B,4E4]|EFGA Bcdf|e(dcd) e(d c2)|[A,3E3] z[CE]|[B,4E4]|EFGA BcdB|
cAB(G A2):|

BUMMER'S REEL. AKA and see "Fletcher's Delight," "Levantine's Barrel," "Reilly's Own," "The Tullamore Piper." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Pennsylvania, Vermont. G Major. Standard. AABB. Bayard (1981) finds no particular antecedents from the British Isles or Europe, and believes it may be an American composition that perhaps derived from Irish tradition; at any rate he says it was a great favorite with Pennslvania fiddlers. He did find an Irish tune, "Bean an Tighe ar Lar" (Woman of the House), with an 'A' part that was similar to the 'A' part of "Bummer's Reel," but with a different 'B' part. O'Neill maintains the piece is similar to "The Cows Are A-Milking," while Bayard finds another Irish tune with similarities under the title "Maighstreas an Ti" (Lady of the House). Some versions of "Bummer's Reel," though many American variants have considerable differences, are similar to the American tune "Peaches and Cream." R.P. Christeson (1973, pg. 109) gives a tune, "Breakdown #155" from Bob Walters (Burt County) [Nebraska], and identifries the parent tune as "Bummer's Reel." A version also appears in Howe's collection, c. 1860. Sources for notated versions: Harvey Thompson (Pa.) [Christeson]; Harry Daddario (Union County, Pa.) [Guntharp]; Bayard (1981) gives 10 versions from 10 different southwestern Pa. fiddling and fifing sources; Elmer Barton (Vt.) [Phillips]. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 49 (appears as an untitled reel). Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 247A-J, pgs. 206-209. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 74. Guntharp (Learning the Fiddler's Ways), 1980; pg. 104. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 42. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964; pg. 49. Philo 1040, Jay Ungar & Lyn Hardy - "Catskill Mountain Goose Chase" (1977. Learned from a Library of Congress recording by Elmer Barton of Quechee, Vermont).

BURT COUNTY BREAKDOWN. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Major. Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from fiddler Bob Walters of Burt County, eastern Nebraska).

BUTTERFLY HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard or AEAE. AABB. See the related tune "Brilliancy." Source for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 9. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 184.

CAPTAIN COLLINS. AKA and see "Bob Ridley" (Pa.), "The Bell Cow" (Pa.), "Fifer's March" (Pa.), "The Belling Tune" (Pa.), "Montrose's March" (Playford), "Rock and a Wee Pickle Tow, A" (Stokoe), "The Old Woman Tossed Up in a Blanket" (O'Neill), "The Highlander's March" (Oswald), "O'Sullivan Mor's March" (Roche), "The Ribbels (Rebels) March" (Dovey), "The Cowboy's Jig" (Cole), "Blackeyed Biddy" (O'Neill), Untitled "Air" (Joyce, 1909; No. 836). American, Jig. USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard. AB. Bayard (1981) says the tune is in the standard repertory of fifers in southwestern Pa., and one of the older tunes to be found there, having its origins in the 17th century. It can be found in Playford's Musick's Hand-Maid, editions of 1663 and 1678, his Musick's Recreation of 1669 (where it appears as "Montrose's March"), and in Oswald's 1740 collection. Beside's "Montrose's March" other titles for this tune, well and widely known in the British Isles, have been "The Rock and the Wee Pickle Tow" (Northumbria, Scotland) and "The Old Woman Tossed Up in a Blanket" (Ireland, England), which latter title Bayard says is derived from the nursery rhyme beginning:
***
There was an old woman tossed up in a blanket,
Seventy times as high as the moon.
***
One southwestern Pennsylvania title, "The Belling Tune," derived from the custom of well-known local fifer Sam Palmer to play the tune tune for "serenades," or the welcoming home of the newlyweds "with a hellish din of fife-and-drum, bells, gunshots, beaten metal tubs, firecrackers, etc." (Bayard, 1981). Source for notated versions: Bayard collected the tune from nine southwestern Pa. fifers and fiddlers. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 567A-I, pgs. 504-507.

CARLIN, IS YOUR DAUGHTER READY? AKA and see "The Bob O'Dooly." Scottish, Strathspey. A Mixolydian (Athole, Johnson): D Mixolydian (Mackintosh). Standard. AABB. Aird (Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs), Vol. 1, 1782; pg. 9. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 10: Airs & Melodies of Scotland's Past), Vol. 10, 1992; pg. 3. Mackintosh, Vol. 3, 1796; pg. 39. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 14. Queltic Q-104, Ten Strike - "Neuantics."

CASEY'S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Missouri, Nebraska. B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. The tune was recorded by northwest Missouri fiddler Cyril Stinnett (1912-1986). Source for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Neb.) [Christeson, Phillips]. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 37. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 185. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett - "Plain Old Time Fiddling."

CABER FEIDH (Deer's Antlers). AKA - "Caber/Caper Fey/Fei/Feigh," "Caberfei," "The Cameronian Rant," "The Copperplate," "The Deer's Horn," "Jack Smith's Favorite," "Rakish Paddy." Scottish, Canadian, Shetland; March, Reel and Country Dance. Canada, Cape Breton. C Major (most versions): D Major (Jean Carignan). Standard. AB (most versions): AABB (Begin). A particularly popular reel that has long been a mainstay of Scottish tradition and has been subsumed into the Irish. The earliest record of the tune is in Scottish musician David Young's MS. of 1734, called the Drummond Castle MS (because it was in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle) or The Duke of Perth MS, where it is set with variations. The MS is inscribed 'A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant." The melody also appears in Young's Bodlein MS (1740, named for the Bodlein Library, Oxford, where it is kept), the McLean Collection (published by James Johnson in Edinburgh in 1772), and in the McFarland MS of 1740 (where it is credited to David Young). In Robert Bremner's 2nd Collection (1768) it is printed in four parts in the key of C (with both f sharp and f natural accidentals). Cooke prints the following words to the tune, collected in the Shetland islands:
***
Mary made away being good luck wi' Teddie
All grown doss (toss?) makin me a dock an piddie.
***
The piece is often played in Scotland as a medley with "The Bob of Fettercairn," and is the tune for the famous Highland Dance called the "Caber Feidh," in which the dancers symbolically simulate the shape of deer's antlers with arms and fingers. From time immemorial a march version has been the clan march and insignia of the MacKenzie clan, "and in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries it was the official march used to signal the charge of Highland troops" (Cowdery). Pipers generally consider the strathspey, reel and even jig versions of the tune to be relatively recent adaptations; in point of fact, the strathspey version is by Pipe Major W. Ross (a member of the Scots Guards from 1896 to 1918) while the jig is by a modern musician, D. Johnstone. Cape Breton fiddler and editor Paul Stwart Cranford (1995), however, suspects that Bremner's 1768 variations may have been a strathspey setting due to his particular grouping of sixteeth notes.
***
With adaptations made necessary (according to Paul Stewart Cranford) by the scale available to 19th century Irish pipes, the tune also entered into Irish tradition. Despite its Scottish origins, it is a member of the tune family Cowdery (1990) classifies under the Irish reel "Rakish Paddy." See also "Rakish Paddy," "Padraig Reice," "Glastertown's Downfall," "The Castle Street Reel," "Copperplate," "Sporting Pat," "Cameronian Rant." Jean Carignan, taxi driver and famous Canadian fiddler from Montreal Canada, played the tune in the relatively rare (for this tune) key of D Major. Source for notated version: Mike MacDougal (Ingonish, Cape Breton, 1928-1982) via Jerry Holland (Invernesss, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 25, pg. 38. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 20, pg. 6. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 117, pg. 48. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 186. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 23, No. 4, pg. 14. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 117. Sannella, Balance and Swing (CDSS). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 60. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 10. Breton Books and Records BOC 1HO, Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald - "Classic Cuts" (reissue of Celtic Records CX 40).
T:Cabar Féidh
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:C Major
G|~c2ed ~c2GB|~c2GF ECCE|Ddd^c d2Ac|d2AG FDDB|
~c2ed ~c2GB|cGAF ECCE|DEFG ABcA|d2 AG FDD||
f|ecgc acgc|ecgc ecce|fdad bdad|fgag fddf|ecgc acgc|GAcd eccg|
afge fdf^c|d2AG FDD||

CALLAHAN. AKA - "Callahan's Reel," "Callahan Rag," "Fiddler's Farewell," "Last of Callahan," "McClahan's March." AKA and see "Old Sport" [1]. USA; southwest Va., eastern Tenn., Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Major. Standard, AEAE. The piece is known simply as "Callahan" in Patrick County, southwestern Va., where it is regarded as one of the older pieces in the fiddler's repertoire and predates the "string band" genre tunes which featured banjo/fiddle combinations (Tom Carter & Blanton Owen, 1976). Bobby Fulcher (1986) concurs regarding the age of the melody and says it belongs to a group of archaic tunes characterized by cross tunings, elaborate bowings and eccentric melody lines: "These droning exotic, richly flavored tunes were not to be danced to, or accompanied by other instruments, but just made interesting listening." Clyde Davenport (b. 1921), of Monticello, Ky., had the tune from his father, who picked it and other similar tunes up from a man named Will Phipps, an "old-timer" from Rock Creek, Tennessee (who is remembered for being buried with his fiddle in his coffin). Farther west, the title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Mark Wilson (in the liner notes to Vol 1 of "Traditional Fiddle Music of Kentucky") points out that the tune "radically shifts" in fiddle versions from east to west across the state of Kentucky, until it seems that the only similarities between extremes are a similar ascending and descending lines over a drone 'A' chord.
***
A legend attached to the tune gives that it was written by a condemned man, one Callahan, just before he was executed by hanging; this is, of course, a centuries old tale primarily attached to the Scottish outlaw Macpherson (see "Macpherson's Farewell"), hanged in Banff in the year 1700. D. W. Wilgus, in his article "The Hanged Fiddler Legend in Anglo-American Tradition," extensively explores the "Callahan" legend, first collected in 1909 by Katherine Jackson French near Louden, Kentucky, from two boys who "played and sang 'Callahan's Confession.'" A report by E.C. Perrow in the Journal of American Folklore (25) in 1912 gave that "Some years ago an outlaw named Callahan was executed in Kentucky. Just before his execution he sat on his coffin and played and sang a ballad of his own composing, and, when he had finished, broke his musical instrument over his knee." This story, in almost exactly the same words, was related by elderly Bell County, Kentucky, fiddler Estill Bingham (1899-1990) to Bob Butler and Bruce Greene, also appearing in Suzy Jones Oregon Folklore (Bingham had moved to Oregon for a time before returning to Kentucky):
***
One I never have heard played nowhere only around amongst a few old
fiddlers there (i.e. Kentucky). It was called 'Callahan.' My dad played it, and they's a
story goes with it. Well, they had this man Callahan up to be hung. And he
had his casket made and brought there to the scaffold where they was aimin'
to hang him, and they asked him if he wanted any request, any last request-
and he was a fiddler so he said he'd like to play one more tune. So they
give him his fiddle and he set on the end of his casket and played that
tune. And he said, 'If they's anybody can play that tune any better 'n I
can, I'll give 'em my fiddle.' The story goes that nobody tried, and he
busted his fiddle over the end of his casket.
***
Elderly sources swear the Callahan story "really happened" in Clay County, Kentucky, though other locales also claim the honor. One such elderly source, one Oscar Parks of Deuchars, Indiana, recounted the story to Alan Lomax in 1938. Parks was originally from Livingston County, Kentucky, and had the tale from an old man in nearby Jackson County. According to this version John Callahan was being hanged for killing a man in the course of a feud. This Callahan offered his fiddle to anyone who would join him on the gallows and "sit down with him and play that tune1/4" and when no one dared for fear of being involved in the feud Callahan "busted that fiddle all to pieces overt that coffin" (Prior to his death Callahan supposedly married his sweetheart, Betty Larkin, and lived with her "for several months" in the jail in Manchester, Clay County, Kentucky--an interesting union of "Callahan" with the Southern play-party song "Betsy Larkin," "Betsy Diner" or "Rosa Betsy Lina"). Wilgus found there were Callahans (and indeed one John Abe Callahan) involved in feuds in Kentucky, albeit in Breathitt County, and none were recorded as having been hung.
***
Another version of the tale was supplied by a Mrs. Herman R. Staten of Paris, Kentucky, who wrote to the Archive of American Folksong soon after World War II to say that she was a Callahan descendent and that her fiddler-father and an elderly relative told her that the Callahan of the tale was an Isaac Callahan who died in the middle of the 19th century, and "knowing he was to hang, he built his coffin, and taking his fiddle he played while his sister danced upon his coffin." Similar to this is a note by A. Porter Hamblen which gives that Callahan was convicted of murdering a Jewish peddler and was hanged at Barbourville, Kentucky, on May 15, 1835--"At the hour of his execution he requested to be allowed to play a farewell on his violin. While seated on his coffin he played this tune which since has borne his name. He then handed the violin to the sherrif, was lead onto the gallows and the trap sprung, sending Callahan to his maker." Kentucky banjo player Pete Steele (living in Hamilton Ohio) told musicologist Alan Lomax in 1938 the Callahan tale with emphasis on the disposition of the fiddle. In this variant the condemed man sits on his coffin at the place of execution and declares as his last wish that he wants to play "Callahan," and further, that if anyone in the crowd can also play the tune then that individual will be given the fiddle. Someone does play "Callahan," the fiddle is transferred to a new owner and the event proceeds.
***
D.W. Wilgus says that some eastern Kentucky and West Virginia sources give the title as "Calloway" (see note below), and place the event in Madison, Boone County, W.Va., dated around 1850. Marion Thede published a version of the piece played by Oklahoma and Arkansas fiddlers as "The Last of Callahan" with the particularly western variant that Callahan was a horse thief caught by a posse and about to be summarily hung. While standing in a wagon underneath a tree limb with a noose around his neck, Callahan was asked for his last words. The outlaw requested instead to play the fiddle one more time, and with the noose still around his neck he played a tune, the likeness of which is remembered as "The Last of Callahan," and handed his fiddle down to one of the bystanders at the fateful event. See also notes for "MacPherson's Lament," "Coleman's March" and "Pennington's Lament." In the repertoire of Kentucky fiddler William H. Stepp, who recorded for the Library of Congress in 1937. Eastern Kentucky fiddler Luther Strong's version was transcribed for John and Allan Lomax's book Our Singing Country (1941).
***
Despite the assertion by Wilgus that "Calloway" is a variant of the "Callahan" title, it seems that most of the "Calloway" pieces are a family of (primarily) banjo tunes unrelated to "Callahan" (which itself has a wide variation in melodic contours). There is much variation in collected versions of both tunes, and perhaps a bit of overlap, however. Morgan Sexton (1911-1992) played a "Last of Callahan" in the banjo tuning associated with "Calloway" (eCGCD) that in fact resembles some of the "Calloway" tunes.
***
Source for notated version: Cyril Stinnet (Mo.) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 18. Columbia (15570, 78 RPM), Roane County Ramblers (eastern Tenn., as "Callahan Rag" {1929}). County 403, Roane County Ramblers. County 788, Clyde Davenport - "Clydescope: Rare & Beautiful Tunes from the Cumberland Plateau" (1986). Gennett 16087 (78 RPM), Fiddlin' Doc Roberts & Asa Martin (1930. An unrealeased master). Marimac 9009, Dave Spilkia - "Old Time Friends" (1987). Old Homestead OHCS191, Dykes Majic City Trio (eastern Tenn.), originally recorded for Brunswick/Vocalation 5181 (1927). Rounder CD-0376, George Lee Hawkins - "Traditional Fiddle Music of Kentucky, Vol. 1" (1997). Victor 19450 (78 RPM) {as "Callahan's Reel"} Fiddlin Cowan Powers (1877-1952?, Russell County, S.W. Va. {1924}).

CENTERVILLE [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard or ADAE. AABBCC. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska, 1951) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; No. 15, pg. 12.

CHAMPION HORNPIPE [1]. American, Hornpipe. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. B Flat Major ('A' part) & F Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; J. Hand [Cole]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 23. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 94. Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson - "Fiddle Favorites," c. 1971-72. Green Linnet SIF1035, Brian Conway & Tony De Marco - "The Apple in Winter" (1981. Learned from a 78 RPM recording of Irish-American fiddler Lad O'Beirne and Louis Quinn, who perhaps picked the tune up from Cole's 1001).

CHEATHAM COUNTY RAG. Old-Time, Ragtime. USA, Nebraska. C Major. Standard. AB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 114.

CHICKADEE'S POLKA, THE. American, Polka. USA, New Hampshire. G Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Peterborough, New Hampshire, accordion and piano player Bob McQuillen, October, 1975. McQuillen is one of the modern founding fathers of the contra-dance revival. Miller & Perron (101 Polkas), 1978; No. 79. McQuillen (Bob's Notebooks), Vol. 2; No. or pg. 44. Alcazar Dance Series FR 203, "New England Chestnuts" (1980).

CHILLY WIND(S). Old-Time, Song and Breakdown. USA; Arkansas, North Carolina. G Major. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Mt. Airy, North Carolina, fiddler and banjo player Tommy Jarrell learned the tune in early in the 20th century and played it in AEAE tuning. He related to Mike Seegar:
***
Carlie Holder and me was playing for a dance when I was about
fifteen or sixteen years old--I was just beginning to play the fiddle
...back then you didn't have over six or eight girls, you know, and
they'd get tired and want to rest a while. While they was a-resting,
why Carlie, he got to playing that tune, the first time I ever heard it.
Then I got him to play it right smart little bit, maybe over two or
three times and I learned it right there. I was young then, I could
listen to a fellow play a tune, you know, and it would go in my
head and stay...I thought it was the prettiest thing I ever heard.
And I used to know a lot of words to it but I forgot 'em cause I
quit making music for about forty years there. I didn't play none
much and I forgot some of them songs.
***
Alcazar Dance Series ALC 202, Sandy Bradley - "Potluck & Dance Tonite!" (1979). Carryon 005, "The Renegades" (1993). County 778, Tommy Jarrell - "Pickin' on Tommy's Porch" (1984?. Learned from Carlie Holder). Heritage XXIV, Tommy Jarrell - "Music of North Carolina" (Bradywine, 1978). Marimac 9009, John Cohen - "Old Time Friends" (1987). Reed Island Rounders - "Wolves in the Wood" (1997). Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1980. Learned from revival musicians in New York in the early 1970's). Rounder CD 0383, Mike Seegar and Paul Brown - "Down in North Carolina."

CHINQUAPIN/CHINQUIPIN. AKA and see "Too Young to Marry," "Sail Away Ladies." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Virginia. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is known to fiddlers Roscoe Parish (Galax, Va.) as "Chinquapin," while Tommy Jarrell (Mt. Airy, N.C.) has recorded it as "Sail Away Ladies" (it is not related to the tunes that usually go by that title). Source for notated version: Roscoe Parrish (Va.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 31. Heritage V, Roscoe Parish. Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion."

CHOCTAW BILL. Old-Time, Breakdown. C Major. Standard. AA'BB. Source for notated version: Bob Douglas [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 50.

CHRISTMAS EVE [4]. Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB'CC'. The tune, played slower than a normal breakdown, was learned by south-central Kentucky fiddler Jim Bowles (b. 1903) from local musicians--it was not widely known outside the area. The 'A' part is irregular, with a measure of 3/4 and a measure of 2/4 time in an otherwise cut time piece. Also in the repertoire of Isham Monday, who played it in ADAE, but tuned his fiddle low, sounding below C. Source for notated version: Jim Bowles (Ky.) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 31. Marimac 9060, Jim Bowles - "Railroading Through the Rocky Mountains." Marimac 9023, Bruce Molsky & Bob Carlin - "Take Me as I Am."

CIDER MILL. AKA - "Cider." AKA and see "Stillhouse." Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. ADAE. ABB'. A Blue Ridge dance tune, popular in Patrick County and the Galax, Va./Mt. Airy, N.C. areas. Source for notated version: Bruce Molsky with Bob Carlin [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 53. County Records, Tommy Jarrell, Fred Cockerham & Oscar Jenkins - "Down to the Cider Mill." Living Folk LFR-104, Allan Block - "Alive and Well and Fiddling." ADAE. Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin (with Bruce Molsky)- "Banging and Sawing" (1985).

CINCINNATI HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Brown's Hornpipe," "Cliff Hornpipe," "Cork Hornpipe," "Dundee Hornpipe." "Fisherman's Favorite," "Fred Wilson's Clog," "Granny Will Your Dog Bite" (Pa.), "Harvest Home," "Kephart's Clog" (Pa.), "Kildare Fancy," "Higgin's Hornpipe," "Lady of the Lake" (Burchenal), "Ruby Hornpipe," "Snyder's Jig," "Standard Hornpipe," "Wilson's Clog." American, Hornpipe. USA; New England, Arkansas, Missouri. D Major. Standard. One part (Burchenal): AABB (Cole, Miller & Perron, Phillips, Sweet). Composed by Fischer. The tune has been used in New England for the dance "Lady of the Lake," and has been sometimes called by that name. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. It was in the repertoies of Ohio fiddler Estill Adams, Nebraska fiddler Bob Walters (b. 1889) and Missosuri fiddler Kelly Jones (b. 1947), who, having the ability to read music, learned this and other tunes from Cole's 1000 Fiddle Tunes, as previous sight-reading mid-western fiddlers had learned such tunes from both Coles 1001 and its predecessor, Ryan's Mammoth Collection. Source for notated version: Kelly Jones (Mo.) [Phillips]. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1917; pg. 35. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 88. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 125. Appears in "Old Familiar Dances," Theodore Presser Co. Page (Ralph Page Book of Contras), 1969; pg. 13. Page, Heritage Dances of Early America; No. or pg. 15. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 186. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 51. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 15. F&W Records 1, "F&W String Band." June Appal 003, John McCutcheon - "How Can I Keep From Singing" (1975. Learned from fiddler Tommy Hunter, Mars Hill, N.C.). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters - "Drunken Wagoneer." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Kelly Jones - "Authentic Old-Time Fiddle Tunes."
T:Cincinnati Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
DA FA DA FA|dA fA eA fA|gA fA ed cd|ed cB AG FE|
DA FA DA FA|dA fA eA fA|gA fA ed cB|cd eg fd d2:|
Dd dd ce ee|df ff eg gg|fg af bg ec|d2f2d2A2:|

CINCINNATI RAG [1]. AKA and see "Trilby's Clog." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA. G Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AB. The melody was printed in 1896 by White-Smith, Universal Series, as "Trilby's Clog." Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 72.

CLINCH MOUNTAIN BACKSTEP. Old-Time, Breakdown. G Dorian. AABB. Composed and recorded by banjo player Ralph Stanley in clawhammer style in the 1930's. Fretless/Alcazar Records, Sandy Bradley - "Potluck and Dance Tonight." King/Gusto Records, The Stanley Brothers and the Clinch Mountain Boys. Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1980. Source: Tracy Schwartz, who calls it "Liza Jane").

COLORED ARISTOCRACY. AKA and see "Southern Aristocracy." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. This late 19th century or c. 1900 tune is more correctly categorized as a cakewalk (which suggests ragtime from its syncopated rhythms) rather than a fiddle tune though the popularized version apparently comes from old-time fiddler Sanford Rich, a resident of Arthurdale, West Virginia in August of 1936. Arthurdale, according to Kerry Blech and Gerald Milnes, was a resettlement camp for displaced persons during the depression, a project of Elanor Roosevelt's, and it was there at a festival of folk heritage that musicologist Charles Seeger (father of New Lost City Ramblers member Mike Seeger) recorded the Rich Family for the Library of Congress (AFS 3306 B2). Gerald Milnes has located Sanford's son, Elmer Rich, an elderly man who still fiddles and who remembers the event. Mike Seegar learned the tune at a young age by playing the aluminum recordings in his parent's house. It became one of the first tunes recorded by his group the New Lost City Ramblers in the early 1960's, and introduced the song to "revival" era fiddlers.
***
The second chord in the accompaniment has been variously played as both an E minor and an E major. The origin of the title remained obscure, although it was speculated that it derived from Reconstruction sentiments (or resentments) about the perceived attitude (either within or without the black community) of some African-Americans (i.e. that "Colored Aristocracy" was a gentrification of "Uppity Nigger"). However, Peter Shenkin tracked the title to a piece of sheet music from a 1902 revue entitled "In Dahomey," which starred the famous African-American vaudeville duo Williams and Waltker. The music (entitled "Leader of the Colored Aristocracy") is credited to Will Marion Cook, words by James Weldon Johnson (later of Harlem Renaissance fame), published by Harry Von Tilzer. Another "Coloered Aristocarcy" dates from 1899 credited to one Gus W. Bernard (published by the Groene Co.); it is listed as a "Cake-walk" on the cover. Neither the Bernard tune or the one published by Tilzer is the "Colored Aristocracy" played by fiddlers, however. Bob Buckingham reports that a fiddling preacher of his aquaintance named Buck Rife (originally from the Beckley WV area) calls the tune "The Young Man Who Wouldn't Hoe Corn" and gave that he had it as a youngster learning clawhammer banjo from an uncle. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 72. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 11. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 33. Columbia GP18, Taj Mahal - "De Old Folds at Home." Folkways FA 2396, New Lost City Ramblers- "Vol. 1." Folkways 2494, New Lost City Ramblers - "Sing Songs of the New Lost City Ramblers" (1978. Learned from a Library of Congress recording of the Riche Brothers at the 1936 Athurdale, W.Va. fiddler's Convention). Fretless FR 200A, Yankee Ingenuity - "Kitchen Junket" (1977). Front Hall FHR-01, Bill Spence & Fennig's All Stars - "The Hammered Dulcimer." Rounder 0002, Spark Gap Wonder Boys- "Cluck Old Hen." Rounder 0075, Richard Greene- "Duets." Smithsonian/Folkways SF CD 40098, New Lost City Ramblers - "There Ain't no Way Out" (learned from the Library of Congress field recording of Sanford Rich).

COME KISS WITH ME (COME CLAP WITH ME). AKA and see "Newburn Lads," "Kail and Knockit Corn," "The Bob of Fettercairn." Scottish, Reel or Air. "The Bob of Fettercairn" is the title Neil Gow gave to the tune in his third collection, but it was known half a century earlier than that as the song "Come Kiss With Me, Come Clap With Me." In the Shetlands the same tune was known as "Kail and Knockit Corn" (kail and bruised oats) which was also a song still in oral tradition during the 1970's (Cooke, 1986)./ Bayard believes the tune to be a special development of "Boyne Water."

COMING DOWN FROM DENVER. AKA - "Here and There." See "Lardner's Reel," "Turnpike Reel." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Missouri, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. The 'A' part parallels "Lardner's Reel" but the 'B' part shows some modification. The tune has been published as early as 1864 by Howe in Boston under the title "Lardner's Reel" (Christeson). Howard Marshall informs that the tune has two distinct 'B' parts current in Missouri fiddling tradition, both different. Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Byron Berline [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 11. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 56. Caney Mountain Records CEP 207 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66. Voyager VRCD 3 44, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999).

CONSTITUTION HORNPIPE [1]. AKA and see "Lone Appendicitis." American, Canadian; Hornpipe or Breakdown. USA, New England, Nebraska. Canada, Cape Breton Nova Scotia. F Major. Standard. AABB (Bayard, Christeson, Ford, Harding, Jarman, Messer, Miller & Perron, Phillips): AA'BB' (Kerr). Christeson (1973) says the original version, as published in older tune books, is more difficult to play than the one he collected, and Bayard's (1981) source also thought the tune strenuous, saying "If you think that's not hard to play, just try it!" The first strain is also the same as the "Jinriksha Hornpipe" and, in simplified form, Huntington's 3rd tune on his pg. 23. (Cole, pg. 93). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Winston Fitzgerald (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) [Phillips]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 138, pg. 75-76. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 116, pg. 83. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 116. Ford, 1940; pg. 95. Harding's All-Round Collection, 1905; No. 77. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. or pg. 28. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 336, pg. 37. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 14. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 103. O'Malley, 1919; pg. 19. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 186. White's Unique Collection, 1896; No. 139.
T:Constitution Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:F
f2f2 fc af|g2g2 gc bg|ag fe dB ba|gf ga gc de|
f2f2 fc af|g2g2 gc bg|ag fe db ge|f2a2f2c2:|
|:Ac fc af cA|Bd fd bf dB|ce ge bg eg|fa gf ed cB|
Ac fc af cA|Bd fd bf df|ce ge bg eg|f2A2f2c2:|

COOLEY WALTZ, THE. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Neb.) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old-Time Fiddlers Repertory), 1984; pg. 151.

COON DOG [2]. AKA and see "Angeline the Baker." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, southwestern Virginia. A band tune and title characteristic of Patrick County, Va., quite similar to the better-known "Angeline the Baker." Dudley Spangler (Patrick County, Va.) is the primary source for the tune. County 201, J.W. Spangler (Patrick County, Va.) - "The Old Virginia Fiddlers: Rare Recordings 1948-49." Yodel-Ay-Hee 020, Rafe Stefanini & Bob Herring - "Old Paint."

CORI McLENON. American, Waltz. B Minor. Standard. AA'B. Composed in 1979 by New Hampshire contra dance pianist and composer Bob McQuillen, in honor of a friend. The tune is also circulated via photocopy among contra-dance musicians in the key of A Minor. Bob's Note Book #4. Mathiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 13.

COROVAT JIG [1], THE. AKA and see "The Geese in the Bog," "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "Wiseman's Favourite," "The Mountain Lark," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Jackson's Coola," "Twice Tricked," "The Piper's Frolic," "Tuhy's Frolic," "The Green Meadow." Irish, Jig. Breathnach (1996) gives this as a County Limerick title, along with "The Mountain Lark" for this tune, a member of the "Jackson's Walk to Limerick" family of tunes.

COTTEN-EYED JOE [1]. See "Citaco." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, widely known, but may have originally been a Texas tune. A Major (most versions): G Major (Ford, Kaufman): D Major (Zenith String Band). Standard, AEAE, ADAE, GDAD (Thede, John Dykes). AABB (Perlman): AABBA: AA'BB' (Kaufman). Charles Wolfe has called this tune "a Texas dance-hall anthem" but it has had such widespread currency in the United States that the tune is really a pastiche of melodies using interchangable phrases, the most recognizable of which usually is associated with the verses:
***
Where did you come from, where will you go?
Where did you come from Cotten-Eyed Joe.
***
Marion Thede believes 'cotten-eyed' may refer to a person with very light blue eyes, while Alan Lomax suggests it was used to describe a man whose eyes were milky white from Trachoma. Charles Wolfe (1991) writes that African-American collector Thomas Talley, in his manuscript of stories, Negro Traditions, relateed a story entitled "Cotton-Eyed Joe, or the Origin of the Weeping Willow." The story includes a stanza from the song, "but more importantly details a bizarre tale of a well-known pre-Civil War plantation musician, Cotton Eyed Joe, who plays a fiddle made from the coffin of his dead son."
***
The tune was a favorite of John Dykes (Magic City Trio {Eastern Tenn.}) and it was in the repertoire of Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner (in the key of G Major) who said a fellow fiddler named Youngblood brought it to the territory from Mississippi around 1890. It was one of the tunes played at the turn of the century by Etowah County, Alabama, fiddler George Cole, according to Mattie Cole Stanfield in her book Sourwood Tonic and Sassafras Tea (1963), and was mentioned in accounts of the DelKalb County Annual (Fiddlers) Convention, 1926-31. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Some verisons are similar to Lowe Stokes (N.Ga.) popular "Citaco." Ken Perlman (1996), who collected the tune on Prince Edward Island, believes Canadian versions probably derived from the playing of radio and TV Maritime fiddler Don Messer (the 'B' part is played with a strong Acadian flavor). See also Bayard's (1981) note to a related tune "The Horse Called Rover" (No. 10, pgs. 20-21).
***
Where'd you come from, where'd you go?
Where'd you come from Cotten-Eyed Joe.
I'd-a been married a long time ago,
If it hadn't a-been for Cotten-Eyed Joe.
***
Cornstalk fiddle and shoestring bow,
Come down gals on Cotten Eyed Joe.
Wanna go to meeting and wouldn't let me go,
Had to stay home with Cotten Eyed Joe.
***
Come a little rain and come a little snow,
The house fell down on Cotten Eyed Joe. (Thede)
***
Hold my fiddle and hold my bow,
'Till I knock the devil out of cotton-eyed Joe. (Ford)
***
I'll make me a fiddle and make me a bow,
And I'll learn to play like Cotten-eyed Joe.
I tun'd up my fiddle, I went to a dance,
I tried to make some music, but I couldn't get a chance.
***
You hold my fiddle and you hold my bow,
Till I whip old Satan out of Cotten-eyed Joe.
I've make lot of fiddles and made lot of bows,
But I never learned to fiddle like Cotten-eyed Joe. (Thomas & Leeder).
***
Thomas Talley gives the following in Negro Folk Rhymes:
***
Hol' my fiddle an' hol' my bow,
Whilst I knocks ole Cotton Eyed Joe.
***
I'd a been dead some seben years ago,
If I hadn' a danced dat Cotton Eyed Joe.
***
Oh, it makes dem ladies love me so,
W'en I comes 'roun' pickin' ole Cotton Eyed Joe.
***
Yes, I'd a been married some forty years ago,
If I hadn' stay's home wid Cotton Eyed Joe.
***
I hain't seed ole Joe, sonce way las' Fall;
Dey say he's been sol' down to Guinea Gall.
***
Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (New York) [Brody]; John Hendricks (Bates, Arkansas) [Thede]; Tommy Magness [Phillips/1994]; Steve Hawkins (Rowan County, Kentucky, 1911) [Thomas & Leeder]; Louise Arsenault (b. 1956, Wellington, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 74. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 20. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 60. Frets Magazine, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle," September 1981; pg. 64. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 50. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 86. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 12. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pgs. 56 & 57 (two versions). Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 26-27. Thomas & Leeder (The Singin' Gatherin'), 1939; pg. 60. Bay 209, "The Gypsy Gyppo String Band" (1977. Learned from Paul Ermine of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan). Bay 727, "Kenny Hall and the Sweets Mill String Band." Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." Caney Mountain Records CEP 213 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66. Cassette C-7625, Wilson Douglas - "Back Porch Symphony." County 506, The Skillet Lickers- "Old Time Tunes, 1927-1931." County 518, Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers- "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 1." County 520, Carter Brothers and Son- "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 3." County 528, Carter Bros. & Son - "Mississippi Breakdown, Traditional Fiddle Music of Mississippi, Vol. 1." County 544, Fiddlin' John Carson- "Georgia Fiddle Bands, Vol. 2." County 756, Tommy Jarrell- "Sail Away Ladies" (1976. Learned after 1925 from a friend, Charlie Lowe, a clawhammer banjoist who heard the tune broadcast on Nashville radio). Fretless 201, Gerry Robichaud--"Maritime Dance Party." Gusto 104, Tommy Jackson- "30 Fiddler's Greatest Hits." Heritage XXIV, Dave Holt - "Music of North Carolina" (Brandywine, 1978). Heritage XXXIII, Zenith String Band (Conn.) - "Visits" (1981. Learned from the Carter Brothers via Vermont/Ohio fiddler Pete Sutherland). June Appal JA 028, Wry Straw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978. Version learned from Creed Power {Dungannon, VA} and Byard Ray {Shelton Laurel, N.C.}). Mercury SRW 16261, Tommy Jackson- "Instrumentals Country Style." Marimac 9000, Dan Gellert & Shoofly - "Forked Deer" (1986. Version learned from Carter Bros. & Son recording). Marimac 9009, Doris Kimble & Dave Spilkia - "Old Time Friends" (1987). Old Homestead OHCS191, "Dykes Magic City Trio" (Eastern Tenn.) {originally recorded in 1927 on a Brunswick 78}. Rounder 0074, Highwoods String Band- "No. 3 Special" (1977). Rounder 0047, Wilson Douglas- "The Right Hand Fork of Rush's Creek" (1975). Rounder 0193, Rodney Miller - "Airplang" (1985). Rounder CD0262, Mike Seeger - "Fresh Oldtime String Band Music" (1988. With the Ithica, N.Y., group Agents of Terra). Stoneway 143, Ernie Hunter- "All About Fiddling." Tennvale 004, Bruce Molsky- "An Anthology."
T:Cotton Eyed Joe
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, learned from his Uncle Bob; originally transcribed by John Hartford
K:G
A/|B/d/d d>d|f/d/e/f/ d>d|B/A/G/B/ A/G/E/G/|B/A/B D>:|
|:E/|D/E/G/B/ A/G/E/F/|G/A/B/d/ cd/c/|B/A/G/B/ A/G/E/G/|B/A/B D>:|

COTTON EYED JOE [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. G Major. Standard. AABB'. A variant of version #1, related to "Miss Brown" or "Cousin Sally Brown." Source for notated version: Bob Wills (Texas) and Leah Weiss [Phillips]. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 12. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 56.

CRIPPLED TURKEY. Old-Time. Recorded by Texas fiddler Bob Wills in 1936, but unreleased.

CUBANOLA GLIDE. Old-Time, Piece. USA, Nebraska. F Major ('A' part) & B-Flat Major ('B' part). Standard. AB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska), who said it was used at dances in the early 1900's at Decatur, Nebraska [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg.130.

CUMBERLAND GAP [1]. AKA - "Tumberland Gap." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Arkansas, southwest Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, western North Carolina, Alabama. G Major: A Major: D Major (Tommy Jarrell). Standard, DGDG (Harvey Sampson) or ADAD (Tommy Jarrell). ABCC'DD (Phillips): AABB (Thede): AABBCC (Brody). The Cumberland Gap is a pass in the Appalachians between upper Tennessee and Kentucky. The tune was played by Rock Ridge, Alabama, fiddlers c. 1920 (D.B. Vol. 17, #2, pg. 20). It was in the repertoires of Fiddlin' Cowan Powers 1877-1952? (Russell County, southwest Va.) who recorded it in 1924 for Victor {though it was unissued}, and African-American fiddler Cuje Bertram of Kentucky's Cumberland Plateau region (Bertram recorded it on a 1970 home recording made for his family). Also in repertoire of J. Dedrick Harris who was from eastern Tennessee and who fiddled regularly with Bob Taylor in his run for Governor of the state in the late 1800's. Harris moved to western North Carolina in the 1920's and influenced a generation of fiddlers including the Helton brothers, Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, and Marcus Martin. In the Round Peak region of western North Carolina the melody was known by the title "Tumberland Gap" for many years until the isloation of the area broke down. Near Round Peak, Mt. Airy, North Carolina, fiddler Tommy Jarrell (d. 1986) remembered the tune "came around" the region when he was a young man, around 1915, and was not known before then. The tune was mentioned by William Byrne who described a chance encounter with West Virginia fiddler 'Old Sol' Nelson during a fishing trip on the Elk River. The year was around 1880, and Sol, whom Byrne said was famous for his playing "throughout the Elk Valley from Clay Courthouse to Sutton as...the Fiddler of the Wilderness," had brought out his fiddle after supper to entertain (Milnes, 1999). The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Sources for notated versions: Luther Strong [Phillips]: Walter Fenell (Latimer County, Oklahoma) [Thede]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 62. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 114. Augusta Heritage Recordings AHR-004C, Harvey Sampson and the Big Possum String Band - "Flat Foot in the Ashes" (1986/1994. Learned by Calhoun County, W.Va. fidder Harvey Sampson from his father). Broadway 5118-A (78 RPM) {1924} and Library of Congress AFS 4804-B-3 {1941}, Osey and Ernest Helton (Asheville N.C.). Conqueror 8239 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts. County 723, Cockerham, Jarrell, and Jenkins- "Back Home in the Blue Ridge." Marimac 9008, The Lazy Aces String Band - "Still Lazy after All These Years" (1986. Learned from Arthur Smith). Rounder 1005, Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers- "Hear These New Southern Fiddle and Guitar Records." Rounder 0058, Corbit Stamper and Thornton Spencer - "Old Originals, Vol. 2" (1978). Rounder 0089, Oscar and Eugene Wright (W.Va.) - "Old-Time Fiddle." Vocalation 14839 (78 RPM, 1924) Uncle Am Stuart (b. 1856, Morristown, Tenn). Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling." Yodel-Ay-Hee 05, The Wildcats - "On Our Knees" (1992).

DANCE ALL NIGHT. AKA- "Danced All Night With a Bottle in My Hand," "Give the Fiddler a Dram," "Give Me a Bottle of I Don't Care What." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA: West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina, north Georgia, Alabama, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB (Brody, Christeson, Phillips) or AABAACCB (Kuntz, Brody). Guthrie Meade thinks the tune has some relation to "Buffalo Gals." Rosenbaum (1989) points out that the recording by Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers for Columbia was very influential, especially in Georgia (in fact, the melody is known as a north Georgia tune). His source, Georgian Lawrence Eller, learned the tune/song from family tradition and Rosenberg concludes (apparently on the strength of the floating verse about hanging Jefferson Davis) from this that the lyrics bespeak Unionist loyalties in parts of the southern Appalachians.
***
Dance All Night with a bottle in my hand,
Bottle in my hand, bottle in my hand;
Dance All Night with a bottle in my hand,
Just before day give the fiddler a dram.
***
I left my jawbone sittin' on a fence,
I ain't seen nothin' of my jawbone since;
Walked on home and didn't get along,
In come Sally with her big boots on.
('big boots', 'red dress' or 'blue dress')
***
Who's been here since I been gone?
Pretty little girl with the red dress on;
She took it off and I put it on,
In come Sally with her big boots on. (Kuntz)
***
Dance all night with a bottle in your hand,
Bottle in your hand, bottle in your hand,
Dance all night with a bottle in your hand,
As we to marching along.
***
We'll hang Jeff Davis from a sour apple tree,
Sour apple tree, sour apple tree,
Hang Jeff Davis from a sour apple tree,
As we go marching along.
***
Old Aunt Peggy, won't you fill 'em up again,
Fill 'em up again, fill 'em up again,
Old Aunt Peggy, won't you fill 'em up again,
As we go marching along. (Eller/Rosenbaum)
***
Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (Ithica, N.Y.) [Brody, Kuntz]; Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Lawrence Eller (Towns County, Ga.) [Rosenbaum]; Clark Kessinger (W.Va.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 84. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 104. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 305-306. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 97 (appears as "Give the Fiddler a Dram"). Rosenbaum (Folk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia), 1989; pg. 20. Alcazar Dance Series ALC-202, Sandy Bradley - "Potluck and Dance Tonite!" (1979). Columbia 15200 (78 RPM), Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers. County 401, "The Stripling Brothers" (Ala.). County 727, John Ashby (Va.) - "Old Virginia Fiddling." County 733, Clark Kessinger (Va.) - "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." County 778, Tommy Jarrell (N.C.) - "Pickin' on Tommy's Porch" (1984?). Folkways FA 2336, Clark Kessinger- "Fiddler." Gennett 6734 (78 RPM), Tweedy Brothers (Harry, George, Charles, from W.Va. who played twin fiddles and piano) {1928}. Marimac 9038, Dan Gellert & Brad Leftwich -"A Moment in Time." Rounder 0045, Highwoods String Band - "Dance All Night." Rounder Records, Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers - "The Kickapoo Medecine Show" (appears as the 2nd and 3rd tune of Kickapoo Medecine Show skit). Vocalation 5395 (78 RPM), Stripling Brothers (Ala.) {1929}.
T:Dance All Night
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:D
gg/a/ gd/c/|B/G/B/G/ [GB]B|A/G/F/E/ D/F/A/c/|B/[G/B/][G/B/][G/B/] [GB]>(f|
g/)a/g/g/ g/e/d/c/|B/G/B/[G/B/] [GB]B/G/|A/B/A/F/ D/F/A/c/|B/G/[G/B/][G/B/] [G2B2]:|
gg/a/ g/e/d/e/|g/f/g/a/ b>(e|f)f/g/ a/f/a/g/|f/e/f/g/ a/f/d/f/|gg/a/ g/e/d/e/|g/f/g/a/ b(b|
d')d' e<f|g>a g||
|:G/E/|D[B,/D/]D/ D/B,/D/G/|[C/E/]E/E/E/ [CE](A|A/)[A/B/][A/A/]F/ D/F/A/c/|
B/G/[G/B/][G/B/] [GB]G/E/|D[B,/D/]D/ D/B,/D/G/|E/[CE]C/ E(A|
A/)[A/B/][A/A/]F/ D/F/A/c/|B/[GB]G/ [GB}:|

DANCING BEAR [1]. American, Reel. E Minor. Standard. AABB. Composed in February, 1978, by piano and accordion player, and composer Bob McQuillan (Peterborough, New Hampshire). Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 78.
T: the Dancing Bear
C: Bob McQuillen 2/22/78
N: Bob wrote:
N: I have a wonderful friend who is a Bear named Oso and this tune is for him because he
N: likes it. Barry Nielson likes it too, and so its for him, too, with love from Mac.
Z: John Chambers <jc@trillian.mit.edu>
R: reel
M: C|
L: 1/8
K: Em
|: "Em"EFGF EFGF | EFGA G2E2 | "A"EFGF EFGF | EFGA G2E2 |
| "Em"EFGF EFGF | EFGA B4 | "B7"B2Bc BAGF | "Em"G2E2 E4 :|
|: "Em"e2ef gfef | gfe2 e4 | "A"e2ef gfef | gfe2 e4 |
| "C"e2ef gfef | gfe2 e2dc | "B7"B2Bc BcBA | "Em"GFE2 E4 :|

DARK HAIRED GIRL, THE [1]. Old Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Oklahoma) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 147, pg. 104.

DARKEY'S/DARKIE'S DREAM. AKA and see "Darkey Dan," "The Wind Blow You Away." Old-Time, Breakdown or Schottische. USA; eastern Tenn., western N.C., West Virginia, Missouri, southwestern Pa., Arizona. D Major (Bayard, Roche): F Major (Phillips). Standard. AAB (Roche): AA'B (Bayard, Phillips). Dischord tuning. One version was in the repertoire of legendary fiddler J. Dedrick Harris, born in Tenn., who played regularly with Bob Taylor when he was running for Governor of the state in the late 1800's. He moved to western North Carolina in the 1920's and influenced a generation of fiddlers there: Osey Helton, Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, Marcus Martin--in fact, a tune by the title was also in Osey Helton's repertoire. A version of "Darkie's Dream," possibly this one, was identified by John Hartford as a Missouri tune similar to "Essence of Sugar Cane" which is known to have inspired the "Darkie's Dream" by George Lansing. Lansing himself was a white banjo player in Boston in the 1880's. A tune by this title in the key of G Major was in the repertoire of Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner who identified it as a "clog dance," sometimes played at dances for a schottische. Bayard (1981) noted that Pennsylvania fiddlers played this tune with a variety of tempos and styles, and he too mentions that the schottische style was common. "Darkie's Dream" even appears in an Irish collection (Roche) where it is listed simply as a "barndance." Other tunes that bear a general or part similarity are "Always Welcome," "The Butcher's Row"and "Old Yaller Houn.'" In the repertoire of West Virginia fiddler Burl Hammons, who learned it from African-American musician Grafton Lacey. Sources for notated versions: Samuel Losch (Juniata County, Pa., 1930's), William Shape (elderly fiddler from Greene County, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]; Grant Lamb (Mo.) [Phillips]. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 38. Roche Collection, 1982; Vol. 3, pg. 53, No. 159. Caney Mountain Records CEP 213 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66.

DAVY, DAVY. AKA and see "Goin' Down the River," "Sailing Down the River," "Paddy Won't You Drink Some Good Old Cider." Old-Time, Breakdown. A version of "Goin' Down the River." County Records - "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 3." County Records, "Weems String Band." Rounder Records 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1980. Learned from Ithica, N.Y., revival musicians Judy Hyman and Jeff Claus).

DEAD SLAVE, THE. AKA- "The Dead Nigger." AKA and see "Fiddler's Hoedown." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Missouri (an "old Boone County tune"-Christeson). D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB (Christeson): AABBCC' (Phillips). Howard Marshall informs that this tune was popularised by "The Fiddlin' Sheriff," George Morris, of Columbia in the 30s, 40s, and early 50s. "The title of the tune is said by many, including the late Taylor McBaine, to commemorate a public lynching of a black man in Columbia, sometime in the late 1920s. The victim of the lynching was accused of raping the young daughter of a professor at the University of Missouri and was awaiting trial. The site of the rape was a wooden bridge (now gone) over the old KATY railroad tracks on the west side of campus; when the mob took the fellow from the Boone County jail up town, they brought him to the spot and hung him from the bridge over the KATY tracks. The girl's father pleaded with the mob, but to no avail. The story was covered in local papers. I think "Dead Slave" was Bob Christeson's "AKA" for the actual title..." Missouri fiddlers also call the tune "Fiddler's Hoedown." Source for notated version: John Hartford [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 67. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 64.

DEVIL/DIVEL/DE'IL AMONG THE TAYLORS/TAILORS [1]. AKA and see "Devil's Dream" (New). Scottish, English, Irish, Canadian, Scotland, American; Reel. Canada, Prince Edward Island. England, Northumberland. A Major (Bain, Cole, Emmerson, Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Johnson, Kennedy, Kerr, MacDonald, Skinner, Stwart-Robertson & Raven): D Major (Huntington). Standard. AB (Hardie, Honeyman, Hunter, Johnson, Kerr, Skinner): ABB' (MacDonald, Emmerson): AABB (Bain, Cole, Huntington, Kennedy, Raven): ABCB (Skye). A popular tune throughout the present and former English commonweatlh. It was performed on the concert stage as part of a set romantically entitled "Spey's Fury's" by J. Scott Skinner in 1921. "De'il Among the Tailors" is the name of a skittles game, according to Nigel Gatherer. Title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes, which he published c. 1800./ Johnson (1983), whose version is from Macgoun's Five fashionable Reels (c. 1800), states the tune was written c. 1790./ Bayard collected a version resembling the "Devil's Dream" forms of the tune from a source raised on Prince Edward Island, Canada (Bayard, 1981; Appendix No. 2B, pg. 572). See also "Devil's Dream" for another PEI collected version. In America the tune is almost invariably known by the Dream title, while in the British Isles it appears under the De'il/Devil title. Emmerson (1971) suggests the melody can be identified as belonging to a class of melodies with phrases based on a quarter note followed by two eighth notes; tunes in this class also include "Largo's Fairy Dance," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley."
***
The English novelist Thomas Hardy mentions the tune in Absent Mindedness in a Parish Choir, a passage which bears repeating:
***
"...Twas a very dark afternoon, and by the end of the sermon all you
could see of the inside of the church were the pa'son's two candles
alongside of him in the pulpit, and his spaking face behind 'em. The
sermon being ended at last, the pa'son gi'ed out the Evening Hymn.
But no quire set about sounding up the tune, and the people began
to turn their heads to learn the reason why, and then Levi Limpet, a
boy who sat in the gallery, nudged Timothy and Nicholas, and said,
"Begin! Begin!" "Hey? what?" says Nicholas, starting up; and the
church being so dark and his head so muddled he thought he was at
the party they had played at all the night before, and away he went,
bow and fiddle, at "The Devil among the Tailors," the favourite jig
of the neighborhood at that time. The rest of the band, being in the
same state of mind and nothing doubting, followed their leader with
all their strength, according to custom. They poured out that there
tune till the lower bass notes of "The Devil among the Tailors" made
the cobwebs in the roof shiver like ghosts; then Nicholas, seeing
nobody moved, shouted out as he scraped (in his usual commanding
way at dances when the folks didn't know the figures), "Top couples
cross hands! And when I make the fiddle squeak at the end every man
kiss his pardner under the mistletoe!"
***
"...Then the unfortunate church band came to their senses, and
remembered where they were; and 'twas a sight to see Nicholas
Puddingcome and Timothy Thomas and John Biles creep down
the gallery stairs with their fiddles under arms, and poor Dan'l
Hornhead with his serpent, and Robert Dowdle with his claionet,
all looking as little as ninepins; and out they went. The pa'son
might have forgi'ed 'em when he learned the truth o't, but the
squire would not. That very week he sent for a barrel-organ
that would play two-and-twenty new psalm-tunes, so exact
and particular that, however sinful inclined you was, you could
play nothing but psalm-tunes whatsomever. He had a really
respectable man to turn the winch, as I said, and the old players
played no more..."
***
Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 8. Carlin (English Concertina), 1977; pg. 36. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 18. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 49, pg. 140. Gow (Beauties), 1819. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1992; pg. 36. Honeyman (Stathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 7. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 229. Huntington (William Litten's), 1977; pg. 14. Johnson (Scottish Fiddle Music in the 18th Century), 1984; No. 75, pg. 225. Kennedy (Fiddler's Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 18, pg. 9. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 6, No. 2, pg. 6. Lowe (A Collection of Reels and Strathspeys), 1844. MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 4. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 170. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist, with variations), pg. 29. Skinner - Harp and Claymore. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 11. Antilles (Island) AN-7003, Kirkpatrick and Hutchings - "The Compleat Dancing Master" (1973). Beltona BL2128 (78 RPM), The Edinburgh Highland Strathspey and Reel Society (1936). Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). "The Caledonian Companion" (1975). "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Ideal Music" (1977).
T:De'il Among the Tailors
M:C
L:1/8
Z:Andrew Kuntz
K:A
|: e2 | a2eg a2eg | a2eg fedc| dfBf dfBf | dfba gefg | a2eg a2eg | a2ea
fedc | defe dcBA| E2G2 2A2 :|
|: ed| ceAe ceAe | ceAa fedc| dfBf dfBf | dfBb gfed | ceAe ceAe | ceAa f
edc | defe dcBA| E2G2 A2 :|

DRUNKEN WAGONEER, THE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. G Major ('A' part) & E Major ('B' and 'C' parts). Standard. ABCC. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pgs. 77-79. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters (b. 1889) - "Drunken Wagoneer."

DRY AND DUSTY [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Arkansas, Missouri. D Major. DDAD or Standard. AABB. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph. Ken Perlman (1979) relates that whenever an Ozark fiddler wanted a drink while playing for a dance he played this tune as a cue that he was feeling "Dry and Dusty". Reiner & Anick (1989) suggest the title refers rather to the "drought and dust endured by settlers on government-provided, free land claims in the West." A variant of the usual "Dry and Dusty," in DADD tuning (the same tuning the Morrison Twin Brothers used), appears as an untitled tune on Texas fiddler Eck Robertson's County LP (County 202). Sources for notated versions: Gus Vandergriff (Pulaski County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Morrison Twin Brothers (Ark.) [Reiner & Anick]; Lynn 'Chirps' Smith [Phillips]. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 68. Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 121. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 75. Caney Mountain Records CLP 213 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66. County 518, Morrison Twin Brothers String Band (Ark.) - "Echoes of the Ozarks" (orig. rec. 1930). County 790, Leftwich & Higginbotham - "No One to Bring Home Tonight" (1984). Marimac 9000, Dan Gellert & Shoofly - "Forked Deer" (1986). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion."

DOC CHAPMAN'S BREAKDOWN. Old-Time, Breakdown. From Kentucky fiddler Snake Chapman. Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion."

DOGGIE ON THE CARPET. AKA - "Doggie on the Carport," "Froggie on the Carport." Old-Time, Breakdown. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard. AABB (Songer): AABB' (Phillips). Source for notated versions: Ruthie Dornfeld (Seattle) [Phillips, Songer]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 72. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 81 (appears as "Froggie on the Carport"). Rounder 0172, Bob Carlin - "Where Did You Get That Hat?" (1982. Learned from Ruth Dornfeld).

DONE GONE [1]. AKA - "All I've Got's Done Gone." Old-Time, Bluegrass. USA, Widely known, especially among Texas-style fiddlers. B Flat Major ('A' part) & G Aeolian ('B' part). Standard. AABBAA (Brody, Songer): AA'BB'CC' (Reiner & Anick): ABCDD (Christeson, 1973): AABBCCDD (Christeson, 1984). "Done Gone" (played in a flat key that is generally unusual for Southern fiddlers) has been credited to an old fiddler from the Texas Panhandle named Matt Brown, who was a regionally well-known musician but who did not record. The story of the origins of the tune has it that Brown was trying to hitch a ride after being stranded some twenty-eight miles outside of Amarillo; he attempted to flag down one car which passed him, and while waiting for another he composed "Done Gone." If the story is true it must have been in the early days of the automobile, for Brown died in 1915 (see also "Kelly's Waltz"). The tune was Texas fiddler Eck Robertson's signature piece. Georgia fiddler Clayton McMichen recorded the tune with guitarist Riley Puckett, in the key of C major. Sources for notated versions: Kenny Baker [Brody]; Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, 1973]; Cecil Hammack (Waynesville, Missouri) [Christeson, 1984]; Eck Robertson (Texas) [Phillips]; J.T. Perkins [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 88. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 177 (#1). R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 22, No. 2. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 73 (two versions). Reiner & Anick (Old Time Fiddling Across America), 1989; pg. 135. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 64. In the repertoire of Texas fiddler Bob Wills. Brunswick 396 (78 RPM), Clark Kessinger (Kessinger's 1929 version was copied directly from the Eck Robertson Victor disc, notes Mark Wilson and Guthrie Meade). County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 412, "Fiddling Doc Roberts" {Ky.} (appears as "All I've Got's Done Gone" {learned from black musician Owen Walker [Madison Cty., Ky.]}). County 507, Clayton McMichen {Ga.} - "Old-Time Fiddle Classics." County 747, Clark Kessinger {W.Va.}- "Sweet Bunch of Roses." County 714, Kenny Baker- "High Country." Flying Fish FF 90468, Critton Hollow - "Great Dreams" (1988). Flying Fish FF 70572, Frank Ferrel - "Yankee Dreams: Wicked Good Fiddling from New England" (1991). Rounder 1010, Ed Haley- "Parkersburg Landing" (1976. Hayley perhaps learned his version from Clark Kessinger). MCA-162, Tommy Jackson- "Square Dances Without Calls." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Uncle Bob Walters - "Old Time Fiddlers' Repertory" (1976). Prize 498-02, Carl Jackson- "Bluegrass Festival." Sonyatone STR-201, Eck Robertson {Texas}- "Master Fiddler." Victor 19372 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1922). Terry Morris - "For the Record."

DON'T LET YOUR DEAL GO DOWN [1]. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Country Rag. USA; Mo., Texas. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is built on a circle of fifths. Source for notated version: Phillips credits the 'B' part to Bob Wills. Phillips (Fiddlecase TuneBook), 1989; pg. 16. Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson (Mo.) - "Fiddle Favorites." Voyager 309, Benny & Jerry Thomasson - "The Weiser Reunion: a Jam Session" (1993).

DIXON COUNTY BLUES. Old-Time, Country Blues. USA, Nebraska. D Major. Standard. ABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 154. Welling (Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 2.

DUBUQUE. AKA and see "Duck River," "Fiddling Phil," "Five Miles Out of Town," "General Lee," "Mabel," "Muddy Road to Kansas," "Old Dubuque," "Phiddlin' Phil," "Sally in the Green Corn." Old-Time, New England; Reel. USA, Missouri. D Major. Standard. AABB (Brody): AABBAAB'B' (Phillips). See also the related "Possum Up a Gum Stump" [1]. All seem related to the "Off to California" family of tunes. "Muddy Road to Kansas" is an Illinois title for the melody. Sources for notated versions: Fennigs All Stars (N.Y.) [Brody], Jay Ungar (West Hurley, New York) [Kuntz, Phillips]; Art Galbraith (Mo.) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 93. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 76. Front Hall 01, Fennig's All Star String Band- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." Revonah RS-924, "The West Orrtanna String Band" (1976. Learned from the playing of Neil Rossi).
T:Dubuque
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
A,B,DE D2 DE|FABF A4|BAdA BAFE|1 DEFD ED B,:|2 DFED D4||
F A2 F A2 BA|FE D2 B,2 D2|A B2 A B2 de|dBAG FG A2|F A2 F A2 BA|
FE D2 B,2 DE|F2 FD EDB,G,|A,B,DE D4||

DUGLER WITH A SHOOFLY ON. Old-Time, Breakdown. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Howard Forrester, learned from his Uncle Bob [Devil's Box, Phillips]. Devil's Box, Vol. 22, No. 1, Spring 1988; pg. 41. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 77.
T:Duggler with a Shoofly On
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:John Hartford's Howdy Forrester transcriptions, Devil's Box
K:G
B/d/|gg/a/ g/e/d/B/|A/G/F/D/ FA/d/|f/g/f/e/ d/f/e/d/|B/G/G/A/ G B/d/|
G/f/g/a/ g/e/d/B/|A/G/F/D/ FD|f/g/f/e/ d/f/e/d/|B/G/G/A/ G||
D||B>c B/A/G/B/|A/G/F/D/ FD|c>d c/B/d/c/|B/G/G/A/ GD|
B>c B/A/G/B/|A/G/F/D/ FD|fe d/B/A/d/|B/G/G/A/ G||

DUNCAN'S REEL [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 18.

DUNDEE HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Brown's Hornpipe," "Cincinatti Hornpipe," "Cliff Hornpipe," "Cork Hornpipe," "Duxbury Hornpipe," "Fred Wilson's Clog/Hornpipe," "Harvest Home,", "Higgin's Hornpipe," "Kephart's Clog" (Pa.)," "Kildare Fancy" (Rogha Chill Dara)" "Paine's Reel," "The Rakes of Kildare," "Ruby Hornpipe," "Snyder's Jig" (Pa.), "Standard Hornpipe," "Union Hornpipe," "Wilson's Clog," "Zig Zag Clog." Scottish, Irish, American, Canadian; Hornpipe or Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Pennsylvania, New England. Canada; Cape Breton, New Brunswick. D Major. Standard. AABB (Christeson, Cole, Cranford, Phillips): AA'BB' (Gatherer, Kerr). The name Dundee is formed from the Celtic root-word dun, meaning a fortified place, along with what is thought to be a man's name, perhaps an early chieftain. Dundee, in Angus, was made a royal burgh by William the Lyon about 1190. A century later William Wallace attended grammar school their and supposedly fatally wounded another student in an argument about his dagger. It was an unlucky town: attacked by Robert I in 1313, it was burned by John of Gaunt in 1385, plundered by Henry VIII's forces in 1547, looted by the marquess of Montrose in 1645 and many of its citizens were massacred by General Monck when it refused to surrender to Cromwell. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; No. 84, pg. 55. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 87. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 115, pg. 33. Gatherer (Gatherer's Musical Museum), 1987; pg. 42. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 335, pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 191. White's Excelsior Collection, pg. 52. Boot Records, Jerry Holland - "Master Cape Breton Fiddler" (1982). RCA Victor LCP 1001, Ned Landry and his New Brunswick Lumberjacks - "Bowing the Strings with Ned Landry."

DURANG'S HORNPIPE [1] (Crannciuil Ui Deorain). AKA and see "Wobble Gears." See also "Little Hornpipe." British Isles, American, Texas Style, Old-Time; Hornpipe, Reel or Breakdown. USA, Widely known. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB (most versions): AABB' (Emmerson, Kerr): AA'BB' (Moylan). The melody is thoroughly ensconced in American traditional repertoire. It is "a Missouri standard," according to Howard Marshall, and "an old stand-by" remarked Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner (in the early twentieth century). It was commonly played at country dances in Orange County, New York in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folk Life Quarterly, pgs. 211-215) and was part of the older fiddle repertory in Patrick County, southwestern Va., before such tunes were superceded in popularity by clawhammer banjo/fiddle tunes (Tom Carter & Blanton Owen, 1976). The title appears in the repertory list of Henry Ford's champion fiddler of the late 1920's, Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham, who was quite elderly at the time. The tune was recorded in the early 1940's from Ozark Mountain fiddlers for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph and was one of the relatively few recordings by legendary Galax, Virginia, fiddler Emmett Lundy. Interestingly, given the usual variation in fiddle tune titles due to faulty memory, "folk process" or other such 'drift', it is nearly always found going by the title "Durang's Hornpipe."
***
Marion Thede speculates the piece was named for Ferdinand Durang, an actor, who first sang the "Star Spangled Banner" in a tavern near Baltimore's Holiday Street Theatre, but in this she is mistaken, at least in part, for Sam Bayard (1981), George Emmerson (1972) and others researched the tune and definitively conclude that it was named after actor and dancer John Durang (b. Lancaster, Pa., 1768--d. Philadelphia, 1821), styled as "the first American dancer." Durang (who was born of German parents) stated in his memoirs that it was composed for him by one "Mr. Hoffmaster, a German Dwarf, in New York, 1785." The thespian had taken violin lessons from Hoffmaster (who, with his wife, was only 3 feet tall "with a large head, hands and feet"), who wrote the hornpipe "expressly for me, which is become well known in America, for I have since heard it play'd the other side of the Blue Mountains (of Pennsylvania) as well as in the cities" (pg. 344, quoted from Downer's "The Memoir of John Durang, American Actor 1785-1816," {1966}). Bayard finds the original a much more banal piece than it is today, and that it has been much improved by the aforementioned "folk process," which has given it character and distinction in his opinion.
***
The dwarf's composition came a year after Durang's debut with the company of Lewis Hallam in 1784, who had just returned from a long period in England which encompassed the Revolutionary War (Emmerson, 1972). Later in his career, around 1790, he records he danced "a Hornpipe on thirteen eggs blindfolded without breaking one," which feat points to the dancer's main claim to fame (beside the tune associated with his name), that of poularizing the nautical-style hornpipe dance the Sailor's Hornpipe. In fact, from Durang's time on the nautical theme became intimately associated with the hornpipe dance and the tune "College Hornpipe," to which it was predominantly performed. Durang went on to dance in comic ballets, "pantomimic dances" and other entertainments, and in 1796 was engaged to direct pantomimes for the circus of John B. Ricketts, a Scottish immigrant, until the enterprise was destroyed in a fire at year's end, 1799.
***
Burchenal gives the tune under the title "The Lady of the Lake" [2], taken from the New England contra dance of that name (which she also prints).
***
In the Irish Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border the tune seems to be considered, and used, as a reel according to Terry Moylan (1994).
***
Sources for notated versions: Marion Unger (Oklahoma County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; black fiddler Bill Driver (Miller County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Franklin George (W.Va) [Krassen]; John Baltzell, 1923 (Ohio) [Bronner]; Jehile Kirkhuff, 1976 (Pennsylvania) [Bronner]; 6 southwestern Pennsylvania fiddlers [Bayard]; James Marr (elderly fiddler from Missouri, 1949) [Bayard]; New Hampshire Fiddler's Union [Phillips]; accordion player Johnny O'Leary (Sliabh Luachra region of the Cork-Kerry border) [Moylan]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Adam, 1938; No. 19. Bayard (Dance the the Fiddle), 1981; No. 349A-F, pgs. 341-344 and Appendix No.22, pg. 581. Begin (Fiddle Music in the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 23, pg. 36. Brody (Fiddlers Fakebook), 1983; pg. 94. Bronner (Old Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 6, pg. 34 and No. 11, pg. 68. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 34 (appears as "The Lady of the Lake" [2]). Cazden, pg. 12 or 42. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 63. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 94. DeVille, No. 4. Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 87, pg. 163. Ford (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 53. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. 30, pg. 77. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; No. 341, pg. 38. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 82. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 121. Moylan (Johnny O'Leary), 1994; No. 191, pg. 111. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 215. O'Neill (1850), 1979; No. 1772, pg. 330. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 936, pg. 160. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 192. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 163. Robbins, No. 156. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 42, pg. 16. Shaw (Cowboy Dances), 1943; pg. 387. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 67. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 116. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 17 (includes a harmony part). White's Excelsior Collection, pg. 50. American Heritage 515, Junior Daugherty- "You Be the Judge." Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." County 707, Major Franklin- "Texas Fiddle Favorites." County 747, Clark Kessinger- "Sweet Bunch of Daisies." County 769, U.S. Senator Robert Byrd- "Mountian Fiddler." Edison 50900 (78 RPM), Joseph Samuels, 1920 (appears as 1st tune of "Miss Johnson's Party Medley"). Edison 51236 (78 RPM), 1923, John Baltzell (appears as 1st tune of "Durang Hornpipe Medley"). Elektra EKS 7285, The Dillards with Byron Berline- "Pickin' and Fiddlin.'" F&W Records 2, "F&W String Band 2." Folkways FA 2337, Clark Kessinger- "Live at Union Grove." Gambier Folklore Society GFS 901, Alan Jabbour, ed.- "Seems Like Romance to Me: American Fiddle Tunes From Ohio" (1985). Heritage 060, Art Galbraith - "Music of the Ozarks" (Brandywine, 1984). Jonathan Edwards Memorial Foundation JEMF-105, Wes Dickinson - "New England Traditional Fiddling" (1978). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Kelly Jones (b. 1947) - "Authentic Old-Time Fiddle Tunes." Rounder 0194, John W. Summers- "Indiana Fiddler" (1984). Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999). Topic 12T312, Billy Clifford. Voyager 312-S, Grant Lamb- "Tunes From Home." Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling." 78 RPM, Dan Massey and Family.
X:1
T:Durang's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
DA FA DA FD|Bc dB BA FA|DA FA DA FA|A,E CE A,E CE|
DA FA DA FD|Bc dB BA FA|fg af bg ec|d2f2d4:|
|:de fe dc BA|Bc dc BA GF|E2 E2 ed cB|A^G AB A2 F=G|
A^G AB cB cd|ed ef gf ge|fg af bg ec|d2f2d4:|
X:2
T:Durang's Hornpipe
R:Reel
C:New York, 1785, by Mr. Hoffmaster
H:Composed in honor of the then renowned dancer and actor John Durang.
N:This is a "straightened out" version, giving the basic melody line.
N:Cyril Stinnett, Cleo Persinger and others played the "A" part of this
N:tune with a wholly different melody in the 2nd half of the "A" part.
N:Durang's Hornpipe as it appears in Cole's gives an example of this
N:variation.
A:Missouri
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABCs
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:120
K:D
(de|fe)fa (fe)d(A|BA)Bc (dB)AF|GBAG (FG)AF|(ED)EF E2d(e|!
fe)fa (fe)d(A|BA)Bc (dB)AF|(Ac)ea (3fgf ec|[d3f3][df] [d2f2]:|!
|:(FE|D)AFA DAF(A|Bc)(dB) A(GF)(E|D)AFA DAFA|A,ECE A,EC(E|!
D)AFA DAF(A|Bc)(dB) (AGF)E|(Ac)ea (3(fgf) ec|[d3f3][df] [d2f2]:|

DURANG'S HORNPIPE [2]. Old-Time, Breakdown. D Major. Standard. AABB (Phillips, Songer): AA'BB (Brody). Sources for notated versions: J.T. Perkins [Phillips]; Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Bruce Schwartz (Ketchikan Alaska) [Songer]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 94. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 191. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 68. American Heritage 24, Lonnie Peerce- "Golden Fiddle Tunes." Davis Unlimited DU 33017, J.T. Perkins- "Fiddle Favorites Perkins Style." Folkways FTS 31039, "Red Clay Ramblers" (1974 Based on a version from Marion, Indiana fiddler John Summers). Kicking Mule, David Winston- "Soutern Clawhammer Banjo." Marimac 9023, Bruce Molsky and Bob Carlin - "Take Me as I Am." Voyager 309, Benny and Jerry Thomasson- "The Weiser Reunion: a Jam Session" (1993).
T:Durang's Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
N:ADAE tuning
K:D
D/E/F/E/ D/E/F/E/|A/A/d/A/ B/B/A|D/E/F/E/ D/E/F/E/|D/B,/A,/(A,/ G,2|
D/E/F/E/ D/E/F/E/|A/A/d/A/ B/A/B/(3A/4B/4c/4|d/A/d/e/ f/f/e/(A/|
d/ f) (d/ f2):|
|:(e/|f/)(g/a/)e/ (f/e/)d/A/|B/(c/d/)A/ (B/A/)F/D/|G/ F D/ E/(D/E)|
e>f e>(e|f/)(g/a/)e/ (f/e/)d/A/|B/c/d/A/ B/A/F/(D/|G/) F A/ fe|
(d/ f) (d/ f)z/:|

DUSTY BOB'S (JIG). AKA and see "Jack's Alive." American, Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB'. As "Jack's Alive" the title was first published by Playford. The first strain is a variant of "The Kesh Jig." Philippe Varlet discovered the tune on a 78 RPM recorded in 1938 by Irish accordion player Terry Lane as part of a medley called simply "Quadrilles." The same tune appears in the Fleishmann index of traditional Irish music as "The Miser," from Kane O'Hara's comic opera Midas, London, 1764. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 72. Sannella, Balance and Swing. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 29. Front Hall Records FHR-03, Dudley Laufman--"Swinging on a Gate."
T:Dusty Bob
M:6/8
L:1/8
Q:120
K:G
D |: G2G GAB | A2A ABc | d2B c2A | B2G A2D | G2G GAB |
A2A ABc | dcB AGF|1 G2G G2D :|2 G2G GBd ||
|: g2g gag | f2f fgf | e2e efg | a2g f2d | g2g gag | f2f fgf |
efg agf | g2g g2 :||

DUSTY MILLER [2]. AKA - "Miller's Reel." Old-Time, Bluegrass, Canadian, Texas Style. USA; Texas, Missiouri. Unrelated to version #1. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABBCC. The tune is commonly played at mid-western fiddle contests. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Joe Greene [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 97. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 22. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 78. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1977; pg. 66. American Heritage 25, "Poor Richard's Almanac." County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 722, Joe Greene- "Joe Greene's Fiddle Album." County 724, Benny Thomasson- "Country Fiddling." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Dwight Lamb (b. 1934) - "Old Ladies Pickin' Chickens." Rounder 0046, Mark O'Conner- "National Junior Fiddle Champion." Rounder 0086, Butch Robbins- "Forty Years Late." Rounder 0235, Alison Krauss - "Too Late to Cry." Rounder C-11565, Alison Krauss - "Rounder Fiddle" (1990). Voyager 319-S, Ace Sewell- "Southwest Fiddlin.'"

EBENEZER. AKA and see "West Virginia Farewell," "West Viginia Highway." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; West Virginia, southwestern Virginia. G Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is not widespread, according to Alan Jabbour, found only in western Virginia and parts of West Virginia. Most modern "revival" versions seem to stem from West Virginia fiddler Franklin George's version, popularized by fiddler and violin-maker Armin Barnett, as well as George Wilson and Allan Block. A version of "Ebenezer" was recorded by fiddler Kahle Brewer of Galax, Va., in the 1920's, and another by Ernest Stoneman on 78 RPM, although they both issued it under the title "West Virginia Highway." Galax fiddler Uncle Charlie Higgins called it "West Virginia Farewell." Glen Lyn, Virginia fiddler Henry Reed recorded it for Alan Jabbour twice in the 1960's-although he did not have a name for it the first time, on the second occasion he called it "Alabama Gals Give the Fiddler a Dram." Bob Buckingham remarks that a neighbor and fiddler, Bob Hill plays "Ebenezer," and told him that his father had played it when Bob was young in Chillhowie, Virginia, calling it "Professor Wise."
***
Jabbour says The Hollow Rock String Band learned Reed's version, but played and recorded it under the Brewer/Stoneman title "West Virginia Highway." The tune has the feel of a country rag, notes Jabbour, and shares some melodic content with the late-19th century popular song "Climbing Up the Golden Stairs." Sources for notated versions: Charlie Higgins, Frank George, Kahle Brewer [Krassen]; Nelson Gage [Spandaro]; Fuzzy Mountain String Band (Durham, N.C., who learned the tune from Frank George {W.Va.} and Henry Reed {Glen Lyn, Va.} via Alan Jabbour) [Kaufman]; Bill Christopherson & Alan Kaufman [Phillips]. AABB. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 98. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 58. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 63. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 79. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 29. Justice JLP 1002, Franklin George - "31st Annual Old Fiddlers' Convention, Galax, Virginia" (1966). Rounder 0010, "Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972). Bradley, Thompson, and Jabbour- "Sandy's Fancy." Rounder 02144, "Ernest V. Stoneman and the Blue Ridge Corn Shuckers" (appears as "West Virginia Highway"). Victor 20237 (78 RPM), Kahle Brewer (appears as "West Virginia Highway").
T:Ebenezer
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:G
Bc | dBdB G2Bc | dBdB G2Bc | d2g2 f2g2 | a3b a2AB |
cBAG F2AB | cBAG F2AB | gfed BAFD | G3FG2 :|
|: Bc | d2g2 gfg2 | b2ba b2ef | g2 g2 g2 g2 | b2ba b2g2 |
agbg ageg | agbg agef | gfed BAFD | G3F G2 :|

EIGHTH OF JANUARY. AKA and see "Jackson's Victory." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, Widely known. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB (Brody, Christeson, Phillips, Ruth, Sing Out, Sweet): AABB' (Krassen). One of the most popular and widespread of Southern fiddle tunes. Ken Perlman (1979) reports that the melody was originally named "Jackson's Victory" after Andrew Jackson's famous rout of the British at New Orleans on January, 8th, 1815. Around the time of the Civil War, some time after Jackson's Presidency, his popular reputation suffered and the tune was renamed to delete mention of him by name, thus commemorating the battle and not the man. Despite its wide dissemination, Tom Carter (1975) says that some regard it as a relatively modern piece refashioned from an older tune named "Jake Gilly." Not all agree-Tom Rankin (1985) suggests the fiddle tune may be older than the battle it commemorates, and that it seems American in origin, not having an obvious British antecedent, as do several older popular fiddle tunes in the United States. A related tune (though the 'B' part is developed differently") is Bayard's (1981) Pennsylvania collected "Chase the Squirrel" (the title is a floater).
***
"Eighth of January" was recorded for the Library of Congress from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, and from Mississippi fiddlers (John Hatcher, W.E. Claunch, Enos Canoy, Hardy Sharp) in 1939 by collector Herbert Halpert. It was in the repertoire of Cuje Bertram, an African-American fiddler from the Cumberland Plateau region of Kentucky who recorded it on a home tape in 1970, made for his family. In the 1950's Jimmy Driftwood famously refashioned the tune with new lyrics into his best-selling song "The Battle of New Orleans."
***
Missouri fiddler Glenn Rickman, born in 1901, was featured in an article in Bittersweet magazine and played "The Eighth of January" as part of his core repertoire. He had a seemingly curious habit:
***
I play the 'Eighth of January' over the telephone to a department store
here. Every eighth of January I call up the department store and they
put in on their loud speaker. This time I had it taped. I played 'Carroll
County Blues,...Sally Goodin',...Forked Deer' and 'Eighth of January.'
I'm glad to get to do this. The 'Eighth of January,' that was known way
back before my grandpa was born...
***
Rickman's playing over the phone for a department store audience is less curious when one considers that playing over the phone was at one time not unusual:
***
When the party line came in, telephones were used sort of like the radio
was later. Ten to fifteen families on a line could all listen in. On lines
like Slim Wilson's line, the neighbors would get a treat. The Wilson
family that lived near Nixa, Missouri, were all good musicians, and
when they were ready to play, they'd signal over the telephone line.
Everyone would take down the receivers and listen to the Wilson
family fiddling. Some would let the receiver hang down in a bucket
to help amplify the sound. (Allen Gage, Bittersweet, Volume IX, No. 3, Spring 1982)
***
Sources for notated versions: Charlie Higgins (Galax, Va.) [Krassen]; Cyril Stinnett (Oregon, Missouri) [Christeson]; Tommy Jackson [Phillips/1994]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 99. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 65. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 63. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 39. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 50. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 17. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 80. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 15, pg. 7. Sing Out, Vol. 36, No. 2, August, 1991; pg. 77. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 76. Brunswick 239 (78 RPM) {1928}, Dr. Humphrey Bate and His Possum Hunters (Nashville, Tenn. Bill Barret was the fiddler for the tune, not Bate's regular, Oscar Stone). Caney Mountain Records CLP 228, Lonnie Robertson (Mo.) - "Fiddle Favorites." County 518, Arkansas Barefoot Boys- "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 1." County 531, "Old TIme String Band Classics" (1975). County 541, Dr. Humphrey Bate & His Possum Hunters - "Nashville; the Early String Bands, Vol. 1." County 727, John Ashby- "Old Virginia Fiddling." Heritage 060, Major Contay and the Canebreak Rattlers - "Music of the Ozarks" (Brandywine, 1984). Kicking Mule KM-301, "Happy Traum, American Stranger" (1977). Marimac 9017, Vesta Johnson - "Down Home Rag." Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH-002, Hardy C. Sharp (Meridian, Mississippi) - "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo-American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1985). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters (b. 1889) - "Drunken Wagoneer." Morning Star 45004, Ted Gossett's String Band (western Ky., originally recorded Sept., 1930) - "Wish I Had My Time Again." Ok 45496 (78RPM), The Fox Chasers. Rounder 0085, "Tony Rice." Rounder 7002, Graham Townsend--"Le Violin/The Fiddle." Spr 2655 (78 RPM), Buddy Young's Kentuckian's (AKA the Ted Gossett Band, originally recorded Sept. 1930). Spt 9775 (78 RPM), The Country String Band (AKA the Ted Gossett Band/Buddy Young's Kentuckian's/Tommy Whitmer Band). Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling."
T:Eighth of January
L:1/8
M:2/4
K:D
e/a/|f/e/f/a/ f/e/d/f/|e/f/e/d/ BB/d/|ee/f/ e/d/B/A/|d/B/A/F/ De/a/|
f/e/f/a/ f/e/d/f/|e/f/e/d/ B/d/e/f/|a/f/e/a/ f/e/c/A/|d/B/A/F/ D:|
|:A/A/|AA/B/ AA/A/|A/d/B/A/ F/E/D/F/|AA/B/ AA/d/|B/A/F/E/ DD/F/|
AA/B/ AA/A/|A/d/B/A/ F/E/D/F/|AA/A/ A/d/f/e/|d/B/A/F/ D:|

ELI GREEN(E)'S CAKEWALK. Old-Time, Country Rag. USA, Nebraska. A Minor ('A' part) & C Major ('B part) {Christeson}: E Minor ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part) {Phillips, Songer}. Standard. ABB + Coda (Christeson): AA'BB (Phillips): AA'BB' (Songer). The tune was published in 1896 during the vogue for cakewalks. Christeson's source was an elderly man in the 1950's and who had made a living busking among work crews and labor camps in his youth. Sources for notated versions: W.A. "Banjo Bill" Lottridge (Lincoln, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Stuart Williams (Seattle, Washington), who learned if from fiddler and folklorist Linda Danielson (Eugene, Oregon), who collected it from Oregon fiddler Wayne Walter, the nephew of Uncle Bob Walters--Christeson's source [Songer]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 118-119. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 47. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 71. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters (b. 1889) - "Drunken Wagoneer."

EMMA'S PRIDE. Old-Time, Polka (?). USA, Michegan. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: named by Bob Spinner who learned it from fiddler Emma Warner. Emma came from a family of musicians who lived around the Charlevoix, East Port, and Torch Lake areas of Michigan [Johnson]. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 7: Michigan Tunes), Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 4 (two versions).

EWE REEL, THE ("Seisd An Aisg," "Cor An Foisc" or "Ril na Foisce"). AKA and see "Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Bob with the one Horn," "Miss Huntley's," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "The Red Blanket," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Merry Lasses," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street." Irish, Reel. Ireland; County Sligo, west Clare. G Major (Breathnach, Mitchell, O'Neill/1850): G Mixolydian/Major {'A' part} & G Major {'B' part} (Flaherty, O'Neill/1001). Standard. AB (Mitchell): AAB (Flaherty): AA'B (O'Neill): AABB (Breathnach). The Irish version of the Scots "Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn." Breathnach (1985) found the tune under the title "Sweet Roaslea and the Sky over it" in County Monaghan, "Miss Huntly's" in Fermanagh, "Go see the fun" in Kerry, "The Red Blanket" in Clare and "The Ewe with the Crooked Horn" in Armagh. "The Pretty Girl in Danger" was the title printed by Goodman and Kerr gives it as "The Foe" and "The Bob with one horn." Sources for notated versions: piper Pat Mitchell (Dublin, Ireland) [Breathnach]; fiddler Fred Finn, 1919-1986 (Kiltycreen, Kilavil, County Sligo, Ireland) [Flaherty]; piper Willie Clancy (1918-1973, Miltown Malbay, west Clare) [Mitchell]; Chicago fiddler James Kennedy who had the tune from his father, a celebrated local fiddler from Ballinamore, County Leitrim [O'Neill]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 145, pg. 77. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 74. Mitchell (Dance Music of Willie Clancy), 1993; No. 106, pg. 91. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 261, pg. 134. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1229, pg. 231. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 504, pg. 95.
T:Ewe Reel, The
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (504)
K:G
DGGF DGGE|=F2 AF cFAF|DGGF DGGg|1 fdcA BGAF:|2
fdcA BG G2||g2 bg dgbg|f2 af dfaf|g2 bg dgbg|agfa g2 ga|
bgaf gdde|fefd cAGF|dggf (3gab ag|fdcA BGAF||

EW(I)E WI' THE CROOKED HORN, THE/MY [1] ("A' Chaora chrom" or "Ard Mhacha"). AKA and see"Bob with the one Horn," "Carron's Reel," "Crooked Horn Ewe," "Ewe Reel," "The Flowers of Limerick," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn." Scottish, Strathspey; Irish, Highland. G Dorian (Athole, Gow): G Minor (Fraser, Hunter, Kerr): A Minor (Honeyman). Standard. AB (Kerr): AAB (Athole, Fraser, Gow, Hunter): AABB (Honeyman). The title comes an old song, in both Scots and Gaelic. Perhaps the most famous adaptation of the lyrics is by Reverend John Skinner, set to the tune of "Carron's Reel," although some find his set wanting. Fraser further explains: "This set of the Ewe with the Crooked Horn appears to be a standard, formed a century ago, by three neighboring gentlemen in Nairnshire, eminent performers,--Mr. Rose of Kilravock, Mr. Campbell of Budyet, and Mr. Sutherland of Kinsteary. It may not be generally known, that the Ewe thus celebrated is no other than the 'whisky still, with its crooked horn (distilling tube),' which gave more milk than all the sheep in the country." The following words are from an old Scots version appearing in Chambers' Songs of Scotland prior to Burns.
***
verse:
Ilka ewe comes hame at even (x3)
Crookit hornie bides awa
***
chorus:
Ewie wi the crookit horn
May ye never see the morn
Ilka nicht you steal my corn
Ewie wi the crookit horn
***
Ilka ewie has a lambie (x3)
Crookit hornie she has twa
***
A the ewes gie milk eneuch (x3)
Crookit horn gies maist of a
***
Alburger (1983) retells the persistent tale, probably not true, of Niel Gow and this tune: "One (story) concerns a violin which is supposed to have been given to Neil by a London dealer, when Niel was up with the Duke of Atholl. After some discussion the dealer ('said to have been a Mr. Hill') told Neil 'I shall give it you if you play 'The Ewie wi' the Crooked Horn,' in anything like the style in which I heard it in your own country.' Niel played his best, and the dealer presented the violin, 'a veritable 'Gaspar di Salo in Brescia,' to the understandably sceptical Gow, who 'said to his son, 'Come awa, I'm feared he may rue and take it back.'" Niel Gow's own "Cheap Mutton," published in his "Fourth Collection," is a simple variation on this tune.
***
John Glen (1891) thought the earliest printing of the melody was in Robert Ross's 1780 collection (pg. 16), although Bruce Olson finds the melody (under the title "Crooked Horn Ewe") in Rutherford's 24 Country Dances for 1758 (see abc below) and Jack Campin notes it is in the c. 1740 MacFarlane Manuscript in dorian mode under the title "An caora crom." The title also appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes which he published c. 1800. "Ewe/Yowie wi' the crookit horn" is also the name of a Scottish song whose singing was mentioned by Alexander Jaffray in his scketch of the assembly at Aberdeen in 1777 in Recollection of Kingswells. Jaffray gives an accounty of the various assemblys or country dances and recalls them as convivial affairs:
***
After the dance, followed a supper, where cheerfulness and good humour
prevailed. Those who could sing entertained the company, which remained
to a late, or rather early hour...I particularly noticed Mrs. Grant of Caron, a
very pleasant sensible woman. Her two songs were "Yowie wi the crookit
horn," and "Tibby Fowler in the Glen."
***
Irish versions appear in reel or hornpipe form (see Ewe with the Crooked Horn [3], but in County Donegal it is popularly played as a highland (see version #5). The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 55. Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isles), 1874; No. 19, pg. 7. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 17. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 169. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 3; No. 187, pg. 22. McGlashan (A Collection of Reels), c. 1786; pg. 31 (appears as "Crooked Horn Ewe"). Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 191. Culburnie CUL 113D, Alasdair Fraser & Tony MacManus - "Return to Kintail" (1999). Plant Life PLR017, "The Tannahill Weavers" (1979).
X:1
T:Ewie Wi' the Crooked Horn [1]
L:1/8
M:C
R:Strathspey
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Minor
F|D<G G>A F>GA>F|D<G G>A B>G A<a|f>-e d<f c<f A>F|
A<f d>B c<AG:|
G<g g>a f>ga>f|d<g g>a b>ga>^f|d<g g>a f>ga>f|dg/a/ b>ga>^f g2|
f>=f d<f c<f A>F|D<G G>A B>G A<a|b>gf>d c>BA>F|
A<f d>B c<A G||
X:2
T:Crooked Horn Ewe, The
L:1/8
M:C|
S:McGlashan - Reels
K:G Mixolydian
D>GG>A F>GA>F|D>GG>B c>GB>G|c>GB>G A>G F>C|D>GG>B AF G2|
D>GG>A F>G AG/F/|D>GG>A c>AB>G|A/B/c B/c/d c/B/A/G/ FA|DGGA FA G2||
G>gg>a f>g ag/f/|d>gg>a b>ga>g|d>gg>a f>ga>f|d>gg>b a^f g2|f>g d>f c>f A>F|
D>GG>B c>GB>G|f/g/a/g/ f>d c>BA>F|D>GGA FA G2||
X:3
T:The Crooked Horn'd Ewe
S:Rutherford's 24 Country Dances for 1758
Z:Transcribed by Bruce Olson
Q:156
L:1/8
M:C
K:G
DG2B AG "tr"FE/D/|DG2B cABG|ABcB AG "tr"FE/D/|DG2B AG/F/ G2::\
dg2a =fagf|dg2a fa g2|dg2a "tr"b(ag) a(g/f/)|\
d(g/a/) _ba/g/ (f/g/a/f/)g2|=(fefd) c_B "tr"A(G/F/)|\
Gd2c BA G2:|]

FADED LOVE. American, Song Tune. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed by John Wills and Bob Wills, copyright 1950. Source for notated version: Bob Wills, Johnny Gimble and Vassar Clements [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 48.

FAIRY DANCE (Rinnce Na Sideoga/Sideog). AKA and see "Fisher Laddie," "The Haymaker," "La Ronde des Vieux," "Largos Fairy Dance," "The Merry Dance" (New England), "Old Molly Hare" (Old-Time). Irish, English, Scottish, Shetlands, American, Canadian; Reel. D Major (most versions): G Major (Merryweather): A Major (O'Neill/1001). Standard. AB (Honeyman, Raven): AAB (O'Neill/1001): AABB (Ashman, Brody, Ford, Sweet, Taylor, Trim): AABB' (Kerr): AA'BB' (Athole, Merryweather): AABCCD (Roche): AABBCCDDEEF (Cranford/Fitzgerald). Often this tune is a "beginning tune" for fiddlers, and though simple, it seems to have retained its popularity through the years. It was one of 197 compositions claimed and published (in Fifth Collection,"1809) by Nathaniel Gow under the title "Largo's Fairy Dance," which dates it to the latter eighteenth or early nineteenth century. Breandan Breathnach states that it was composed by Niel Gow for the Fife Hunt Ball held in 1802, but this is only partly true, according to Nigel Gatherer, for it was actually a pair of tunes Gow wrote, the second being "The Fairies Advance." Both tunes together make up "Largo's Fairy Dance." Emmerson identifies this tune in a class of tunes defined by the rhythm 'quarter note-two eighths-quarter note-two eigths,' which includes "De'il Among the Tailors," "Rachel Rae," and "The Wind that Shakes the Barley" (which Emmerson {1971} says is substantially a set of "Fairy Dance").
***
In Ireland, it was learned by Joyce in his boyhood in County Limerick, c. 1840. He (1909) says a Donegal setting of this will be found in the 'Journal of the Irish Folk Song Society.' O'Neill (1913) records that a special dance was performed to the tune in that country. Under the title "The Fairy Reel" the tune features in stories of enchantment by the wee folk. A tale is told by Padraig Mac Aodh-O'Neillin in his 1904 book Songs of Uladh (Songs of Ulster) of the origins of the tune which stem from a fiddler of the Mac Fhionnlachs from Flacarragh:
***
There was a gathering of Bel-Taine on St. John's Day (23rd of June), around
the bonfire in Caislean-na-dThuath in northern Dun-na-nGall about 150-160
years ago (~1850).
***
"...the fire was wearing low, the dancing nearly over, and the sturdiest
steppers getting tired, a stranger came among the people, announcing himself
in the words: "Sonas, sonas--luck on all here! The music called me, and I
going to bed." He said no more.
***
He was attired only in his night-garments. Much consternation was
caused by his curious appearance and behaviour, the more so as he was quite
unknown to the festive-maker. He went around asking the young girls to
dance with him; but out of fifty or more assembled there, he found but one
(and she, happily, was not a native of the district) who expressed herself
willing to accept his invitation. There were three or four fidilers there
and one piper, and he called on them to turn on the "Fairy Reel." But not
one of them knew it; every man of them declared that the air and the name
was new to him. Whereupon the mysterious stranger snatched the fidil out of
the hands of mac Fhionnlaoich, the Falcarrach man, who was nearest him, and
flourishing his bow with the grace of a master, turned on the tune himself,
the people standing around with their mouths wide open in wonderment.
***
"Now," he said to mac Fhionnlaoich, when he had finished the wonderful
tune, "there's your fidil for you. Turn on the 'Reel.' Play it after me;
for you're the only man in the Five Kingdoms can do that same!"
***
So mac Fhionnlaoich complied--somewhat reluctantly, it must be said-and played the 'Fairy Reel: through from beginning to end without a break, while the weird stranger and his fair partner danced, all the people looking on. When he had finished dancing with the girl he slipped a gold peiece into her hand, and turning solemnly towards the people, said: "Remove the fire seven paces to the North, and enjoy yourselves till daybreak. A Sonas, sonas--luck with all here!"
***
And so saying, he strode off into the darkness, disappearing as
mysteriously as he had come.
***
I give this story pretty much as I got it from my friend Padraig mac
Aodh o Neill, who got it from Proinseas mac Suibhne, the schoolmaster of
Losaid, in Gartan
***
Another fairy tale collected (by Seamus Ennis) on Tory Island mentions the tune, is again related by Mac Aoidh, and has parallels in other cultures. It seems that an islander, while going to collect his sheep at Port Glas, overheard wonderful music emanating nearby and investigated. The fairy folk were playing the "Fairy Reel" and the man, being an avid and accomplished dancer, felt compelled to join in. The music and dancing lasted and lasted, and he danced and danced, unable to stop until by chance another islander came upon him. This second man heard no music, and saw nothing of the fairy celebration, and asked the first what he was doing. He got the reply that the dancer was enchanted and would not be able to stop until a mortal laid hand on him. This was done, and the dancer saved from his fate. Mac Aoidh translates: "The soles of his shoes and his socks were worn through and his feet were sore to the bone from the roughness of the place he was dancing on." A similar tale is told by Canadian storyteller Alan Mills (to the accompanying fiddling of Montreal musician Jean Carignan) collected from French-Canadian tradition, which he calls "Ti-Jean and the Devil" (with the Devil substituting for Fairies).
***
A Pennsylvania collected version appears in Bayard (1981) as "Rustic Dance" (No. 52, pg. 38), and, as "La Ronde des Vieux" it was recorded in the latter 1920's by French-Canadian fiddler Willie Ringuette.
***
The tune is associated with a traditional dance in the village of Askham Richard, which lies a few miles from York, England. The famous Dorset novelist Thomas Hardy, himself an accordion player and fiddler, mentioned the tune in The Fiddler of the Reels:
***
Then another dancer fell out - one of the men - and went into
the passage in a frantic search for liquor. To turn the figure into
a three-handed reel was the work of a second, Mop modulating
at the same time into 'The Fairy Dance,' as best suited to the
contracted movement, and no less one of those foods of
love which, as manufactured by his bow, had always intoxicated her.
***
Sources for notated versions: Dave Swarbrick (England) [Brody]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton), who adapted J. Scott Skinner's variations [Cranford]. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; NO. 30b, pg. 9. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 7. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 100. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 129, pg. 53. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 71. Honeyman (Secrets of the Gaelic Harp), 1898; pg. 8. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin Tunes); No. or pg. 24. Joyce (Old Irish Folk Music and Song), 1909; No. 129, pgs. 65-66. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; Set 14, No. 2, pg. 10. Merryweather (Merryweather's Tunes for the English Bagpipe), 1989; pg. 53. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 986, pg. 170. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 162. Roche Collection, 1982, Vol. 3; No. 138, pg. 43 (listed as a Long Dance). Skinner, Harp and Claymore, 1903. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 113. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 61. Taylor (Where's the Crack), 1989; pg. 13 (appears as "Fairy Reel"). Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 24. Edison 50653 (78 RPM), Joseph Samuels (appears as 4th tune of "Devil's Dream Medley"). Glencoe 001, Cape Breton Symphony- "Fiddle." Transatlantic 341, Dave Swarbrick- "Swarbrick 2." Fife Strathspey and Reel Society - "The Fiddle Sounds of Fife" (1980). "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Ideal Music" (1977). "Fiddlers Three Plus Two." Ron Gonella- "A Tribute to Niel Gow."
X:1
T:Fairy Dance
L:1/8
M:C|
R:Reel
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
f2fd f2fd|f2fd cAeA|f2fd gfed|1 cABc d2de:|2 cABc defg||
|:a2af b2ba|gfge a2ag|1 fefd B2 e>d|cABc defg:|2 fefd Bged|
cABc d2D2||
X:2
T:Fairy Dance, The
L:1/8
M:C
S:Joyce - Old Irish Folk Music
K:D
f2fd f2fd|gfed cdeg|f2fd gfed|cABc d2d2|f2fd f2fd|gfed cdeg|fafd gfed|cABc defg||
a2af b2bf|g2ge a2 ag|f2fd gfed|cABc defg|a2af b2bf|g2ge a2 ag|fagf gfed|cABc d2d2||
X:3
T:Fairy Reel, The (Irish)
R:reel
Z:Transcribed by Philippe Varlet
M:C
L:1/8
K:G
~B3 A GBdB|{d}cBAG FGAc| BG~G2 cBAg|fdaf {a}gedc|
~B3 A GBdB|{d}cBAG FGAc| BG~G2 cBAG|1 FDEF G3 A :|2 FDEF GABc||
~d3 g e3 d|cA A/A/A d3 c|BG~G2 cBAg|fdaf {a}gfge|
~d3 g e3 d|cA A/A/A d3 c|BG~G2 cBAG|1 FDEF GABc :|2 FDEF G4||

FALLS OF RICHMOND. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Aeolian or Dorian ('A'and 'B' parts) & A Major ('C' & 'D' parts). AEAE (Brody, Phillips): ADAE (Kuntz). AABCB (Brody): AABBCCDDBB (Kuntz, Phillips, Songer). "Falls of Richmond" has been a popular piece among old-time revivalists but its original associations were with the Hammonds family of West Virginia. Burl Hammonds called the tune "Falls of Richmond," in the plural. The title refers to the small waterfalls, or rapids, on the James River at Richmond, rather than, as some have supposed, the 1865 capitulation (or "fall") of that city, the capital of the Confederacy during the American Civil War (Allan Jabbour points out Richmond 'fell' not only in the Civil War, but in the Revolutionary War as well). The falls of the James mark the farthest navigable point on the river, leading to the development of Richmond. Phillips (1994) and Songer (1997) note the fourth part is credited to Marty Somberg of Dexter, Michigan. Source for notated version: Ruthie Dornfeld (Seattle) [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 101. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 82. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 75. Bay 217, Any Old Time - "Ladies Choice." Rounder 0035, Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973. Learned from Burl Hammons, Marlinton, W.Va.). Rounder 0128, The Backwoods Band - "Jes' Fine" (1980. Version learned from Marty Somberg). Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1980. Learned from the Fuzzy Mountain String Band's 1973 recording).
T:Falls of Richmond
L:1/8
M:2/4
N:Parts are ABCDB
K:A Dorian
D/|E/D/E/G/ A(G|G)A/B/ c/B/c/D/|E/D/E/G/ Ac/A/|B/A/G A2|
E/G/A/B/ A2|GA/B/ c/B/c/d/|e>c Ac/A/|B/A/G A2:|
|:e>c Ac/A/|B/A/G/A/ c/B/c/d/|B/c/e/g/ e/c/A/c/|B<G A2|
A/c/e/c/ A/c/e/c/|B/A/G/A/ c/B/c/d/|B/c/e/g/ e/c/A/c/|B<G A2:|
K:A Mix
|:e/ a e ac'/a/|b/a/c'/a/ b/a/c'/a/|e/ a e/ ac'/a/|b/a/b/b/ a2:|
|:a/|d'/a/c'/a/ b/a/b/a/|d'/a/c'/a/ b>a|d'/a/c'/a/ b/a/b/e/|f2 e:|

FAREWELL TRION. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Alabama. G Major (Carlin): C Major (Kuntz, Phillips). Standard. AABC (Kuntz): AA'AA'BB'C (Phillips). Played slower than the usual breakdown tempo. The primary source for the tune is fiddler Mack Blalock, of Mentone, Alabama, who had it "from his great-uncle Joe Blalock (b. 1854) who composed it upon returning to Alabama after getting laid off from a mill in Trion, Georgia. James Bryan added a third part to the tune" (Old-Time Herald, Vol. 1, No. 6, Winter 1988-89). Source for notated version: James Bryan (Ala.) with Bob Carlin [Phillips]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 49. Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985).
T:Farewell Trion
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:James Bryon
Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz
K:C
z|e/ g a/ ge|(dc) c2|A/ c d/ c/A/G/A/|c/A/c/d/ e2|e/ g a/ ge|(dc) c2|
A/ c d/ c/A/G/A/|A/G/E/C/ D/C:|
||C/|G,/A,/C/D/ E/G/A/B/|c/B/A (c2|c2 c)c/d/|c/A/G/c/ A/G/E/C/|
D/ E3 C/|G,/A,/C/D/ E/G/A/B/|c/B/A (c2|c2 c)c/d/|c/A/G/A/ c/A/G/E/|
D/C/E/F/||GE/F/ GE/F/|G/A/G/E/ D/C/E/F/|GE/F/ GA/B/|c/A/G/E/ D/C/E/F/|
GE/F/ G>G|G/A/G/E/ D/C/A,/C/|G,/A,/C/D/ E/G/A/B/|c/A/G/E/ D<C||

FIDDLE HEAD REEL. New England, Reel. USA. D Major (Brody): G Major (Sweet). Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Fennigs All Stars (N.Y.) [Brody]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 104. Jarman (Jim Magill's Square Dance Tunes), No. or pg. 4. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 66. Front Hall 01, Fennigs All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo."

FIDDLER'S DREAM [1]. AKA - "Fiddler's Trouble." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; Arizona, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Tennessee. G Major ('A' part), D Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB' (Brody): AA'BB (Phillips). Charles Wolfe (1978) says the tune, which was fashioned by Tennessee fiddler Arthur Smith, is "based vaguely on the changes of 'Flop Eared Mule,'" though the only similarity appears to be the I-V key change between parts. Sources for notated versions: Arthur Smith (Tennessee) [Brody]; Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska; Christeson); Lymon Enloe [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 105. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol.1), 1973; pg. 103. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 84. Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 66, pg. 24. American Heritage 25, "Poor Richard's Almanac." Bluebird 5843-A (78 RPM), Arthur Smith (1935). CMH 9006, Benny Martin- "The Fiddle Collection." County 547, Arthur Smith- "Arthur Smith, Vol. 2" (1978). County 762, Lymon Enloe (b. 1906)- "Fiddle Tunes I Recall." Marimac 9017, Vesta Johnson (Mo.) - "Down Home Rag." MCA 162, Tommy Jackson- "Square Dances Without Calls."
X:1
T:Fiddler's Dream [1]
L:1/8
M:2/4
K:D
D/D/|:F/AB/ AA/A/|d/e/f/g/ f/e/d/A/|c/d/e/d/ c/d/B/c/|d/c/d/A/ B/A/F/D/|
F/AB/ AA/A/|d/e/f/g/ f/e/d/A/|c/d/e/f/ a/e/c/A/|1 A/dd/ dA/A/:|2 d/e/d/A/ =c/d/c/A/|
K:G
|:B/A/G/E/ D/C/B,/A,/|G,/A,/B,/C/ D/G/E/D/|G/A/B/d/ e/f/g/a/|b/g/a/g/ e/f/g/a/|
b/g/a/g/ e/f/g/a/|g/e/d/B/ A/G/E/G/|D/B,/G,/B,/ D/G/A/c/|1 B/G/A/F/ GG/A/:|2
B/G/A/F/ G||
X:3
T:Fiddler's Dream [1]
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:120
R:reel
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R. P. LaVaque, ABCs
K:G
A|:(BA)(GE D)CB,A,|(G,B,)D(G EF)G(A|Bd)e(f gf)g(a|bg)a(g eg)d(g|!
bg)a(g eg)d(e|ge)(dB A)(GE)(F|GE)D(C B,C)D(F|1 G)BAF G3 A :|2 G)BAF G2 G2|!
K:D
|:([FA][A2A2])[AA] [AA](BA)G|(FG)Ad (fe)dA|(cd)e(d cA)B(c|dc)d(B cB)AG|!
([FA][A2A2])[AA] [AA]BA)G|FGAd (fe)dA|(cd)e(f ge)ce|1 d2(3edc d2 d2 :|2
dedB =cdcA)||
X:3
T:Fiddler's Dream [1]
T:Fiddler's Trouble
L:1/8
M:2/4
S: Viola "Mom" Ruth - Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948)
K:G
(A/_B/|=B/)G/F/E/ D/C/B,/A,/|G,/A,/B,/C/ D/E/G/A/|B/d/e/f/ g/f/g/a/|
b/g/a/g/ e/d/g/a/|c'/g/a/g/ e/d/e/f/|g/e/d/B/ A/G/E/F/|G/E/D/C/ B,/D/G/A/|
B/G/A/F/ G:|
K:D
[F>A>][FA][FA][FA]|A/d/d/e/ f/e/c/A/|c/d/e/d/ c/B/(3A/B/c/|d/c/d/A/ B/A/F/G/|
[F>A>][FA][FA][FA]|A/d/d/e/ f/e/c/A/|c/d/e/f/ g/e/c/A/|[F2d2][Fd]:|

FIFER'S MARCH. AKA and see "Captain Collins" (Pa.), "Bob Ridley" (Pa.), "The Bell Cow" (Pa.), "The Belling Tune" (Pa.), "Montrose's March," "Rock and a Wee Pickle Tow." American, March (6/8 time). USA, southwestern Pa. G Major. Standard. AABB. Bayard (1981) identifies this as one of the older marches in American fifing repertory, having been published by Playford in 1663, 1669, and 1678. Source for notated version: James Taylor (fifer and fiddler from Greene County, Pa., and Wetzel County, W.Va., 1930's) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 567E, pg. 505.

FILL THE BUMPER FAIR (Lion Suas An Glucaid). AKA and see "Bob and Joan," "Keep Your Wife at Home," "Love and Whiskey," "Stoneybatter" [1]. Irish, Air (3/4 time, "lively"). G Major. Standard. AB. The title comes from a song by Thomas Moore. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 440, pg. 77.

FINDY SICKLE TWO-STEP. Old-Time, Two-Step. USA, Nebraska. Christeson says a piece of music titled "La Fin de Siecle" was published around the turn of the century. C Major ('A' and 'B' parts), F Major ('C' part). Standard. ABC. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 126-127.

FIRE ON/IN THE MOUNTAIN [1]. AKA and see "Sambo," "Hog-Eye," "Betty Martin." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, widely known. A Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard, AEAE or ADAE. AAB (Brody, Krassen): AABB (Lowinger): AABB' (Phillips/1994). The tune usually goes at breakneck speed, giving rise to popular folklore for the reason for its name: the fiddler plays so fast the fiddle catches on fire and lights up the woods (Lowinger, 1974). The title may be Celtic in origin: Scottish clans often used blazing bonfires on highland hills as gathering signals (ironically, this also may be the origin for the Ku Klux Klan's blazing crosses). Krassen (1973) notes his 'B' part has similarities with a 78 RPM recording of Pope's Arkansas Mountaineers' "Hog-eyed Man," and Bayard (1981) also recognizes the similarity between the second parts of the same tunes, though a closer match to "Fire On the Mountain" he believes to be "Betty Martin," which is "reminiscent all through." Guthrie Meade (1980) links the Kentucky version of the tune (which also goes by the name "Big Nosed Hornpipe") to the "Sally Goodin'" family of melodies. Winston Wilkinson, in the Southern Folklore Quarterly (vol. vi, I, March, 1942), gives a bar-for-bar comparison of the tune with a Norse 'halling' tune, set by the Norwegian composer Greig and published in Copenhagen in 1875 (Norges Melodier, 1875 & 1922, iv, pg. 72). The tunes are so close as to be almost certainly cognate. Bayard records the tune's earliest American publication date is 1814 or 1815 in Riley's Flute Melodys (where it appears as "Free on the Mountains"), and as "I Betty Martin" in A. Shattuck's Book, a fiddler's manuscript book dating from around 1801. The piece was recorded in the early 1940's from Ozark Mountain fiddlers by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph for the Library of Congress. Lowe Stokes (1898-1983), one of the north Georgia band 'The Skillet Lickers' fiddlers, remembered it as having been fiddled by his father.
***
Verses are sometimes sung to the melody, especially in the variants by other names such as "Betty Martin," "Pretty Betty Martin" and "Hog-eye." Wilkinson (1942) says that the following verse made its way into some editions of Mother Goose:
***
Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run,
Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run.
***
Other verses (some of which are floating) have been:
***
Fire on the mountain, run boy run;
Sal, let me chaw your rosin some.
***
Fire on the mountain, run, boys, run;
Fire on the mountain till the day is done.
***
Fire on the mountain, water down below;
Never get to heaven 'less you jump Jim Crow.
***
Fire on the Mountain, fire on the hillside
Fire on the Mountain, run, boys, run.
***
Old Uncle Cyrus fished all night,
Never caught a fish on a crawfish bite.
***
Old mother Taylor she drinks whiskey,
Old mother Taylor she drinks wine.
Old mother Taylor she got drunk,
Swung across the river on a pumpkin vine.
***
Two little Indians lying in bed,
One turned over and the other one said,
Fire on the mountain coming son,
Fire on the mountain run boy run.
***
Two little Indians and their squaw
Sittin' on a mountain in Arkansas.
***
All little Indians gonna drink whisky
All little Indians gonna get drunk.
***
Sources for notated versions: Highwoods String Band (N.Y.) [Brody]; Gid Tanner & the Skillet Lickers (Ga.) [Krassen]; Clayton McMichen (Ga.) [Kaufman]; James H. "Uncle Jim" Chisholm (Greewood, Albermarle County, Virginia) [Wilkinson]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 106. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pgs. 76-77. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1973; pg. 72. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 17. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 18. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 85. Wilkinson, Southern Folklore Quarterly, Vol. VI, pg. 9). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 39. Briar 4202l, The Kentucky Colonels- "Living In the Past." Brunswick 470 (78 RPM), The Red-Headed Fiddlers (1929). CMH 9006, Benny Martin- "The Fiddle Collection." Columbia 15185-D (78 RPM), Riley Puckett (fiddled by Clayton McMichen). County Records, Kyle Creed and Fred Cockerham. Flying Fish 065, Buddy Spicher- "Me and My Heroes" (appears as the third tune of 'Fiddle Tune Medley'). King Records (78 RPM), Curley Fox (Greysville, Tennessee). Library of Congress Records, The Red-Headed Fiddlers - "Dance Music, Breakdowns and Waltzes." Morning Star 45004, Ted Gossett's String Band (western Ky.) - "Wish I Had My Time Again" (originally recorded Sept., 1930, probably with fiddling by Tommy Whitmer instead of Ted Gossett, although the recording was issued under the band name Buddy Young's Kentuckians). OKeh 45068 (78 RPM), John Carson. Rounder 0023, Highwoods String Band- "Fire On the Mountain." Rounder 0035, Fuzzy Mountain String Band- "Summer Oaks and Porch" (1973. Learned from Henry Reed, Glen Lyn, Va.). Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging and Sawing" (1985. Appears as "Far in the Mountain," learned from the Red-Headed Fiddler's record). Rounder C-11565, Bob Potts & Walt Koken - "Rounder Fiddle" (1990). Starday SLP 235, Curly Fox {Ga.} (1963). Stoneway 148, E.J. Hopkins- "Fiddle Hoedown." Vetco LP 104, Clayton McMichen - "The Wonderful World of Old-Time Fiddlers" (orig. rec. 1928). In the repertoire of black string band John Lusk Band (as "Sambo") from the Cumberland Plateau region of Ky./Tenn.
T:Fire on the Mountains
L:1/8
M:2/2
S:James H. "Uncle Jim" Chisholm, Greenwood, Albermarle County, Va.
K:A Mixolyidan
efed c2A2|B2G2B2d2|efed c2A2|B2G2 A4:|
|:efed c2d2|e2f2g2g2|efed c2d2|e2a2 a4:|

FLEUR DE LIS SCHOTTISCHE. New England, Schottische. G Major. Standard. One part. McQuillen (Bob's Notebooks) Vol 1; No. or pg. 70.

FLYING CLOUD COTILLION. American, Reel. G Major ('A' part) & D Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Another name for the tune called "Flying Clouds," probably when someone pointed out that tunes in two keys were sometimes called cotillions. Source for notated version: Gary Craig [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 109. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 90. Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo."

FOE, THE. AKA and see "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "My Love is Far away", "The Merry Lasses," "The Kerry Lasses," "The Red Blanket," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Go see the Fun," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it," "Miss Huntley's."

FOLDING DOWN THE SHEETS. AKA and see "Hanging Out the Sheets" (Ky. title), "Mackilmoyle," "Missouri Hornpipe," "Republican Spirit." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; southwestern Va., West Virginia, Kentucky. D Major. Standard or ADAE. AABB. A somewhat-similar tune, perhaps a version of the melody, appears under the title "Republican Spirit" in George P. Knauff's Virginia Reels, volume I (1839), and elsewhere the tune appears in mid-nineteenth century Elias Howe volumes as "Missouri Hornpipe." Canadian fiddlers, such as Don Messer, have a version of the melody (most similar in the 'B' parts) and call it "The Mackilmoyle." Most modern sources learned the tune from the playing of southwest Virginia fiddler Henry Reed (Glen Lyn, Va.), however, another set of "Folding Down the Sheets" was recorded in 1954 by Wyatt Insko from the playing of Floyd Burchett in Pike County, Kentucky. Reed told Alan Jabbour that he learned the tune from his mentor, Old Man Quince Dillion (who had been a fifer in the Mexican War), and from John Dillion and an unidentified "Falls", but that "all of 'em played it." Sources for notated versions: Henry Reed (Glen Lyn, Va.) [Krassen]; Henry Reed via Alan Jabbour with the Hollow Rock String Band [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 110. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 91-92. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 91. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 8. Cassette C-7625, Wilson Douglas - "Back Porch Symphony." Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." Kanawha 311, Hollow Rock String Band- "Traditional Dance Tunes." June Appal 028, Wry Straw - "From Earth to Heaven" (1978. Learned from Pete Vigour and Ellen Scherer).
T:Folding Down the Sheets
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:D
|:af|edcB ABc2 |dBAF D2EF|G4 F4|EDE2 A2:|
|:edef gfgf|Ace2 a4|A2a2A2g2|1edef e4:|2ede2d2|]
T:Folding Down the Sheets
L:1/8
M:4/4
S:Henry Reed, from a transcription by Alan Jabbour
K:D
(a/g/|f/)e/d/B/ e/d/c/A/ dF A/F/A/(d/|B/)G/B/(B/ A/)F/A/F/ A,2 D (a/g/|
f/)d/f/d/ e/c/e/c/ d[FA] A/F/A/d/|[D/B/]G/B/[G/B/] [D/A/]F/(A/F/) A,2 D2|
[A>e>](f g/f/)(g/f/) [A/e/]c/(e/f/4g/4) aa|c(e/c/ Bg (f/d/)(e/c/ d)d|
e(e/f/ g/f/)(g/f/) [A/e/]c/(e/f/4/g/4) aa|[c2e2] Bg f/d/e/c/ d2||
[A>e>]g|fd[Ae]c dF A/F/A/(d/|B/)G/B/(G/ D/F/)(A/F/) A,2 D2 e>(g|
f)d (e/c/)(e/c/) dF (A/F/)(A/d/)|(B/G/)(B/G/) (D/F/)(A/F/) A,2 D2|
e>(e/4f/4 g/f/)(g/f/) (e/c/)(e/f/) [A2a2]|[c2e2] [Bf]g f/d/(e/B/4c/4 d2)|
(e>f g/f/)[B/g/]f/ [A/e/]g/(e/f/) a2|[c2e2] Bg (f/d/)(e/c/ d)||

FOOT THAT FALTERED WALTZ, THE. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. E Flat Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 186.

FOX CHASE [1]. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky. Imitative tune in the repertoire of fiddler Gid Tanner (north Ga.), of Skillet Lickers fame. A tune by this name was also played by Muhlenburg County, western Ky., fiddler Ted Gosset (b. 1904), who learned it from a neighborhood fiddler (the first whom he considered a superior musician) named Charlie Jones. Gosset became famous for the tune, and it provided the name for Gosset's band when they played over WFIW, "The Fox Chasers." Two fiddling brothers vied in the 1880's for the office of governor, Alf and Bob Taylor, and each took his fiddle with him during the campaign and played for the crowds--Alf helped popularize "Fox Chase" (Wolfe, 1997). Not only a fiddle tune, "Fox Chase" is also known as a banjo song for which a special tuning is employed. Gennett 3022 and Svt 4010-B (78 RPM's), Jess Young (Tenn.) {appears as "The Fox Chase Reel"}. Morning Star 45004, Ted Gosset's String Band (western Ky.) - "Wish I Had My Time Again" (Originally recorded Sept. 1930 and issued on 78's as: Gnt 7308, Vrs 5090, and Ch 16116 under the group name Ted Gossett's Band; Spr 2655 as by Buddy Young's Kentuckians; Spt 9738 as by Marvin's String Band) Rural Records RRCF 251, Curly Fox {Ga.} (1970).

FRIENDSHIP WALTZ [1]. Old-Time, Waltz. USA, Nebraska. F Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 228, pg. 185.

FRISKY JIM. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB (Christeson): AA'BB (Phillips). Christeson reports that Bob Walter's father learned the tune around 1905 - he has heard no other fiddlers play it, save Walters. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old-Time Fiddlers Repertory, I), 1973; pg. 4. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 92.

GEESE IN THE BOG [2] (Na Geabha sa bPortach). AKA and see "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "The Green Meadow," "The Humours of Limerick," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "Jackson's Coola," "The Lark's March," "The Mountain Lark," "The Pipers Frolic," "Tuhy's Frolic," "Twice Tricked," "Wiseman's Favourite." Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB (Breathnach): AABBCC (Roche). Some similarities to version #2. Michael Coleman recorded a two part version of the tune. Alternate titles are many: Goodman gives a version as "The Humours of Limerick," Dickman as "The Piper's Frolic," Hudson as "Jackson's Coola," and "Twice Tricked" in Holden. O'Farrell (Pocket Companion) has it as "Tuhy's Frolic." Source for notated version: flute and whistle player Micko Russell, 1969 (Doolin, north Co. Clare, Ireland) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 53, pg. 29. Roche Collection, 1983; Vol. 1; No. 91, pg. 40. Tara Records 2006, Noel Hill & Tony Linnane. Plant Life Records PLR017, "The Tannahill Weavers" (1979). Rodeo 47, Johnny Wilmot - "Another Side of Cape Breton."

GEESE HONKING. AKA and see "Wild Goose Chase." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. B Flat Major. Standard. ABB. Dick Burnett, of Monticello, Ky., claimed to have learned the tune from the fiddling governor of Tennessee in the early 20th century, Bob Taylor. Source for notated version: James Bryan with Bob Carlin [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 95. Rounder 0197, Bob Carlin - "Banging & Sawing" (1985. Learned from Ky. fiddler Clyde Davenport, who had the tune from Dick Burnett).

GEORGIA BELLE(S). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Western North Carolina. C Major [Krassen]: G Major. Standard. ABA'CCA'C'. Source for notated version: Manco Sneed (Graham County, North Carolina) [Krassen]. Sneed learned the tune from J.D. Harris or Mac Hensley around 1897-1903 (Krassen). In the repertoire of fiddler Osey Helton, from the same region as Sneed. J. Dedrick Harris was a legendary Tennessee fiddler who played with Bob Taylor while the latter was running for governor of the sate in the late 1800's. He moved to Western N.C. in the 1920's and influence a generation of fiddlers there: Osey Helton, Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, Marcus Martin. The colony of Georgia was named in honor of King George II, in 1732. Krassen (Masters of Old-Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 126-127.

GIVE THE FIDDLER A DRAM [3]. See "Pretty Polly Ann" recorded by Bob Carlin. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Oklahoma. A Major. AEAE. AABB. Unrelated to Brody's or Christeson's versions. Source for notated version: G. Blevins (Bryan County, Oklahoma) [Thede]. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 53.

GLORY AT/IN THE MEETINGHOUSE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Mt. Airy, N.C., Ky. D Mixolydian (Carlin/Sing Out): E Major/Mixolydian (Phillips). Standard, EDAE or ADAD. AABB'BB'C (Carlin/Sing Out): AA'BB'AA'B"B"'. The melody was in the repertoires of Kentucky fiddlers Luther Strong (Salyersville, Ky.) and W.M. (Bill) Stepp. It was also collected from fiddlers Bev Baker and Boyd Asher, from the same region. Strong recorded his version for Alan Lomax and the Library of Congress in 1937, a trip which resulted in several eastern Kentucky fiddler's waxing their renditions (on aluminium disks!) of this tune for the musicologist. The piece can be played either in the major or mixolydian mode. The tune has similarities to "Jerusalem Ridge," Sources for notated versions: Mark Graham (Seatle, Wash.) [Carlin/Sing Out]; Armin Barnett with the Hurricane Ridgerunners [Phillips]. Sing Out! ("Teach In: Clawhammer Banjo," Bob Carlin). Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 56. Library of Congress L2 ("Anglo-American Shanties, Lyric Songs, Dance Tunes and Spirituals") - Luther Strong (orig. rec. 1937). Flying Fish 283, The Harmony Sisters. Green Linnet SIF 1122, Kevin Burke - "Open House" (1992). Marimac 9000, Dan Gellert & Shoofly - "Forked Deer" (1986). Rounder CD 0139, The Hurricane Ridgerunners - "The Young Fogies." Shanachie Records 6040, Gerry Milnes & Lorriane Lee Hammond - "Hell Up Coal Holler" (1999. Learned from Luther Strong's recording). Yazoo CD 2014, Luther Strong - "Music of Kentucky" Vol. 2. Yodel-ay-hee Records 002, Critton Hollow Stringband - Sweet Home" (1983). Yodel-ay-hee Records 014, The New Dixie Entertainers - "Maybelle Rag."
T:Glory in the Meeting House
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Gerry Milnes
Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz
K:D
A/B/d d/B/A/F/|A/B/d d>B|A/B/d d/B/A/G/|F/G/A/F/ D2|
A/B/d d/B/A/F/|A/B/d d>e|f/e/f/e/ d/B/A/G/|F/G/A/F/ D2:|
|:D/E/F/G/ A/B/A/G/|A/B/A/F/ DD/D/|D/E/F/G/ A/B/A/G/|F(D D2:|
"Variations" B- Part
|:d/e/f/g/ a(a|a/)g/f/e/ d/B/A/B/|d/e/f/g/ a/b/a/g/|f(d d2):|

GO SEE THE FUN. AKA and see "Bob with the one Horn", "The Ewe Reel", "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn", "The Kerry Lasses", "The Lowlands of Scotland", "The Merry Lasses", "Miss Huntley's", "My Love is Far Away", "The Ram with the Crooked Horn", "The Red Blanket", "The Pretty Girl in Danger", "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it", "The Foe".

GOING DOWN TO CAIRO. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA. G Major. Standard. Cairo is a river town on the Mississippi at the mouth of the Ohio, and was quite a rowdy town in its day. The word cairo is pronounced 'Kay-row'.
***
I'm goin' down to Cairo, Goodbye, magpie;
Goin' down to Cairo, To see my Liza Jane.
***
Train on the Island Records TI-12, Bob Bovee and Gail Heil - "For Old Times Sake."

GOIN' TO CHATANOOGA. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Tennessee. G Major. Standard. AABB. Similar to the Leake County Revelers' "Been to the East, Been to the West." Also in repertoire of Chatanooga fiddler Bob Douglas. Source for notated version: Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]. Kuntz, Private Collection. CA-01, Charlie Acuff - "Left Handed Fiddler" (1990. A privately issued cassette from an Alcoa, Tenn., fiddler in his 70's).
T:Goin' to Chatanooga
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz
K:G
B/c/|dd/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/B/d/A/ B/A/B/c/|dd/A/ B/A/B/B/|A/[GB][G/B/] [GB]B/c/|
d/B/d/A/ B/A/B/c/|d/B/d/A/ B [Bg]|[Bg]/A/d B/A/B| A/[GB][G/B/] [GB] :|
|:(e/f/|g/)A/f/A/ ed|e/A/f [B2g2]|b2 g>g|e d2 (e/f/|g)/e/f/f/ ed|e/e/f [B2g2]|
[d2g2] B>(B|A) [G2B2]:|

GONE INDIAN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Texas. D Major ('A' part) & G Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 99.

GOOD FOR THE TONGUE. AKA and see "Jenkins Hornpipe," "The Stony Steps," "The Washington Hornpipe." American, Breakdown or Hornpipe. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. B Flat Major (Christeson, Cole, Ford, Phillips): A Major (Songer). Standard. AABB. Missouri fiddler Cyril Stinnett (1912-1986) thought it one of the more difficult tunes in his repertoire. See also the related tune "White Fish in the Rapids." Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (1889-1960, Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]; Deborah and Creighton Lindsay (Portland, Oregon) [Songer]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 25. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 92. Ford, 1940; pg. 96. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 195. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 85. Ryan's Mammoth Collection. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters - "Drunken Wagoneer." Laurie Andres - "Fantastic Hornpipe" (1991. learned from Bob Childs and Greg Boardman, who had the tune from Maine dance musician Otto Sopher).

GOODBYE LIZA JANE [1]. AKA- "Liza Jane." Old-Time, Bluegrass, Western Swing; Breakdown. USA. A Major. Standard. AABB. Two influential recordings were made of the tune in the 1920's which helped spread its popularity among early country musicians, remarks Charles Wolfe (1991). The first was by the east Tennessee string band The Hill Billies, who released it under the title "Mountaineers Love Song," and the second was by another band from the same area, the Tenneva Ramblers, as "Miss Liza, Poor Gal." Bob Wills (Texas), the father of western swing, said this was the first tune he learned (as "Goodbye, Miss Liza Jane") to fiddle.
***
Swing Ma, swing Pa, goodbye, goodbye,
Swing that gal from Arkansas, Goodbye Liza Jane.
***
Chorus
Oh how I loved her, ain't that a shame,
Oh how I loved her, Goodbye Liza Jane.
***
Swing that gal and don't be late, goodbye, goodbye,
Knock down Sal, big fat gate, Goodbye Liza Jane.
***
Take a chaw of tobacco, spit on the wall, goodbye, goodbye,
Swing that gal clear across the hall, Goodbye Liza Jane.
***
Three wheels 're off and the axel's draggin', goodbye, goodbye,
You can't ride the little red wagon, Goodbye Liza Jane.
***
A version of the tune and song, under the title "Rejected by Eliza Jane," was collected by the African-American collector Thomas Talley which he printed in his book Negro Folk Rhymes (1922, reprinted 1991 edited by Charles Wolfe). His lyrics go:
***
W'en I went 'cross de cotton patch
I give my ho'n a blow.
I thought I heared pretty Lizie say:
"Oh, yonder come my beau!"
***
So: I axed pretty Lizie to marry me,
An' what d'you reckon she said?
She said she wouldn' marry me,
If ev'ybody else was dead.
***
An': As I went up de new cut road,
An' she go down de land;
Den I though I heared somebody say:
"Good-bye, ole Liza Jane!"
***
Well: Jes get 'long, Lizie, my true love.
Git 'long, Miss Lizie Jane.
Perhaps you'll sack "Ole Sour Bill"
An' git choked on "Sugar Cain."
***
Sources for notated versions: Bobby Hicks (Brody, Phillips): Plank Road String Band via Delaware Gap String Band (Kuntz). Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 124. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 339-340. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 21. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 100. County 772, Bobby Hicks- "Texas Crapshooter." King 787, Reno and Smiley- "Banjo Special." Mountain 301, Kyle Creed- "Blue Ridge Style Dance Time." Kicking Mule 205, Delaware Water Gap- "From the Rivers of Babylon to the Land of Jazz" (1979. Appears as "Liza Jane"). Kapp KS 3639, Bob Wills and Mel Tillis- "Mel Tillis and Bob Wills in Person." Victor 21141 (78 RPM), The Tenneva Ramblers (1927, as "Miss Liza, Poor Gal"). Vocalation 5115 (78 RPM), The Hill Billies (1926, as "Mountaineers Love Song").
T:Goodbye Liza Jane
T:Liza Jane
L:1/8
M:C|
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:G
(G|G)F G2 A2 AA|[GB]A [G2B2] [G2c2] [G2c2]|BA G4 G2|FEDC D2 DF|
GFGB AGAc|BABd cBAc|BAGB AGFA|[G2B2] [G6B6] [GB]:|
|:[Dd]|[D4d4] [e3e3]e|B2 (d4 d) (3D/E/F/|G2 [G2B2] [G3A3] [GA]|
[G2B2] [G4B4] [GB] (3A/B/c/|d2d2 e3d|B2 d4 A2|BA G AGFA|1 GEDE G3:|2
GEDB, G,3||

GOVERNOR TAYLOR'S MARCH. AKA and see "Napoleon/Bonaparte Crossing the Alps," "The Officer on Guard," "I Won't Be a Nun," "Dennis Murphy's Hornpipe." American, March (2/4 time). USA, southwestern Pa. D Major. Standard. AB. Bayard (1981) identifies related tunes, perhaps from a common ancestor, as "Pewter Mug," "The Tin-Ware Lass," and "The Ladies Dressed in Their Garments So Green." It may perhaps be one of the tunes named for or credited to the fiddling Governors of Tennessee, Alf and Bob Taylor (i.e. "Taylor's March," "Taylor's Quickstep"). Source for notated version: Hiram Horner (fifer from Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pa., 1944) [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 54, pg. 39.

GRANDMAMMY LOOK AT UNCLE SAM. AKA - "Granny Look at Uncle Sam," "Grandma, Take a Look at Uncle Sam," "Run Here Granny, Take a Look at Uncle Sam" (Ed Hayley's title). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Tennessee. A Dorian/Mixolydian/Major. Standard. ABCC. The tonality keeps shifting between the minor and major throughout the tune.
Run here Grandmammy, look at (Uncle) Sam,
He's soppin' all the gravey and eatin' all the ham.
Source for notated version: Howard Forrester who learned it from his Uncle Bob Cates (Hickman, Tennessee) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 57. Marimac AHS #3, Glen Smith - "Say Old Man" (1990. Learned from Howdy Forrester). Rounder CD0392, John Hartford - "Wild Hog in the Red Brush and a Bunch of Others You Might Not Have Heard" (1996. Learned from Howdy Forrester).
T:Grandmammy Look at Uncle Sam
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:140
S:John Hartford "Wild Hog in the Redbrush" transcribed by Llarry Brandon
K:Am
P:A
|:.A,2 A,B, CA,CD|EDEF AB.c2|.A,2 A,B,CA, CE|GBAG EDCE|!
..A,2 A,B, CA,CD|EDEF ABcd|egab a2 ea|^ fged cA A2:|!
P:B
|:eg a2 a2 ab|aged g2 B2|Bdga bgag|edcd eg a2)|!
a4 Aceg|a2 abag ed|g2B2 Bdga|bgag edcd|eg a2 a4:|!
P:C once
"4"[A2A2] [Ac][AA] [AB]AAA|cABc ABAF|GFGA BGAG|EDCD EA A2|A4z4|]

GRANNY, WILL YOUR DOG BITE? [1]. AKA and see "Betty Martin," "Boatin' Up Sandy," "Brad Walters," "Chippy/Gippy Get Your Haircut," "Hog Eye and a Tater," "The Hog Eye Man," "Hog Eye," "Jake Gilly," "Old Mother Gofour," "Old Granny Rattletrap," "Pretty Betty Martin," "Very Pretty Martin," "Sally in the Garden," "Tip Toe Fine,""Fire on the Mountain." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma. A Major/Mixolydian (Christeson, Ford, Phillips, Songer, Thede): D Major (Sweet). Standard or AEAE. AABB (Christeson, Phillips, Sweet): AABBC (Thede). This melody is popular under several titles, however, the title "Granny Will Your Dog Bite" also is a floating title. It was frequently played at Mid-Western fiddle contests. R.P. Christeson says his version is dissimilar to the tune of the same title in Ford (1940), but is similar to "Tip Toe, Pretty Betty Martin" in the same book. Bayard (1981) notes the resemblance between this tune and the "Betty Martin" variants, many listed as alternates above. The tune was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. See also related tunes "Gate to Go Through" and "Old Coon Dog." Ford (1940) said that "occasional verses" were sung by fiddlers while playing the tune, and indeed, various verses have been collected from both white and black sources. (Ford's collection area was the Mid-West, often Missouri, and Thede printed Oklahoma versions). Charles Wolfe (1991) remarks the tune has been collected widely from Mississippi to California, and notes that Ray Browne (writing in The Alabama Folk Lyric, 445) heard it often as a banjo tune popular more with blacks than whites.
***
Granny will your dog bite, cow kick, cat scratch?
Granny will your hen peck, sow root the corn patch?
Granny will your duck quack, old grey goose hatch?
Granny will your dog bite? "Yes, child, No!" (Ford)
***
Granny will your hen peck, hen peck, hen peck,
Granny will your hen peck, Lord, child, no;
Hog bit 'er pecker off a long time ago. (Thede)
***
Granny will your dog bite, dog bite, dog bite,
Granny will your dog bite , Lord, child no;
Wolf bit 'er biter off long time ago.
***
African-American collector Thomas Talley, in his Negro Folk Rhymes (edited in a new edition by Charles Wolfe in 1991) printed lyrics under the title "Chicken in the Bread Tray." They go:
***
Auntie, will yo dog bite?
No, Chile, No!
Chicken in the bread tray
A makin' up dough
***
Auntie, will yo broom hit?
Yes, Chile, Pop!
Chicken in the bread tray,
Flop, Flop, Flop!
***
Auntie, will you oven bake?
Yes, Jes fry!
What's dat chicken good fer?
Pie, Pie, Pie!
***
Auntie, is yo pie good?
Good as you could 'spec,
Chicken in the bread tray;
Peck, Peck, Peck!
***
See also Brown (3:205). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (1949, Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]; Sherman Collins (Pawnee County, Oklahoma) [Thede]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; No. 1, pg. 3. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 36. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 102. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 87. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 58. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 82. Augusta Heritage AHS6, Melvin Wine - "Vintage Wine." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Dwight Lamb (b. 1937) - "Old Ladies Pickin' Chickens." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Bob Walters (1889-1960) - "Old Time Fiddler's Repertory" (1976). Revonah Records RS-924, "The West Orrtanna String Band" (1976). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999).

GRAY BOB. Scottish. Green Linnett GLCD 1146, The Tannahill Weavers - "Capernaum" (1994).

GREAT BIG TATER(S) IN SANDY LAND. AKA - "Great Big Taters." AKA and see "Sandyland," "Better Quit Kickin My Dog Around," "Sail Away Ladies." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi. A Major: G Major (W.E. Claunch, Kuntz, Sweet). AEAE or Standard. ABB (Rankin): ABB' (Phillips/Wills): AABB' (Sweet): AABBCC (Phillips/Eck Robertson). The melody is directly related to "Sail Away Ladies" (and thus to "Sally Ann") and some indicate it is merely a variant of that tune, though the title "Great Big Taters" and its variations is considerably disseminated in the South and Old Southwest. Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner knew a tune by this title in the very odd key of C Major (for this kind of tune), which he learned from Frank Pruitt, about 1900. The title was one of those in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954, and it was mentioned in an article entitled "Fiddler's Jubilee" in the Fayette Banner (Fayette County, Alabama) of January 2, 1908 (Cauthen, 1990).
***
Another of Ira Ford's (1940) improbable tales goes: "From a fiddler who played 'Great Big Taters in Sandy Land' as his favorite tume, comes the following tradition obtained by the writer thirty years ago. The fiddler was then a man more than seventy years old, who had 'larned' the 'chune' when a you fellow of twenty, from the 'feller' who composed it (c. 1860?). It appears that Steve, the composer homesteaded 160 acres of land in the rough sandstone hills in a remote section of the country, it being the only land left open for homesteading. Steve was engaged to be married to a beautiful young girl of the community and the wedding was to take place as soon as he developed his farm and got his place built. He broke the new ground, which was all in patches on the tops of the hills, the remainder of the farm consisting of steep rocky hillsides and gullies. As his first crop he planted oats and corn. The oats only came up a few inches and the corn did not even make 'nubbins'. So the wedding had to be postponed. The boys teased Steve considerably about trying to make a living on the sandy land, but he took it all good-naturedly, as did the girl. That same year there was a shortage in the potato crop, and, as the land around there was not suitable for potato growing, the farmers had to pay exorbitant prices for the potatoes they had to ship in. Betty, Steve's girl, suggested that he plant potatoes for his next crop. The following spring he planted all his ground accordingly, to the great amusement of his friends. But their amusement was changed to astonishment when that fall Steve harvested 300 bushels to the acre of high grade potatoes and sold them to the farmers as a good price. The wedding was elaborately celebrated with a big supper, followed by a dance that lasted until morning. This tune, composed by Steve and afterwards played at all the dances, was commonly known as 'Steve's Tune', but it was Betty who originated the verses. To get even with those who had 'poked fun' at Steve and his sand farm, she invented the verses, singing them at the dance that night much to the amusement of the guests."
***
Thede says the Henry Hilderbrand referred to in the lyrics which she collected with the Oklahoma version given in her book was a farmer who lived near West Plains, Missouri, and that Eli was a mule.
***
Great big tater in the sandy land,
Plow it up Henry Hilderbrand;
Great big tater in the sandy land,
Git there Eli of you can. (Thede)
***
Great big taters in sandy land,
We-all dig 'em out as fast as we can.
The folds all buy 'em from a foolish man,
Raisin' great big taters in sandy land.
***
Sow them oats, but you can't get a stand,
Corn won't grow in that sandy land.
Folks won't think you're much of a man,
If you can't make a livin' on sandy land. (Ford)
***
Sift the meal and save the bran,
Goodby gals I'm goin' in
Raise big taters in sandy land,
Raise big taters in sandy land. (W.E. Claunch)
***
Sources for notated versions: Eck Robertson (Texas) and Earl Collins (Oklahoma/Texas) [Brody, Phillips]; Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]; Jubal Anderson (Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 125. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 39. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Music), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 103 (two versions). Rankin, 1985; Notes to "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo American Fiddle Music from Mississippi." Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 43, pg. 16. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 75. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 80-81. Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." County 517, Eck Robertson and J.B. Cranfill- "Texas Farewell." Folkways 31062, Ship in the Clouds- "Old Time Instrumental Music" (1978. Learned from Bruce Molsky). Gennet 3255 (78 RPM_, Sam Long (1926. Appears as "Sandy Land"). Mississippi Department of Archives and History AH-002, W.E. Claunch - "Great Big Yam Potatoes: Anglo-American Fiddle Music from Mississippi" (1985). Rebel 1515, Curly Ray Cline- "My Little Home in West Virginia." Sonyatone 201, Eck Robertson- "Master Fiddler." Victor 40205 (78 RPM), Eck Robertson (1929. 2nd fiddle by Dr. J.B. Cranfill).
T:Great Big Taters in Sandy Land
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
Z:Transcribed by Andrew Kuntz
K:G
e/f/|g/f/g/e/ e/(A/d)|(e/ e) (e/ e)(e|e/)f/e/(A/ d/)A/B/(B/|d>)B dd|
g/a/g/e/ e/(A/d)| )|(e/ e) (e/ e)(e|e/)f/e/(A/ d/)A/B|A>B (A A/):|
|:(A/|B/)A/B/B/ A/D/G|(G/ B) (G/ B)B/c/|d/B/d/A/ B/D/E|(A/ B) (A/ B>)(A|
B/)A/B/B/ A/D/G|(G/ B) (G/ B)(D|D/)D/B A/B/A/(D/|A/ B) (G/ B)z/:|
|:(D|D/)D/B A/(D/G)|(G/ B) (G/ B/)A/B|1 D/D/B/(B/ A/)B/A/D/|
(G/ B) (G/ B):|2 d/A/B/B/ A/B/A/D/|G/ [GB] G/ [GB]||

GREAT MEMORIES. American, Waltz. Composed by Peterboro, New Hampshire, accordion and keyboard player Bob McQuillen in 1988, just before the memorial service for two close friends and gifted musicians, April Limber and Pete Colby. Smithsonian Folkways SFW CD 40126, Bob McQuillen & Old New England - "Choose Your Partners!: Contra Dance & Square Dance Music of New Hampshire" (1999).

GREEN MEADOW, THE [2] (An Moinfeur Glas). AKA and see "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "Na Geabha sa bPortach," "The Geese in the Bog," "The Humours of Limerick," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Jackson's Coola," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "The Lark's March," "The Mountain Lark," "The Pipers Frolic," "Tuhy's Frolic," "Twice Tricked," "Wiseman's Favourite." Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB'. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 63. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 1062, pg. 200. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 266, pg. 59.
T:Green Meadow, The [2]
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:O'Neill - 1001 Gems (266)
K:D
A|def AFA|DED AFA|def AFA|EFA B2A|def AFA|DED AFA|dcB AGF|EFA B2:|
|:A|Add fdB|cBc ecA|Add fdB|AFA B2A|1 Add fdB|cBc efg|fdB AGF|EFA B2:|2
Aff fed|cee efg|fdB AGF|EFA B2||

GREEN WILLIS [1]. AKA and see "First Come in Was a Bumble Bee," "Green Willis the Raw Recruit," "New Rigged Ship," "The Raw Recruit," "Chapel Hill Seranade," "Jackson's March." Old-Time, New England; Breakdown or Reel. USA, southwestern Va. D Major. ADAE or Standard. AABB. Green Willis was a 19th century fiddler from the Galax, Viriginia, area whose name became associated with the tune. A related tune and probably ancestral tune (actually the same melody in jig version) is "New Rigged Ship." It has been stated that a waltz setting is known as "The Peekaboo Waltz," however, the tune usually known by the latter title seems not to be related.
***
Drinkin' moonshine at the age of fifteen,
Caused poor Willis' face to turn green;
Then it turned red, 'cause he was ashamed,
So we'll play the tune that goes by the name
Of...Green Willis.
***
Sources for notated versions: Fuzzy Mountain String Band (Durham, North Carolina) [Brody]; Danny Gardella [Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 127. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 105. Welling (Welling's Hartford Tunebook), 1976; pg. 2. Folk Legacy FSI-74, Howard Bursen - "Cider in the Kitchen" (1980. Learned from the Correctone String Band). Kicking Mule 209, Bob Carlin and Henry Sapoznik- "Melodic Clawhammer Banjo." Kicking Mule KN-327, "Scartaglen" (1984). Rounder 0010, "Fuzzy Mountain String Band" (1972. Learned from Taylor Kimble of Laurel Fork, Va.).

GREY BOB, THE. Scottish, Pipe Reel. A Mixolydian. Standard. ABCD. Source for notated version: Winston Fitzgerald (1914-1987, Cape Breton) [Cranford]. Cranford (Fitzgerald), 1997; No. 60, pg. 26.

GREY EAGLE [1]. AKA and see "Gray Eagle." AKA - "Grey Eagle Hornpipe." Old-Time, Bluegrass, Texas Style; Breakdown, Hornpipe. USA; Alabama, Mississippi, southwestern Va., southwestern Pa., western N.C., eastern Tenn., Kentucky, Missouri, Indiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona. A Major (most versions): G Major (Bayard, W.E. Claunch): C Major (uncommon, but known in the western N.C./ eastern Tenn. area in this key). Standard. AB (Bayard): AABB (Brody, Krassen, Phillips): AA'BB (Shumway): AABBCC (Christeson): AA'BB'CC'D (Frets Magazine). "One of the standard square dance tunes in the key of A Major" (Krassen, 1973), and, in fact it is one of the more commonly played fiddle tunes at mid-western fiddle contests. Several writers have noted the similarity between "Grey Eagle" and the Scottish tune "Miller of Drone," with the "Grey Eagle" melody probably derivative. There are many different sets of this tune collected from folk sources in almost all parts of the South and West; in addition it has made its way into numerous commercial collections, among the first of which is George H. Coes' Album of Music (Boston, 1876). It was one of the older tunes in fiddle repertory in Patrick County, southwest Va., before such tunes were supplanted by tunes more conducive to the fiddle/clawhammer banjo combination -- the tune may also have been called "Ducks on the Pond" (??) (Tom Carter & Blanton Owen, 1976). Bayard (1981) is surprised at the tenacity of the title in the face of so many disperate versions./ Popular with Kentucky fiddlers, remarks Charles Wolfe (1982), who first suggested it was possibly named for the famous Kentucky race horse of 1839. John Hartford ("The Devil's Box") found that the "Grey Eagle" title for the melody known as "The Miller of Drone" became attached to the tune in America following this famous late 1830's race between horses known as "Grey Eagle" and "Wagner." In the repertoire (C Major version) of legendary fiddler J. Dedrick Harris, a Tenn. born fiddler who played regularly with Bob Taylor when the latter ran for Governor of the state in the late 1800's. Harris moved to western N.C. in the 1920's and influenced a generation of fiddlers there, including Osey Helton, Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, and Marcus Martin./ In the Deep South the melody was in the repertory of Alabama fiddler D. Dix Hollis (1861-1927), who considered it one of "the good old tunes of long ago" (as quoted in the "Opelika Daily News" of April 17, 1926) {Cauthen, 1990}, and was recorded for the Library of Congress in 1939 by Guntown, Mississippi, fiddler W.E. Claunch. It was also one of the tunes listed in the Troy Herald of July 6th, 1926, as having been played at a fiddlers' convention held at the Pike County, Alabama, fairgrounds. / Part of the tune the same as "Ostinelli's Reel" (Cole)./ Arizona fiddler (and Mormon) Kenner C. Kartchner maintained the tune was played by Mormon fiddlers crossing the plains. Sources for notated versions: Kenny Baker [Brody]; Floyd Smith (Cole County, Missouri) [Christeson]; Charlie Higgins (Galax, Va.) [Krassen]; Kenner C. Kartchner (Arizona) [Shumway]; William Shape (elderly fiddler from Greene County, Pa., 1930's) [Bayard]; Byron Berline learned the tune from his father who had it from his friend Frank Mitchell (Enid, Oklahoma) [Frets Magazine]; Jeff Goehring with the Red Mules (Ohio) [Phillips]; Howard Forrester, Robert Rutland & Herman Johnson [Phillips/1995]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 103, pg. 60. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 127. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 12. Ford, 1940; pg. 86. Frets Magazine, "Byron Berline: The Fiddle," February 1981; pg. 52. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 73. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 106 (breakdown versions). Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 197 (hornpipe version). Shumway, 1990; pg. 268. Christeson says the tune also appears in Harding's All-Around Collection of Jigs and Reels (1905, New York) and in 1935 in 100 WLS Barn Dance Favorites (Chicago). Briar 0798, Earl Collins- "That's Earl." County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 703, Bartow Riley- "Texas Hoedown." County 705, Sonny Miller- "Virginia Breakdown." County 722, Joe Greene- "Joe Greene's Fiddle Album." County 744, Kenny Baker- "Dry and Dusty." Gennett Records (78 RPM), Taylor's Kentucky Boys (1927. Featuring the only black hoedown fiddler to recorde commerically, Jim Booker). Global Village C-302, Chicken Chokers - "New York City's 1st Annual String Band Contest - 1984." June Appal 007, Thomas Hunter- "Deep in Tradition" (1976. Learned from his grandfather, fiddler James W. Hunter of Madison County, N.C.). MGM E4035, Howdy Forrester - "Fancy Fiddlin' Country Style." Missouri Old Time Fiddlers Association 002, Taylor McBaine (b. 1911) - "Boone County Fiddler." Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Dwight Lamb (b. 1934) - "Old Ladies Pickin' Chickens." Morning Star 45003, Taylor's Kentucky Boys - "Wink the Other Eye: Old-Time Fiddle Band Music from Kentucky" (1980. Originally recorded in 1927). Rounder 0068, Mark O'Conner- "Pickin' in the Wind." Rounder 0099, Dan Crary - "Lady's Fancy." Rounder 0100, Byron Berline- "Dad's Favorites." Rounder 0194, John W. Summers - "Indiana Fiddler" (1984). Rounder 0213, The Chicken Chokers - "Chokers and Flies" (1985) Rounder 0215, James Bryan - "The First of May" (1985). Vocalation 14839 (78 RPM), Uncle Am Stuart, 1924, (b. 1856, Morristown, Tenn.). Voyager 309, Benny & Jerry Thomasson - "The Weiser Reunion" (1993). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999). In the repertoire of Western N.C. fiddler Osey Helton (C Major version).
T:Grey Eagle
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:A
cB|A2 FA ECA,C|EFAc BABc|A2 FA ECA,C|EF (3ABc e2 (3cec|
A2 FA ECA,C|EFAc (3BcB Ac|eAce dcBG|EGBd (3cec:|]
AF|ecAe cAeA|fdAd fgaf|edce cecA|EGBc dBGB|
AecA ecAc|dABd faeg|abga (3faf ed|ceBc A2:|]

GULF COAST BLUES. The title of a tune recorded by a very young Texas fiddler named Bob Wills for Brunswick Records in 1939.

HAD I THE WYTE/WIGHT. AKA and see "Kail and Knockit Corn," "The Bob of Fettercairn," "Newburn Lasses" (Northumberland). Scottish, Reel. The title is Scottish.

HANNAH AT THE SPRINGHOUSE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Dorian/Mixolydian. Standard. AB. The tune was in the repertoire of legendary fiddler Lewis Johnson "Uncle" Jack McElwain (1856-1938) of White Oak, a tributary of Laurel Creek, near the village of Erbacon, Webster County, West Virginia (local lore, remarks Gerry Milnes (Play of a Fiddle, 1999), gives that Erbacon was named by the habit of the cook at the local hotel, who invariably asked, "Do you want ham 'r bacon? Investigating further, Milnes found that the town was actually named for E.R. Bacon, an official with the B & O railroad.) Braxton County, West Virginia, fiddler Melvin Wine (1909-1999) learned the tune from his father, Bob, who had it from his father Nels and Grandfather "Smithy." Source for notated version: Melvin Wine [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 60. Cass., Melvin Wine - "Hannah at the Springhouse."

HAPPY TO MEET {AND SORRY TO PART} ("Is Sultmar An Casad's/Teagmail's Uaigneac An Sgarad/Scaramain" or "Rimead ar Chastail"). AKA and see "You'll go a hunting no more," "Jemmie the Gom," "Sorry to Part," "The Wake Jig," "My Love in the Morning." Irish (originally), New England; Double Jig. Ireland, Counties Galway, Sligo. G Major. Standard. AAB (Cole, O'Neill/1915): AABB (Breathnach, Flaherty, Miller & Perron, Tubridy): AABB' (O'Neill/1850 & 1001): AA'BB' (Taylor). O'Neill could find no previously published version in Irish sources, though he did find one printing in an American volume of miscellaneous dance music (Irish Folk Music, pg. 101). See also the related "Port an tSagairt." Sources for notated versions: flute player Jim Conroy, 1969 (Co. Galway) [Breathnach]; accordion player Joe Fallon (b. 1935, Collooney, Co. Sligo) [Flaherty]; Bob Spence, "a fellow boarder, 1870" [O'Neill]; set dance music recorded at Na Píobairí Uilleann, late 1980's [Taylor]. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 28, pg. 17. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 55. Flaherty (Trip to Sligo), 1990; pg. 102. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 23. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 177, pg. 97. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 807, pg. 150. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 78, pg. 29. Taylor (Music for the Sets: Blue Book), 1995; pg. 30. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 30. RCA 60939, Chieftains - "Another Country."
T:Happy to Meet, Sorry to Part
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
dBB BAB|GEF G2A|Bee dBA|B2B gfe|dBB BAB|GEF G2A|Bee dBA|BGG G3:|
|:g2g fed|Bdd def|g2g fed|Bee e2f|g2g fed|Bdd def|gfg eag|fef gfe:|

HARMONY. Texas Swing; Breakdown. USA, Texas. G Major ('A', 'B' and 'D' parts) & C Major ('C' part). Standard. AABBCCD. Recorded by Texas swing fiddler Bob Wills in 1935. Source for notated version: Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 62.

HASTE TO THE WEDDING [1] (Brostuig Go Dti An Posad). AKA and see "Carrickfergus," "Come, Haste to the Wedding," "Rural Felictiy," "The Long Eight," "Perry's Victory" (American), "Footprints," "Granny Plays the Fiddle," "Trip to the Dargle," "A Trip to the Gargle," "Let Brainspinning Swains," "The Small Pin Cushion." British Isles, New England, American, Canadian, Old-Time (fiddlers in the Appalachians seldom knew or played jigs - when they did this tune was one of the most frequently played.); Jig, Country Dance, Long Dance (Irish), Morris Dance Tune, or Quadrille (meaning 6/8 tunes from Midwestern USA). D Major (most versions): C Major (Harding's, Sharp): F Major (Bacon-Adderbury): G Major (Bacon-Brackley): A Major (Cranford). Standard. AB (Bacon-Adderbury, Bayard, Harding, Kerr): ABB, x4 (Bacon, Mallinson): AABB (most versions): AA'BB' (Cranford): ABCD (Bayard {Marr}). "The tune 'Come, Haste to the Wedding,' of Gaelic origin, was introduced in the pantomime, The Elopement, in 1767. This version is known as the Manx tune and was printed by the Percy Society in 1846. It is the basis of the Manx ballad, 'The Capture of Carrickfergusby,' written by Thurot in 1760" (Linscott, 1939). Samuel Bayard (1944, 1981) comments on the popularity of the air over the past two centuries as well as the tenacity of the main title to stick with the tune. When Chappell printed his well-known set in National English Airs (1840, I, No. 163; notes, II, 129; reprinted in JEFDSS, III, 210.), he traced the tune to the year 1767, when it was used in pantomime, to a song beginning 'Come, haste to the wedding, ye friends and ye neighbors!' This version of the air, continues Bayard, is still the earliest known, and it may be that the popularity of the song occasioned the fixed quality of the title. In his 1944 work Bayard posses the question as to whether the words were included in the original pantomime as a result of its associations, or whether the later uses of the tune secured it.
***
If it at first achieved popularity as a stage piece, it was soon after quickly disseminated, entering folk tradition. Chappell noted that the tune was "more frequently to be heard upon the chimes of country churches than any other, and usually played when a wedding is about to take place." Caoimhin Mac Aoidh (1994) reports that in County Donegal tradition a bride was 'hauled' (marched) from her house to the chapel along with her family and guests, led by a fiddler playing this tune. Morris dancers picked up the melody and morris dance versions have been collected from the villages of Adderbury (Oxfordshiere), Brackley (Northamptonshire), and Headington (Oxfordshire) in England's Cotswolds. The author of "English Folk-Song and Dance" found the melody in the repertoire of fiddler William Tilbury (who lived at Pitch Place, midway between Churt and Tilbury in Surrey), who used, in younger days, to play at village dances. Tilbury learned his repertoire from an uncle, Fiddler Hammond, who died around 1870 and who had been the village fiddler before him. The conclusion was that "Haste to the Wedding" and other country dance tune of similar type had survived in English tradition (at least in southwest Surrey) well into the second half of the 19th century. In southern Ireland "Haste" is often the first tune played in a set (along with "Leslie's Hornpipe" and "The German Beau") for the set dance The Three Tunes, which dates to the ceili dance revival of the 1930's.
***
In America the piece was printed by Burchenal under the title "Green Mountain Volunteers" along with a New England contra dance by the same name. It was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, and also was recorded by Herbert Halpert for the same institution in 1939 from the playing of a Lauderdale County, Mississippi, fiddler named Stephen B. Tucker. The title appears in a list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham's repertoire (the elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the late 1920's) and it was a favorite dance tune in western New York at the turn of the century (according to Bronner's source, Milo Kouf). As "Hasten to the Wedding" it was mentioned in an account of a fiddlers' convention at the Pike County Fairgrounds in the Troy Herald of July 6th, 1926. Winston Wilkinson ("Virginia Dance Tunes," Southern Folklore Quarterly, VI, 1, March, 1942) calls it "one of the best-loved tunes in Virginia." He collected it from Albermarle County fiddler James H. "Uncle Jim" Chisholm, who had played it and other tunes in the 1930's at the White House for President and Mrs. Roosevelt.
***
An odd alternate title called "A Trip to the Gargle" appears in O'Neill's 1001 Gems (probably a corruption of "A Trip to the Dargle") while as "Carrickfergus" it appears in Brysson's A Curious Selection of Favourite Tunes with Variations to which is appended Fifty Favourite Irish Airs (Edinburgh, 1790). The classical composer Camille Saint Saens used "Haste to the Wedding" in his opera Henry VIII, and John Powell employed a variant he collected from Mrs. John Hunter, a Virginia fiddler, in the last movement of his symphonic composition Set of Three (Wilkinson). The English novelist Thomas Hardy, himself an accordion player and fiddler, mentions "Haste to the Wedding" in Under the Greenwood Tree, as one of the tunes the wedding-guests danced to after the marriage of Dick and Fancy.
***
Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]: Smith Paine (Wolfeboro, N.H.) [Linscott, 1939]: Candace Woltz [Phillips]: Emery Martin, Dunbar, Pennslyvania, October 14, 1943 (learned from his father) [Bayard]; Milo Jouf, 1877 (New York State; learned from his father) [Bronner]; James Marr (elderly fidder from Missouri, 1949), and 21 southwestern Pa. fiddlers and fifers [Bayard]; Mrs. Ben Scott (Turlock, California) [Kaufman]; Blackwell via Dr. Kenworthy Schofield [Bacon]; Jehile Kirkhuff (Pa.) [Phillips/1995]; fiddler Dawson Girdwood (Perth, Ottawa Valley, Ontario) [Begin]. Adam, No. 15. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 15, pg. 5. The American Veteran Fifer, 1927; No. 49. Bacon (The Morris Ring), 1974; pgs. 12, 107, 189. Bayard (Hill Country Tunes), 1944; No. 22. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; Appendix No. 33, pgs. 585-586, and No. 447, pgs. 420-428. Begin (Fiddle Music from the Ottawa Valley: Dawson Girdwood), 1985; No. 61, pg. 70. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 131. R.P. Bronner (Old Tyme Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 1, pg. 10. Burchenal (Rinnci na h-Eireann), pg. 104. Burchenal (American Country Dances, Vol. 1), 1918; pg. 42. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 121. Cole, 1940; pg. 53. Cranford (Jerry Holland's), 1995; No. 198, pg. 57. DeVille, No. 61. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 53. Hardings All Round Collection, 1905; No. 190, pg. 60. Hardings Original Collection, 1928; No. 8. Jarman (The Cornhuskers Book of Square Dance Tunes), 1944; pg. 13. JEFDSS, III, 208 (from a fiddler's book formerly the property of Thomas Hardy's father), 210 (see Bayard's note). JFSS, VIII, 220, 221 (a Manx vocal set). Jigs and Reels, pg. 22. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 8 (altered version appearing as "The Long Eight"). Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 46. Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 81, pg. 40. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 4, pg. 27. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 86. Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 88 (appears as "Come, Haste to the Wedding"). MacDonald (The Skye Collection), 1887; pg. 168. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 30. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 19, pg. 122. O'Neill (Krassen), 1976; pg. 49. O'Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 987, pg. 184. O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1907/1986; No. 203, pg. 48. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 25. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 367. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 102. Robbins, No. 5. Roche Collection, 1983, Vol. 2; No. 291, pg. 37 (listed as a Long Dance). Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 5, pg. 4. Saar, No. 44. Seventy Good Old Dances, pg. 6, No. 6. Sharp and Macilwaine, Morris Dance Tunes, pgs. 10-11 (as a handkerchief dance). Sharp (Country Dance Tunes), 1909/1994; pg. 10. Southern Folklore Quarterly, VI, pg. 8 (Wilkinson- "Virginia Dance Tunes"). Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 45. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 145. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1965/1981; pg. 24. Thomas and Leeder (The Singin' Gatherin'), 1939; pg. 63 (appears as a waltz, "Footprints"). Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 1. Tubridy (Irish Traditional Music, Vol. 1), 1999; pg. 30. White's Excelsior Collection, 1907; pg. 76. Antilles (Island) AN-7003, Kirkpatrick & Hutchings - "The Compleat Dancing Master" (1974). Edison 50653 (78 RPM), John H. Kimmel (accordion player from N.Y.C.), 1920. F&W Records 4, "The Canterbury Country Orchestra Meets the F&W String Band." Folkways FG 3531, Jean Carignan- "Old Time Fiddle Tunes." Folkways 8826, Per's Four--"Jigs and Reels." Front Hall 01, Fennigs All Stars- "The Hammered Dulcimer." Gennett 6088 (78 RPM), Uncle Steve Hubbard and His Boys (New England?), c. 1928. June Appal JA 029, Guy Carawan - "Jubilee" (1979). Library of Congress AFS L62, "American Fiddle Tunes." North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." Rounder Records, "Jerry Holland" (1976). Victor 19940 (78 RPM), Mellie Dunham, 1926 (appears under the title "Mountain Rangers"). Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from Missouri fiddling tradition).
X:1
T:Haste to the Wedding
L:1/8
M:6/8
B:Sharp - Morris Dance Tunes
K:D
DFA A2f|ede fdB|ABA AGF|GFG E2F|DFA A2f|ede fdB|AFA faf|ded d3:|
|:afa agf|gfg bag|fga agf|gfg efg|a3 f3|ede fdB|AFA faf|ded d3:|
X:2
T:Haste to the Wedding
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:D
DFA A2f|ede fdB|ABA AGF|GFG E2F|DFA A2f|ede fdB|AFA faf|ded d3:|
|:afa agf|gfg bag|fga agf|gfg efg|a3 f3|ede fdB|AFA faf|ded d3:|
X:3
T:Haste to the Wedding
L:1/8
M:6/8
R:Country Dance
B:The Athole Collection
K:D
B|AFA Aaf|ede fdB|AFA AdF|EFE E2A|AFA Aaf|ede fdB|AFA faf|ddd d2:|
|:f/g/|faf faf|bgb bgb|afa agf|efe e2f/g/|a3 f3|ede fdB|AFA faf|ded d2:|

HAWK'S GOT/CAUGHT A CHICKEN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Kentucky, Texas. G Major (the 'A' part starts on an E Minor chord). Standard. ABACC. A tune indigenous to east-central Kentucky, according to Charles Wolfe (1982). It was recorded by Kentucky fiddler Doc Roberts, and though he recorded many sides, he was supposed by Wolfe to have paid little attention to music outside his home region. Roberts' son James remembered playing the tune with his father in the mid-1920's, thus dating it early in Roberts' repertoire. Musically, Wolfe thinks the end phrases resemble the Kessinger Brothers' "Little Betty Brown." Texas fiddler Eck Robertson, who recorded in the 1920's, seems also to have known a tune by this name, as did north Virginia fiddler John Ashby (1915-1979). Source for notated version: Eck Robertson (Texas) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 108. County 202, "Eck Robertson: Famous Cowboy Fiddler." County 773, John Ashby and the Free State Ramblers - "Fiddling by the Hearth." County 412, "Fiddling Doc Roberts." Gennett 7110 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (1930).
T:Hawk Got a Chicken
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, from his Uncle Bob; transcribed by John Hartford
N:Sung to the 'A' part: "Old man, old man, get your gun, The hawks got a chicken N:and away he run. Vocal melody is third part
K:E Minor
Be (e2|e/)f/e/d/ B>A|Be d/B/A/G/|ED G>A:|
B/G/A/G/ B/G/A/G/|B/c/d/B/ G>A|B/G/A/G/ B/G/A/G/|ED G>G|
G/BB/ B2|B/c/B/A/ GA|B/G/A/d/ B/G/A/G/|ED G>A|]
eeee|ed B>d|ee/e/ d/B/A/G/|ED G2||

HEIGHTS OF ALMA. AKA - "The Alma." Scottish (originally), Old-Time (?); Quickstep March. A Major. The title of this tune, a standard in pipe repertory, comes from the first pitched battle of the Crimean War. Curiously, it appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. Kerr (Caledonian Collection), pg. 3. Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Better than an Orchestra" (1977).

HELL AMONG(ST) THE YEARLINGS [1]. AKA - "Trouble Among the Yearlings," "Hell After the Yearlings," "Devil Among the Yearlings," "Round Up the Yearlings," "Hell Among the Indians." Old-Time, Breakdowwn. USA; Oklahoma, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska. G Major (Ford, Thede): D Major (Bayard, Brody, Christeson, Fiddler Magazine, John Hatcher, Phillips): C Major (Christeson/1984, Songer). Standard. AB (Christeson, 1984): AA'B (Bayard): AABB (Thede): AA'BB (Phillips): AA'BB' (Fiddler Magazine): AABBCCDD (Songer). The 'A' part generally has nine measures instead of the usual eight. What is the 'B' part for most of the versions is usually quite a bit different than some other versions, and is very seldom similar from region to region or collection to collection. However, the title (or variations on it) is often a floater and appears for totally unrelated tunes. The most influential version historically was recorded by Kanawha County, West Virginia, fiddler Clark Kessinger (1896-1975) who recorded it (backed with "Turkey in the Straw") in 1928 for the Brunswick label (#235), his second recording for the company. It was the first commercial recording of the tune and featured Kessinger's much imitated technique of brushing the stings of the fiddle with his forefinger, creating a pizzicato effect (Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed., 1999, pg. 28. The title is mentioned in reports (1926-31) of the De Kalb County, Alabama, Annual (Fiddlers') Convention, finds Cauthen (1990). The piece was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's, and, by Herbert Halpert, in 1939 from the playing of Lauderdale County, Mississippi, fiddler Frank Kittrell. Today it is especially common among Midwest fiddlers. See also related tune "Streak of Fat, Steak of Lean." Sources for notated versions: Claude Keenan (Oklahoma County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Clark Kessinger (West Virginia) [Brody, Phillips]; Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) and George Helton (Maries County, Missouri) are referenced by Christeson {1973}; Cyril Stinnett (Oregon, Missouri) [Christeson {1984}]; Laurie Lewis [Fiddler Magazine]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 277, pgs. 232. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 133. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 67. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 44. Fiddler Magazine, Spring 1994; pg. 31. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 101. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 109. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 94. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 130. Brunswick 235 (78 RPM), The Kessinger Brothers (1928). County 202, Eck Robertson. County 733, "The Legend of Clark Kessinger." Flying Fish 515, Laurie Lewis - "Singin' My Troubles Away" (1990). Folkways FA2379, Arthur Smith. Folkways FA 2336, Clark Kessinger (W.Va.) - "Fiddler." June Appal 0056, Ralph Blizard and the New Southern Ramblers - "Blizard Train." Marimac 9110, Dilly and His Dill Pickles (1930) - "It'll Never Happen Again: Old Time String Bands, Vol. 1." MSOTFA 007, Charlie Walden - "Draggin' the Bow" (1985). Northeastern Records 5011, American Cafe Orchestra - "Egyptian Dominoes" (1991). Rounder 0006, Country Cooking- "Fourteen Bluegrass Instrumentals." Vetco 506, Fiddlin' Van Kidwell- "Midnight Ride." Vocalation 5446 (78 RPM), 1930, Dilly and His Dill Pickles (AKA John Dilleshaw, No. Ga.). Voyager 301, Bill Mitchell- "Fiddle Jam Session." Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from Pete McMahon & Charlie Walden).

HEY FOR STONEY BATTER. AKA and see "Bob and Joan," "Bóthar na gCloch," "Bobbing Joe," "Bob in Jie," "Bobby and Joan," "Fill the Bumper Fair," "Love and Whiskey," "Stoneybatter" [1]. The melody is printed under this title in J. Clinton's Gems of Ireland (c. 1840, pg. 52).

The High Level Bridge, Tyneside, c. 1890 (Gateshead Library)
***
There is a pub at one end of the structure is called The Bridge, and has long been home to The Bridge Folk Club, where the band The High Level Ranters started. It remains a desirable venue for traditional and folk performers.
***
Williamson (1976) says: "The tune is a very popular one in the North of England, and many players have evolved their own elaborations of it." It also became popular in the American mid-west (especially in Missouri), largely through the playing of fiddlers who could sight-read and had a copy of Ryan's Mammoth Collection, in which it appeared (see note for "Thunder Hornpipe" for more information). R.P. Christeson (1973) believes the melody was derived from the "Highland Hornpipe," which is commonly published (e.g. in Cole's 1001). "High Level Hornpipe" was a signature tune of American fiddler Howdy Forrester. Phillips swing version adds a fourth part in the key of G Minor. In county Donegal it is a popular hornpipe (the title contrasts with another popular Donegal hornpipe, "The Low Level Hornpipe"). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Howard Forrester and Jeff Guernsey [Phillips]; Ervan Sonnier (1920-1994) & Toussaint Arsenault (b. 1916) {Summerside, East Prince County, Prince Edward Island} [Perlman]. Bain (50 Fiddle Solos), 1989; pg. 8. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 32-33. Hardie (Caledonian Companion), 1986; pg. 39. Honeyman (Strathspey, Reel and Hornpipe Tutor), 1898; pg. 53 (appears as "High Level Bridge Hornpipe"). Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 338. Jarman (Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes); No or pg. 21. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 2; pg. 44. Koehler's Violin Repository. Messer (Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes), 1980; No. 111, pg. 70. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertorire), 1983; No. 75. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 4, pg. 88. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 114. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 198. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 44. White's Excelsior Collection. Williamson (English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish Fiddle Tunes), 1976; pg. 37. Condor 977-1489, "Graham & Eleanor Townsend Live at Barre, Vermont." Fiddler FRLP001, Tom Doucet (Nova Scotia/eastern Mass.) - "The Down East Star." Gael-Linn CEF 045, "Paddy Keenan" (1975). Green Linnet SIF1035, Brian Conway & Tony De Marco - "The Apple in Winter" (1981. Learned from a 78 RPM recording of fiddler Lad O'Beirne with Louis Quinn). Leader Records LEA 4006, "Billy Pigg, The Border Minstrel." Rounder 1123, Lad O'Beirne & Louis Quinn - "Milestone at the Garden." Rounder CD7014, Alton Silliker - "Fiddlers of Western Prince Edward Island" (1997).
X:1
T:High Level Hornpipe
L:1/8
M:C|
K:B_
|:dc|Bd FB DF Bd|fb df Bd cB|ce Ac FA cf|ag f=e gf _ec|
Bd FB DF Bd|fb df Bd cB|GA Bc de =ef|gf ec B2:|
|:cB|Af cf Af cf|AF Ac fc Ac|df Bf df Bf|dB df bf df|=eg cg eg cg|
=ec eg bg eg|f=e fa gb eg|1 f=e fg f2:|2 f=e ag fe _ec|]
X:2
T:High Level Hornpipe
M:4/4
L:1/8
Z:transcribed by Cari Fuchs
K:Bb
(3FGA|Bd FB DF Bd|fb df Bd cB|ce Ac FA cf|ag f=e gf _ec|
Bd FB DF Bd|~f2 df Bd cB|GA Bc de =ef|gf (3edc B2:|
|:cB|Af cf Af cf|AF Ac fc Ac|df Bf df Bf|dB df bf df|
=eg cg =eg cg|=ec =eg bg =eg|f=e fa gb ag|f=e fg f2:|
|: (3^fga|bf df ge cA|Bf dB F2 BA|Ge Ge Fd Fd|Ec ~c2 dc AF|
G^F GA Be cA|Bf dB F2 BA|~G2 eG ~F2 dF|~E2 cA B2:|

HIGHLAND HILLS. AKA and see "Newburn Lads," "The Bob of Fettercairn." Scottish. John Glen (1891) finds the earliest printing of the tune in Joshua Campbell's 1778 collection (pg. 20), though it had earlier appeared in the Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). An early name for the tune now known as "The Bob of Fettercairn."

HOG IN THE CANE-BRAKE. AKA and see "Wild Hog in the Cane Brake." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Ga. Played by Bob Young (Newton, Ga.) in a 1913 Atlanta, Ga., fiddling contest.

HOLLOW POPLAR. Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA, Nebraska, Tenn. G Major. Standard. AABB. Popularized by Fiddlin' Arthur Smith. Earnest Smith, the grandson of the famous Tennessee fiddler, told Susan Songer (1997) that this tune was his father's favorite and that it was the first tune he played on the Grand Old Opry. Although Smith had played the tune since the 1930's, he never recorded it until he made his 'comeback' with the McGee Brothers in the late 1950's. Sources for notated versions: Kenny Baker (Brody); Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Marion Summer [Phillips]; mandolin player Rodney Freeland (Berkeley, California) [Songer]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 136-137. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 86. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 114. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 98. In the repertoire of the Perry County Music Makers (Tenn.), Nannie Presson and Bulow Smith on zither and guitar. County 744, Kenny Baker- "Dry and Dusty." Folkways FA-2379, Arthur Smith - "Mountain Songs And
Instrumentals" (1964). June Appal 030, Marion Sumner- "Road To Home" (learned from Fiddlin' Arthur Smith). OHCS-90174, Marion Sumner (1986).
T:Hollow Poplar
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Liz Slade
K:G
B|(B/ d) B/ dd/d/|d/e/d/A/ B/A/B|(B/ c) (B/ c>)(c|c)B A>G E2|
GB/A/ B(c/d)|g/e/f e/(A/d|GB A/A/F|(G/ B) (G B2)||
(g/ g) (g/ g) gg/g/|gd B/(D/G)|f/g/a/f a(a|a/)(b/a/)e/ f/e/d|
gg/g/ g(g|g/)e/f e/(A/d)|B/c/d/A/ (A/B/A/)F/|(G/ B) (G/ B2||
T:Hollow Poplar
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, transcribed by John Hartford
K:G
B/d/||g2 gg/a/|g/e/d/c/ B/G/B/d/|aa/b/ aa/b|a/g/e/d/ B/G/B/d/|g/f/g/a/ gg/a/|
g/e/d/c/ B/G/A/G/|F/G/A/c/ B/A/G/B/|A/G/G/A/ G||D|g2g2|d/e/d/c/ B/G/G|
c2 c2|c/e/d/c/ B/G/G|G,/B,/D/F/ GB/d/|g/e/d/c/ B/G/A/G/|F/G/A/c/ B/A/G/B/|A/G/G/A/ G||

HOME WITH THE GIRLS IN THE MORNING. AKA - "Go Home with the Girls in the Morning." Old-Time, Breakdown. A Dorian (Reiner): D Dorian (Johnson, Songer). Standard. AAB (Johnson, Reiner): AABB' (Songer). The tune was in the repertoire of legendary fiddler J. Dedrick Harris, born in Tennessee, who played regularly with Bob Taylor while the latter was running for Governor of the state in the late 1800's. Harris moved to Western N.C. in the 1920's and influenced a generation of fiddlers there: Manco Sneed, Osey Helton, Bill Hensley, and Marcus Martin. Texas fiddler Bob Wills also played the tune, which fiddler Snake Chapman heard over the radio (see "Snake Chapman's Tune"). Johnson (The Kitchen Musician: Occasional Collection of Old-Timey Fiddle Tunes for Hammer Dulcimer, Fiddle, etc.), No. 2, 1982/1988; pg. 9. Reiner (Anthology of Fiddle Styles), 1979; pg. 27. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 99. Okehdokee 74002, Deseret String Band - "Land of Milk and Honey" (1974).

HOMEMADE SUGAR. AKA - "Home Made Sugar and a Puncheon Floor." Old-Time, Breakdown. G Major. Standard. AAB. The title appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954.
T:Home Made Sugar and a Puncheon Floor
L:1/8
M:2/4
S:Howdy Forrester, from his Uncle Bob; transcribed by John Hartford
K:G
g/a/g/a/ f>d|ed e/ee/|e/f/e/d/ B/A/G/B/|AG G2:|
d/dd/ d>B|d/B/d/e/ d>B|d/e/d/c/ B/A/G/B/|A(G G2)|G/A/B/c/ dB|
d/B/d/e/ d>B|d/e/d/c/ B/A/G/B/|A(G G2)||

HOOKER'S HORNPIPE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; north Missouri, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB. The low part is reminiscent of Clayton McMichen's tune "McMichen's Reel." Hooker may refer to the Civil War general Joe Hooker, or, as Howard Marshall points out, to a laborer on a riverboat, a petty thief or pickpocket , a one-masted fishing boat, loggers, etc. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Taylor McBaine (Mo.) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers' Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 87. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 201. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers Association 002, Taylor McBaine (b. 1911, Columbia, Mo.) - "Boone County Fiddler." Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling." Voyager VRCD 344, Howard Marshall & John Williams - "Fiddling Missouri" (1999. Learned from Taylor McBaine and Jimmy Gilmore of Jefferson City).

HOP UP, KITTY PUSS [1]. AKA and see- "Black-Eyed Susie," "Kitty Puss." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Missouri, Oklahoma. D Major. Standard. AABB. The tune, learned from local southwestern Missouri Ozarks fiddlers, is in the repertoire of fiddler Bob Holt (b. 1930). Source for notated version: John Crawford (McIntosh County, Oklahoma) [Thede].
***
Hop Up Kitty Puss, hop a little higher,
Hop Up Kitty Puss, your tail's on fire.
***
Refrain
O my honey, O my sugar,
O my pretty little black-eyed Susie.
***
Rain come wet me, sun come dry me,
Stand back pretty girl, don't come nigh me.
Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 89.

INDIAN (WAR)WHOOP [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Arkansas, Mississippi. David Freeman (1975) relates that this was fiddler Hoyt Ming's (of Lee County, Mississippi) most requested tune and was a novelty piece. A drawn-out note on the fiddle simulated the war whoop of and Indian, which was then carried on by Ming's voice. In performance Ming would put the fiddle on his lap during this vocal part, and "sometimes went so far as to actually put the fiddle in its case for added effect. Hoyt tells of an occasion when one curious spectator was so mystified by this musical sleight-of-hand that he grabbed the fiddle out of the case and took the instrument off to a corner to inspect it closely, thereby bringing that evening's rendition of 'Indian War Whoop' to an abrupt end." Harry Smith (1952) notes that Ming's Pepsteppers' drumming of feet on the recording is a performance more common in religious music. The melody is frequently cited as an "Ozark tune." County 528, Floyd (Hoyt) Ming & His Pep-Steppers - "Mississippi Breakdown: Traditional Fiddle Music of Mississippi, Vol. 1." Folkways FA 2952, "Antholody of American Folk Music, Vol. 2: Social Music" (1952). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion." Victor 21294A (78 RPM), Floyd Ming and His Pep-Steppers" (1928).

INIMITABLE REEL. AKA and see "A Bunch of Chickens." American, New England; Reel. USA; Nebraska, New Hampshire. G Major. Standard. AABB. The piece is widely disseminated due to its appearance in Cole's 1001 Fiddle Tunes, the standard source for fiddlers who read music in the mid-20th century in America. The melody is similar to the first two strains of "Kitty Sharp's Championship Jig." Sources for notated versions: E. Christie [Cole's]; Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; No. 124, pg. 77. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 36. Miller & Perron (New England Fiddlers Repertoire), 1983; No. 115. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 80. Tolman (Nelson Music Collection), 1969; pg. 8.
T:Inimitable Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
K:G
|:G2D2E2DC|B,D GB d2 ^cd|ed cB cB AG|FG AB cD EF|
G2D2E2DC|B,D GB d2 ^cd|ed cB cB AG|FG AF G2G2:|
|:Bd re dB AG|Bd rd b2g2|Bd re dB AG|FG AB c2 BA|
Bd re dB AG|Bd rd b2g2|Bd re dB AG|FG AF G2D2:|
T:Inimitable Reel
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:122
S:Cyril Stinnett
R:Reel
A:Missouri
N:Have heard on other fiddlers play this tune
D:as recorded by Cyril Stinnett in September '79
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABCs
K:G
D(F|G2)DG (EG)DC|B,(DG)B d2^c(d|ed)^cB (=cB)AG|(FG)A(B c)AF[DA]|!
G2DG (EG)DC|B,(DG)B d2^c(d|ed)^cB (=cB)AG|1(FD)(EF) G2:|2(FD)(EF) G4|!
|:(Bd2)(e d)BGB|d2 b2 g2 d2|(B^cd)(e dB)A(B|cB)AG (FG)Ad)|!
(Bd2)(e d)BGB|d2 b2 g2 d2|(B^cd)(e dB)A(B|1c)AFA G4:|2c)AFA G2|!

I DON'T LOVE NOBODY [3]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Texas. G Major. Standard. AA'B. Source for notated version: Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 68.

ICE ON THE PUMPHANDLE. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 68.

ICY MOUNTAIN. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, West Virginia. A Major/D Mixolydian. Standard or AEAE. AABB. There is a song collected in Kentucky by this title given by Roberts (pg. 105), which is a variant of "My Home's Across the Smoky Mountains" or "My Home's Across the Blue Ridge Mountains;" it seems unrelated to this breakdown piece. However, the tune in circulation by this title was collected from Ward Jarvis (b. 1894), originally of Braxton County, West Virginia (later of southeastern Ohio), who learned it from a Clay County (W.Va.) left-handed fiddler by the name Frank Santy. Spandaro (10 Cents a Dance), 1980; pg. 15. Front Hall 017, Michael, McCreesh, & Campbell - "Dance Like the Waves of the Sea" (1978). Rounder 0132, Bob Carlin - "Fiddle Tunes for Clawhammer Banjo" (1980).

IDA RED. AKA- "Idy Red." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; West Virginia, southwest Virginia, north Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas. A Major (Phillips): G Major (Krassen). AEAE or Standard. AB: AABB (Krassen). Ida Red was originally supposed to have been an African-American bad man, but the gender of the character in most versions is feminine or androgynous. The tune, which varies widely though retains distinctive cadences, was recorded for the Library of Congress by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's. Riley Pucket's (north Georgia) version of the tune, released in 1926, became the second best-selling country music record for the year. Kentucky fiddler Jim Bowles plays a crosstuned version.
***
Ida Red who lives uptown, weighs three hundred and forty pounds,
Down the road and 'cross the creek, don't get a letter but once a week.
***
Refrain
Ida Red, pearly blue,
My little honey don't I love you.
***
I don't know and I don't care, know there's hard times everywhere,
Ida Red you won't do right, won't do nothin' but quarrel and fight.
***
Down the road hat in my hand, hello sherrif I've killed my man,
Ida Red you won't do right, won't do nothin' but quarrel and fight.
***
Down the road a mile and a half, my little honey looks back and laughs,
Ida Red you're workin on the road, work enough money to buy a load.
***
Ida Red, Ida Blue, Ida bit a hoecake half in two,
If I'd a-listened to what Ida said, I'd a-been sleepin' in Ida's bed. {Kuntz}
***
I went down town one day in a lope,
Fool around till I stole a coat;
Then I come back and I do my best,
Fool Around till I got the vest.
O weep! O my Idy!
For over dat road I'm bound to go. {Thede}
***
Sources for notated versions: Double Decker String Band (Kuntz): Frank West (Murray County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Bob Wills and Sleepy Johnson (Texas) [Phillips]; Tweedy Brothers (W.Va.) [Phillips]. Kaufman (Beginning Old Time Fiddle), 1977; pg. 37. Krassen (Appalachian Fiddle), 1973; pg. 16. Kuntz (Ragged but Right), 1987; pg. 387-388. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 117 (two versions). Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 60-61. Fretless 144, Double Decker String Band- "Giddyap Napoleon." Bluebird 5488A (78 RPM), Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers (North Ga.) {1934}. Gennett 6604 (78 RPM), 1928, Tweedy Brothers (Wheeling, W.Va. brothers Harry, George, and Charles who played twin fiddles and piano). Rounder CD0364, The Red Mules - "The Marimac Anthology: Deep in Old-Time Music." Victor 19434 (78 RPM, recorded 1925), Fiddlin' Cowan Powers 1877-1952? (Russell County, S.W. Virginia).
T:Ida Red
L:1/8
M:2/4
B:Kuntz - Ragged but Right
K:A
c>c BB|A/B/A/F/ EF|AA/c/ B/A/F|EF AA/B/|cc/c/ BB|A/B/A/F/ EE/F/|AA/c/ B/A/F|
EF A>(c||c/)e/e [ee][ee]|c/A/B AA|B/A/B/A/ c/A/B|E/E/F AA|c/B/c/d/ ee|c/d/e AA|
B/A/B/A/ cB|E/F/A A2||

HUMORS OF LIMERICK, THE [2]. AKA and see "The Geese in the Bog," "The Green Meadow," "Jackson's Coola," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "The Mountain Lark," "Wiseman's Favourite," "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "Twice Tricked," "The Piper's Frolic," "Na Geabha sa bPortach," "Tuhy's Frolic." Irish, Jig. The tune appears under this title in the John E. Pigot manuscript in the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin.

HUMPHREY'S JIG [1]. AKA and see "Doctor Humphrey's Jig." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Kentucky. G Major. Standard. AA'BB'. A popular tune (whose 'A' part is in duple time and whose 'B' part is in triple time--apparently a cross between a breakdown and a jig--) with Kentucky fiddlers especially in the (north)eastern portion of the state, drawn from a Scottish tune called "Bob of Fettercairn," and not easy to play. Mark Wilson and Guthrie Meade (1976) point out that east Kentucky fiddler Ed Hayley's (or Haley) version of the tune resembles not the mainland Scottish versions but rather a Shetland version of the melody called "Knockit Corn." Regardless, they say, it is extremely rare for a tune "of this nature to survive in the American South, where the original dance function of the music has been forgotten."
***
Fiddler Wilson Douglas (W.Va.) declared in 1995:
***
I've only heard one man who I thought would come up to Ed
Hayley, and I believe he died a year or two ago. A man named
George Hawkins from Ashland, Kentucky. I'd put him and Ed
Hayley together, you couldn't tell 'em apart. He and Ed Hayley's
the only two men I heard could play the tune "Humphrey's Jig."
I never got a chance to learn it.
***
Kentucky fiddler J.W. Day recorded the tune twice for the Library of Congress, and George Hawkins, also of that state, also released a version on a 78 RPM. Douglas stated the tune was in old Saul Carpenter's (Clay County, West Virginia) repertoire, and was handed down to his son, Tom, who taught it to his son, the regionally influential French Carpenter (d. 1965), a distant relative and mentor of Douglas. Source for notated version: John Hartford [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 116. Rounder 1010, Ed Hayley - "Parkersburg Landing" (1976).

HY PATITTIAM/PATITIAN. AKA - "Hy Patillion," "Allen Brother's Rag." Old-Time, Breakdown or Two-Step. C Major. Standard. AABB'. A Hawaiian tune covered by the Chatanooga, Tennessee, based duo the Allen Brothers. It was also recorded by fiddler Curly Fox for one label, and earlier for Gennett by Chattanooga fiddler Jesse Young (as "Hy Patillion"). Source for notated version: John Hartford [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Music, Vol. 2), 1995; pg. 66. Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion." SVT 4010 (78 RPM), Jess Young Band (Tenn.), c. 192

IRISH COBBLER, THE. AKA and see "Shortening Bread." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Missouri, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. ABCDD (Christeson): AA'BBCC (Phillips). See also the related tune "Shortening Bread." Sources for notated verisons: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) and (various) Jefferson City, Missouri, fiddlers [Christeson]; Cyrill Stinnett (Mo.) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 97. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 119.

IRISH WASHERWOMAN, THE (An Bhean Niochain Eireannach). AKA and see "Corporal Casey," "Country Courtship," "Dargason," "Irishwoman," "The Irish Wash-Woman," "Irish Waterman," "Jackson's Delight," "Paddy McGinty's Goat," "The Wash Woman," "The Scheme," "The Snouts and Ears of America," "Star at Liwis," "Sedany." Irish, English, Scottish, American; Double Jig. USA; Very widely known. G Major ('B' part is in G Mixolydian in some Scottish versions). Standard. AA'B (Breathnach): AABB (most versions): AA'BB' (Gow, Perlman): AABBCC (Ashman). Although the tune has popularly been known as an old, and perhaps quintessential Irish jig, it has been proposed by some writers to have been an English country dance tune that was published in the 17th century and probably known in the late 16th century. Samuel Bayard (1981), for example, concludes it probably was English in origin rather than Irish, being derived from the air called "Dargason," or "Sedany" as it is sometimes called. Fuld (1966) disagrees, believing "Dargason" (which he gives under the title "Scotch Bagpipe Melody") and "The Irish Washerwoman" developed independently. "Dargason" was first printed in Ravenscroft's Pammelia (1609) and appears in the Playford's Dancing Master editions from 1651 to 1690, but subsequently the "folk process" melded the strain to other parts, thus making other tunes (see "The Green Garters" for example) including the precursors to the Washerwoman tune. One of these precursors was the English tune "Country Courtship" which dates from at least 1715 and probably to 1688, in which latter mentioned year it was first entered at Stationers' Hall. "The Irish Washerwoman" appears to have developed from "The Country Courtship," which was extremely popular in the 19th century, as the tune under the "Washerwoman" title was to become a little later. The ending of the jig is the same as the endings of "In Bartholemew Fair" and "The Free Masons." Breathnach (1976) finds the second part identical to that of "Star at Liwis or The Scheme" printed by Walsh in Caledonian Country Dances (c. 1730, pg. 59).
The melody was found by the author of English Folk-Song and Dance (pg. 144) in the repertoire of fiddler William Tilbury (who lived at Pitch Place, midway between Churt and Thursley in Surrey), who used, in his younger days, to play at village dances. Tilbury learned his repertoire from an uncle, Fiddler Hammond, who died around 1870 and who was the village fiddler before him. The conclusion was that "Haste to the Wedding" and melodies of similar type survived in English tradition (at least in southwest Surrey) well into the second half of the 19th century.
***
A variant of the modern version of the tune appears as air 13 in Samuel Arnold's stage piece The Surrender of Calais, report Van Cleef and Keller (1980), which was first performed in London in 1791. It was sung by the character O'Carrol, and Irish soldier, and the song became known as "Corporal Casey:"
***
When I was at home I was merry and frisky
My Dad kept a pig and my mother sold whiskey.
My Uncle was rich but he would never be easy
'Til i was enlisted by Corporal Casey.
Oh, rub a dub, row de dow Corporal Casey,
My dear little Sheelah I thought would run crazy,
Oh when I trudged away with tough Corporal Casey.
***
As "Corporal Casey," the tune appears in Instructions for the Fife (London, 1795). The melody also found its way into various broadsides and similar 'low' publications, such as the latter 18th century "Irishman's Epistle to the Officer's and Troups at Boston" (sic). Later the song "Paddy McGinty's Goat" was set to the tune of "Irish Washerwoman." Shropshire musician John Moore penned a version in his notebook of c. 1837-1840 which has a third part in 3/8 time, breaking the pattern of the rhythm--perhaps, thinks editor Gordon Ashman, it was used in an introductory mode for "setting" or "step to your partner."
***
Fuld (1966) finds the earliest printings of the tune under the title "Irish Washerwoman" to be in Neil Gow's A Third Collection of Strathspey Reels &c for the Piano-forte, Violin and Violoncello (1792) and James Aird's A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs (1794). Breathnach noted Dublin publication of "The Wash Woman" by Henry Mountian, c. 1785 and Ó Canainn (1978) finds it printed in Brysson's A Curious Selection of Favourite Tunes with Variations to which is appended "Fifty Favourite Irish Airs" (Edinburgh, 1790) under the title "Irish Waterman." Fuld also finds the melody under the title "The Melody of Cynwyd" in Edward Jones' Musical and Poetical Relicks of the Welsh Bards (London, 1794). Bruce Olson suggests that "The Wash Woman" was probably the original title, with 'Irish' being prefixed to the title outside of Ireland as an identifier--he thinks there were probably many tunes with 'Irish' in the title that identified place of origin and that were not part of the original title.
***
By the end of the 18th century the tune was identified with Ireland, and it is not surprising that that country also has laid claim to the tune. It has been reported that it was written by 19th century piper, fiddler and composer "Piper" Jackson, who was from either County Limerick or County Monaghan (according to the Boys of the Lough). Breathnach (1976) reports that Henry Mountain, No. 20 White Friar Street, Dublin, printed the melody in about the year 1785, calling it "The Wash Woman," a favourite New Country Dance. A few years later is appeared in Lee's New Collection of Irish Country Dances for the year 1788. The title appears in a list of tunes in his repertoire brought by Philip Goodman, the last professional and traditional piper in Farney, Louth, to the Feis Ceoil in Belfast in 1898 (Breathnach, 1997). In modern times in Ireland the tune is rarely played, remarks Caoimhin Mac Aoidh, as it is considered trite and hackneyed, though it does retain strong currency among County Donegal fiddlers who play several elaborate versions. Doolin, County Clare, whistle player Micho Russell called it "The Big Jig."
***
American versions with the "Washerwoman" title appear toward the end of the 18th century. It was contained in A Collection of Contra Dances (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1792) under the title "Irish Wash Woman," and several American dance copybooks contain various dances to the melody, including Nancy Shepley's Manuscript (Pepperell, Massachusetts, c. 1795) and different figures in Asa Wilcox's MS (Hartford County, Conecticut, 1793). A third dance can be found in Gentleman and Lady's Companion (Norwich, Connecticut, 1798), while A Collection of Contra Dances (Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1792) gives a dance similar to that copied by Shepley. Van Cleef and Keller (1980) state the name changes from "Irish Wash Woman" to "Irish Washerwoman" around 1795. The tune retained its popularity, at least for contra dancing, and was cited as having commonly been played for Orange County, New York country dances in the 1930's (Lettie Osborn, New York Folklore Quarterly), by 20th century Arizona fiddler Kenner C. Kartchner for dances in the Southwest, and by contemporary Buffalo Valley, Pa., dance fiddlers Ralph Sauers and Harry Daddario. Viola "Mom" Ruth, in her collection Pioneer Western Folk Tunes (1948) appends to the "Irish Washer Women" that it was what she played when she "Won the state's (Arizona) championship 1926." Other than for dancing, it was popular as a vehicle for "American stage Yankees," and according to Bronner (1987) it was included in the music to the "Federal Overture" (published by B. Carr in 1795) which played to theatres in Philadelphia and New York just prior to and at the beginning of the 1800's. Outside of the east coast Musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph recorded the tune for the Library of Congress from Ozark Mountain fiddlers in the early 1940's and it was recorded as having been predicted by a local southwest Alabama paper (the Clarke County Democrat) in May, 1929, that it would by played at an upcoming fiddlers' contest. It appears in the repertoire list of Maine fiddler Mellie Dunham (the elderly Dunham was Henry Ford's champion fiddler in the 1920's). Referred to by Bayard (1944) in his note for "The Snouts and Ears of America," and Breathnach (1976) regards it as a "stain on the honour of washer women" that the tune was used for that song and "Paddy McGinty's Goat" in the United States. Bayard reports that in Pennsylvania the following rhymes were collected with the tune:
***
Jim Doodle, he dramp that his father was dead,
And his father he dramp that Jim Doodle was dead. (x2)
Chorus:
Jim Doodle, Jim Daddle, Jim Doodle, Jim Daddle,
Jim Doodle he gramp that his father was dead;
Jim Doodle he dramp that his father was dead,
And his father he dramp that Jim Doodle was dead.
or:
Jim Doodle didn't know that his father was dead,
And his father didn't know that Jim Doodle was dead,
And they both lay dead on the same damn' bed,
And neither one knew that the other was dead. (Bayard)
***
I have heard nearly the same rhyme with the name "McTavish" substituted for "Jim Doodle." Also from Pennsylvania:
***
We've plenty of horses, the best to be got,
The ones that can canter, the ones that can trot-- (Bayard).
***
Introduced to the Shetland islands "by Scots girls (in the last decade of the 19th century) who came up in their hundreds during the herring season to live and work as gutters and packers at the numerous fishing stations which mushroomed each year around the Shetland shoreline" (Cooke, 1986).
***
Perlman (1996) notes that, unlike Ireland, the tune is one of the most widely played by fiddlers on Prince Edward Island. At the beginning of the 20th century in Cape Breton a solo dance called The Irish Washerwoman was in the repertoire of Donald Beaton, an itinerant tailor and an influential dancer and fiddler in the region around Mabou. It originally consisted of 12 steps.
***
Sources for notated versions: John Bennett (Cimarron County, Oklahoma) [Thede]: Edson Cole (Freedom, N.H.) [Linscott]; {1} Floyd Woodhull, 1976 and {2} Hornellsville Hillbillies, 1943 (New York State) [Bronner]; 13 southwestern Pa. fiddlers and fifers [Bayard]; fiddler Paddy Fahy, 1970 (Ballinasloe, Co. Galway, Ireland) [Breathnach]; a c. 1837-1840 MS by Shropshire musician John Moore [Ashman]; Attwood O'Connor (b. 1923, Milltown Cross, South Kings County, Prince Edward Island) [Perlman]. Adam, 1928; No. 3. Allan's Irish Fiddler, No. 14, pg. 4. American Veteran Fifer, 1902 & 1927; No. 11. Ashman (The Ironbridge Hornpipe), 1991; No. 1, pg. 1. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 446A-M, pgs. 415-419. Breathnach (CRE II), 1976; No. 19, pg. 12. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 140. Bronner (Old-Time Music Makers of New York State), 1987; No. 9, pg. 55 and No. 19, pg. 89. Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 336. Cazden (Dances from Woodland), 1945; pg. 12. Cazden, 1955; pg. 23. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 57. Ford (Traditional Music in America), 1940; pg. 43. Harding's All-Round, 1905-1932; No. 201. Harding Collection (1915) and Harding's Original Collection, 1928; No. 187. Howe (Diamond School for the Violin), 1861; No. pgs. 44 & 62. Jarman, Old Time Fiddlin' Tunes; No. or pg. 8. Johnson, Vol. 8, 1988; pg. 5. Karpeles & Schofield (A Selection of 100 English Folk Dance Airs), 1951; pg. 10 (appears as "Circassian Cirle"). Kennedy (Fiddlers Tune Book), Vol. 1, 1951; No. 94; pg. 46. Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 8, pg. 36. Linscott (Folk Songs of Old New England), 1939; pg. 117. O'Malley, 1919; pg. 3. O'Neill (1915 ed.), 1987; No. 164, pg. 91 (appears as "The Irishwoman"). O'Neill (1001 Gems), 1986; No. 317, pg. 67. Perlman (The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island), 1996; pg. 129. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 30. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 108. Reavy, 1979; No. 38. Reavy, No. 90, pg. 100 (an idiosyncratic version). Ruth (Pioneer Western Folk Tunes), 1948; No. 22, pg. 9. Stewart-Robertson (The Athole Collection), 1884; pg. 139. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 32. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 118-119. Trim (Thomas Hardy), 1990; No. 46. White's Excelsior Collection, 1907; pg. 73. Flying Fish FF70610, Robin Huw Bowen - "Telyn Berseiniol fy Ngwlad/Welsh Music on the Welsh Triple Harp" (1996. Appears as "Yr Hen Olchyddes/The Washerwoman"). Folkways FA 2381, "The Hammered Dulcimer as played by Chet Parker (Michigan)" (1966). Fretless 122, Emile Boilard- "Old Time Fiddling 1976". North Star NS0038, "The Village Green: Dance Music of Old Sturbridge Village." RCA Victor LCP 1001, Ned Landry and His New Brunswick Lumberjacks - "Bowing the Strings with Ned Landry." Supertone 9169 (78 RPM), Doc Roberts (Ky.). Victor 20537 (78 RPM), Mellie Dunham, 1926. Pibroch MacKenzie - "The Mull Fiddler" (1969). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Better than an Orchestra" (1977).
T:Irish Washerwoman
L:1/8
M:6/8
R:Jig
B:The Athole Collection
K:G Major
d/c/|BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cAA EAA|cAc edc|BGG DGG|BGB dcB|cBc Adc|
BGG G2:|
|:d|gdg gdg|gdg bag|=fcf fcf|=fcf agf|egg dgg|cgg Bgg|cBc Adc|BGG G2:|

IVY LEAF HORNPIPE. AKA and see "Jim Clark's Hornpipe" (Cole), "Clark's Hornpipe" (O'Neill), "Morpeth Hornpipe" (Cole). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 55.

JACK DANIELSON'S REEL. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. A Major. Standard. AABBCC. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 10. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 119. Marimac 9054, The Ill-Mo Boys - "Fine as Frog Hair" (1995).

JACK LINTEL'S JIG. AKA and see "Cam Ye O'er From France." English, Jig (3/4 time). England, Northumberland. A Minor. Standard. AABBCC. "This is quite similar to 'Bob and Joan' (Vickers, Part 1, No. 138). The third part especially suggests the C's should be natural, F's are, I think, debatable, but on fiddle work well natural, though pipers may prefer them sharp" (Seattle). Seattle (William Vickers), 1987, Part 2; No. 208.

JACK'S ALIVE [3]. AKA and see "Dusty Bob's Jig." English, Scottish; Jig. G Major. Standard. AABB (Raven): AAB (Gow). A triple time version of the tune in version #1. One version was played by the English sailors in their artillary battery before San Sebastian in 1809, whenever a French shell landed in their works (Winstock, 1970; pg. 141). The melody appears in the James Gillespie Manuscript of Perth (1768). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. Ryan's/Cole's published the same tune as "Dusty Bob's." Carlin (The Gow Collection), 1986; No. 387. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 3, 1806; pg. 17. Raven (English Country Dance Tunes), 1984; pg. 127.
T:Jack's Alive
L:1/8
M:6/8
S:Gow - 3rd Repository
K:G
(GAG) B3|(ABA) c3}(B/c/d)B c2A|B2G AFD|(GAG) B3|(ABA) c3|(B/c/d)B cAF|G3G3:|
g2g gag|f2f fgf|e2e efg|{fg}a2g fed|g2g gag|fff g2f|efg afd|g3 g2d|gag gag|fgf fgf|efe efg|
{fg}a2g fed|g3 Bcd|e2 ABc|dBG cAF|G3G3||

JACKSON'S COOLA. AKA and see "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "The Geese in the Bog," "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "Wiseman's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "Twice Tricked," "The Humours of Limerick," "Tuhy's Frolic," "The Piper's Frolic," "The Mountain Lark," "Na Geabha sa bPortach." Irish, Jig. The tune appears under this title in Henry Hudson's manuscript collection (Boston Public Library).

JACKSON'S TRIP TO LIMERICK. AKA and see "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "Na Geabha sa bPortach," The Geese in the Bogs," "The Humours of Limerick," "Jackson's Coola," "Jackson's Walk to Limerick," "Morrison's Fancy," "The Mountain Lark," "The Piper's Frolic," "Tuhy's Frolic," "Twice Tricked," "Wiseman's Favourite."

JACKSON'S WALK TO LIMERICK (Triall Mhic Shiacais ar Luimneach). AKA and see "Bob Thompson's Favourite," "The Coravat Jig," "Custom House," "Na Geabha sa bPortach," "The Geese in the Bogs," "The Green Meadow," "The Grouse in the Bog," "The Humours of Limerick," "Jackson's Coola," "Jackson's Trip to Limerick," "Morrison's Fancy," "The Mountain Lark," "The Piper's Frolic," "Tuhy's Frolic," "Twice Tricked," "Wiseman's Favourite." Irish, Double Jig. D Major. Standard. ABCDE. Related tunes include O'Neill's "The Geese in the Bogs" (DMI, 279), "Morrison's Fancy/Castlebar Races," and "Nóra Chrionna." The first two parts of the tune are also known as "The Humours of Glin" in Mitchell and Small's The Piping of Patsy Tuohey (1986). The tune, attributed to the 18th century gentleman piper Walker 'Piper' Jackson, of the townland of Lisdaun, parish of Ballingarry, Aughrim, County Limerick, appears in Patrick Gunn's manuscript collection (pg. 16). Source for notated version: John & Tommy Gunn (County Fermanagh) [Breathnach]. Breathnach (CRE IV), 1996; No. 22, pg. 12.

JACOB'S JIG. American, Jig. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by New Hampshire accordion player and caller Bob McQuillen. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 33.

JAKE'S BEST REEL. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. D Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 56. Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett (1912-1986) - "Plain Old Time Fiddling."

JAMIE HARDIE. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard. One Part. Composed by J. Scott Skinner, who says: "Relative of the Famous Drumnagarry Reel for 'Bob Steel.'" Jamie (James) Hardie (1836-1916) was an Edinburgh violin maker whom Skinner knew, and who had a fine reputation as a craftsman, producing over two thousand instruments (the finest of which were based on the master Maggini's violins) during his long career. He was a member of the famous Hardie family who have been for generations Scots fiddlers of renown. Skinner (The Scottish Violinist), pg. 21.

JENNY ON THE RAILROAD. AKA and see "Paddy on the Turnpike." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; identified in Thede as a "Texas Tune," Oklahoma, Mississippi. A Mixolydian. Standard. AABB: AABBC (Phillips): AA'BB'CC' (Thede). A 'jenny' is a slang term for a female donkey. Related to "Paddy on the Turnpike." Alan Jabbour sees the antecedent of the tune, at least in America, as "Colonel Crocket" which appears in George P. Knauff's Virginia Reels, volume III (Baltimore, 1839). The melody also has similarities to a tune called "The Route." Sources for notated versions: T.T. Lowe (Love County, Oklahoma) [Thede]; Liz Slade (Yorktown, New York) [Kuntz]; Carter Brothers (Miss.) [Phillips]. Kuntz, Private Collection. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 124. Thede (The Fiddle Book), 1967; pg. 46. County 528, Carter Bros. & Son - "Mississippi Breakdown: Traditional Fiddle Music of Mississippi, Vol. 1." Folkways FA 2492, New Lost City Ramblers - "String Band Instrumentals" (1964). Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion." Vocalation 5297 (78 RPM), Carter Brothers and Son.
T:Jenny on the Railroad
L:1/8
M:2/4
Z:Andrew Kuntz
K:A
c/B/|A/(B/c/)d/ e/(f/=g/)(f/|e/)(d/B/)A/ (=G/<B)e/f/|=g/f/e/(d/ c/A/)B/A/|E/AA/ A:|
|:A/(A/|c/)A/B/(A/ c/A/)B/A/|c/A/E/(E/ =G)A/(B/|B/)A/=G/A/ B/A/G/(D/|(E/AA/ A:|
|:(a|a/)b/a/a/ a/(b/a/)(a/|b/)a/e/(e/ =g(g|b/)=g/a/(g/ b/)g/a/e/|e/aa/ a(a|a/)b/a/a/ a/b/a/a/|
b/a/e/(e/ =g)g|b/=g/a/g/ b/g/a/e/|e/aa/ a:|

JUMP FINGERS. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Missouri. C Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated versions: George Pounds via Bob Walters (both Burt County, Nebraska, fiddlers) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 41. Marimac 9054, The Ill-Mo Boys - "Fine as Frog Hair" (1995). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Uncle Bob Walters - "Old Time Fiddler's Repertory" (1976).

JUMPING TOOTHACHE [1]. Old-Time, Reel. USA; Michigan, Indiana. G Major. Standard. AABB. This version is distinguished by raps in the 2nd and 6th measures of the 'B' part, meant to represent, says Johnson, "those little spots in your teeth." Source for notated version: Bob Hubbach [Johnson]. Johnson (The Kitchen Musician's No. 7: Michigan Tunes), Vol. 7, 1986-87; pg. 7.

JUST FRIENDS. Old-Time, Waltz. D Minor ('A' and 'B' parts) & F Major ('C' part). Standard. AA'BBC. Source for notated version: Bob Wills (Texas) [Phillips]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 270.

JOHN BELDEN'S TWO-STEP. Old-Time, Two-step (6/8 time). USA; Iowa, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. ABB. John Belden was "one of a trio of fiddlers of considerable local fame in western Iowa years ago. The other two were Frank Sexton and Willis Kirkpatrick" (Christeson). Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 146.

JOHN BOWE'S [3]. AKA and see "Land of Sunshine." Irish, Reel. C Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is a Martin Mulhaire composition, originally entitled "Land of Sunshine," written soon after Mulhaire came to the United States. Source for notated version: Brendan Mulvihill (Baltimore, Md.) [Mulvihill]. Mulvihill (1st Collection), 1986; No. 130, pg. 35. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 111. Kerry Elkin - "Soir et Matin" (1990). Out of the Blue Productions, "A Band Named Bob" (1994).

JOHNNY, BRING THE JUG AROUND THE HILL. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. ABCC. Also in repertoire of Missouri fiddler Cryil Stinnett. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 13.
T:Johnny Bring the Jug (Around the Hill)
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:122
S:Cyril Stinnett
R:Reel
A:Missouri
B:transcribed in OTFR as tune #16
N:Taken from the playing of Cyril Stinnett and Dwight Lamb
H:Cyril mentioned this tune as having been played by Casey Jones, a
H:Missouri and Iowa fiddler of great renown, under the then common title
H:of 'Far from Home." Cyril said that people later got to calling it
H:"Johnny Bring the Jug (Around the Hill).
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABCs
K:A
Ac|(ef)ec (BA)cf|e(cB)A B-[c2e2][ce]|(ef)ec (BA)cf|e(cB)G A2Ac|!
(ef)ec (BA)cf|e(cB)A B-[c2e2][ce]|(ef)ec (BA)cf|e(cB)G A2:|!
|:([EA][FA]| [A2A2])A(c BA)c(B|Ac)B(A cB)AF|(EF)Ac (BA)c(B|Ac)BA [F2A2][E2A2]|!
[(FA][A2A2)](c BA)cB|(Ac)BA [c2e2][ce][ce]|(ef)ec (BA)cf|1e(cBG) A2:|2e(cBG)
A3|!
|:(e|f2)a2 a3(a|b2)a2 (ab)a(e|f2)a2 (ab)(af)|e2[c2e2] [c3e3]e-|!
f2a2 a3(a|b2)a2 (ab)a(e|f2)g2 (ab)(af)|1e2[c2e2] [c3e3]:|2e2[c2e2] [c2e2]|!

JOHNNY, DON'T COME HOME DRUNK. AKA - "Johnny Don't Get Drunk," "Johnny, Johnny, Don't Get Drunk," "Don't Come Home Drunk, Johnny," "Jimmy Don't Come Home Drunk." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska. D Major. Standard. AABB. The melody is known as a Missouri tune. Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Art Stamper (Ky.) [Phillips]; Stuart Williams [Songer]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 62. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 74. Songer (Porland Collection), 1997; pg. 115 (appears as "Johnny, Johnny, Don't Get Drunk"). County CD2712, Art Stamper (Ky.) - "The Lost Fiddler" (c. 1982). June Appal 0067, Snake Chapman - "Seedtime on the Cumberland" (1992). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association 001, Pete McMahan - "Ozark Mountain Waltz" (1987). Missouri State Old Time Fiddlers' Association, Cyril Stinnett (1912-1986) - "Plain Old Time Fiddling."

JOHNNIE STEELE. AKA and see "The Auld Brig of Ayr," "Bob Steele," "The New Brig o' Dee," "The Miller o' Dervil," "Benholm Castle." Scottish, Strathspey. D Major. Standard. AB. Composed originally by James Barnett (1847-1898) of Kirkwall, though developed by others under a variety of titles. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 102. Kohler, Violin Repository, Book II (1881-1885).

JIMMY IN THE SWAMP. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; eastern Kentucky, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB. West Virginia fiddler Wilson Douglas stated that regionally (i.e. eastern Kentucky/West Virginia/southern Ohio) influential fiddler Ed Haley played this tune. John Hartford notes that R.P. Christeson's source, Uncle Bob Walters' family moved to Iowa from Kentucky in the mid-1800's and that both Walters' father and grandfather were fiddled. His implication is that this musical family brought the tune to the mid-west from eastern Kentucky. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson, Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 86. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 124. Rounder CD0392, John Hartford - "Wild Hog in the Brush and a Bunch of Others You Might Not Have Heard" (1996).
T:Jimmy in the Swamp
M:1/2
L:1/8
Q:220
S:John Hartford's "Wild Hog in the Redbrush" transcribed by Llarry Brandon
K:G
GE |:"G"DEGA BAGA| Bded ef .g2|DEGA BAGA|BAGB"D" AGEG|!
"G" DEGA BAGA|Bded efga|bgag efge|1"D"dBAF "G"G2 GE:|2dBAF G2 z2| !
|"Em"|:{d}e4 B4| efed B2 gf|"G"e2 .E2 EFGA|BAGB AGE2|!
"Em"{d}e4 B4 | efed B2 gf|"G"e2 .E2 EFGA|"D"BGAF"G" G4 :|

JOEY'S HORNPIPE. American, Hornpipe. D Major. Standard. AABB. Composed by Peterborough, New Hampshire, caller and accordion player Bob McQuillen. Sweet (Fifer's Delight), 1964/1981; pg. 78.

KAFOOZALUM. AKA and see "London Bridge," "Will You Go to Sheriffmuir?" Scottish, Highland Schottische. D Major. Standard. AABB. The tune is quite similar to "The Stewart's March" and "London Bridge is Falling Down" family of tunes. The title of from a humorous stage piece called "Ka Foozle-Um" which was written by S. Oxon and published in New York in 1866. The song is a mock-Oriental piece like "Abdulla Bulbul Ameer" which became popular in college songsters of the 1870's and 1880's. Curious, Cazden (1982) points out, since it is so derivative of the Scottish original, is that the melody became known by the American title in Britain in the later 19th century and was so published in Kerr's collection; Peter Kennedy's volume "100 English Folk Dance Tunes" (1951) gives the title "London Bridge (Ka-foo-zalum)". Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 15, pg. 20. "Bob Smith's Ideal Band, Better than an Orchestra" (1977).

KAIL AND KNOCKIT CORN. AKA and see "The Bob of Fettercairn," "Come Kiss With Me, Come Clap With Me," "Had I the Wyte." Shetland. The title means "kail and burised oats."
***
I'll be kissed and du'll be kissed
We'll all be kissed the morn
The best maet that's in the house
Is kail and knockit corn. (Cooke)

KANSAS CITY REEL. Old-Time, Reel. USA, Arkansas. A Major/Mixolydian. Standard or AEAE. AA'BB. Source for notated version: Ron Andrico (Corvalis, Oregon) [Songer]. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 136. Songer (Portland Collection), 1997; pg. 117. Alcazar Dance Series ALC 202, Sandy Bradley - "Potluck and Dance Tonite!" (1979). County 519, Fiddlin' Bob Larkan & Family - "Echoes of the Ozarks, Vol. 2."

KATE DALRYMPLE. AKA and see "New Highland Laddie," "Jinglin' Johnnie." Scottish, Reel or Scottish Measure. A Major. Standard. AAB. Hunter (1979) explains that Kate Dalrymple was a noted beauty, and the subject of a Gainsborough portrait. The melody was first published in 1750 under the title "The New Highland Laddie." Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 241 (arranged by James Hunter). Kerr (Merry Melodies), Vol. 1; No. 8, pg. 24. Lerwick (The Kilted Fiddler), 1985; pg. 13. Tradition 2118, Jim MacLeod & His Band - "Scottish Dances: Jigs, Waltzes and Reels" (1979). "Fiddle Me Jig" (c. 1978). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Better Than an Orchesta" (1977). Bob Smith's Ideal Band - "Ideal Music" (1977).

KATY HILL [1]. AKA- "Going Around the World," "Sally Johnson." Old-Time, Bluegrass; Breakdown. USA; Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee, northeast Alabama, Missouri, Nebraska. G Major. Standard. AABB (Christeson, Lowinger, Phillips): AB (Brody). North Carolina fiddler Tommy Jarrell told an interviewer in 1982 he thought the melody derived from "Piney Woods Gal," and that "Sally Johnson" was in turn derived from "Katy Hill": "There's three tunes played just about like that, right there" (Peter Anick, "An Afternoon with Tommy Jarrell," Fiddler Magazine, Spring 1995). The tune was popularized by Tennessee's Fiddlin' Arthur Smith, but it was also known as a signature tune of north Georgia fiddler Lowe Stokes (1898-1983). Stokes recalled his father playing the tune but he actually learned it from Alabama fiddler Joe Lee (b. 1883, Etowah County, Alabama), a man who influenced that generation of north Georgia fiddlers including the great Clayton McMichen. Lee was, Stokes declared in an interview printed in 1982 (in Tony Russell's Old Time Music), the "best old time fiddler I ever heard, but he couldn't win a prize to save his life," due to the degree of the performance anxiety he suffered from when on stage. The tune was listed in reports (1926-31) of the De Kalb County (northeast Alabama) Annual (Fiddlers') Convention (Cauthen, 1990).
***
Randolph County, West Virginia, fiddler Woody Simmons (b. 1911) told his version of the tale of the great bluegrass fiddler Chubby Wise's audition with Bill Monroe to Goldenseal magazine in 1979. Wise, who lived in Florida, heard on Saturday night that Monroe's regular fiddler, Big Howdy Forrester, was going to be inducted into the army on Monday. He drove to Nashville that night, sought out Monroe's venue, and asked to see the bandleader. He was shown in back behind a curtain and there was Monroe:
***
He went in there and asked...'I hear you need a fiddle player.' Bill said, 'Yes I do.' Said, 'Can you play?' Said, 'Yes.' Said, 'How about playing me a hoedown.' He said, 'All right.' Said he played Katy Hill. Monroe said to him, he said, 'How about playing one of my songs that I sing, and let me sing and you play it.' And he said he done Footprints in the Snow. Bill said, 'Where's your clothes at?' So he fiddled for him for several years" (Mountains of Music, John Lilly ed., 1999, pg. 23).
***
Sources for notated versions: Alan Block [Phillips]: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]: Kenny Baker [Brody, Phillips]. Brody (Fiddler's Fakebook), 1983; pg. 154. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 100. Lowinger (Bluegrass Fiddle), 1974; pg. 20. Phillips (Fiddlecase Tunebook), 1989; pg. 25. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 1, 1994; pg. 130. Caney Mountain Records CEP 213 (privately issued extended play LP), Lonnie Robertson (Mo.), c. 1965-66. CMH 6237, Paul Warren- "America's Greatest Breakdown Player." Columbia 15620-D (78 RPM), 1930, Lowe Stokes (North Georgia). County 538, Charlie Monroe- "On the Noonday Jamboree- 1944" (appears as "Going Around the World"). County 745, John Ashby (Va.) - "Down on Ashby's Farm." County 750, Kenny Baker- "Grassy Fiddle Tunes." Heritage XXIV, Smokey Valley Boys - "Music of North Carolina" (Brandywine, 1978). Heritage XXXIII, The Puryear Brothers Band - "Visits" (1981. Learned from the Ithaca, N.Y., Correct Tone String Band). RCA Camden CAL-719, Bill Monroe- "The Father of Bluegrass Music." Rounder 0089, Oscar and Eugene Wright - "Old-Time Fiddle and Guitar Music from West Virginia" (learned from Fiddlin' Arthur Smith). Rounder CD 0371, Mac Benford & the Woodshed All-Stars - "Willow" (1996). Voyager 301, Bill Long- "Fiddle Jam Session." Voyager 340, Jim Herd - "Old Time Ozark Fiddling."
T:Katy Hill
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:122
C:Trad.
R:Reel
A:Missouri
D:As recorded by Cyril Stinnett on his album "Cyril Stinnett Plays His
D:Favorite Old Time Tunes.'
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABC
K:G
d2-|:d2g(a bg)a(g|eg)d(g ea)ge|d(eg)(a bg)a(g|e)d-[dg][eg]- [d3g3]e-|!
gdg(a bg)a(g|eg)d(g ef)g(a|ge)d(B A)(GEG)|(DE)GB A([GB][G2B2]):|!
|:[G3B3]G A(GE)(F|G)(AB)d e(fge)|(dB)GB A(GE)(G|DE)GB A[GB][G2B2]|!
[G3B3]G A(GE)(F|G)(AB)d e(fga)|(ge)d(B A)(GE)G|(DE)GB A([GB][G2B2]:|!
[G3B3]G A(GE)(F|G)(AB)d e(fga)|(ge)d(B A)(GE)G|(DE)GB A(FG2:|!

KELLY SCHOTTISCHE. Old-Time, Schottische. USA, Nebraska. B-Flat Major ('A' part) & F Major ('B' part). Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory), 1973; pg. 157.

KERRY LASSES, THE [1]. AKA and see "Bob with the one Horn," "The Ewe Reel," "The Ewe Wi' the Crooked Horn," "The Foe," "Go see the Fun," "The Merry Lasses," "The Ram with the Crooked Horn," "Miss Huntley's," "My Love is Far Away," "The Lowlands of Scotland," "Peter Street," "The Pretty Girl in Danger," "Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it."

KEY(S) OF THE CELLAR, THE. AKA and see "Cam Ye O'er From France," "The Marchioness of Tweed-Dale's Delight." Scottish, Country Dance Tune (3/2 time). B Flat Major. Standard. AABB. The tune, in old hornpipe metre, appears in the Bodleian Manuscript (in the Bodleian Library, Oxford), inscribed "A Collection of the Newest Country Dances Performed in Scotland written at Edinburgh by D.A. Young, W.M. 1740." It is the vehicle for the political satire song "Cam Ye Ower Frae France(, Cam ye round by London)," and the bawdy Irish ballad "The Rakes of Stoney Batter" (Bruce Olson finds this latter song has a verse which mentions the even older English song and dance tune "Bobbing Joan," and because of this the "Rakes" tune became itself known as "Bobbing Joan" or "Bob and Joan." The "Bob" title and variants even came to replace the original title in some Scottish publications). Emmerson (Rantin' Pipe and Tremblin' String), 1971; No. 16, pg. 121. Gow, Second Collection (2nd Ed.), 1803.

KING PIN JIG. AKA and see "Bob Chadduck's Jig." American, Dance Tune (2/4 time). A Major. Standard. AABB. The 'jig' refers not to the Irish jig in 6/8 time, but rather a type of old-time banjo tune. The name is perhaps derived from 'jig dancing' or a derogatory name for African-Americans. Cole (1001 Fiddle Tunes), 1940; pg. 83.

KITTY PUSS. AKA and see "Hop Up, Kitty Puss," "Blackeyed Susie," "Puncheon Camps," "Tucker's Old Barn," "Old Time Mockingbird." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; northeast Kentucky, Tennessee. G Major (OTH/Thomas): D Major (Phillips). Standard. ABB'. A somewhat archaic sounding American fiddle tune.
***
Hop up, Kitty Puss, hop up higher,
Hop up, Kitty Puss, your tail's in the fire.
***
Sources for notated versions: learned by Buddy Thomas (Ky.) from his grandfather, via the whistling of his mother [Old-Time Herald]; Charlie Acuff (Tenn.) [Phillips]. Old-Time Herald, Fall 1992, pg. 31. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 133. CA-01, Charlie Acuff - "Left Handed Fiddler" (1990. This privately issued cassette was recorded by 70 year old fiddler Acuff, from Alcoa, Tennessee). County 788, Clyde Davenport (Monticello, Ky.) - "Clydeoscope: Rare and Beautiful Tunes from the Cumberland Plateau" (1986. Learned from an old time fiddler from Rock Creek, Tennessee, by the name of Will Phipps, who was buried with his fiddle in his coffin). Rounder 0032, Buddy Thomas (Northeast Ky.) - "Kitty Puss: Old-Time Fiddle Music From Ky." Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion" (learned from fiddler Charlie Acuff).

LADIES ON THE/A STEAMBOAT. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Nebraska, Kentucky. G Major. Standard. AA: AABB (Phillips). A favorite tune of Blind Ed Haley, influential fiddler from northeastern Kentucky. Dick Burnett of Monticello, Wayne County, Ky., who recorded the tune in 1927 (for Columbia Records) with fiddler Leonard Rutherford, recollected he might have learned the tune from Haley. In any case, the Rutherford and Burnett version was very influential and has become a standard especially for Wayne County, Kentucky, old-time musicians, "the banjo head usually getting rapped in remembrance of Dick Burnett's wild performance of the piece" (Bobby Fuclher, 1986). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Leonard Rutherford (Ky.) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 2), 1984; pg. 77. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 134. Columbia 15209-D (78 RPM), Burnett & Rutherford (1927). County 788, Clyde Davenport (Ky.) - "Clydeoscope: Rare and Beautiful Tunes from the Cumberland Plateau" (1986). Davis Unlimited Records, Gregory & Davenport - "Monticello." Rounder 0172, Bob Carlin - "Where Did You Get That Hat?" (1982). Rounder 1004, "Ramblin' Reckless Hobo: The Songs of Dick Burnett and Leonard Rutherford."

LADY HAMILTON [1]. Slight resemblance to "Eileen Curran" (says Krassen). Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Western North Carolina, Eastern Tennessee. G Mixolydian. Standard. AB (Krassen): ABB (Phillips). Believed by Blanton Owen to have been learned by North Carolina fiddler Manco Sneed from J. Dedrick Harris (eastern Tenn.). Harris was a native of Tennessee who regularly fiddled with Bob Taylor when the latter ran for Governor of that state in the late 1800's. He moved to western North Carolina in the 1920's and greatly influenced a generation of young fiddlers there, including Manco Sneed, Bill Hensley, Osey Helton and Marcus Martin (the latter two also played "Lady Hamilton" and there are recordings of Martin's version circulating). The tune was considered a 'signature piece' of Sneed's. It was also in the repertoire of fiddler Tommy Magness (1911-1972), born in north Georgia near the southeastern Tennessee border.
Source for notated versions: Manco Sneed (Graham County, N.C.) [Krassen, Phillips]. Krassen (Masters of Old Time Fiddling), 1983; pg. 123. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), Vol. 2, 1995; pg. 74. (There is also a transcription of a version by Marcus Martin of Ararat, N.C., in the article "Instrumental Music of the Southern Appalachians: Traditional Fiddle Tunes," North Carolina Folklore Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2., Dec. 1964, pp. 1-8).

LADY ON THE GREEN. AKA and see "Hell on the Wabash," "Hell on the Potomac," "Hell on the Pappahannock," "Wake Up Susan," "Picnic Romp," "The Night We Paid the Rent," "Jack of Diamonds," "The Cottage By the Sea." Old-Timey, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddler's Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 4.

LANTERN IN THE DITCH. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska. D Major. Standard. ABCC. The melody was also in the repertoire of Dwight Lamb (western Iowa). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Cyril Stinnett (Mo.) [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 53. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes), 1994; pg. 136. Rounder 0320, Bob Carlin & John Hartford - "The Fun of Open Discussion."
X:1
T:Lantern in the Ditch
M:4/4
L:1/8
Q:180
S:John Hartford's "The Fun of Open Discussion"
Z:transcription by Llarry Brandon
K:D
P:A
DE|:F2 A2 A2 FE|F2 A2 FEDB,|A,B,DE D2 fe|dBAF D2 DE|!
F2 A2 A2 FE|F2 A2 FEDB,|A,B,DE D2 fe|1dBAF D2 DE:|2dBAF D2 fg||!
P:B
a2 ab a2 fg|abaf efde|faab a2 ba|faec d2 fg|!
a2 ab a2 fg|abaf efde|faab a2 ba|1faec d2 fg:|2faec d2 AB||!
P:C
|:defd e2 fe|dBAF EF D2|Adfd efaf|gfec d2 AB|!
defd e2 fe|dBAF EF D2|Adfd efaf|1gfec d2 AB:|2 gfec d2 z2||!
X:2
T:Lantern in the Ditch
M:2/4
L:1/16
Q:122
S:Cyril Stinnett
R:Reel
A:Missouri
B:Transcribed in OTFR as tune #70.
N:as recorded by Cyril Stinnett in September of '79
Z:B. Shull, trans.; R.P. LaVaque, ABCs
K:D
(fg|a2)ab (af)df|(ab)(af) (ef)de|(fa2)b a2ba|fae(d BdA)d|!
(fa2)(b a2)e(f|ab)af (ef)de|(fa2)(b a2)ba|fa)ec d2:|!
|:A(c|d2)fd (eaf)e|d(BA)(F [EA])[FA][D2A2]|d2fd e(fa)(f|gf)ec d2Ac-|!
-d2fd (eaf)e|d(BA)(F [EA])[FA][D2A2]|d2fd e(fa)(f|gf)ec d2:|!
|:([D2A2]|[FA])[A2A2](B- (A2[DA][EA])|[F2A2]A([EA] [FA])[EA][DA][B,D]|(A
,B,)DF A2(fe)|(dB)(AF [EA])[FA][D2A2]|!
([FA]A2)(B A)(FE)D|(AB)A(F EF)DB,|(A,B,)DF A2(fe)|(dB)AF D2:|!

LARRY'S WALTZ. American, Waltz. USA, New Hampshire. G Major. Standard. AA'BB. Composed in December, 1977, by composer, pianist and accordionist Bob McQuillen (Peterborough, New Hampshire), in honor of friend Larry Haddock. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 29. Alcazar Dance Series FR 203, Rodney Miller - "New England Chestnuts" (1980).

LASAIRTEINIG, AN. AKA and see "The Lightening Flash."

LAST NIGHT IN LEADVILLE. AKA and see "Old Joe Sife's Reel" (published in Howe), "Farrell O'Gara's Favorite," "Last Night's Fun" [1], "Macroom Lasses," "Stick it in the Ashes." Old-Time, Breakdown. USA, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. Source for notated version: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 22.

LATE SUMMER WALTZ. Scandinavian, Waltz. D Major. Standard. AA'BB'. Traditional. Sources for notated version: Grey Larson & Bob Pasquarello (Pa.) [Matthiesen]. Matthiesen (Waltz Book II), 1995; pg. 30.

LAZY KATE [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. USA; Alabama, Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska. A Major. Standard. AABB. The tune was described in Adams' book as a typical Ozark Mountain tune of about 1840, and it appears in a list of traditional Ozark Mountain fiddle tunes compiled by musicologist/folklorist Vance Randolph, published in 1954. The tune was listed by the "Northwest Alabamian" of September 4, 1930, as one of the examples of "acceptable old-time numbers" for an upcoming fiddlers' convention in Fayette (Cauthen, 1990). Sources for notated versions: Bob Walters (Burt County, Nebraska) [Christeson]; Becky Miller [Phillips]. R.P. Christeson (Old Time Fiddlers Repertory, Vol. 1), 1973; pg. 3. Phillips (Traditional American Fiddle Tunes, Vol. 1), 1994; pg. 138.

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